(Oryza sativa, Linn.)

Rice belongs to the great order of grasses. The seeds of many are called cereals. Rice is both a cerial and a vegetable in cooking parlance. It is very rich in starch, contains a small amount of proteid, a trace of fat and some mineral matter. Many of the East Indian varieties contain a considerable amount of nitrogenous material, which makes it possible for the poor of that country to subsist on a diet composed chiefly of rice. In many countries rice is used just as it is husked, without polishing. In America, all the rice is highly polished. In this way the rice loses a large amount of nitrogen but very little starch.

Rice is the most easily digested of all starchy foods. It contains four times as much nourishment as an equal weight of potatoes. It is readily absorbed and leaves little or no waste in the intestines. It is the most desirable starchy food, both from a nutritive and money standpoint. When served with, milk, eggs or nitrogenous nuts, it forms a well-balanced meal.

COMPOSITION OF DRY RICE (Church)

Water

14.6

Albuminoids, etc.

.7.5

Starch, etc

76.0

Fat ...

0.5

Cellulose

0.9

Mineral matter

. o.s

COMPOSITION OF BOILED RICE (Hutchinson)

Water

52.7

Proteid

5.0

Fat

0.1

Carbohydrates

41.9

Mineral matter

0.3