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Amateur Gardencraft | by Eben E. Rexford



A Book For The Home-Maker And Garden Lover

TitleAmateur Gardencraft
AuthorEben E. Rexford
PublisherJ. B. Lippincott Company
Year1912
Copyright1912, J. B. Lippincott Company
AmazonAmateur gardencraft

Not wholly in the busy world, nor quite Beyond it, blooms the garden that I love Tennyson Not wholly in the busy world, nor quite
Beyond it, blooms the garden that I love
Tennyson

-Foreword
The home that affords the most pleasure to its owner is the one which is largely the result of personal effort in the development of its possibilities. The ready-made home, if I may be allowed the e...
-The Lawn: How To Make It And How To Take Care Of It
The owner of the average small home seldom goes to the expense of employing the professional gardener to do the work of lawn-making. Sometimes he cannot afford to do so. Sometimes skilled labor ...
-The Lawn: How To Make It And How To Take Care Of It. Part 2
It is impossible to put too much work on the soil. That is - you cannot make it too fine and mellow. The finer it is the finer the sward will be. A coarse, lumpy soil will always make an unsatisfactor...
-The Lawn: How To Make It And How To Take Care Of It. Part 3
Some persons advocate raking the lawn after each mowing. Others advise leaving the clippings to act as a sort of mulch. If the clippings are allowed to remain, they wilt, and this will detract from th...
-Planting The Lawn
WHEN the lawn is made we begin to puzzle over the planting of trees and shrubbery. What shall we have? Where shall we have it? One of the commonest mistakes made by the man who is his o...
-Planting The Lawn. Part 2
Avoid formality as you would the plague if you want your garden to afford you all the pleasure you can get out of it. Nature's methods are always restful in effect because they are so simple and direc...
-Planting The Lawn. Part 3
It must not be inferred that the list of trees of which mention has been made includes all that are desirable for planting about the home. There are others of great merit, and many might prefer them t...
-Shrubs
Every yard ought to have its quota of shrubs. They give to it a charm which nothing else in the plant-line can supply, because they have a greater dignity than the perennial and the annual plant...
-Shrubs. Part 2
In planting shrubs, the rule given for trees applies quite fully. Have the hole for them large enough to admit of spreading out their roots naturally. You can tell about this by setting the shrub down...
-Shrubs. Part 3
The Spireas are excellent shrubs for grouping, especially when the white and pink varieties are used together. This shrub is very hardy, and of the easiest culture, and I can recommend it to the amate...
-Shrubs. Part 4
Another early bloomer, somewhat similar to the Plum, is the Flowering Almond, an old favorite. This, however, is of slender habit, and should be given a place in the front row. Its lovely pink-and-whi...
-Vines
A home without vines is like a home without children - it lacks the very thing that ought to be there to make it most delightful and home-like. A good vine - and we have many such - soon beco...
-Vines. Continued
HONEYSUCKLE For verandas and porches the Honeysuckles will probably afford better satisfaction because of their less rampant habit. Also because of the beauty and the fragrance of their f...
-The Hardy Border
THE most satisfactory garden of flowering plants for small places, all things considered, is one composed of hardy herbaceous perennials and biennials. This for several reasons: 1st Onc...
-The Hardy Border. Part 2
By planting low-growing kinds in front, and backing them up with kinds of a taller growth, with the very tallest growers in the rear, the effect of a bank of flowers and foliage can be secured. This t...
-The Hardy Border. Part 3
THE PEONY AT ITS BEST Peonies are superb flowers, and no border can afford to be without them. The varieties are almost endless, but you cannot have too many of them. Use them everywhere....
-The Garden Of Annuals
In preparing the garden for annuals, the first thing to do is to spade up the soil. This can be done shortly after the frost is out of the ground. This is about all that can be done to advantage...
-The Garden Of Annuals. Part 2
If seedlings are to be transplanted, do it after sundown or on a cloudy day. Lift the tender plants as carefully as possible, and aim to not expose their delicate roots. Get the place in which you pro...
-The Garden Of Annuals. Part 3
Candytuft A free and constant bloomer, of low habit. Very useful for edging beds and borders. Comes in pure white and purplish red. Celosia (Cockscomb) A plant with most peculiar flowers. Wha...
-The Bulb Garden
EVERY lover of flowers should have a garden of bulbs, for three reasons: First, they bloom so early in the season that one can have flowers at least six weeks longer than it is possible to have ...
-The Bulb Garden. Continued
I do not think it advisable to say much about plans for bulb-beds, because comparatively few persons seem inclined to follow instructions along this line. The less formal a bed of this kind is the bet...
-The Rose: Its General Care And Culture
THE owner of every garden tries to grow roses in it, but where one succeeds, ten fail. Perhaps I would be safe in saying that ninety-nine out of every hundred fail, for a few inferior blossoms f...
-The Rose: Its General Care And Culture. Part 2
Care must be taken, in the choice of a location, to guard against drafts. If Roses are planted where a cold wind from the east or north can blow over the bed, look out for trouble. Plan for a screen o...
-The Rose: Its General Care And Culture. Part 3
Do not apply any covering early in the season, as so many do for the sake of getting the work out of the way. Wait until you are reasonably sure that cold weather is setting in. Teas, and the Bou...
-The Rose: Its General Care And Culture. Part 4
The Rugosa Roses are more valuable as shrubs than as flowering plants, though their large, bright, single flowers are extremely attractive. Their chief attraction is their beautifully crinkled foliage...
-The Rose As A Summer Bedder
THE amateur gardener may enjoy Roses from June to November if he is willing to take a little trouble for them. Not, however, with the material treated of in the chapter on The Rose - though wh...
-The Dahlia
THIRTY or forty years ago the Dahlia was one of our popular flowers. That is, popular among those who aspired to keep up with the times, and grow all the new plants that had real merit in them...
-The Gladiolus
ONE of the most popular flowers of the day is the Gladiolus. All things considered, it is our best summer bloomer. Nothing in the floral world exceeds it in variety and range of color. This colo...
-Lilies
THE Rose, like the Lily, is a general favorite. It has more than once disputed the claim of its rival to the title of Queen of Flowers, and though it has never succeeded in taking the place of t...
-Plants For Special Purposes
AMATEUR gardeners are always wanting plants for some special purpose, and, for their benefit, I propose to devote this chapter to special-purpose information. What shall we grow to shade d...
-Plants For Special Purposes. Continued
THE ODDS AND ENDS CORNER Sweet Peas make a good screen if given proper support, and planted thickly. I would like a large group or bed of ornamental foliaged plants on the lawn, but h...
-Arbors, Summer-Houses, Pergolas, And Other Garden Features
FEW persons who daily pass attractive homes in the suburban districts of our large cities and the outlying country, realize that much of their charm is due to effects which require a comparative...
-Arbors, Summer-Houses, Pergolas, Other Garden Features. Part 2
It often happens that there are ravines or small depressions on the home-grounds over which a rustic bridge could be thrown with pleasing effect, from the ornamental standpoint, and prove a great conv...
-Arbors, Summer-Houses, Pergolas, Garden Features. Part 3
A SIMPLE PERGOLA FRAMEWORK What vines would I advise for use about arbors, summer-houses, and pergolas? The Wild Grape, though not much used, is one of our best native vines. It has th...
-Carpet-Bedding
CARPET-BEDDING is not the most artistic phase of gardening, by any means, but it has a great attraction for many persons who admire masses of harmonious and contrasting colors more than the indi...
-Flowering And Foliage Plants For Edging Beds And Walks
WE do not lay as much stress on edging beds and walks with flowering plants as formerly, but the practice is a most pleasing one, and ought not to be neglected. It is one of the phases of garden...
-Planning The Garden
THE flower garden not being one of the necessities of life, in the usual sense of the term, people are likely to consider the making of it of so little importance that it is hardly worth while t...
-The Back-Yard Garden
A GREAT deal is written about the flower-garden that fronts the street, or is so located that it will attract the passer-by, but it is seldom that we see any mention made of the garden in the ba...
-The Wild Garden. A Plea For Our Native Plants
MANY persons, I find, are under the impression that we have few, if any, native flowering plants and shrubs that are worthy a place in the home-garden. They have been accustomed to consider them...
-The Winter Garden
MOST persons who are the owners of gardens seem to be under the impression that we must close the summer volume of Nature's book at the end of the season, and that it must remain closed until th...
-Window And Veranda Boxes
SOMEBODY had a bright thought when the window-box came into existence. The only wonder is that persons who were obliged to forego the pleasure of a garden did not think it out long ago. It is on...
-Spring Work In The Garden
NOT much actual work can be done in the garden, at the north, before the middle of April. But a good deal can be done toward getting ready for active work as soon as conditions become favorable....
-Summer Work In The Garden
IF weeds are kept down through the early part of the season, there will not be a great deal of weeding to do in midsummer. Still, we cannot afford to take it for granted that they require no att...
-Fall Work In The Garden
BECAUSE the growth of grass on the lawn is not as luxuriant and rapid in fall as it is in midsummer, is no reason why the lawn should be neglected after summer is over. It should be mowed whenev...
-By Way Of Postscript. A Chapter Of Afterthoughts Which The Reader Cannot Afford To Miss
PLANTING TO HIDE FOUNDATION WALLS THINK things out for yourself. Do not try to copy anybody else's garden, as so many attempt to do. Be original. What you see on your neighbor's hom...
-A Chapter Of Afterthoughts. Part 2
Many a place is all but spoiled because its owner finds it difficult to confine his selection of plants for it to the number it will conveniently accommodate. There are so many desirable ones to choos...
-A Chapter Of Afterthoughts. Part 3
Seedling Hollyhocks almost always look well when winter comes, but in spring we find their leaves decaying from the effect of too much moisture, and this decay is likely to be communicated to the crow...
-A Chapter Of Afterthoughts. Part 4
On the north side of a dwelling large-growing Ferns can be planted with fine effect. These should be gathered in spring, and a good deal of native soil should be brought with them from the woods. They...
-A Chapter Of Afterthoughts. Part 5
The best label to make use of is a zinc one, because it is almost everlasting, while a wooden one is short lived, and whatever is written on it soon becomes indistinct. In attaching any label to a ...
-Gardening Books By Eben E. Rexford. The Home Garden
A practical book for the use of those who owna small garden in which they would like to growvegetables and small fruits. Eight full-page illustrations. 12mo. 198 pages, cloth, ornamental, $1.2...









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previous page: Laboratory Manual Of Horticulture | by Ginn And Company
  
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next page: A Practical Handbook Of Trees, Shrubs, Vines And Herbaceous Perennials | by John Kirkegaard