Buds that appear in the axil of the leaf are in some respects like seeds. Indeed same buds, such as those of the tiger lily, drop to the earth and germinate like seeds. The grape and some other fruits and shrubs also grow from planted buds with a little wood attached, and it may be said that about all buds of woody-plants will grow when inserted under the bark of a variety of the same species. The great distinctive difference between the bud and the seed is that the leaf-bud reproduces the individual parent without change, while the seed reproduces usually the species but not the variety. The fruit-buds of the peach, apricot and Chicasa, and some Japan plums, grow on each side of the leaf-bud as shown in Fig. 8. In the apple and pear the flower-buds are mostly formed on short spurs as shown in Fig. 9. The European plums also fruit on short spurs as shown in Fig. 10.

Pottawatamie plum. The centre bud in the group of three is a leaf bud, and the two outer ones are fruit buds. (After Goff.)

Fig. 8. - Pottawatamie plum. The centre bud in the group of three is a leaf-bud, and the two outer ones are fruit-buds. (After Goff.)

After a little study even the amateur can distinguish in advance the difference between leaf- and flower-buds.

Fruit spurs of the apple

Fig. 9. - Fruit-spurs of the apple. A, A, points at which apples were detached the preceding year; W, wrinkles marking points at which fruit and leaves were detached in previous years.

But some seasons the fruit-spurs of the apple, pear, and plum develop as leaf-buds.

Fruit spurs of European plums

Fig. 10.—Fruit-spurs of European plums. (After Bailey.)

But some seasons the fruit-spurs of the apple, pear, and plum develop as leaf-buds.