Magdala

Medium, roundish; color creamy white, marbled and blotched with crimson; suture slight. Flesh yellowish white, with some red at pit, juicy, firm, sprightly, rich; pit not free. An old English variety considerably grown in the southeastern States.

Mamie Ross

Medium to large, roundish oval, white, with rich blushed cheek. Flesh yellowish white, rich, high-flavored; pit nearly free; of Chinese type, larger and better than Early Rivers, ripening at same time. Texas.

Marshall

Large, roundish, somewhat oblong; color pale yellow, with mottling of red and thin bloom; cavity narrow and deep; suture two-thirds around. Flesh yellow, with much red at pit, quite firm, somewhat acid, good; pit free. Popular in Ohio and around the lakes.

Mary Choice

Large to very large, oblong; color yellow, with red cheek. Flesh yellow, firm, rich, very good; pit free. Grown for dessert and market in New Jersey, and Maryland, and is a favorite in California. New Jersey.

Mathews

Large, roundish; color golden yellow, with red streaks and crimson cheek. Flesh yellow, firm, juicy; pit free. Season, three weeks later than Elberta in Georgia. Said to be a cross between El-berta and Smock. Becoming commercial in Maryland.

Mccollister

Medium to large, oval, or roundish ovate; color yellow, with bright red cheek and much bloom; cavity broad and deep; suture distinct, extending to apex. Flesh yellow, with red at pit, tender, sprightly, vinous; pit free. Widely grown for market. Ripens with Smock.

Mcintosh

Large, roundish; color creamy white, with red and crimson cheek. Flesh creamy white, quite firm, luscious; pit nearly free. Ripens in Maryland, between Triumph and Elberta, and is widely planted.

Miller Cling

Large to very large; color golden yellow, flushed with carmine. Flesh yellow, firm, sweet. A remarkable keeper and shipper, considerably grown in the Southwest.

Minnie (Alton, Incorrectly)

Large, roundish; color creamy white, with dappled red cheek; cavity broad and shallow; suture distinct, deepest near cavity, terminating at apex. Flesh creamy white, with red at the pit, quite firm, vinous; pit free; quality good. A profitable variety in Texas and the South, and it does well in Michigan. Texas.

Mountain Rose

Large, roundish, tapering toward the apex; color creamy white, blushed and sprinkled with red spots; suture in slight depression extending beyond the apex; cavity abrupt and deep. Flesh creamy white, with red at the pit, tender, melting, very good; pit free. An amateur home variety mainly, but grown across the continent. New Jersey.

Morris White (White Rareripe)

Large, roundish or roundish oval; color creamy white, often with colored cheek; suture extends to small swollen apex. Flesh white, quite firm, melting, rich in flavor; pit free. An old variety, yet planted widely.

Mrs. Brett

Large, roundish; color yellowish white, with bright red cheek; suture broad and shallow, extending somewhat beyond apex. Flesh white, with red at pit, juicy, melting, sweet, rich; pit free. Earlier than Oldmixon Free and superior to it in color and quality. Commercial. New York.

Muir

Large, roundish, oval, somewhat compressed; color yellow, with reddish cheek and splashes of red and crimson; cavity broad and quite deep; suture extends to apex. Flesh yellow, tender, sprightly; pit free. A cosmopolitan variety, doing well over the peach sections of the Union. In California Prof. Wickson says: "A good shipper and canner, and peculiarly adapted to drying because of exceptional sweetness and density of flesh; yielding one pound dry from less than five pounds fresh." California.