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American Horticultural Manual Vol2 | by J. L. Budd



The word Pomology is practically synonymous with fruit-grow ing in its broad sense as given in Part I. But Systematic Pomology, as now used, is confined to the classification and description of fruits, and by usage it also includes the nuts. In the past hundreds of varieties have been described which are not at this time known to our nursery lists or to those recommended by the widely distributed State and District Horticultural Societies. Charles Downing said in 1869: "If it were only necessary for me to present for the acceptance of my readers a choice garland of fruits comprising the few sorts that I esteem of the most priceless value, the space and time occupied would be very brief."...

TitleAmerican Horticultural Manual Vol2
AuthorJ. L. Budd
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. London
Year1902
Copyright1902, J. L. Budd And N. E. Hansen
AmazonAmerican Horticultural Manual, Part Two

American Horticultural Manual. Part II

Systematic Pomology. Containing Descriptions Of The Leading Varieties Of The Orchard Fruits, Grapes, Small Fruits, Subtropical Fruits, And The Nuts Of The United States And Canada by J. L. Budd, Late Professor of Horticulture in the Iowa State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts,

Assisted By N. E. Hansen, Professor in the South Dakota Agricultural College.

Illustrated by hundreds of Outlines of the Leading Commercial Fruits and Nuts.

First Edition.

New York. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. London: CHAPMAN & HALL, Limited 1911

Copyright, 1903 By J. L. Budd And N. E. Hansen

Robert Drummond And Company Brooklyn. N. Y.

-Preface
The word Pomology is practically synonymous with fruit-grow ing in its broad sense as given in Part I. But Systematic Pomology, as now used, is confined to the ...
-The Apple
Systematic Pomology Preliminary Notes A warm friendship existed for many years between Charles Downing and J. L. Budd. By the terms of Mr. Downing's will in ...
-The Classification Of Apples
Botanical Versus Pomological Systems The characteristics of the tree, especially the habit of growth and color of young shoots, are often of great service in ...
-The First Natural Apple Classification System
In 1792 Dr. Diel, of Germany, published a classification of apples based on natural affinities and resemblances, and the merits of this system were soon ...
-The First Natural Apple Classification System. Part 2
Class IV Reinettes (Reinetten). 1. The flesh is fine-grained, delicate, crisp, firm, or so delicate as to be tender. 2. They are mostly the ideal of a ...
-The First Natural Apple Classification System. Part 3
Class VI Pointlings or Tapering Apples (Spitzaepfel). 1. Core is regular. 2. The bloom is always absent. 3. They are never striped, and are either one-colored ...
-The Diel-Dochnahl Apple Classification System
In 1855, Dr. Jac. Dochnahl, of Germany, presented a modification of Diel's System which is herewith given, as translated for Robert Hogg's British Pomology: ...
-The Diel-Dochnahl Apple Classification System. Continued
Section II Sphaeroidae (Spherical). They have sometimes prominences on the fruit and around the eye, but never true ribs. Class III Mala Mespilaria (Medlar- ...
-The Diel-Lucas Natural Apple Classification
1856. Dr. Ed. Lucas, the leading pomologist of Germany, presented the following: Class I Calvilles. Strawberry or Raspberry Apples. (Calvillen, Erdburaepfel, ...
-The Diel-Lucas Natural Apple Classification. Part 2
Class VI Pound Apples (Pfundaepfel, Rambouraepfel). Form: Large, and very large, of quite irregular form, sometimes flat round, sometimes longish, one half ...
-The Diel-Lucas Natural Apple Classification. Part 3
Class XI Gray Reinettes, Leather Apples, Russets (Graue Reinetten, Lederaepfel). Form: Small, medium, and large, of globular and flat round, seldom longish ...
-A Double System Of Apple Classification
1862. Dr. Ed. Lucas presented the view that every fruit must be classified according to two systems: 1. Artificial; based on external characters and period of ...
-Two American Apple Classification Systems
1867. John A. Warder in his American Pomology presented the following classification: Class I. Oblate or flat, having the axis shorter than the transverse ...
-An English Artificial Apple Classification System
1876. Robert Hogg, the leading pomologist of England, published an artificial system in which new points are considered. The structural characters on which ...
-The Alphabetical Apple Classification Arrangement
1872. Charles Downing, in his Second Revision of Fruits and Fruit-trees of America, abandoned the arrangement of fruits by classes and periods of ripening, ...
-Other Apple Classification Systems
The available space will not permit of a fuller discussion of the very numerous and elaborate systems of classification proposed by European pomologists. Those ...
-Reproduction Of Apple Varieties
The beginner should understand that although as many different varieties may be raised from seed of one apple as there are seeds in that apple, it may also ...
-Apple Bud Variation
From the foregoing discussion the reader will conclude that propagation by grafts or other mode of division will always reproduce the variety. This is so ...
-Terms Used In Describing Apples
Tree In closely related varieties it is sometimes essential to know the characteristics of growth in the orchard and the color of the young wood. The color and ...
-Terms Used In Describing Apples. Part 2
Size The size is variable, depending upon soil, climate, overbearing, age, and health of tree, etc. The one given is that attained as an average and under ...
-Terms Used In Describing Apples. Part 3
Stem This is sometimes a constant mark, but is often variable. When reaching to the general curvature of the fruit it is medium; when below this outline, short; ...
-How To Study Apples
First study the technical terms employed and the leading systems of classification. This knowledge is then illustrated in practice by comparing good, typical, ...
-What Apple Varieties Should I Plant?
To give a list of varieties best adapted to every part of the United States would exceed the limits of this book. The question is best answered by consulting ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: A
Alexander Of Russian origin; tree vigorous, spreading, productive. In the West it is now largely supplanted by its Wisconsin seedling, the Wolf River. Fruit ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: A. Part 2
Aport Orient Origin, Russia. One of the best of the Alexander type. Fruit large, oblong, regular, slightly tapering; surface greenish yellow, mostly covered ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: A. Part 3
Arnold (Arnold's Beauty) Originated by the late Charles Arnold, of Paris, Ontario, Canada, from seed of Northern Spy crossed with Wagener and Spitzenburg. Tree ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: B
Babbitt (Western Baldwin) Originated from seed of Baldwin by C. W. Babbitt, of Woodford County, Illinois, about 1845; hardy and productive in Central States.
-Description Of Apple Varieties: B. Part 2
Batullen Origin, Transylvania; tree very vigorous, hardy, of spreading habit. Imported from Russia. Fruit medium to large, roundish oblate, very regular, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: B. Part 3
Benoni Origin, Dedham, Massachusetts; tree vigorous, upright, spreading, productive. Fruit medium, roundish oblate, somewhat conical, obscurely angular; ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: B. Part 4
Bismarck Origin, New Zealand. As seen in 1894 by the writer in the nursery of the introducer at Erfurt, Germany, this variety fruits freely on one-year old ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: B. Part 5
Black Oxford Origin, Maine; there esteemed for its long keeping and productiveness; at Cedar Falls, Iowa, it has done well top-grafted. Fruit medium, roundish ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: B. Part 6
Blue Pearmain Fruit very large, nearly regular, roundish to roundish oblong, very slightly conical; surface pale yellow, almost wholly covered with large dark ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: B. Part 7
Borovinka Origin, Russia; as grown in the Northwest this variety very closely resembles Oldenburg, but the question of their identity has not been settled.
-Description Of Apple Varieties: B. Part 8
Broadwell Originated with Jacob Broadwell near Cincinnati, Ohio; tree vigorous, very spreading, irregular, productive. Fruit medium, oblate, somewhat conic, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: C
Camack Origin, North Carolina; tree of slow growth, an early and abundant bearer. Fruit medium, roundish, sometimes conical, light yellow green, red on sunny ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: C. Part 2
Carolina Beauty Origin, North Carolina. Fruit large, oblate, slightly conical; skin thick, tough; surface smooth, excepting numerous russet knobs; color yellow, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: C. Part 3
Chenango (Chenango Strawberry, Sherwood's Favorite) Origin, Lebanon, New York. Tree vigorous, spreading; fruit a great favorite for dessert wherever grown.
-Description Of Apple Varieties: C. Part 4
Cogswell Origin, Griswold, Connecticut. Fruit above medium, roundish, oblate, regular; surface rich yellow, nearly covered with red, marked and streaked with ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: C. Part 5
Cooper Market Tree vigorous, upright, with long slender branches; very productive. Fruit small to medium, round oblate conic; surface greenish yellow, heavily ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: D
Danvers Sweet Origin, Danvers, Massachusetts; tree productive and of very rapid growth. Fruit large, roundish oblong, sometimes roundish oblate, regular; ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: E
Early Cooper Grown in Illinois, Kansas, and other western States mainly for home use; tree productive. Fruit medium, roundish, a little flattened; surface ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: E. Continued
Early Strawberry Origin, New York; tree thrifty, very upright while young, spreading and large with age, quite distinct from the Early Red Margaret, which has ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: F
Fallawater (Tulpehocken) Origin, Pennsylvania; tree of strong growth and very productive. Very popular in Pennsylvania and Ohio. Fruit large to very large, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: F. Part 2
Fall Wine Of American origin; tree of rather slender spreading growth, a moderate annual bearer. Fruit too tender for distant market. Fruit above medium, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: F. Part 3
Fanny Origin, Pennsylvania; tree vigorous, spreading:, very productive. Fruit above medium to large, roundish oblate, slightly conical; surface yellow, almost ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: G
Gano Origin, Missouri; a seedling of Ben Davis, much grown in its native state. It may be described in brief as a solid-colored Ben Davis, the broad dark ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: G. Part 2
Gilbert (Of Minnesota) The new Minnesota variety under this name is described as Minnesota Gilbert; the apple of Tennessee origin has priority in the name.
-Description Of Apple Varieties: G. Part 3
Golden Russet (English Golden Russet) An old English variety; tree of strong, spreading, rather irregular growth, forming a bushy head, an early bearer. Fruit ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: G. Part 4
Gravenstein This is considered one of the finest apples of northern Europe, both in appearance and quality. Origin, Gravenstein, in Holstein, Germany. The ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: G. Part 5
Green Sweet Fruit medium, roundish oblate, somewhat conic; surface green, sometimes becoming a little yellow at maturity; dots whitish or light russet with ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: H
Haas (Gros Pomier, Fall Queen) Origin near St. Louis, Missouri; tree of very strong upright growth, a good early annual bearer. Fruit medium or above, roundish, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: H. Part 2
Hewes (For Cider Only) Origin, Virginia; very popular in the South for making cider, for which purpose it was thought to be unsurpassed ; tree a very heavy ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: H. Part 3
Horn Origin unknown; tree vigorous with stout diverging branches. Fruit medium or below, oblate, unequal; surface whitish yellow, shaded and obscurely striped ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: I
Ingram Ingram is said to be a seedling of Ralls Genet and resembles that variety, but more highly colored; it is said that the seed was planted by Jack Ingram, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: J
Jacobs Sweet Origin, Medford, Massachusetts; resembles Sweet Bough in habit of growth, in texture and feeling of skin, but has more blush and is a late keeper.
-Description Of Apple Varieties: J. Continued
Judson(Thompson's Seedling No. 29) Originated in Grundy County, northern Iowa, by J. S. B. Thompson. In fall of 1861 Mrs. Thompson saved the seed in her father' ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: K
Kaump (Harry Kaump) Origin, Wisconsin; tree very productive, and doing well in northern Iowa; now on trial list of Minnesota State Horticultural Society. Fruit ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: L
Lacon Originated with E. R. McKinney, Lacon, Illinois; tree vigorous, forming a round compact head, productive. Fruit medium, irregular, oblate, unequal; ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: L. Part 2
Lansingburg Origin, New York; tree upright, spreading, vigorous, thorny, a fair bearer. Fruit medium, roundish oblate, conical, angular, oblique, often unequal; ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: L. Part 3
Limbertwig Supposed origin, North Carolina; tree thrifty, very productive, roundish, spreading, the slender shoots drooping with the heavy crop. Fruit rather ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: L. Part 4
Lowe Originated in an old Dutch settlement in the eastern part of Guilford Co., North Carolina. The name is sometimes spelled Lough. A large early apple, very ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: M
Mcafee (Mcafee Red) Originated at McAfee's old fort, Kentucky; tree a good grower and very productive. Fruit large, roundish, slightly oblate; surface polished, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: M. Part 2
Magog Red Streak Raised from seed by William Warren, Newport, Vermont; tree thrifty, vigorous, upright, spreading, productive. Fruit medium or nearly so, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: M. Part 3
Margaret, Early Red A very old English variety, of slender growth; a moderate bearer; fruit good when freshly picked, but soon becomes mealy. It is desirable ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: M. Part 4
Milam Origin uncertain; an old favorite Southern and Southwestern variety; tree of moderate vigor, round-headed, very productive, and an annual bearer. Fruit ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: M. Part 5
Minister Origin, Rowley, Massachusetts; tree moderately vigorous, early and heavy bearer. Fruit large; oblong conical, ribbed, irregular; surface smooth, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: M. Part 6
Mitchell's Red Warrior Originated in 1869 or 1870, at Cresco, northern Iowa, by J. B. Mitchell; tree hardy and very productive. Distinct from the Red Warrior ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: M. Part 7
Munson (Munson Sweet) Origin probably Massachusetts; tree vigorous, spreading, an abundant annual bearer. Fruit below medium; form very regular, oblate; ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: N
Nansemond (Nansemond Beauty) Supposed origin, Virginia; tree vigorous, rather spreading, a good annual bearer. Fruit medium, roundish oblate, slightly conic; ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: N. Continued
Nixonite (Ozark Mammoth) Originated on the farm of M. Nixon, near Hopewell, Mo., some fifty or seventy-five years ago. It came up from seed alongside of an old ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: O
Oconee Origin, bank of Oconee River, near Athens, Georgia, tree vigorous and productive. Fruit large; form roundish-flattened; surface yellow, a little ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: O. Continued
Duchess Of Oldenburg This well-known Russian variety is the hardiest of the old list, its endurance of severe winters encouraged the importation of other sorts ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: P
Paragon (Mammoth Black Twig) Originated in the orchard of Major Rankin Toole, Lincoln Co., Tenn., nearly seventy years ago, and first propagated about 1870.
-Description Of Apple Varieties: P. Part 2
Peach Of Montreal Origin, France; tree vigorous, shoots light brown. Fruit large, roundish oblong; skin thin and tenacious; surface smooth, glossy, white, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: P. Part 3
Perfection Recommended in Bul. No. 8, U. S. Div. Pomology. A Wisconsin seedling of Tetofsky; tree perfectly hardy and symmetrical; fruit as large again as ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: P. Part 4
Plumb Cider Introduced by the late J. C. Plumb, Milton, Wis. Mr. Plumb, in 1874, said that it was brought from Ohio, in 1844, to Wisconsin by his father- that ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: P. Part 5
Primate Origin unknown; one of the best dessert summer apples for the family orchard; too tender for distant shipment; tree vigorous, strong, and stocky, and ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: Q-R
Cole Quince Origin, Maine. Fruit large; form oblate conical, angular, ribbed toward the base; surface yellow; dots distinct, numerous, russet, with light bases; ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: Q-R. Part 2
Raspberry Origin, Russia; exceedingly productive and a good substitute for Red June where that variety winter-kills. Fruit small, oblong, obscurely angular, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: Q-R. Part 3
Red Queen (No. 316) Origin, Russia. Fruit above medium to large, regular, roundish conical; surface greenish yellow, sometimes with dull reddish blush; dots ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: Q-R. Part 4
Ribston (Ribston Pippin) Origin, Ribston Hall, near Knares-borough, England, probably about 1688; highly esteemed in England, but not equal to some other ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: Q-R. Part 5
Roman Stem Origin, Burlington, New Jersey; tree very productive, of moderate vigor, spreading, irregular. One of the hardiest of the old eastern varieties for ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: Q-R. Part 6
Roxanna Origin, Wisconsin. Fruit medium, conical, irregular, angular; surface yellow, wholly covered with fine crimson and carmine splashes (much like a well- ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: S
Saint Johnsbury Origin, St. Johnsbury, Vermont; tree a very strong grower, productive. Fruit medium, round oblate, yellow, mostly covered with dark red or ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: S. Part 2
Scott Winter Origin, Vermont; introduced by Dr. T. II. Hos-kins. Tree a strong, upright grower; an annual and good bearer. Promising at the North. Scott Winter.
-Description Of Apple Varieties: S. Part 3
Shiawassee (Shiawassee Beauty) Originated in Shiawassee Co., Mich., one of the best varieties of the Fameuse type; tree a strong, moderately upright grower; a ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: S. Part 4
Speer A stray variety in some scions of another variety received from Russia. Named in honor of R. P. Speer, Cedar Falls, Iowa, by the Iowa State Horticultural ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: S. Part 5
Stephenson (Stephenson' S Winter) Origin, Marshall Co., Mississippi; tree of moderate growth, productive. Fruit medium, roundish oblate, greenish yellow, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: S. Part 6
Summer Pearmain (American Summer Pearmain) Of American origin; of slender, slow growth in nursery, in orchard large, round-headed, productive. Summer Pearmain.
-Description Of Apple Varieties: S. Part 7
Swaar Originated by the Dutch settlers on the Hudson River, near Esopus, New York; the name in Low Dutch means heavy, alluding to its unusual weight; a deep, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: S. Part 8
Sweet Winesap Origin, Pennsylvania; tree of moderate, upright growth, productive. Fruit medium, oblate, slightly approaching conic; surface red, splashed with ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: T
Taunton Origin unknown; some claim it for Alabama, others Georgia; tree a vigorous but straggling grower, very productive. Fruit rather large, oblate conic; ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: T. Continued
Tolman Sweet (Tallman Sweet) Origin, Rhode Island; tree vigorous, upright, spreading, very productive. One of the hardiest of the old eastern apples in the ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: U
University (Duchess No. 103) Originated about 1882 from seed of Duchess by C. G. Patten, Charles City, Iowa. Fruit large, oblate, very regular; surface a clear ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: V
Vandevere An old variety, originated at Wilmington, Delaware; distinct from Vandevere Pippin grown at the West. Fruit medium, oblate; surface waxen yellow, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: W
Wagener Origin, Penn Yan, Yates Co., New York; tree thrifty, upright, productive, a very early bearer. Wagener. Fruit above medium, oblate, angular, often ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: W. Part 2
Carolina Watson Of Southern origin; tree vigorous. Fruit large, oblate conical; surface greenish yellow, shaded, splashed and striped with dull red; dots large, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: W. Part 3
Whinery (Whinery's Late Winter) Origin, on the farm of Joshua Whinery, near Winona, Ohio; tree a very regular, early, and heavy bearer. Fruit has often been ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: W. Part 4
White Pippin Of unknown origin, popular at the West and Southwest. Of the Newtown Pippin class, and distinct from the Canada Reinette. Tree vigorous, upright, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: W. Part 5
Winesap Supposed origin, New Jersey; described by Coxe in 1817 as one of the best cider and eating apples of his region (western New Jersey), very popular in ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: W. Part 6
Wythe Origin, on the farm of Rodolphus Chandler, Wythe, Illinois; tree vigorous, with round top; a good annual bearer, blooms late. First introduced about 1873.
-Description Of Apple Varieties: Y
Yahnke Originated as a root sprout, from a tree killed in 1873, with Frank Yahnke, Winona, Minnesota; tree vigorous, spreading, productive. One of the ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: Y. Continued
Yellow Sweet (No. 167) Origin, Russia; tree very hardy at the North. Fruit medium, roundish, regular; surface yellow; somewhat transparent; dots white, ...
-Description Of Apple Varieties: Z
Zolotareff (No. 275) Origin, Russia. A large handsomely colored apple of the Vasilis Largest type and much resembling that variety. Zusoff (No. 585) Origin, ...
-Crab-Apples
In the prairie Northwest considerable attention has been paid to Siberian crab-apples because of their superior hardiness and value for culinary use.
-Crab-Apples. Part 2
Beach (Beach's Sweet) Of American origin. Fruit large, roundish, somewhat conical, regular, yellow, mostly covered with bright red, thinly overlaid with gray; ...
-Crab-Apples. Part 3
Elgin (Lady Elgin, Geneva) Originated on the farm of James Forbes, of Ridott Township, Illinois. Tree hardy, vigorous, upright, slender branches, very ...
-Crab-Apples. Part 4
Howard (Hamilton) Probably a hybrid of the native crab (Pyrus Iowensis) with the cultivated apple (P. Malus). Originated near Oakville, Iowa; first brought to ...
-Crab-Apples. Part 5
Lyman Prolific Originated by H. M. Lyman, Excelsior, Minnesota, about thirty-five years ago. Fruit large, roundish, conical; surface yellow, mostly covered ...
-Crab-Apples. Part 6
Montreal (Montreal Beauty) Of American origin; tree a strong grower and very ornamental. Fruit large, roundish obovate to roundish oblate, bright yellow, ...
-Crab-Apples. Part 7
Shields Fruit small, angular, flattened, somewhat ribbed, unequal; surface a bright solid crimson, the coloring thinner on shady side showing a little yellow ...
-Crab-Apples. Part 8
Transcendent Origin, America. One of the best market varieties, but in many sections is much subject to blight. Fruit medium to large, roundish to roundish ...
-The Pear
An outline of the races and history of the standard and dwarf pears, with their propagation and management, is given in Chapter XIII of Part I, and distance ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: A
Alamo A variety originating in Texas. Not as large as the Bartlett by one-half; pale yellow in color; not as rich in flavor as the latter yet good in quality.
-Varieties Of The Pear: B
Bartlett Large, oblong, obtuse pyriform; color clear yellow with blush usually on sunny side; surface of skin usually uneven; stalk one to one and one-half ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: C
Chambers Medium, obtuse, obovate, pyriform; color light green, but yellow when ripe, with numerous brown and green dots, sunny side reddish brown; stalk one ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: D
Danas Hovey Small to medium, pyriform, tapering towards the stem; color green, blotched and specked with russet, with pale red cheek on exposed side; stalk ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: E
Early Duchess (Duchess Precoce) Large, obovate pyriform; color yellow, usually with blushed cheek, and showing numerous russet dots with traces, blotches, and ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: F
Fitzwater Medium to large, obovate obtuse pyriform; color yellow, with blotches, areas, and spots of russet; stalk short, stout, inclined, with fleshy growth ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: G
Gakovsky Medium in size, pyriform; color greenish yellow, with indistinct dots; stalk one and one quarter inches long, with fleshyring where inserted in slight ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: H
Hardy (Beurre Hardy) Large, obovate, obtuse pyriform; color light green covered with light russeting and shaded with brownish red; dots numerous; stalk one ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: I-J
Idaho Large, nearly round, regular; color golden yellow; dots numerous; stalk short, largest at upper end, inserted in irregular and quite deep cavity. Flesh ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: K
Kieffer Large, oval, narrowing at both ends, but variable in shape; often roundish and nearly obtuse pyriform; color yellow with brighter shade in sun; patches ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: L
Lady Clapp Large, yellow with smooth skin. Flesh juicy, melting, vinous, quality very good. Season last half of September, following the Bartlett. A promising ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: M-N
Macomber Medium, pyriform; color greenish yellow with bright red cheek; dots numerous, small, russet; stalk short, quite stout and fleshy at insertion in ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: O
Ogereau (Anna Ogereau) Large, pyriform, but often obovate; color yellow, nearly covered with russet and numerous russet dots; stalk one inch long', stout, ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: P
Paradise (D'Automne) Large, oblong obovate, and acute pyriform; color yellow, mottled and very often covered with bright cinnamon-colored russet; surface of ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: R
Reeder (Doctor Reeder) large, roundish ovate, obtuse pyriform; color light yellow with numerous russet dots and patches of russet, especially around the basin; ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: S
Sapieganka Medium, roundish obtuse pyriform; color green, with blushed cheek; stem short, upright, in very shallow cavity; basin wide and somewhat deep. Flesh ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: T
Therese Appert Medium to large, pyriform, rounded toward the basin and tapering to the stem by two deep concave curves; color yellow, mottled with areas of ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: U-V
Urbaniste Medium to large, obovate pyriform; color pale yellow with russet streaks and quite numerous gray dots; skin very smooth; stalk one inch long, stout, ...
-Varieties Of The Pear: W-Z
Washington Size medium, oval or obovate, regular; color lemon yellow, with reddish dots where exposed; stalk one and one-half inches long, inserted in very ...
-The Quince
An outline of the origin, races, propagation, management, and uses of the Quince is given in Chapter XIII, and in Section 137 its pruning is discussed. In the ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Quince
Alaska Large, pyriform; color yellow. Said in New York to bear unusually young, and to bear regular crops. As yet not widely tested, but the present record is ...
-Ornamental Quinces
The Scarlet Japan, Blush Japan, Grandiflora, Umbellicata, and still other fine flowering varieties are grown, most of which bear handsome and fragrant fruit.
-The Stone Fruits
The Cherry, Plum, Prune, Apricot, Peach, and Nectarine are classed together in Chapter XIV of Part I in discussing their history, classification, propagation, ...
-Duke And Morello Cherry Varieties: A-B
Amarelle Bunte Fruit large, round; stalk moderately long and stout; cavity shallow; skin yellow, covered with fine red. Flesh slightly colored, firm, tender, ...
-Duke And Morello Cherry Varieties: C-D
Carnation Large to very large for its class, roundish; color yellowish white, with marbling of orange red, becoming bright red when fully ripe; stem one and ...
-Duke And Morello Cherry Varieties: E
Early May (Of The West) Medium in size, markedly flattened; color clear red; stem seven-eighths to one inch long, in broad shallow cavity; apex depressed.
-Duke And Morello Cherry Varieties: F-G
Flagg Medium in size, roundish. Flesh firm, rich, mildly acid; quality very good for this Morello type. Tree short-jointed and very hardy. Ripens in advance of ...
-Duke And Morello Cherry Varieties: H-K
Hortense Large to very large, roundish, elongated, with sides slightly compressed; color shining red, mottled with darker red; stalk slender, about two inches ...
-Duke And Morello Cherry Varieties: L
Late Duke Large, obtuse heart-shaped; color dark handsome red when fully ripe; stalk one to one and one-half inches long, in shallow cavity. Flesh lightly ...
-Duke And Morello Cherry Varieties: M-N
May Duke Large, roundish obtuse, heart-shaped; color nearly black when ripe; stalk one to one and one-quarter inches long, in light depression. Flesh lightly ...
-Duke And Morello Cherry Varieties: O-R
Olivet Large, globular, heart-shaped; color deep red or crimson, glossy; stem one and three-eighths inches long, quite stout, and inserted in a broad deep ...
-Duke And Morello Cherry Varieties: S
Sappington Originated in St. Louis. Said to be earlier than Early Richmond, a good bearer and vigorous grower. Becoming commercial. We have not seen the ...
-Duke And Morello Cherry Varieties: T-W
Timme Large, roundish, heart-shaped; color red; stem one to one and one-eighth inches long, in broad shallow cavity. Flesh melting, rich, with uncolored juice; ...
-Bigarreau And Heart Cherry Varieties: A
On account of the natural and artificial crossing of the various classes of cherries, as noted in Section 179 of Part l,it is difficult to decide in some cases ...
-Bigarreau And Heart Cherry Varieties: B
Baltaver Medium, heart-shaped, surface glossy; color light and dark crimson on yellow ground, with numerous golden dots; stem one and one-eighth to one and ...
-Bigarreau And Heart Cherry Varieties: C-D
Centennial Large to very large; oblate; color yellow, with marbling of crimson; stalk one to one and one-half inches long, erect, in wide shallow cavity. Flesh ...
-Bigarreau And Heart Cherry Varieties: E-H
Early Purple Medium to small, oval, heart-shaped; color dark red, and purple when ripe; stem two to two and one-half inches long, in broad shallow cavity.
-Bigarreau And Heart Cherry Varieties: K-M
Kirtland's Mary Large, round, heart-shaped, with flattened base; color varied shades of red on yellow ground; stem one to one and one-half inches long. Flesh ...
-Bigarreau And Heart Cherry Varieties: O-S
Oxheart Large, obtuse, heart-shaped ; color dark red. Flesh red, tender, pleasant, Ohio Beauty but not high in flavor. Commercially grown for shipping in ...
-Bigarreau And Heart Cherry Varieties: V-Y
Vilna Sweet Large, heart-shaped; color light red; stem long, quite slender, inserted in narrow cavity. Flesh tender, juicy, sweet, with uncolored juice; ...
-The Plum
The evolution in varieties and species of plums grown in the United States and Canada during the past thirty years is quite as remarkable as the development of ...
-The American Plum Varieties And Plum Hybrids: A
Aitkin Large, oval, compressed; color dark red, but paler on shady side, without dots; suture obscure. Flesh yellow, rich, quite firm; quality very good.
-The American Plum Varieties And Plum Hybrids: B-C
Best Of All Medium to large, round; color rich red. Flesh firm, meaty, and best in quality. Said by F. V. Munson, the originator, to be a seedling of Miner ...
-The American Plum Varieties And Plum Hybrids: D-E
Davenport Medium to large, oval, often conical, and flattened laterally; color yellow, with pink blush on sunny side. Flesh yellow, firm; skin thin, not ...
-The American Plum Varieties And Plum Hybrids: F-G
Fairchild Large, oval, irregular; color variable from yellowish to deep red, with marbling and large gray dots; bloom lilac-colored. Flesh yellow firm, subacid; ...
-The American Plum Varieties And Plum Hybrids: H-K
Hart (Hart's De Soto) Large, oval, purplish red over orange, with blue bloom, and many small yellow dots; stem slender in shallow flaring cavity; suture a mere ...
-The American Plum Varieties And Plum Hybrids: L-M
Lone Star Medium, oval, pointed; color red, with numerous white dots and white bloom; stem slender, in broad shallow cavity. Flesh yellow, juicy, rich, and ...
-The American Plum Varieties And Plum Hybrids: N-O
Newton Large, red, freestone, and best in quality. This description is given by T. V. Munson, of Texas, where it originated. Americana. New Ulm Large to very ...
-The American Plum Varieties And Plum Hybrids: P-R
Piper (Piper's Peach) Large, round, red, with thin bluish bloom. Flesh orange yellow, quite firm; quality good. A Minnesota variety, hardy far North. Americana.
-The American Plum Varieties And Plum Hybrids: S-T
Sanderson Large; roundish oval, regular; color light red on yellow ground, with blue bloom; skin quite thin, with slight astrin-gency; quality very good; pit ...
-The American Plum Varieties And Plum Hybrids: W-Z
Waugh Medium to large, roundish oval; color dark reddish purple. Flesh firm, meaty, yellow, and nearly free from the pit; quality good to very good. Produced ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: A
Abundance Large, roundish ovoid, with unequal sides; color bright red over yellow ground; dots numerous; stem short and strong; suture distinct but shallow.
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: B
Bavay (Bavay Green Gage, Reine Claude, Saint Clair) Large, roundish, somewhat compressed; color greenish yellow with stripes and splashes of green, overspread ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: C
Chabot (Yellow Japan) Large, heart-shaped, or oblong conical; color at West yellow overspread on sunny side with cherry-red, with blue bloom; stalk short, ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: D
Damson In a general way the description given thirty years ago by Downing will apply to the many seedling varieties found from the Atlantic to the Pacific. He ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: E
Early Red Large, oval, smooth, and regular; color dark red, with white dots that show through the lilac-colored bloom; stalk medium, stout, in regular shallow ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: F-G
Field Large, oval; color purple with blue bloom; stem one inch long in small narrow cavity. Flesh greenish yellow, quality very good: clingstone. Season, ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: H
Hale (Prolific) Medium to large, round, with unequal sides; color yellow, thinly covered with mottled red; yellow dots numerous; bloom thin; stalk slender; ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: I-K
Ickworth (Ickworth Imperatrice) Medium to large, obovate; color purple-traced with peculiar streaks and shades of yellow; stem quite long, thick. Flesh ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: L
Lafayette Large, roundish, color purple with heavy bloom. Flesh juicy, rich, quality very good; pit free. Season, last of Sep- . tember. Grown east of the ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: M-N
Marketman (Shipper) Large, nearly round; color light red with whitish bloom. Flesh red, firm, juicy, half-cling. This proves an admirable shipper, and its red- ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: O
Occident (Burbank' S Sultan) Very large, nearly round; color dull red over a greenish ground with many yellow dots and blue bloom; stem short, stout, inserted ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: P
Peach Large to very large, roundish, flattened at ends; suture very distinct, apex depressed; color brownish red with dark dots and pale bloom; stalk short, ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: Q-R
Quackenboss Large, roundish oval; color deep purple with blue bloom and blue dots; stalk quite long in flaring shallow cavity; suture a line. Flesh with ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: S
Saratoga Large, roundish oval; color dull red or dark purple with thin bluish bloom and many small whitish dots; stalk one inch long, in deep and narrow cavity.
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: T-V
Tatge Medium to large, regular, oblong, with ends flattened; cavity broad and deep; suture usually broad and deep; color purplish red with light green patches ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: W
Washington Very large, roundish oval; suture obscure, except near the cavity; color in the interior bright yellow,but in moister sections withpatches and ...
-The Foreign Varieties Of The Plum And Their Hybrids: Y
Yellow Aubert Large, ovate; color bright yellow; stalk one inch long, inserted in fleshy ring in narrow shallow cavity. Flesh yellow, juicy, rich, quality good; ...
-The Apricot
Section No. 184 of Part I tells of the close relation of this beautiful and excellent fruit to the Plum and Peach, and something of its history and possible ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Apricot: A-B
Alexander Medium to small, oblong, flattened somewhat at ends, color light orange-yellow with show of color in the sun. Flesh tender, juicy, sweet, quality ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Apricot: C-G
Cluster A profitable variety grown in Texas. Mr. T. V. Munson says of it: This valuable variety was introduced by A. M. Ramsay Son. It is claimed to have never ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Apricot: H-M
Harris As large as Orleans Plum; oval, somewhat flattened; color bright yellow, with red cheek; suture distinct. Flesh tender, juicy; quality very good. Prized ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Apricot: N-R
Newcastle Size medium, roundish oblate, with flattened apex; color deep yellow, usually with red cheek; cavity deep and wide; suture indistinct. Flesh deep ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Apricot: Y-S
St. Ambroise Size large to very large, ovate, and compressed; color pale orange, with red in the sun; cavity shallow and narrow, with distinct suture. Flesh ...
-The Peach
The history, propagation, orchard culture, pruning, laying down in colder climates, and other facts in regard to this important commercial and home fruit are ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: A
Admiral (Admiral Dewey) Large, roundish; color yellow, with red and crimson cheek. Flesh yellow to the pit, quality very good; pit free. Regarded superior to ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: B
Baldwin Late Large, oblong, with decided raise at apex; color greenish white with blushed cheek. Flesh firm, juicy, melting, good; pit free. An Alabama variety ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: B. Continued
Bidwell Late Medium to large, oval; color white with shades of marbled red. Flesh greenish white; quality very good; cling. Florida. Blood Cling Large to very ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: C
Carman Large, broadly oval, pointed; color white dotted, splashed, and flushed with shades of red. Flesh creamy white tinged with red, vinous, sprightly, good.
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: D-E
Denton Large, oblong oval; color yellow, with red cheek; cavity wide and quite deep. Flesh yellow, firm, good. One week later than Elberta, which it much ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: F
Family Favorite Large, roundish, inclined to oblong; color golden-yellow, with waxen complexion and blushed cheek; suture shallow. Flesh yellow, with red ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: G
Geary (Hold On) Large, roundish ovate; color light yellow with blushed cheek; cavity broad; suture extends beyond apex. Flesh yellow with red at pit, quite ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: H
Haines Early Large, roundish, flattened at top; color light with deep-red cheek; suture well marked, extending round the fruit with sides very unequal. Flesh ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: I-K
Ingold (Lady Ingold) Medium to large, roundish; color creamy yellow, quite well covered with bright red. Flesh yellow, quite firm, vinous; pit free; quality ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: L
Late Admirable Large, roundish or oval, with deep suture nearly around, and decided point at apex; color light yellowish green with red cheek, often marbled ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: M
Magdala Medium, roundish; color creamy white, marbled and blotched with crimson; suture slight. Flesh yellowish white, with some red at pit, juicy, firm, ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: N-O
Nectarine Large, ovate, pointed at apex; color pale yellow, with faint red and marbled cheek; pubescence very slight; suture obscure. Flesh white, with red at ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: P
Pallas Medium to large, roundish oval; color greenish yellow, with red blushed cheek; suture distinct to the prominent apex. Flesh creamy white, with red at ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: R
Rareripe (Red Rareripe, Late Rareripe) Large, heavy, roundish oval; color grayish yellow, marbled with red and reddish spots, with deep red cheek; suture ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: S
Salway Large, roundish, somewhat oval, with one side largest; color yellow, with red cheek and bloom; suture slight, extending beyond apex. Flesh yellow, with ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: T-V
Thurber Large, roundish oblate; color creamy white, marbled and splashed with crimson. Flesh juicy, melting, rich; pit free. Commercial South, where it ripens ...
-Leading Varieties Of The Peach: W-Y
Waddell Medium to large, oblong; color creamy white, with bright red cheek. Flesh firm, white, rich, and sweet; pit free. An admirable shipper of good quality.
-The Nectarine
This fine fruit may be described simply as a smooth-skinned peach, yet as stated in Section 187 of Part 1 it is an ancient fruit in Centra] Asia, and it is ...
-Varieties Of Nectarine
Boston Large, roundish oval; color light yellow, with bright red cheek. Flesh yellow to the stone, which is small and pointed, sweet, with pleasant and ...
-The Mulberry Varieties
The mulberry is one of the most ancient fruits over Central and, Eastern Asia and to this day Albert Regel says: They are considered the most valuable ...
-Persimmon (Date Plum, Kaki)
Sections 217, 218, and 219, give an outline of the advance within recent years in growing the native and foreign persimmons in this country, and their ...
-Japanese Persimmon Varieties
Among (Yemon) Large, two and one-half to three inches in diameter, round, flattened, deeply ribbed; color dark orange red or yellowish red. Flesh red, very ...
-Valuable Native Persimmon Varieties
The native persimmon (Diospyros Virginiana) under favorable conditions makes a tree from fifty to one hundred feet in height, which in open position makes a ...
-The American Grapes
Chapter XXII of Part I, gives an outline of the history and development of the grapes of the United States, with their propagation, management, classes for ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: A
Agawam (Rogers' No. 15) Bunch large, quite compact, shouldered; berry large, roundish oval; color dark red or nearly black. Flesh quite tender, juicy, vinous, ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: B
Bacchus Bunch medium, compact, shouldered; berry small to medium, black, with blue bloom. Flesh juicy, sprightly, good when fully ripe. Of Clinton type, mainly ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: C
Campbell Early Bunch large, roundish, shouldered, quite compact; berry large, nearly round, black, with blue bloom. Flesh meaty, very tender, juicy, sweet, ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: D
Delaware Bunch small, very compact, and usually shouldered; berry small, round; color handsome light red. Flesh rich, vinous, sweet, aromatic, delicious; ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: E
Early Dawn Bunch medium long, shouldered; berry round, black, with heavy bloom. Flesh tender, juicy, sweet, rich, very good; matures early, and keeps and ships ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: F-G
Faith Bunch large, long, shouldered; berry small to medium; color pale amber or white. Flesh juicy, sweet, pure flavored; Season as early as Hartford. One of ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: H
Hartford Bunch long, fairly compact, shouldered; berry medium to large, round; color black, with blue bloom. Flesh whitish vinous, juicy, good. An old variety ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: I
Ideal Bunch medium to large, compact, usually shouldered; berry large, round, bright wine-red in color. Flesh tender, juicy, sprightly, pure flavored; quality ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: J
Herman Jaeger Bunch large to very large, shouldered, conical, very compact; berry small to medium, black. Flesh tender, vinous, quite rich; seeds separate ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: L
Lady Bunch medium, oblong, somewhat conical, slightly shouldered, fairly compact; berry medium to large, white or greenish yellow, with some whitish bloom.
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: M
Martha Buch medium, shouldered, compact; berry medium to large, roundish, greenish yellow, with bloom. Flesh sweet, juicy, and usually regarded better than ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: N-O
Naomi Bunch very large, shouldered; berry medium, roundish oval, pale green, often with red in the sun, and covered with white bloom. Flesh juicy, melting, ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: P
Paragon Bunch large, shouldered, compact; berry large, roundish, tender, sweet, rich, vinous, without central pulp, very good. Season of Concord. Grown in Ohio ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: R-S
Rebecca Bunch roundish, heavy, compact, often shouldered; berry medium, oval, light green, with yellow cheek, and a light bloom. Flesh juicy, sweet, delicious.
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: T-V
Telegraph Bunch large to very large, roundish, shouldered, very compact; berry medium to large, roundish oval, black, with blue bloom. Flesh white, sprightly, ...
-Native Varieties Of The Grape And Their Hybrids: W
Warder (Dr. Warder) Bunch large, shouldered; berry large, round, greenish yellow. Flesh sweet, rich, very good. One of Theophile Huber's seedlings, as yet not ...
-Foreign Or Vinifera Varieties Of The Grape
Alexandria (Muscat Of Alexandria) Bunch large, long, loose shouldered; stalk long; berry large, oval, greenish yellow, changing to pale amber, with thin white ...
-Blackcap Family. Black Raspberry (Rubus Occidentalis)
This native species is very distinct in habit, character of fruit, and method of propagation from the tips (243). It is so distinct that it has no near ...
-The Raspberry
Flesh firm, juicy, and sweet, one of the best in quality of its class. Rapidly coming into favor in Michigan and the East. Doolittle (American Improved) Medium, ...
-Purple-Cane Raspberry Varieties (Rubus Neglectus)
In this division is included the varieties that appear to be intermediate between the red and black species. But it is only a horticultural division, as some ...
-American Red Raspberry Varieties (Rubus Strigosus)
The red native varieties were in cultivation quite generally long prior to the advent and culture of the Blackcaps. It is very similar in plant and fruit to ...
-European Red Raspberry Varieties (Rubus Idoeus)
Varieties of this species have been grown in Europe since the historic period began, and some of the largest and best varieties were introduced for trial at an ...
-The American Blackberry
Like the native grapes the cultivated blackberries of the United States belong to several distinct types or species. But their near relation is indicated by ...
-The American Blackberry. Continued
Eureka A native of Alabama, belonging to the Southern species Rubus cuneifolius. Berry large, long, very sweet, firm, and a perfect success in Texas and the ...
-The Dewberry
In different parts of the Union the trailing blackberry, or dewberry, runs into many forms or types, some of which have been decided to be - distinct species.
-The American Strawberries
Chapter XIX of Part I gives historical notes on the development of our fine American varieties, together with the different systems of management and care. To ...
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: A-B
Afton Medium, conical, somewhat irregular; color bright crimson; flavor subacid. Much like Warfield; stands drouth well at the West. Season of Lovett.
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: C
Captain Jack Medium in size, conical, regular; color bright scarlet and later dark red; quality good. Grown in many sections to pollinate other varieties.
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: D
Dayton Large, oblong conic, with blunt apex, regular in shape and size; color bright crimson. Flesh firm, solid, very good. Season, early. Perfect. Profitable ...
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: E
Earliest Medium, roundish, irregular; color light red. A seedling of Michel Early, which it resembles, but it is earlier and the fruit is larger. Grown ...
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: G
Gandy Large, conical, regular; color glossy crimson; quality very good. Firm enough for distant shipment and an excellent canning variety. Flowers perfect. New ...
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: H
Hall (Hall's Favorite) Large, roundish, compressed, irregular; color scarlet. Flesh scarlet; quality good. It is much firmer than Bubach and ships well. Prized ...
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: I-K
Iowa Queen Medium to large, conical, smooth, regular; color glossy crimson with bright yellow seeds. Flesh firm; quality very good. Quite widely grown as a ...
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: L
Lady Rusk Large, and described in Ohio as several days earlier than Crescent, and it is superior to it in every respect, holding its size well through the ...
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: M
Mary Large, conical, with blunt apex, regular in form; color deep crimson. Flesh quite firm; quality good. A New Jersey variety that has recently gained some ...
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: N-O
Neunan (Neunan's Prolific) Medium in size, roundish conical; color light scarlet. Flesh firm, not very juicy; quality scarcely good. Largely cultivated in ...
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: P
Parry A seedling of Jersey Queen, and much like it in form and color. In New Jersey and the Southeast it is taking the place of its parent on account of added ...
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: R
Regina Medium to large, even-sized. Flesh firm; quality good. Commercial in New Jersey mainly on account of its late season of ripening and its extreme ...
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: S
Sample Large, roundish or broad conical; color rich crimson. Flesh colored, rich, juicy, firm, very good. Season, quite late. Commercial in several States.
-Varieties Of The Strawberry: T-W
Tennessee (Tennessee Prolific) Large to very large, roundish conical, color bright red; quality good. Flowers perfect. Popular in southeastern States.
-The Currant
Flesh quite firm, colored, subacid, very good. Pistillate. Popular as a market variety across the continent. Illinois. Williams Medium to large, roundish ...
-Red And White Currants (Ribes Rubrum)
Albert (Prince Albert) A vigorous upright variety; bunch rather short but compact; berry medium to large, pale red, and ripens late. A favorite variety for ...
-European Black Currants
Baldwin Fruit medium in size, with less acid than Black Naples, and it ripens ten days later. Better for canning than most European varieties. Black Naples ...
-The Golden Or Buffalo Currant (Ribes Aureum)
Crandall Large as Black Naples when properly pruned (267), and wholly free from the odor of the English species. The true variety is also a remarkable bearer, ...
-The Gooseberry
The varieties of this fruit belong to two closely related species. Ribes grossularia includes all the foreign varieties and their American seedlings, and in ...
-European Gooseberry Varieties And Their Seedlings (Ribes Grossularia)
The very large foreign varieties of the Gooseberry and their hybrids are more troubled with mildew than those which are native, yet they are grown commercially ...
-European Gooseberry Varieties (Ribes Grossularia). Continued
Hedgehog Medium, roundish; color white; hairy. A richly flavored variety, quite free from mildew in the lake region. Europe. Huntsman. - Large, oblong, smooth; ...
-The Cranberry
Section 280 of Part I gives an outline of cranberry culture in the States. Although a native wild fruit, it may be said that it has become as much of a staple ...
-Dwarf Juneberry
Section 272 of Part I gives the status of the Dwarf Juneberry as a dessert and culinary fruit and the propagation and pruning are given in Dwarf Juneberry.
-Nut Culture In The United States
Chapter XXIII of Part I gives an outline of the advance of nut culture within recent years. While it is true that nut-orcharding is yet largely in the ...
-The Almond
The Almond is about as hardy in tree as the peach. But as stated in Section 282 its period of blossoming is so early that it rarely escapes frost except in ...
-The Chestnut
Section 291. gives an outline of the relative value of American and foreign varieties of the Chestnut and the advances they have made on both continents as a ...
-European Varieties Of The Chestnut
Prof. Bailey calls especial attention to the fact that nearly all the so-called European varieties now propagated are American-grown seedlings of supposed ...
-Japanese Chestnuts
These varieties have come to the front rapidly on account of the size of the nuts, early bearing, and for more regular and continued bearing than the American ...
-Filberts And Hazel-Nuts
Up to the present we have no cultivated varieties of our native Hazel-nut. But enough has been done to show that by cultivation and selection we could soon ...
-Hickory Nut
It may truly be said that the best native varieties of the Shagbark species of Hickory have been for a century a leading favorite nut of the Northern States, ...
-The Pecan
Several selected varieties of the Pecan have become commercial, and others of special value will soon be planted extensively. As stated in Section 289 a single ...
-The Walnut
Sections 283, 284, and 285 of Part I give some facts in regard to the distribution and culture of the European walnut (Juglans regia) in the United States; the ...
-The Native Black Walnut
Section 286 gives notes on the value of the American Black Walnut as a timber tree and its present and prospective value as a nut tree, and Section 287 gives ...
-The Banana
The Banana (Musa sapientum) is tropical and its cultivation on a commercial scale is carried on extensively in the West Indies, Central America, and Mexico.
-The Date
The Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is an ancient fruit of the desert. Sections 208, 209, and 210 of Part I give something of its history, habits of growth, ...
-The Fig
Sections 205, 206, and 207 of Part I give something of the history, races, caprification, possible improvement, growing at the North, and propagation. In mild ...
-The Fig. Continued
Gentile Very large, pyriform; neck short; color greenish yellow, with white spots. Flesh amber-colored, streaked with rose-color. Season, very early in warm ...
-The Guava
Section 220 gives an outline of the uses and commercial status of what is known as the apple of tropical and subtropical climates as a dessert fruit, and the ...
-Custard Apple
In tropical and semi-tropical climates this name is applied to several species of the Anona of the natural order Anonaceae. The large, and in some cases very ...
-Loquat
(Eriobotrya Japonica, Lindl.; Photinia Japonica, Gray.) In the South this is usually called Japan plum. It is a small evergreen tree (214) and its fruit is ...
-Olive (Olea Europea)
Sections 202, 203, and 204 give notes on the history, soil, and air requisites for culture, propagation, and commercial olive products. The culture of the ...
-The Orange Family
The orange family includes the cultivated oranges, lemon, lime, shaddock, citron, pomelo, and kumquat. Chapter XV of Part I gives something of the history, ...
-The Orange Family. Continued
Madam Vinous Medium, round, yellow; quality best. Originated in Florida, where it is double-starred by the American Porno-logical Society. Majorca Medium, ...
-Lemons
Prior to the winter of 1894-5 lemons were grown commercially in Central Florida. Since that period the plantings have been quite extensive in lower Florida. In ...
-The Lime
The Lime (Citrus medica acida) is most frequently grown from seed, hence the varieties are numerous and variable. This is specially true of the Cuban or West ...
-The Citron
The Citron (Citrus Medica genuina) is a large thick-rinded fruit, of which only the rind is used in the making of preserves and confections. It is a shrub or ...
-The Pomelo, Or Grape-Fruit
The species to which this belongs (Citrus decumana) includes what are known as Shaddocks. The round-fruited varieties are known as Pomelos, Pumelos, or Grape- ...
-The Pineapple (Ananas Sativus)
Sections 212 and 213 of Part I gives something of the history, habits, culture, and increased use of this queen of fruits. The varieties grown in Florida, and ...
-The Pomegranate
This species (Punica granatum) is grown for both fruit and ornamental planting. For ornament the double-flowering varieties are mainly planted in the South and ...
-Some Subtropical Fruits Grown To Less Extent In The United States
Alligator Pear (Persea Gratissima) A handsome evergreen tree. Fruits pear-shaped, about the size of a Bartlett pear, with a single, quite large seed. When the ...
-The Standard American Rules For Exhibiting And Naming Fruits
The rules of the American Pomological Society for exhibiting and naming fruits are as follows: Section I. Naming And Describing New Fruits Rule 1 The ...









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