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The American Garden | by L. H. Bailey



An illustrated journal of horticulture. Combining the horticulturist, gardener's monthly, and floral cabinet

TitleThe American Garden Vol. XI
AuthorL. H. Bailey
PublisherThe Rural Publishing Company
Year1890
Copyright1890, The Rural Publishing Company
AmazonAmerican Horticultural Society A to Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants

To the Memory of John Henderson, Flushing, Long Island, Florist And Philanthropist Volume XI of The American Garden is Dedicated.

The American Garden 1
-An "Off-Year" For Potatoes - 738 Bushels Per Acre
In many parts of the country the potato crop was a sad failure, particularly in the immediate vicinity of New York. The heretofore profitable acres of New Jersey and Long Island - where as much work a...
-The "Sunset Plant."
DURING the winter of last year a catalogue was received from the Lewiston (Idaho) Seed Company which set forth in glowing terms the striking beauty and rare merits of what it believed to be a new plan...
-Abandoned Farms
Do city people know where some of the abandoned farms in New Hampshire are located, which the State is trying to people with foreigners ? Some are reported in the town of Jackson, which is near the he...
-Abobra Tenuifolia (A. Viridiflora)
Abobra tenui-folia is a rapid growing and beautiful climbing plant belonging to the natural order Cucurbitaceae. It is a half-hardy perennial gourd-like plant, with tuberous roots, and attains a heigh...
-Acacia Farnesiana In The South
The gardens of our old city just now (Nov. 15) are fragrant with the perfume of the little golden balls of the Acacia Farnesiana, as Op-is the ne and came are, so knows, unanswered questions. Webster ...
-Ackermann's Phyllocactus (Phyllocactus Ackermanni)
Phyllocactus Ackcrmanni, Haworth, Synopsis Succulentarum, 1819. Cereus Ackermanni, Lindley, Bot. Register, t. 1331. The species of the genus phyllocactus, which, all things considered, is undoubtedly...
-Across Lots
Why is it that some fruits respond so liberally to the efforts of horticulturists, while others defy every advance, preferring seemingly to be simply wild ? We have just been through one of nature's o...
-The Adaptability Of Fruits
Perhaps there is no horticultural subject which has called forth so many conflicting opinions, as the adaptability of fruits to a certain location, for one who succeeds at one place, may not at anothe...
-Agricultural Colleges
The Clemson Agricultural college is founded by the bequest of Thomas G. Clemson, son-in-law of John C. Calhoun, and is to be established at Fort Hill, South Carolina, the home of the great statesman. ...
-Alabama Experiment Station
This bulletin contains, among other things, records of tests with tomatoes, potatoes, beans and peas, by James Clayton. The results are tabular, but few conclusions are drawn, and the figures are not ...
-Along Fences And Walls
The thrifty farmer should cultivate his fields close up to the walls and fences. By so doing, he has the benefit of crops on a long narrow strip of land that is often given up to weeds and brush, whic...
-The Amaryllis
All the varieties of the amaryllis are very beautiful and may easily be cultivated. Their principal requirement is an alternate season of rest and growth. To grow them well supply the plants with abun...
-Amaryllis From Seed
The growing of amaryllis from seed is a very interesting and profitable branoh of floriculture. Save seeds from the best varieties and sow them as soon as ripe, in pots, pans or shallow boxes filled w...
-An Amateur's Plan For Raising Tuberoses
I have just laid down a copy of a western agricultural paper in which I read : A tuberose bulb will not bloom a second season. While this is unquestionably true, such statements often mislead many p...
-Ambrette, Or Musk Plants
In my correspondence relating to the introduction in the South of the manufacture of pomades from odor-bearing flowers, I learned of the value of Hibiscus Abelmoschus Muscheutos [? - Ed.] from Mr. Ung...
-American Chestnuts For Market
Samples of American chestnuts, superior to those of foreign growth both in size and in flavor, have recently been received at the Department of Agriculture, affording a striking illustration of the re...
-Among The Strawberries. Notes And Opinions Of The Season
Central New York While the testing of varieties of fruits and vegetables is among the most difficult and unsatisfactory work that can be done in the way of experimentation, owing to the multitude of ...
-And Little Known Greenhouse Plants
NEW THAT orchids monopolize practically the whole of the energy and resources of our professional collectors, the introduction of new plants has latterly become more a matter of chance than the result...
-Anemone
Of all the autumn-blooming plants none can compare in beauty and grace to the anemone. Its hardy constitution, and the fact that it produces great quantities of pure white blossoms at a time when whit...
-Annals Of Horticulture In North America For The Year 1889
A Witness of Passing Events, and a Record of Progress. By L. H. Bailey. Pp. 249; cuts, 52. Rural Publishing Co., New York. Among the new books of a horticultural nature there is none which contains, i...
-Annual Report Of The Connecticut Experiment Station For 1889
This volume of nearly 300 pages is especially rich in fertilizer tests and analyses. The part which particularly concerns the horticulturist is the report of Roland Thaxter, the mycologist. Dr. Thaxte...
-Annual Report Of The State Botanist of The State of New York For 1889
By Charles H. Peck. Pp. 54. 4 plates. Professor Peck records the growth of the state herbarium during the year, and makes many notes upon plants, chiefly fungi. Many new species of fungi are described...
-Another Pollinating Kit
PROFESSOR Bailey's enthusiasm in the work has led him to describe an outfit for pollination so extensive that many thinking it all necessary, may, I fear, be deterred from practicing this exceedingly ...
-Aphides, Or Plant Lice
Few plants except those of the lowest orders are exempt from the ravages of aphides or plant lice, though some are injured much more than others. Some species of aphis confine their attention to parti...
-Apples
Gano Apple Fruit large; form roundish, slightly conic ; skin smooth ; color light yellow, covered with rich crimson red. Some little mottled; dots small, numerous, yellow; stem medium slender; cavity...
-Apples (2)
The summers and winters during the past six years have been the most trying known to the history of the west on orchard fruits. So far as I know the wreck of western orchards has known no parallel in ...
-The Apple Scab In Wisconsin
My trees suffered so much from apple scab in 1882 or 1883 that they did not recover sufficiently to fruit till 1886. It is possible that checking growth may develop fruit buds, but loss of foliage we ...
-Apple Trees Of Great Size
Measurements of an apple tree of extraordinary size have been furnished by Rev. A. Swartz, Lancaster, Ohio, to the Pittsburgh National Stockman and Farmer. The circumference of the trunk three feet ab...
-Apples For Southwestern Michigan
W. A. Brown, a leading fruit grower in the lake shore fruit region of Michigan, makes the following timely observations in the Allegan (Mich.) Gazette: While most growers will prefer the old standard...
-Apples In Manitoba
Several varieties of crabs are found to succeed at Hendingly, and out of quite a number of Wealthy apples planted some fifteen years ago, two yet survive. Other persons have tried apples, but having, ...
-An Aquatic Garden
WE PRESENT a picture on page 321 which prettily represents a novel bit of aquatic and landscape gardening. As no landscape is complete without its vista of water, so all flower gardens need a refreshi...
-Aquilegia - The Columbine
This is a showy and interesting group. They are all of moderate height, neat in habit, possessing beautiful foliage, and in most cases the flowers are bright and pleasing and their structure is quite ...
-Arbutus In The Garden. Henry Ward Beecher's Estimate
It is my good fortune to know the home of the trailing arbutus (Epigaa repens), one of the most exquisite of nature's fondlings. It grows in the greatest profusion and luxuriance, where we can pick ag...
-Artificial Climates
ONE OF the time-honored subjects in the farmer's conversation is the weather. It is always a bad season for crops. The like of this hasn't been known for a generation. 'Uncommon unseasonable ...
-Artillery Plants
As noted some time ago in The American Garden, the most dry-boned botanist is glad to find that a plant has a good popular name, and invariably uses the popular name when it has become really popular....
-Automatic Greenhouses. A Revolution In Glass Houses - An Invaluable Invention Given Away To Our Readers
IN THE April number of The American Gardner there appeared a description of a new greenhouse erected by Charles Barnard, at Stamford, Conn. Since that time further research has been carried on in the ...
-Automatic Greenhouses. An Invaluable Invention Given Away To Our Readers. Continued
The actual movement of the rod of the thermostat was only one fourth of an inch, while the complete movement of the valve was over three inches. By the use of suitable bell-joints and rods, it was not...
-Automatic Greenhouses. A Surprising And Important Advance In Greenhouse Construction
The American Garden always takes pleasure . in laying before its readers descriptions of new appliances or inventions of use in horticulture. During the past winter a series of experiments have been c...
-Automatic Ventilation
NUMBER of letters have been sent to the editor of The American Garden asking for more information concerning the automatic greenhouse erected by Mr. Charles Barnard, of Stamford, Conn., and in an inte...
-The Back Yard
Always see that the back yard is kept neat and tidy the year around. Never allow rubbish of any kind to lie around. Nothing is more disgusting to see old sticks, dirty rags, or refuse of any kind thro...
-Backwood Gardens. Primitive Tangles Under The Shadows Of Great Cities-----Gardening Of Love
IN AN eastern state, not twenty-five miles from one of the largest cities in the Union, I have come across sections as remote in reality from the centers of thought and the business world as though th...
-A Bacterial Disease Of Corn
This is one of the most valuable bulletins of the year, inasmuch as it deals with a new malady of one of our most important crops; or, rather, it is the first recognition of a very old malady, for fr...
-Bamboo
One of the most noble and distinct of all the bamboos, so far as foliage is concerned, is the Bambusa palmata. This plant has finer leaves and is more erect in habit than any other variety. In one spe...
-Bananas For The Table
This is the season when Cuba and other West Indian points embellish the markets with choice bananas. The fruit from those plantations is much richer in flesh and color than the ordinary strawripened b...
-Barnum Should Nave This 1
Alexander Grogan, West Rutherford, has just received by mail from his brother in Mirzapore, in the northwestern part of India, a plant about a foot long. It is now withered and apparently dead. It bel...
-Beauty In Sorrow
Seldom have lovely flowers been called upon to express sympathy for so sad an event as the tragic death of the wife and daughter of Secretary Tracy, and seldom has a prettier display of rare blossoms ...
-Berlin International Horticultural Exhibition
WHILE so much has been said and written about a great American exhibition in 1892 or 1893, it will be well for us to heed the fact that in the city of Berlin is to be held a great International Hortic...
-Best Sweet Corn
On page 227, 1889, the query is put, In sweet corn, is it impossible to combine a high degree of delicacy and sweetness with great earliness ? I have solved the matter by planting Farquhar's First ...
-Birds In The Garden
PROTECT THE BIRDS-------------DO ENGLISH SPARROWS DRIVE AWAY NATIVE BIRDS - SPARROWS AND SPARROW LAWS. THE immense good our birds do in orchards, gardens and fields is more and more apparent, but onl...
-Black Cherry (Prunus Serotina)
This is the most abundant wild cherry of the United States, occurring mainly east of the Mississippi, where it is found from Florida to the Great Lakes, forming in the Ohio Valley a magnificent forest...
-Black Rot Of The Grape
In the Journal of Mycology, vol. 5, No. 2, Mr. B. T. Galloway gives the results of an interesting experiment respecting the ascospores, or winter spores, of the grape rot. It is well known that it is ...
-Black Rot Of The Tomato
In the report of the Department of Agriculture, 1888, Mr. B. T. Galloway discusses the above disease of the tomato. The disease generally appears at the apex of the fruit when onespot, which rapidly i...
-The Black Wattle For Streets
A Pasadena correspondent of a California contemporary extols the Australia black wattle as a street tree. This tree probably possesses merit for all the warmer portions of the union. The tree is proba...
-The Black-Rot Of Grapes
By Frederick D. Chester and M. II. Beckwith. Pp. 32. i colored plate. Mr. Chester made careful tests of Bordeaux mixture in a commercial vineyard last year, with gratifying results. Sprayed vines yie...
-Blackberries And Raspberries
OUR CULTIVATED brambles fall readily into two groups - the blackberries, characterized by the adherent receptacle or core which pulls off with the fruit, and the raspberries or thimble-berries, in w...
-Blackberries And Raspberries. Continued
Rubusoccidentalis, Linn. (Blackcap, Thimbleberry Of Some) Fig. 4, p. 723. Stems long and at maturity recurved and rooting at the tips, conspicuously glaucous, armed with stiff, hooked prickles; inflo...
-The Bloomless Apple
In the last July issue of The American Garden I illustrated and described the flowers of the so-called bloomless apple. It was found that the flowers are destitute of colored petals, those organs bein...
-The Bloomless Apple (2)
Some months ago a farmer named Wm. Lagle, of Bradford, Ind., sent me a seedless apple. It was opened at the Farmers' Institute in this county and found seedless, but with a partly formed core. The gro...
-Bokhara Clover In The West
The plant referred to as a new species by Omaha and other western papers, which is so rapidly taking the place of the sunflower and the weeds on the Missouri bottom lands, is the Bokhara clover (Mel...
-Boronia Heterophylla
Being dwarf in habit, the bor-onias are some of the most valuable of greenhouse plants for those whose accommodation is limited. They are of elegant appearance, floriferous, and usually very fragrant....
-Boston Markets. For The Month Preceding April 21
All peck, quart, each, pound and dozen prices are retail; all bunch, box, bushel, barrel and hundred rates wholesale, except where noted. Fruits Apples - Best Baldwins and Russett, $5 bbl. Bananas -...
-Boston Markets. For The Month Preceding December 20
All peck, quart, each, pound and dozen prices are retail; all bunch, box, bushel, barrel and hundred rates wholesale, except where noted. Fruits With the approach of the holidays, the fruit trade ha...
-Botanical Language
THERE comes up periodically the attack upon botanical terminology. This criticism possesses the merit of age and of popularizing the very terms which it seeks to destroy ; otherwise, it has little sub...
-Botany And Horticulture
SOME Relations of Botany to Horticulture! It is strange that in these days any one should fail to see the relations of botany to horticulture, strange that any apology is necessary that the gardener...
-Brosimum Galactodendron (Urticaceae)
In 1633, Laet, in his descriptio indiarum occidentalim, lib. 18, says that in Venezuela there are trees which give out a liquid which coagulates like cheese, and which is eaten at meals. This tree, pe...
-The Brown Rot Of Stone Fruits
We have lately entered upon a new era in our knowledge of the economy and methods of fighting the multitudinous fungus diseases which plants are heir to. Twenty, or even ten years ago, very few of the...
-Buds
Friend Nyas - we are glad to call him friend - says, and we believe he is right, that with one exception - that of love - no subject has, to a like extent, challenged the rich and quaint device of th...
-Buffalo-Berry, (Shepherdia Argentea)
For the cold dry northwest, hardly any of our native fruits is of greater promise than the buffalo-berry of that region. As an ornamental plant, it is occasionally grown, but for the production of fru...
-Bullbtin No. 9, Minnesota Experiment Station. Russian Willows And Poplars
Insects Affecting Willows and Poplars, by Otto Lugger. Pp. 24. Illustrated. For ornament, windbreaks and timber, the Russian willows and poplars are receiving much attention in the northwest. The best...
-Bulletin Of The Iowa Agricultural College. 1890
Revised notes of the Pears, Cherries, Plums, Apricots, Peaches [also Apples], Ornamental Trees, Forest Trees and Shrubs, which have been tested on the College grounds and sent out for trial during the...
-Business For Women
LET us try, said Rose. We can do it, said Grace. It was a beautiful room these girls were in. The side towards the street was glass, and a glass door led out to a small open veranda with steps to ...
-Cactus
In the southwestern portion of the United States, from central Texas to the Pacific ocean, the cultivated fruits of temperate, and of semi-tropical climates, can be grown only by means of irrigation, ...
-The Cactus Family
THE remarkable diversity of curious forms exhibited by cactus plants, and their growth and retention of vitality under apparently adverse circumstances, combine to render the group perhaps the most in...
-The Cactus Family. Continued
About two hundred species of echinocactus (See Figs. D, G, H), or hedgehog cactus, have been found in Mexico and various parts of South America. The globular, cylindrical, or oblong stems of these pla...
-Cactus Growing In Florida
OWING to our comparative exemption from severe frosts, cactuses are much more easily grown here than at the north. Yet many of the choicest varieties must have protection from sun and rain in summer a...
-Cactus Landscapes. The Singular Cactus Flora Of Our Great Southwest
THERE are 140 species of the cactus family in the United States, all of which are embraced in five genera, or practically in four genera, as the fifth contains only one species. The four principal gen...
-Cactuses As Window Plants
Cactaceous plants have much to recommend them to lovers of the curious and beautiful, but the majority also possess another very valuable character, i. e., they are easily grown, so easily in fact tha...
-Cactuses In Africa
Cactuses are used by the natives of the Soudan for hedging in their villages and gardens. Whether these cactuses, as the opuntia of the Mediterranean sea, have all been introduced from America, deserv...
-Cactuses In Landscape Gardening
The expression which a landscape gardener gives to any piece of ground on which he works should be one that is appropriate to the climate and in harmony with the effects which nature has already produ...
-Cactuses In Place And Out Of Place
THE cactus is a curiosity, one of the wonders of the vegetable kingdom. It is unusual, and therefore always bold and striking. For this reason it is a favorite with many as an object of ornamentation ...
-Cactuses Indoors And Out
WHAT IS A CACTUS? - THEIR DISTRIBUTION AND COUNTERFEITS----THEIR USES AND CLASSIFICATION. IT IS always difficult to define a family of plants. Nature never consents to be buttoned up in a straight-ja...
-Cactuses Indoors And Out. Part 2
These dissimilarities are but a few of the surprises which abound in this singular family, and which render it extremely attractive to the student of nature's wondrous and never-ceasing diversity and ...
-Cactuses Indoors And Out. Part 3
8. The Northwestern Region, comprising the northern parts of the state of California, the territories of Utah. Oregon and Washington. This region has so far furnished only a single opuntia (from east...
-Cactuses Indoors And Out. Part 4
Broadly stated, the grand influence which the distribution of moisture over the earth's surface exercises upon the distribution of plants is that the earth is girdled round, in and near the borders o...
-Cactuses Indoors And Out. Part 5
Cactuses have many uses aside from their beauty and curiousness. Very many of the species produce edible fruits, and the time will undoubtedly come when some of them will be grown for their fruits. Th...
-Cactuses Under Culture. Neglected Plants Of Peculiar Charm
NOTWITHSTANDING the interesting forms and magnificent flowers of the cacti, these plants are often unappreciated by those who should grow them. They are no favorites with the regular gardener, who s...
-California A Big State
Few persons have an idea of the area of California. It is the second in size of the states of the Union, Texas only being larger. To give those who have not looked the matter up a lucid idea of its si...
-California Profits In Oranges
The Pomona Progress of a recent date publishes the following figures concerning profits of orange culture in Southern California : The following figures concerning the money there is in the orange in...
-California Truck-Gardening
BOUT half a mile from where I write is a piece of sandy soil near the Alameda creek. Twenty years ago it was consid -ered too poor for anything but pasture. Now it is worked by several Italian gardene...
-Canning And Preserving
MORE INSTANCES OF THE IMPORTANCE OF SUPERIOR PRODUCTS - EVAPORATING AND ITS ADVANTAGES TO THE PRODUCER - SOME SUGGESTIONS WORTHY OF CONSIDERATION. Third Paper. IF PROGRESS in this nineteenth century...
-Canning And Preserving (2)
THE SKILL REQUIRED IN CANNING - METHODS OF EVAPORATING-----COST OF EVAPORATORS - QUALITY OF STOCK USED--THE CO-OPERATIVE PLAN. Fourth Paper. PREVIOUSpapershave dealt more largely with canners than w...
-Canning And Preserving (3)
THE QUESTION FROM THE GROWER'S STANDPOINT----DO CANKERS PAY A FAIR PRICE FOR PRODUCE ? - OPINIONS AND SUGGESTIONS. Fifth Paper. A5 STATED previously (p. 151), the problem of ways and means in fruit ...
-Cape Cod Cranberries. A Distinctively American Industry - Its Moods And Tenses
CRANBERRY-GROWing is the most unique of our horticultural industries. It is entirely unlike anything else. All one's knowledge of gardening and fruit growing in general is of no avail when he undertak...
-Cape Cod Cranberries. A Distinctively American Industry. Part 2
To be sure, wild berries are yet common, but they would not interfere with the sale of better and cleaner berries which should come from civilized plantations. Wild cranberries are still abundant over...
-Cape Cod Cranberries. A Distinctively American Industry. Part 3
A new berry which Mr. Makepeace showed me appears to combine more merits than any berry which I have ever seen. Some twelve years ago he observed the original plants in a neighbor's bog, occupying a s...
-The Cape Jessamine
We have among our flowers a cape jessamine that perhaps affords us as much satisfaction, with as little trouble, as any plant in our collection. We have had it at least twenty years, and it is a stout...
-A Card To The Society Of American Florists
It is with much pleasure that I beg to tender my most sincere and warmest thanks to the members of the S. A. F.whom I had the great pleasure and honor to meet during my recent visit to the United Stat...
-Care Of Stocks, And How They Are Improved By Cross-Fertilization
IN seed-saving we may never lose sight of the principle that applies alike to every class and variety - namely, in selecting plants for seed production the most healthy must always be chosen, and thes...
-Carnations As Window Plants
THE carnation is often thought to be a difficult plant to grow in the window garden. I think that the following suggestions will aid those who wish to grow this most handsome flower. The variety chos...
-Casaripe Or Kaseareep
Who knows anything about this West Indian product ? A writer in the Saturday Review says : In the great old times of the West Indies, men boasted the age of their pepper-pot as warmly as the age of t...
-Cassava
The eatable part of the cassava is the root, which grows from 3 to 5 feet long and from 3 to 4 inches in diameter. The appearance of a broken root is enticing, resembling a huge pink radish. When eate...
-Cassava Culture
I find no more trouble to protect the cassava stubble for winter protection than the sugar cane. X have a patch now, the second year planted, that is doing nicely; the roots or tubers are fairly begin...
-The Catalogues
In behalf of the army of seedsmen, allow me to reply to the article on page 181 of The American Garden, headed Do Catalogues Pay? Part of the article in question I heartily endorse, but part of it I...
-Catalogue Of Plants Found In New Jersey
From the Final Report of the State Geologist, Trenton. Pp. 642. This great catalogue is said by the author to be the most complete enumeration of plants of any region of as great area in the world. I...
-Catalogues That Instruct
Your correspondent on page 305, May Garden, hits the nail on the head in criticism of C. L. A.'s remarks in the March number. I know of an honest seedsman, whose catalogue was a perfect encyclopedia o...
-Cattleya
Among a lot of orchids received last June from the river Negro were a dozen large specimens of Cattleya superb a. These were wired on long flat rafts of teak and suspended in partial shade under a lem...
-Cattleya Walkeriana
Cattleya Walkeriana is rare in orchid collections, perhaps for the reason that it is rare everywhere; but it deserves a place in any good collection. It is, perhaps, one of the most distinct of the wh...
-Celery Pests
I find two animals that trouble my celery, and I can find no reference to them in the books. The first is what we call Sow bug. It is a gray, flat bug, full size about inch long ; it eats on the ...
-Celery, And How To Grow It
WELL begun - half done ! Good plants are indispensable to a good beginning. To insure having them just when soil, season and hands are ready, and the weather favorable, they should be grown at home -...
-The Century Plant (Agave Americana)
There are very few people that have had the good fortune to see the large century plant in bloom. For although it does not take a hundred years to mature, as its name would lead one to think, still th...
-Charm For Country Life
GOD made the country. Men will some day learn the truth of this aphorism. They will learn also to combine with it the thought that broad fields, sunshine, the rains and the dews, are in no way incom...
-Cherries
The Russian cherries seemed to do well in nearly all soils from the western coast east to the Volga In like manner they appear to do well here on extremely varied soils when en suitable stocks or on t...
-Cherries And Small Fruits
There can be no finer cherries than those so plentifully grown here. One gentleman exhibited to me limbs of cherries, grown at Tacoma, that appeared almost a solid mass of fruit as large around as a m...
-Chestnuts
The Chestnut is at one of the lands of Appalachi-system, from Tennessee to Massachusetts but may found on all lands which are high and rolling. Most prairie soils are unfavorable to it. The general no...
-Chinese Gardening. Intensive Gardening Among The Celestials
GARDENS of the Middle Flowery Kingdom are of less importance than its gardening. China is a vast garden, and so appears to the eye, the landscape containing no meadows or pastures or fences or hedgero...
-The Chinese Lily
The Chinese lily is considered a most wonderful and choice flower. It is certainly very popular and extremely fashionable, and is supposed to be a Sacred Lily of the Chinese. Although it may be real...
-The Christmas And Lenten Roses
THE hellebores, which are popularly known as Christmas Roses, have long been favor -i t e flowers abroad, having been known and cultivated in continental Europe and England for many years. Occasionall...
-Chrysanthemums
Out of nearly one thousand varieties to be found in cultivation, it would be strange if there were not some kinds that it would be difficult to improve in any way. There are many of the older sorts wh...
-Chrysanthemum Disappointments
PROMISE of a better display of chrysanthemums than had been seen in any previous year, opened the last season's shows. This expectation sprang from the fact that many new varieties had been put upon t...
-Chrysanthemums At The Japanese Court
THERE are still many chrysanthemum growers in England who can carry their minds back to the time when the first Japanese varieties of the Autumn Queen were exhibited at the meeting of the Royal Hort...
-Citrus Trifoliata And The Dwarf Oranges
The introduction of the Satsuma type of oranges and the use of Citrus trifoliata stocks promise to extend and greatly modify the culture of the orange. It appears that both the stock and the variety a...
-City Flowers
It would be interesting to know just what is the educating effect upon that part of the city's youth which we may call the pavement population, of the sight of flowers the year through. During the win...
-A City Garden
A few notes from a little city garden may meet some kindred spirit somewhere. No garden is complete without Scilla Siberica, and to be effective it should be grown in clumps. I find that it delights i...
-Clerodendron Aerotinum
This hardy deciduous shrub was introduced from Japan about twenty years ago under name of Valkameria Japonica, but in more recent classifications is called Clerodendron serotinum. It forms a large spr...
-Climate And Its Relation To Life
IT IS NOT without reason that the staple salutation and customary inquiry are concerning the weather and one's health. In all ages, in every clime and in every stage of society, the primary basis of c...
-Climate And Its Relation To Life. Part 2
We think it would be found a wiser policy to develop more fully the agricultural resources of the states and territories bordering on the Mississippi than to attempt the further invasion of the steril...
-Climate And Its Relation To Life. Part 3
In the near future, it is inevitable that the scope of the work of the Department of Agriculture, in re-spect especially to climatology, will be greatly enlarged. Climatology, in fact, is only one bra...
-Climate And Plants
I am surprised to see in Mr. Willits' article the statement on p. 318, June American Garden, as to the want of knowledge in 1856 of our western interior, its climate and capacities, and particularly h...
-Climbing Hydrangea (Decumaria Barbara)
Oh the beauty of the almost unknown, unappreciated, American climbing hydrangea! Why is it that so many rarely beautiful native plants are unnoticed, while less intrinsically good imported varieties s...
-The Climbing Staff Or Bitter Sweet
The name, Bitter Sweet, is likely to mislead those somewhat benighted people who know the very different Solananum dulconum by the same word-label. The picture of my Bitter Sweet or Climbing Staff (Ce...
-Closing Wholesale Prices, December 20
Fruits Although holiday demands caused some spurt in the fruit trade this month, wet, unseasonable weather has kept life out of sales. Prices for nearly all stuff are above the general purse It is di...
-The Cloudberry (Rubus Chamamorus)
This useful little blackberry, which occurs throughout the arctic regions of both hemispheres, is found along our northern borders, and at interior points of high elevation. Williamson, in his history...
-The Cocoanut At Lake Worth
It may not be generally known to the reader of The American Garden that the cocoanut is growing and bearing abundantly in the United States. It is true that the area of its successful culture is very ...
-The Codlin Moth
This comprises a general essay upon the codlin moth, with recommendations for its destruction. Efforts have been made to determine how long the pest has been known in the state and how widely it is di...
-Cold Graperies
The peculiar method of glazing spoken of in the March issue (p. 186), in which spaces of half inch are left between the panes of glass, looks like a very cranky notion to an old grape grower. We gro...
-Coleus For The Window Garden
There are but few plants better adapted for the window garden or living-room than the finer colored varieties of the coleus. The larger leaved and more highly colored forms seem more at home in the ho...
-Color Variation In Primulas
Having very choice varieties of Chinese primroses, we concluded, last winter, to try an experiment on the variation of color. Two varieties were chosen for our purpose, one being the new porcelain blu...
-Colorado Horticulturists
At the Colorado State Horticultural and Forestry Association's recent annual meeting the prevailing life and enthusiasm afforded convincing evidence that in this almost rainless region horticulture ha...
-The Colors Of Flower Gardens
It does not require any knowledge of color, considered as a subject of inquiry to appreciate the beauty of Bowers, and yet we are willing to credit the fact that our gardeners are ready to welcome mor...
-Companion Plants
While it is true that there is a struggle for life going on between various species of plants, and that in the struggle only the fittest survive, it has seemed to me equally true that certain plants l...
-The Concord And Hartford Grapes
To say that there is no longer any excuse for planting the Concord, as Dr. Hoskins does in the July Garden, is to get have any conception of the marvelous success and popularity of this grape in th...
-Condition Of Fruit Growing In Western New York
By L. H. Bailey. Pp. 16. Illustrated. Professor Bailey ascribes the general failure of the apple crop in Western New York chiefly to an unusual development of the apple scab fungus, Fusicladium dendri...
-Condition Of The Wine Industry In France
United States Consul Roosevelt at Bordeaux, has been making an exhaustive study into the wine industry of France. The result of his observations are summed up as follows, in a recent report to the Sta...
-Confusion Confounded
One or two things that came up at the nurserymen's convention form such an excellent commentary upon some of the matter in The American Garden for June, that I made a note of them for you. In that ...
-The Conservation Of Wines
There is an effort on the part of certain persons to discourage the use of physical means for the conservation of wines. The chief physical treatment is pasteurizing, or the application of heat for ...
-The Construction Of A Low Cost Piazza Conservatory
TO MEET the popular demand for a well built, low cost, and convenient conservatory is a difficult matter. The writer's ambition to possess such a structure, say sixteen feet long and eight wide, built...
-Containing Notes Of Experiments Upon Various Insects
Weed has repeated his experiments of a year ago upon the destruction of the curculio on cherries and plums by means of london purple. It has now been proved by several observers that the adult curculi...
-Contributions To American Botany, XVII
Excerpt from prac. Amer. Acad. Arts and Sci. XXV, 124-163. The occasional systematic publications from the Gray Herbarium of Harvard University have always been the most important contributions to the...
-Controlling The Markets
Organization by horticulturists is often able to effect permanent good in the obtaining of new markets, and the partial control or education of old ones. A marked instance of this just comes to our no...
-Cooking Peaches
In cooking the pits without shells, too much of the prussic acid contained in them naturally would be let into the preserve; but peaches cooked whole, either pared or not pared, are pleasantly flavore...
-Coral-Flower
Following up the efforts of The American Garden to straighten out the confusion arising from the want of authority as to which common name should be selected for general adoption when a number of spec...
-The Cork Oak, Quercus Suber
The Cork Oak, Quercus Suber, has been planted, of recent years, in several of our states, with a view to the successful production of cork bark. Our country is now supplied with this important commodi...
-Corn Smut
Upon p. 289, American Garden for August, 1889, W. H. Bull states that my neighbor, a careful observer, says that the smut on sweet corn is produced by the winds that break the stalks at the root when...
-Cory Corn
I have tried for three years to grow Cory Corn in the state of Nebraska. I obtained seed first of J. J. H. Gregory, Marblehead, Mass., and planted two acres. It was a failure - no marketable ears. The...
-Cosmos
Any word of praise spoken for the lovely cosmos is fully merited, and its late period of bloom only adds to its value in my estimation. Late in the spring I get my stock of cuttings rooted, and as ear...
-Cost Of. Fuel
The next most important point is the size of the coal. In the writer's experience two sizes of coal are best, one of the usual furnace size and one of nut size or small stove size. In starting t...
-Crane Flies And Daddy-Long-Legs
To the average American gardener the insect shown in its three stages in the accompanying illustration is of no special interest, because as yet it here does very little damage; but in England the cas...
-Crane Flies And Daddy-Long-Legs. Continued
If President John May will only keep this from evaporation, he will confer a great favor on all lovers of flowers. SENSE of proportion seems to be unknown to many minds. A single fact or observation ...
-Crocosma (Tritonia) Aurea
Two valuable varieties of this old and useful plant have been introduced within the last year and a half. One named imperialis is especially valuable. The flowers are almost twice as large as those of...
-Crocosmia Aurea Imperialis
This plant, which seems destined to become a favorite in this country, where it is now a comparative novelty, belongs to the iridaceae family ; of the genus there is only a single species. It is also ...
-Cross-Fertilization Of Potatoes
By Cross-Fertilization Of Potatoes they have been vastly improved, both as regards quality and yield. The efforts made by specialists in this direction have been of incalculable value to the grower. N...
-Cross-Fertilization Of The Grape
It has been said that no winged insects have been seen visiting grape blossoms. This season, white hoeing near a grape vine, I heard the humming of a bumble bee and went to the vine to see what it was...
-Crossing Varieties Of The Tomato
The Director of the Royal Gardens at Kew, England, made a public statement a few weeks ago to the effect that a knowledge of the science of botany is of no value to the practical gardener. It may be i...
-Croton Bug
Insect Life for March gives a continuation of Professor Riley's Insect Pests of the Household, being a chapter on cockroaches, illustrated by drawings of the most common species, the croton bug or...
-Cultivation Of Asparagus
CLEAN, rich, light loam soil that will not pack or bake is required for asparagus. A good heavy sod plowed under is good, as it makes a bottom for the roots to feed on. It requires strong, coarse manu...
-Cultivation Of The Tuberous Begonia
The tuberous begonia, when better known, is destined to become one of our most popular flowers. Its free-blooming qualities and lovely shades of color cannot be excelled, if equalled by any class of p...
-Culture
While the tomato will produce a fair crop under almost any circumstances, there is no crop that will more amply repay good care and attention. The soil best suited to it is a light loam, which should ...
-The Culture Of Pelargoniums
HAVE been quite successful in the cultivation of the pelargoniums, and think if their needs were better understood, that they would be more often seen in the window-garden. Many err in giving them too...
-Culture Of The English Cucumber
IF RIGHTLY managed, the English cucumber is one of the most satisfactory of forcing vegetables, but, while not difficult to grow, any tendency to neglect on the part of the gardener is soon manifested...
-Culture Of Water-Cress
Select a level piece of land, with a stream running through it. Mark out the beds, 5, 10, 15 or 20 feet wide. Dig out all the soil from one to four feet deep, according to the locality. Dig out the be...
-The Cut-Worm
By I. H. Orcutt and J. M. Al-drich. Pp. 6. Illustrated. Extensive studies of cutworms have been inaugurated in South Dakota, where these pests appear to be very abundant. The present bulletin is large...
-Cutting Trees To Settle A Thanksgiving Supper
SOME RANK HERESY ON BUDDING AND GRAFTING - MRS. TARRYER AS POMONA - A NEW METHOD WITH TREE AGENTS - A PARSON'S GRAFTING. COME, BOYS! said Mrs. Tarryer,after Thanksgiving supper, get your tools, an...
-Cutting Trees To Settle A Thanksgiving Supper. Continued
Tree-agents have a great respect for Mrs. Tarryer. When a good-looking youngster comes along, who appears as though he was a beginner, I have known her to invite him into the sitting-room and treat hi...
-Cypripedium Arietinum In New England : Dicen-Tra Squirrel Corn
In the notice of Some Native Orchids in the April issue of the Garden Cypripedium arietinum is spoken of as not having been reported in New England south of Vermont. In the report of the Connecticu...
-Cypripedium Spicerianum
The Lady's Slipper tribe of the orchid family varies widely both as regards the habit and beauty of each individual; for while there is nothing very attractive about the flowers of the North America...
-Dahlia
I send you herewith a drawing of a new seedling dahlia. It is one of a dozen or more plants that are flowering this summer for the first time, having been raised from seed last year. The bulbs the fir...
-Daisies, Pansies And Violets
I have a cold frame for daisies, pansies, and violets, and always have a grand show in early spring. The violets and pansies bloom more or less during mild winter weather, and it is seldom that there ...
-Damask Roses For Perfumery. "Southern Header"
This enquirer asks for two of the best of the Damask roses, R. Damascena, for growing in the south for perfumers. They are Mad. Hardy and Mad. Zoutman, and may be obtained of Ellwanger & Barry, Roches...
-A Dangerous Rubus Mildew
While at the Biological Institute at Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island, I came upon a small area of Rubus villosus var. humifu-sus badly attacked by Peronospora Rubi, Rabenh. This mildew is a member of ...
-Death Of George Thurber
Dr. George Thurber, the well known botanist, and for 22 years editor of, the American Agriculturist, died April 9, at his home near Passaic, N. J. Dr. Thurber was particularly distinguished among bota...
-Decapitating Trees
When an expert arboriculturist transplants ornamental trees from the forest, such as maple, elm, or basswood, he saws off the entire top, leaving only a bare stem, like a hop-pole. Why does he cut bac...
-The Defoliation Of Trees In Autumn
The phenomenon of rapid defoliation in the fall is one which may be often observed in our common trees. The causes at work are not a little mysterious, but some understanding of them may be gained by ...
-Deluding The Public - Killing The Trade
Bringing The Seed, Plant And Tree Trade Into Disrepute. For These Things And More, Are The Introducers Of Pseudo-Novelties Responsible. Trade Societies, Step Into The Line Of Reform And Drive The Ras...
-Deluding The Public - Killing The Trade. Continued
1. The study of the distribution of plants over the earth is known as the geography of plants. This term appears to have been used by St. Pierre in a somewhat fanciful manner, but Humboldt first gave ...
-Development Of The Cabbage
No vegetable in the entire list so stubbornly resists our effort for its improvement as does the cabbage. Experience and observation lead me to believe that were careless methods adapted in the propag...
-The Dewberries
THREE species of rubus are popularly called dewberry in the eastern states - Rubus Canadensis, R. hispidus, and R. trivialis. These are also all known as low-blackberry and trailing-blackberry. In the...
-Disagreeable Gardeners
These days of hot and suddenly changing temperature are trying to the tempers of gardeners and employers. Some have stood the test so far, but many have not. Trials have come to all, the bugs, the in...
-Disappearance Of Starch From Twigs In Spring
On March 12th to 14th, 1889, a comparison was made of the amount of starch present in scions of 12 varieties of Russian apples and 3 varieties of Russian plums, which had been kept in a cool cellar, w...
-The Disci Pline Of Difficulties
I REGARD the yellows as one the greatest blessings which ever fell to the lot of peach growers. It has checked the recklessness and inflation which follow uniform success. This bit of heresy was giv...
-Diseases Of Rose Seeds And Seedlings
H. Drogemuller, in the Rosen Zeilung, calls attention to the causes which long delayed the production of new varie-ties in Germany, and in the discovery of which he had an important share. The apparen...
-Do Catalogues Pay?
While writing to-day, a lady of more than ordinary observation, asked: Do these expensive catalogues pay ? The same things over and over again.; and as for the new things, they are so frequently not ...
-Do English Sparrows Drive Off Other Birds ?
Does the English sparrow drive off other birds ? I answer, No ! AH birds have their dislikes, and often rob and chase each other, but do not drive the weaker away. In an old limb of an apple tree a bl...
-Does Fruit Growing Pay?
This question has often been asked. We especially allude to the apple. Probably not one person in ten knows how nice it is when one's home is well supplied with choice fruits that will last not only t...
-Does Market Gardening Pay?
With some men it does; with others it does not. The man who has a taste for the business; who strives to master all its details and obstacles; who has the proper soil, a good market and is honest in h...
-Don'T Be In A Hurry
The middle of May generally finds us anxious to put out our plants, especially as we want to clean house, and the prepared garden beds look bare and forlorn. A cold, long rain storm often sets in the ...
-Dried Tomatoes
Housekeepers who have many tomatoes can easily preserve a large quantity of this very easily-cultivated fruit by drying it. This method requires little outlay, and comparatively little trouble. Scald ...
-Drying Large Fleshy Flowers
There are some parts of plants that loose a great deal of their beauty, not to say characteristic shape, by the ordinary process of drying for preservation between paper under pressure. For example, t...
-A Durable Walk
The flower beds and the green lawn do not constitute the main features of a garden by any means; there is another which should be foremost in receiving our attention and labor, and that is the garden ...
-Early Chrysanthemums
SUMMER is the time of the rose, and the chrysanthemum is the leader among autumn flowers, scarcely less popular than the queen herself. Some varieties produce flowers so regular that it is not in th...
-An Early Winter Garden In California
I AM in a garden on a farm in Alameda county, near the hills, and about thirty miles from San Francisco. To-day is November seventh. There was a week of rain a while ago, which started the grass by th...
-Economic Geology Of Washington
The soil conditions of eastern and western Washington are quite as dissimilar as the climate. When we contemplate the influence that the Columbia river exerts, we are quite apt to associate and limit ...
-Edible Toadstools
So widespread is the ignorance on the subject of edible toadstools, that the writer believes it possible that even the enlightened readers of The American Garden may find some new ideas in the followi...
-The Electric Light Experiment
The general plan of the old house is the same as the new, though differing in some minor details. The most interesting thing in connection with this at present is the electric light experiment. The ho...
-An Energetic Squash Vine
A Michigan exchange speaks of a squash vine which grew so rapidly that the blossoms were killed by being dragged along the ground! The Garden, as Considered in Literature by Certain Polite Writers. W...
-An English Growl
The apologists for the common or popular names of plants, as against scientific designations, can take comfort from the following : Between the language of flowers, as understood by the young p...
-An English Nursery
WHILE in England during the past summer I had the pleasure of visiting some of the most prominent horticultural establishments in and around London. I called upon the celebrated firm of James Veitch &...
-Epiphyllums. Plants Which Should Be In Every Conservatory
Epiphyllums occupy an important place among stove or greenhouse plants, and it would be well-nigh impossible to find a more beautiful object than a full-grown specimen of E. truncatum when covered wit...
-The Eucalyptus In California
I am informed that there are upwards of forty species of these gum trees of Australia in cultivation in California. Of these, the blue-gum, or Eucalyptus globulus is by far the most common, and is the...
-Euchsia Triphylla
Towards the end of the seventeenth century a missionary named Plumier, collecting in the West Indian island of St. Domingo, came across this plant and gave to it the name it now bears. It is a remarka...
-Evaporating Fruit
Sladden & Son, of Eugene, Oregon, have a bearing prune orchard of 2,500 trees, in which they take much pride. For some time past this firm has sold all the evaporated fruit from this orchard for 10 an...
-Exochorda From Soft Cuttings
This fine shrub has been the stumbling block of most propagators, from the difficulty of propogating it except by seeds, and seeds have been produced in such meager quantities that the plant still rem...
-Experiences In Spraying Plants
By L. H. Bailey. Pp. 13. Illustrated. Professor Bailey's investigation upon the solubility of London purple as compared with Paris green shows that over 50 per cent. of the arsenic of London purple is...
-Experiences With Onions. Some Field Notes And Observations Of Value
Oils And Manures The onion needs a rich friable soil, one which is easily worked and which never bakes. Well drained alluvial soil or thoroughly subdued muck is best. The difficulty of caring for a c...
-Experiences With Tomatoes. Results Of A Large Experiment
As most things can be judged only by comparison, I was led last spring to obtain all varieties of tomatoes. In many cases it was found that the so-called new varieties were only new names for old frie...
-Experiences With Tomatoes. Results Of A Large Experiment. Part 2
Livingstons Favorite Ripe in 128 days. Large, fine fruit of red color, very smooth and fine ; cracked a little at stem, bore a long time ; among the best. Kept 8 days. Livingston's Beauty Ripe in 1...
-Experiences With Tomatoes. Results Of A Large Experiment. Part 3
The season was the longest of any grown, being from July 24th until October 12th, when the vines were killed by frost, though still loaded with fruit in all stages. This is a record to be admired. Th...
-Experiences With Tomatoes. Results Of A Large Experiment. Part 4
THE time will come when we shall breed varieties of plants, when the originator shall proceed upon known and definite lines of plant variation. This exact knowledge will be born of exact observation a...
-Experiments In Greenhouse Heating. Some Observations On Peach Yellows
S. T. Maynard. Professor Maynard is the first experiment station officer to make careful tests of the relative efficiency of steam and hot water in heating greenhouses. His tests of last winter indica...
-Experiments In Growing Potatoes
The influence of the amount of the tuber upon yield is again discussed. The Rural New-Yorker trench system of potato culture has been made the subject of experiment, and it was found that the total yi...
-Experiments With Potatoes
Pp. 14. Many trials of potatoes during two years, both at the station and in other parts of the state, give the following results: The most productive of the early varieties are Oxford, Puritan Early...
-Eyes Versus Whole Tubers In Potato Culture
The plat selected for this experiment was a dark loam, only moderately fertile, and as nearly uniform as it could be made. The Burbank variety was used, selected for uniformity in size, and cut in pie...
-Failures Of Fruits
There are few places in which there is a sufficient crop to make heavy shipment to eastern markets. There is almost a complete failure of fruits throughout the south. A few of the citrus fruits will g...
-The Fairyland Of Flowers
A Popular Illustrated Botany for the Home and School. By Mara L. Pratt. 4to. Pp. 154. Illustrated. Boston: Educational Publishing Company. Teach your boys, also, the little legends and poetry of the ...
-False Shag-Bark Hickory (Hicoria Microcarpa)
Hicoria microcarpa, Britton, Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, xv. 283 (1888). Carya microcarpa, Nuttall, Geneva N. Amer. P1. ii. 221 (1818). THE False Shag-bark Hickory is a tree which is very im-perfectly und...
-The Family Fruit Garden
At a recent meeting of the Columbus (O.) Horticultural Society, this subject was discussed. Mr. F. P. Dill, a successful orchardist, said of the apple: Buy trees of a home nursery, selecting straight...
-Farmers' Institutes
Secretary Rusk speaks with enthusiasm concerning farmers' institutes : I would merely say on this subject that it is a matter of no little gratification to me that this great work has nowhere been mo...
-Fascinating Sand In Parks
Heaps of sea sand are placed, at public cost, in the parks and squares of Berlin, where the German children sport under the general supervision of the police. So excellent an example was followed rece...
-The Favorite Flower In New York
The Superintendent of Public Instruction, Mr. Draper, has announced the vote for the State flower as follows: golden-rod, 81,308 ; rose, 79,666 ; daisy, 33.603 ; violet, 31,176; pansy, 21,202; lily, 1...
-Fertilizers For House Plants
One of the chief causes of failure in the growth of plants in window gardens is the want of sufficient food supply in the soil used. If a rich garden soil is used with an addition of leaf mould, parti...
-Fertilizers For The Garden - IV. Forty Years Experience--Action Of Nitrates
FORMERLY it was thought that plants took up their nitrogen in the form of ammonia. Now it is known that they take it up in the form of nitric acid, the acid being combined with some base, such as lime...
-Fertilizers For The Garden. Forty Years Experience--Action Of Nitrates. Continued
In his recent work on Nitrogenous Manures, Prof. Paul Wagner, director of the experiment station, Darmstadt, mentions a fact of great value in this connection. He says: In my experiments a rape plant...
-Fertilizers For The Garden - V. Forty Years' Experience - Fertilizer Values - The Action Of Nitrates
WE HAVE endeavored to show that, for economical use in the garden, many of the commercial fertilizers are too poor in nitrogen. In order to get the necessary amount of nitrogen, we are obliged to use ...
-Fertilizers For The Garden - VI. "Soil Tests"----Source Of Plant Food In Manures----Big Crops - Cost Of Chemical Manures
WERE IT not so aggravating it would be amusing to hear some of our experiment station directors and professors and editors and institute workers talk about the necessity of soil tests. Those of us...
-Fertilizers For The Garden - VII
RURAL NEW-YORKER says: It is much to be regretted that certain writers are advocating the use of nitrate of soda. Unless the land is well supplied with potash and phosphoric acid and needs nitrogen a...
-Festival Of The Months
This little celebration makes a very pleasant deviation from the time-worn fair, bazar or parlor sale that usually flourishes through the winter months. Twelve booths are necessary, but the number of ...
-A Few Good Climbers And Creepers
THE CLIMBING plants have a place of their own in garden decoration, a place that cannot at all be filled by any other plants. Screens are necessary for the veranda or for covering out-buildings, and w...
-Fine Cauliflower On Chemical Fertilizers
The folly of many gardeners' claim and practice that the manufactured fertilizers are inferior to stable manures for the production of fine vegetables is repeatedly proven by their more skillful and l...
-First Annual Report Of The Kansas Experiment Station For 1888
The report of the horticulturist and entomologist in this belated report comprises over a hundred pages, nearly equally divided between descriptions of noxious insects and records of tests of vegetabl...
-The First Essential Of Economy
Of fuel (particularly anthracite) is that all the ashes be regularly sifted and the small unburned coal returned to the fire. The best way to do this is to have the ashes sifted during the day and to ...
-The First Principles Of Agriculture
By James Mills, President, and Thomas Shaw, Professor of Agriculture in the Ontario Agricultural College. Pp. 250. Illustrated. Toronto: The J. E. Bryant Co. This is an admirable book. It is designed ...
-Flavor In Sweet Corn
In addition to what D. W. says (page 227), in relation to flavor in sweet corn, let us add that climate and soil so affect it, that in some sections it is far sweeter than in others. As an example, ...
-Floral Decoration For The Table
One of the prettiest fancies recently noticed was used at a large London dinner. It was a large cornucopia of yellow pompon chrysanthemums, laid flat and close together,, while a profusion of beautifu...
-Florist's Flowers
This is a term often used by foreign floricultural writers, and one we are frequently asked to define. They are flowers with established characters or habits, and such as can be propagated by cuttings...
-Flower Composition And Decoration
IN a charming article by a writer in Figaro, the Parisian flower shops are described in detail, and the lines we quote are full of suggestions for women. Marvels of art, veritable little masterpieces...
-The Flower Markets Of New York
The flowers sold in the metropolis always receive admiration from our visitors, and good judges say that the best are the equal of any in the world. In forced roses and lilies we are ahead of the worl...
-Flower Sports, Particularly With Reference To Color Variation
The laws of nature that govern the changes of color in vegetation are little understood, but are of great interest to investigators, and anything tending to advance the study of them should be preserv...
-Flower Worship In India
A traveler thus describes flower worship as practiced by the Persians in Bombay: A true Persian, in flowing robes of blue, and on his head a sheepskin hat - black, glossy, curly, the fleece of Kar-Ka...
-Flowering Of Seaforthla Elegans
In the grounds of Eugene S. Shefield at Santa Barbara stands a hand. some seaforthia. At 8 inches from the ground the circumference was 33 inches, and at the flower spike, 3 feet from the ground, the...
-The Flowering Wintergreen Or Fringed Poly-Gala
In the latter part of May one frequently finds in moist woods, or near the banks of shady streams, the beautiful fringed polygala (Polygala paucifolia) shown in Fig. 1. It is the cheeriest, brightest ...
-Flowers In The Home Garden
IT WOULD be extremely difficult to find another form of recreation so productive of pleasure as gardening in any of its varied forms. See the pleasant, sunny appearance that plants and flowers impart ...
-Flowers On The Farm
HOW may we cultivate a small flower garden, have it showy and attractive, and yet not have it interfere with our regular home and farm duties ? The barrenness of American farm-house yards is proverbia...
-Flowers Suitable For Cutting
DESIGNS AND BOUQUETS - THE HARMONY OF COLORS - VARIETIES FOR USE. The PRESENT age is one of vacillating ideas in the relation of flower lovers to buds and blossoms. This is owing largely to the craze...
-The Folk-Lore Of Plants
By T. F. Thistleton Dyer. D. Appleton & Co. Pp. 338. As a popular work upon an attractive subject, this handsome volume is well made, but as a scientific treatise upon an important branch of learning,...
-The Food Of The Sparrows
My own personal observation goes to confirm the general opinion that these birds are graminiverous, and only sparingly insectivorous, mainly during the breeding season. Like animal life generally, the...
-Food Plants And Ravages
The food of the larva consists of the roots of grasses and probably also of other low plants. Whether it also feeds on the rootlets of trees and shrubs has not been definitely ascertained, although th...
-For Only 10 Cents
We will send the MAYFLOWER, 4 months on TRIAL, and a Packet of Mixed Flower seeds con-taining 50 of the newest and rarest kinds. Sown this Spring they will give you all Summers bed of rare flowers suc...
-Forcing Lettuce Under Glass
THE SOIL for growing lettuce should be composed of three parts of rich, sandy loam and two parts well-rotted horse manure. Thoroughly mix them together by turning several times, and make as fine as po...
-Forcing Lilacs
One of the neatest as well as the the most novel pot plants we have met in our travels, we come across a few days since at the house of a friend, and it was, like many other good things, a creature of...
-Foreign Fruit Prospects
During the last few weeks the weather has been so changeable that all kinds of fruits have suffered severely. England Plums - The prospect is very bad ; not one-tenth of a crop. Pears - Blossomed we...
-Foreign Notes
The Northern Tasmanian Horticultural Society will be represented at the National Chrysanthemum Society's Centenary Festival at London in November next, by Mrs. W. J. Thromer. Foreign Notes #1 Mr. R....
-The Forests And Meadows Of Mt. Shasta
Enter this wild wood, and view the haunts of nature-----. At the northern boundary of the Sierra Nevadas, Mount Shasta, the peak of eternal snows, looks proudly down from its elevation of 14,440 fe...
-Foretastes Of Paradise. The Autumn And The Springtime - The Blissful Days In Gardens And Fields
IT WOULD seem to be one of the kindly provisions of nature that, at the very time when, if ever, she may be said to be depressing by reason of the outward semblance of death and mourning which she wea...
-The Autumn And The Springtime - The Blissful Days In Gardens And Fields. Continued
In the border, where there is partial shade, yet where no roots from the trees impoverish the soil, plant the hardy lilies from September 1 st as long as the soil can be worked, and if the day be a di...
-Formula For The Fungicide
The experience of convenient formula, a solution composed of one ounce of carbonate of copper dissolved in one quart of aqua-ammonia (strength 22 Baume), diluted with 100 quarts of water. One and one-...
-A Fraud In Trowels
A Fraud In Trowels----A Model Garden Line And Reel----Ideas On Weeders Are Precious--- A Hoe Investigation----More About Grass. OUR young people get in the way of using certain garden tools and conve...
-From New Mexico
One of the greatest needs of orchardists and gardeners in this new region, is very full and frequent quotations from markets. All such quotations regularly given for a series of years would be a guide...
-From North Carolina
After several years successful cultivation of grape vines under glass, I should think that the method of glazing vineries spoken of by Mr. Williams in the March number of The American Garden, hardly a...
-Front Lawns And Fences
The many no fence articles in The American Garden suggested to me to try the experiment of planting flower seeds and setting out plants in front of the house. We are near the outer edge of the city,...
-Fruit A Wholesome Food
In a paper recently read before the Columbus (O.) Horticultural Society, Prof. Wm. R. Lazenby said: In our climate, subject as we often are to great and extreme changes of temperature, passing abruptl...
-The Fruit Garden
Do not plant small fruit in your orchard. Have an acre and fence it from the chickens ; have long raws, and plant everything wide enough to cultivate with the sulky cultivator. Every family needs for ...
-Fruit Growers' Compact
The following compact was recently adopted by the South Haven (Michigan) Pomological Society to aid in the marketing problem : We, the undersigned fruit-growers, believing that a better system of mar...
-Fruit Growing In Canada
As your readers are no doubt fully aware, the subject of fruit-growing is taking a deep and strengthening root among us, and bids fair to overshadow other industries. Its growing importance is being f...
-Fruit In Georgia
Advices from Georgia, the peach center of the South, say that there will be about a fourth crop of peaches in the middle sections of the state and even fewer in the southern parts. The Le Conte pear i...
-Fruit In Oregon
The horticulturist's prospects are bright. All over the state the fruit crop is larger than for several years past. With one or two exceptions, the entire state is blessed with a full crop of the best...
-Fruit List And Apple-Scab
Professor Taft, for Mr. Galloway, applied essentially the same remedies as Professor Goff, with the addition of a modified eau celeste. The eau celeste gave the best results and the carbonate of coppe...
-Fruit Prospects In Arkansas
Le Conte pears are badly killed in Judsonia, in some localities the entire crop. Some of the late, shy-bearing varieties of peaches are badly damaged, but early and medium are all right yet. The Wild ...
-Fruit Testing At The South Haven Sud-Station
The Michigan station is fortunate in securing the services of the venerable T. T. Lyon as directing officer of its most important sub-station. Mr. Lyon is second to no one in this country as a judge ...
-Fruit-Weather Talk
Some Fruit-Weather Talk - Fruit Soups - Don't Keep Off The Grass - Lady Schnipticket And The Old Sheep-Pasture Grass - An Education In Grass. IN reaching after rare fruits that are not as good, and t...
-Fruits And How To Use Them
A Practical Manual for Housekeepers, containing nearly seven hundred recipes for wholesome preparations of foreign and domestic fruits. By Mrs, Hester M. Poole, New York: Fowler & Wells, 12mo. Pp. 242...
-Fruits For The South
I have some very fine and rare fruits which were sent over by ex-Gov. Hubbard, of Texas, while Minister at Japan, viz. : Three varieties of pears, all apple-shaped, better than Leconte and Kieffer, an...
-Fruits From The Department Of Agriculture
Much as I dislike and have written against the practice of scattering over the country from the Agricultural Department common garden seeds, that are to be had at any store, I must come to the defense...
-The Fruits Of China
The apples of China are dry and insipid ; the plums, quinces and apricots afford better varieties, and two pears, the White and Strawberry, are said to be equal to any western varieties. The fruit of ...
-The Fuchsia
SIAS were named in honor of Leonard Fuchs, a celebrated man botanist. There are many varieties of these lovely ers which now differ greatly from their ancestor, whose his-is very interesting. An Engli...
-Fungi And The People
EVERY plant that the farmer, gardener and fruit grower cultivates is subject to the attacks of one or more of these parasitic foes. The grape alone has more than fifty of these pests, and it is a won...
-Fungi And The State
THE most urgent need of agrticul-turists in the direction of laws is a statute in every state designed to control fungous diseases of plants. The ravages of the codlin moth, curculio, canker worm and ...
-Funkias
Beauty of leaves and flowers both considered, few-plants among the long lists of hardy perennials give, year after year, more satisfaction than the funkias, plantains or day lilies, as they are genera...
-The Garden Roses Of India
The principal garden roses cultivated in Europe and in India may be traced to western Asia and China. The old-fashioned summer roses, which were the ornaments of gardens in Europe 40 to 50 years ago, ...
-Garden Work For November
THIS MONTH closes up the season out of doors. Parsnips, horse-radish, salsify, dandelion are hardy in those situations where water does not remain on the land during the winter months. Spinach, corn s...
-The Garden Year
The rigors of winter teach us appreciation of the summer, and its rest should renew us for the activities of another garden year. Of all men in business, the cultivator has most opportunity of change ...
-Gardeners' Dictionary And Nicholson's Dictionary Of Gardening
Generic and specific names are given. Nicholson says that it is a native of 'St. Domingo (1656).' I saw it growing, trained on the wall of a building near Santa Barbara, California, during the winter ...
-Gardening For Women
Gardening is one of the things women can do, and do well. Men may have the strength, but when it comes to that, women gain it, too, by the out-door exercise; and their skill is greater, while their pa...
-Gardening In Southern Florida
SOUTHERN Florida is preeminently the land for successful and profitable gardening on the intensive plan, from the fact that every square foot of the land devoted to this industry can be kept profitabl...
-The Gardens Of The University Of California
FROM the summit of the Contra Costa range, 850 feet above the sea level, there is afforded an extensive view of the two hundred acres comprising the grounds of the University of California, situated i...
-Gardens, Books And Nature
THEY who have spent the summer in a garden, with The American Garden as guide, philosopher, and friend, have missed some of the best things that grew therein if they have gathered only the visible p...
-Gas As Fuel
Within the past fifteen years the people of this country have been given a great object lesson in the economy of fuel. The discovery of natural gas has led tens of thousands of people to consider in t...
-Gas Fuels
EVEN with the rapid spread of gas as a fuel for both heating and cooking, has come a very remarkable increase in the demand for gas. From letters received by The American Garden it is evident that gre...
-The General Management Of Cactuses
THE dwarf habit of the mamil-1arias renders them admirable subjects for window gardening. The best window is one which faces south. In such a position the plants require little attention beyond wateri...
-The Georges Bruant Rose
This is the second season that the new rose, Georges Bruant, has bloomed in our experiment grounds. It is the first known cross between a tea rose (Sombreuil) and Rosa rugosa, the first cross of any k...
-The Georges Bruant Rose. Part 2
From J. M. Jordan, President Society of American Florists: Conventions are of great benefit to any one, and especially to the horticulturist; and I would most earnestly recommend the holding of an In...
-The Georges Bruant Rose. Part 3
WHO should have the flowers if not the chil-dren ? Who can better appreciate their subtle charms ? Upon whom can they have greater influence in the moulding of mind and character ? Who so near in natu...
-Gesneras And Their Kind. Not Much Grown, But Worthy Of Trial
WHY is it that this class of plants is never mentioned in our horticultural periodicals ? Why are they not included in the catalogues of our florists? They certainly are deserving of culture, and affo...
-Get "Novelty" Seed Potatoes Ready Now
Some of the seedsmen announce new varieties of potatoes for the coming year, and offer prizes for the largest yield from one pound of seed potatoes. Those who may wish to experiment in this direction ...
-Girdling The Vine. York Last Month
The hall was transformed into a miniature orange grove, rows of orange trees bearing the luscious golden globes being flanked by mounds, boxes and baskets of oranges, lemons, limes and pomelos, inters...
-Gladiolus Propagation
Do gladioluses run out ? we are asked. No, we think not. But, says one : Mine were formerly nearly all white; now they are mostly dark, and do not produce as large flowers as formerly ; why is this...
-A Glimpse Of The Millennial Age, And A Review Of Gardening In The Golden State - The Garden Gold Mines Of The Future On The Pacific Coast
Horticulture, in its best estate, is one of the factors in the evolution of a noble and refined social order. Not without bitter knowledge of the temptations of cities and politics, the wise Lord of V...
-Gold From The Marshes Of Kalamazoo
THE STORY of Kalamazoo and its celery fields can scarcely be told in space less than a goodly sized book. Celery seems to be the crop predestined by nature for the utilization of our marsh meadows an...
-Good Gardeners
GOOD gardeners are scarce, like good cooks, because the broad country is not propagating enough of them. They will be scarce as long as we spend our best teachings too exclusively on the centers, rat...
-Good Intentions
About nineteen out of every twenty persons owning or renting a place in the country, or in some country village, start out in early spring with a bundle of good intentions, which are to be applied vig...
-A Good Old Begonia
We have beard persons remark that they did not know how people did in former times without bouvardias, winter carnations, and the many other floral beauties that help us so pleasantly to while winter ...
-A Good Planer For Soft Ground
It is eight feet long and four feet wide, made of two-inch plank, with a hard-wood cleat three inches wide and an inch thick on the bottom. The planks are nailed firmly to two pieces of timber, one en...
-Good Plants For The Window. Subjects New And Old For Winter Bloom
OR the encouragement of our women florists I would say that I have never seen a commercial florist who could grow plants better, with the same appliances, than I have seen hundreds of women grow in wi...
-Good Plants For The Window Winter Bloom. Continued
Our native Amaryllis Atamasco, which makes such a show in every moist spot here in spring, is also easily grown in pots, placing three or four in a six-inch pot. In the way of greenhouse shrubs, the ...
-A Good Transplanter
A very cheap and good transplanter for removing plants from one place to another can be made as follows : Let the tin-smith take a sheet of two-cross tin 14x20, cut in two pieces lengthwise, making ...
-A Gorgeous Display Of Chrysanthemums
We may no longer say with Bryant, The melancholy days have come, for these are the days of the chrysanthemum shows, and the chrysanthemums of the present day are as much of a specific for melancholy...
-Grading Produce
The more successful gardener and fruit-grower, as a rule, is the one who carefully grades his produce. It is sometimes claimed that produce marketed as harvested, good, bad and indifferent, will bring...
-Grafting Wax
I call it grafting wax, though its use in grafting is a small part of its proper use. It is to cover wounds of plants, that they may heal. For in curing vegetable wounds, as in curing the wounds of an...
-Grape Culture
In order to satisfy the skeptics who did not believe grapes could be grown successfully on this soil, a most unprepossessing north hill side, of what was known as 'worn out' land, was selected for a...
-Grape Diseases And Bordeaux Mixture
It is gratifying to know that competent vineyard-ists are confirming the results of professional experimenters concerning the almost wonderful efficiency of Bordeaux mixture for some of the diseases o...
-Grape Growing
A simple Treatise on the Single Pole System, or How Grapes are Cultivated in the Upper Rhine Valley. By A. N. Hofer, McGregor, Iowa. Pp. 32. This little volume comes from the pen of a grower who pract...
-Grape Instructions For Indiana
Prepare the ground by deep and thorough culture. Deep planting is less liable to result in winter-killing than shallow planting. For garden cul-ture, 4x6 feet, 4x8 feet or 6x8 feet are all good distan...
-Grape Mildew
The mildew is severely attacking the grape in the eastern part of France - Le Progres Agricole et Viticole opposes trinomial nomenclature, and therefore places a comma or the abbreviation var. between...
-Grape Notes. From The Testing Station For Middlesex County, Connecticut
RAPES had a peculiarly unfav orable year in 1889, mildew and rot making unusual ravages in our vineyards. During no year in the last decade has the season been so unpro-pitious. Among the most success...
-Grapes And Wild Cucumbers
A very common complaint last season was the premature decay or falling off of the leaves of the Niagara and other white grapes. Whether this was due to continuous wet weather or to the work of insects...
-Grapes In Southern Indiana
THE following notes upon varieties of grapes and methods of treatment were presented recently at a regular meeting to the Mitchell District Horticultural Society, in southern Indiana, by Mr. J. P. App...
-About Grass
Mrs. Tarryer Goes To The Connecticut Farmer's Meeting With Her Knitting-Work And Gets Some New-Old Matter To Tell Her Boys. RE is now a growing curiosity about grass-seeds. They do not reproduce indi...
-Grasses And Forage Plants, And Catalogue Of Plants [Of Nebraska]
By C. E. Bessey and H. J. Webber, Pp. 162. Report of the Botanist to the Nebraska State Board of Agriculture. An especial canvas of the grasses and forage plants of Nebraska has been made, and the res...
-Grasses Of The Southwest
Plates and Descriptions of the Grasses of the Desert Region of Western Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and Southern California. Part J. By George Vasey. 50 plates. Small 410. Bulletin No. 12, of the Divisi...
-Grays Manual Of The Botany Of The Northern United States
Sixth edition, revised and extended west-ward to the 100th meridian. By Sereno Watson, Harvard University, and John M. Coulter, Wabash College, assisted by Specialists in certain groups. Ivison, Blake...
-A Great Opportunity
The late Henry Shaw, a millionaire of St. Louis, left some three million dollars for the completion and maintenance of the gardens which he developed during many years. The gardens are to be known as ...
-Greenhouse Building And Heating
By L. R. Taft. Pp. 27. Illustrated. Professor Taft has made some interesting trials in making and heating forcing-houses. This bulletin describes the method of construction of two forcing-houses recen...
-Greenhouse Construction. Steam And Hot Water
MONTH. TEMPERATURE. FUEL. (Average at 6 a. m). (Average per day). Water. Steam Water. Steam. December................ 54.9 ...
-A Group Of Rhododendrons
We have none too many broad-leaved evergreen shrubs that will flourish well in our hot and dry summers, and this is the finest of them all. If it did not cost so much for the plants they would be in e...
-Growing Black Walnut On Waste Land
Owing to the great and increasing demand for black walnut for the manufacture of furniture and inside decoration of railroad cars and dwellings, it is becoming very scarce and the price is advancing r...
-Growing Winter Parsley In An Old Barrel
Relishes and garnishings that we make but little of in the profusion of summer are always welcome in winter. If our frames or glass are limited we can get parsley by utilizing old barrels or boxes. Sm...
-Hamamelis Virginira
The Witch Hazel is one of the most interesting plants in our woods. It is not of large or imposing dimensions, but in exceptional cases it attains a height of 20 feet, though being profuse in the pr...
-Handling Tomato Plants
When going home from the city market, I generally drive out an alley, and can almost always pick up a wagon load of tin cans before I get out of town ; mostly of the size in which corn and tomatoes ar...
-A Handy Cane-Cutter
The sketch shows a very handy tool for cutting out the dead canes from thorny berry bushes, etc. It is made from the point of an old cradle scythe united to a hard-wood handle about three feet long, w...
-Handy Things
My garden is near two tall electric towers which cast light within the fence. I often weed and water after tea by this brilliant light, and can work much more comfortably than in the sunlight. Another...
-Hard Names For Plants
We are all delighted at the noble stand some folks are making at the abominably hard names which so many plants receive from those pedantic old chaps, the botanists. Several of my neighbors, fond of g...
-Hardy Cactuses In The Open Ground
THE illustrations (Figs, 1, 2 and 3), drawn from nature, represent beds on a country place near Cornwall, Orange county, New York, and show an interesting ornamental device. The rocks are entirely art...
-Hardy Fruit Buds And Blossoms
Dr. Halsted's notes (May American Garden) on the condition of peach buds in New Jersey are suggestive. We also were favored with Italian-like weather up to the last days of February, when it was follo...
-Hardy Herbaceous Perennials. A Class Fast Increasing In Our Gardens
PROPER time for planting herbaceous perennials is largely consequent upon the soil and the climate. Generally speaking, the mass of vigorous-growing ones may be planted at any time after growth is ne...
-Hardy Herbaceous Perennials. Their Arrangement In Mixed Borders
It is almost impossible to suggest any plan in the arrangement of the flower garden that can be generally adopted, even on principle, much less in detail. So much depends upon the size, form and situa...
-Hatch Experiment Station Of Massachusetts
A portion of this bulletin, by S. T. Maynard, is devoted to horticultural matters. Many tests of fruits and vegetables are reported, but the results are expressed almost wholly in figures, from which ...
-Hawaiian Vegetation
THE stranger in the Hawaiian Islands finds himself in a new world - a land of eternal bloom and verdure - over which, like a benediction, rests an atmosphere of peace. With a temperature that averages...
-Hawthorne As A Entomologist
Nathaniel Hawthorne's Uncle Manning was a horticulturist, and in the spring of 1822 was much troubled by an insect which attacked his trees. Just at this time there appeared in the Palladium newspaper...
-Heat For A Greenhouse
We have a large con-servatory 80 feet long, 30 feet wide, 20 feet high, 6 feet from ground to the gutters, side ventilators, all the glass 6x8 inches, aspect northeast by southwest, with a slight slop...
-Heaven And Hell
By EMANUEL SWEDENBORG. 430 pages, paper cover. Mailed prepaid, for 14 Cents by the AMERICAN SWEDENBORG PRINTING AND PUBLISHING SOCIETY, 20 Cooper Union, New York City. BOOKS ON BUILDING, PAINTING De...
-Hellanthus Multiflorus
Seeing what Mrs. Mary M------says in the September number of The American Garden, viz., that Helianthus multiflorus needs no protection, reminds me that all climates are not alike any more than all pe...
-The Herbaceous Perennials Of Nurserymen
Noting the increasing interest in perennia for the flower garden, I think it is well to call attention to the miserably small, weak plants that the nurserymen send out under the head of perennials. I ...
-Hesters Experiment
I WILL tell you frankly at the very outset that Hester was neither very young nor very handsome. A goodly number of summers, to say nothing of winters, had passed over her head. She had reached the ag...
-Higher Education For Florists And Gardeners
Lord Ashburton said. We are fitting out man for the struggles of life ; we are fitting up a storehouse for the use of a .philosopher. Man goeth forth into the world, as a soldier goeth forth into a c...
-Hints To Berry Growers
First. Post up on the work. Study your facilities, your land, capital, nearness to market, and ability to obtain needed help. Secure the control of some good land. It costs as much to prepare and cul...
-Home-Made Cider-Vinegar
The wholesale adulteration of commercial vinegar makes it important that everyone who grows apples should manufacture a good quality of cider-vinegar for home use, and for the local market. We doubt i...
-Honey Dew
A very peculiar phenomenon has been observed in the woods in this vicinity. It is a deposit of sweet shining secretion on the leaves of certain trees and entirely absent upon others. It is supposed to...
-Horse Help In The Garden
One of the most remarkable things observed in going from one section of the country to another is the different methods in use for doing the same thing. The West can teach the East many ways of econom...
-Horticultural Advice For Oregon
As California, Oregon and a portion of Washington are the only prune producing districts on the continent, and as Oregon prunes head the list, why not set a few more prune trees ? You will probably no...
-Horticultural Appliances At The Paris Exposition
A TRANSLATION OF CH. JOLY'S RAPPORT SUR LES SERRES ET LE MATERIEL DE L'HORTICULTURE. IN 1878 the horticultural exhibits were scattered over the Champ-de-Mars, filling up such places as the industri...
-Horticultural Education
The future of the country depends upon the proper education of the children, and if this society can do anything to get the children interested in the cultivation of fruits or flowers or vegetables, i...
-Horticultural Markets. How Produce Sells. New York Markets. Closing Wholesale Prices, April 21
High quotations for common grade of apples about explain the situation. Only a few exceptionally well carried Reds and good sized Russets show firmness. California pears have done so well this season ...
-Horticultural Registration: The California Idea
At a recent meeting of the State Floral Society of California, three persons were appointed to meet three others from the State Horticultural Society, and this committee sent out invitations to about ...
-Horticulture As A Business For Women. III. Business Training - Partnerships, Women As Florists - Instances Of Success
WE HAVE tried to show how necessary business ability is in horticultural pursuits. At once the question naturally arises ; Can women form partnerships in business as do men, and make it both congenia...
-Horticulture At Cornell
The visitor to Cornell finds a great and growing general university, in which horticulture has a name and a place. The grounds of the horticultural department occupy about thirty acres of the Universi...
-Horticulture At The Ohio State Fair
Notwithstanding the fact that this year has been an unfavorable one in Ohio for fruits, there was an excellent exhibit at the state fair this year. There were nearly a thousand plates of apples, over ...
-Horticulture At The World's Fair
WE DESIRE to again call attention to the opportunity and necessity offered by the World's Columbian Exposition for a great congress of horticulture. We have repeatedly urged the importance of an Inter...
-Horticulture In Common Schools
Yes, and agriculture ? Why not? For lack of teachers. This is a formidable but perhaps not an insuperable obstacle. How many teachers in the public schools were qualified to teach temperance hygien...
-Horticulture In The Public Schools
Oh, These Women !---- Horticulture In The Public Schools - Tin-Can Flower Pots - Botanic Vs. Common Names Of Plants - Mrs. Tarryer Calls On The Wisdom Of The Granges - Washington Legislators Brought...
-Horticulture In The Public Schools. Continued
For the plants we must take stock in, we need legal denominations as exact as we have for money, and as current wherever we travel. The farmer, gardener, writer or statesman in debate who cannot give ...
-Horticulture In The Public Schools. A Little "Fairy Tale."
A pathetic story credited to the Charleston News and Courier is going the rounds about a shoemaker who willed to his brother an ornamental flower box or pot. The box was filled with shoe pegs, shoemak...
-Horticulture In Utah
The first bulletin of the new Utah Experiment Statton, (E. S. Richman, horticulturist), gives the following information concerning the horticultural plans: The Horticultural Department contains twelv...
-Hot-Air Furnaces In Greenhouses
A subscriber makes the suggestion that in the matter of heating greenhouses the common hot-air furnace may yet prove available. The objections against the hot-air furnace are two-fold. The hot-air pip...
-How Do You Increase Your Plants?
THE amateur is often perplexed as to how to propagate plants in ways that are at once simple and successful. Fig. 1 shows perhaps the simplest way of increasing plants, but it is of use only for a cer...
-How I Gardened
LIKE Mrs. Gummidge, of plaintive memory, I am a lone, lorn critter, but, unlike her, I am not a widow. Rupert is an abiding presence in my home ; but, dear heart! when the highest aspiration of of t...
-How Much Seed Should We Sow
Professor Bailey's comments on my remarks in the December number of The American Garden, page 455, somewhat surprise me. He says: Some of Mr. Harris's comments are wide of the mark and demand modific...
-How Not To Do It. Some Helpful Suggestions In Urban Ornamentation And Economics
OUR COUNTRY is young among nations, but it is old enough to have witnessed the rise and decline of towns whose stories are fruitful of useful lessons, if people would only heed them. Let us take a sin...
-How Not To Do It. Some Helpful Suggestions In Urban Ornamentation/Economics. Continued
Their commerce and allied industries destroyed, the inhabitants thought they would encourage manufactures, and, having neither money nor knowledge of such business themselves, they invited others who ...
-How Sowing Lawn Grass Don't Make Lawns
A Risky Investigation - How Sowing Lawn Grass Don't Make Lawns - How Parson Camperdown's Lawn Was Reformed - Lady Schnipticket's Opinions - The Punishment Of M. Tavish. THOUGH she is apt to be ri...
-How Sowing Lawn Grass Don't Make Lawns. Part 2
Our troubles began as soon as the bits of sod were planted. Public curiosity was roused at once. Three local newspapers kept standing head-lines and sent reporters around twice a week to see what that...
-How Sowing Lawn Grass Don't Make Lawns. Part 3
Nothing appeals to the emotions with more eloquence than the speechless flowers. Their very silence arouses within the human breast the most tender, the most ennobling sentiments. They are treasured l...
-How The Garden Paid
Last season we had three-fourths of a man and half of a horse to each acre, in the way of help. This was enough to plant, care for, harvest and market the products of the garden up to date. Our gree...
-How To Cook Cranberries. Recipes Adopted By The American Cranberry Growers' Association
1. Wash them. Wash them clean, and remove all stems and leaves. 2. Always cook in a porcelain-lined kettle or stewpan. Never cook in tin or brass. 3. The sooner they are eaten after cooking, the soo...
-How To Grow A Fuchsia
Cut the ends off the branches of a fuchsia about four or five joints in length in November or in the spring; strip the leaves off, leaving only three or four upon the end of the cutting ; fill a basin...
-How To Grow Crapes
The back-yard where I live is full of grape vines. A row on one side covers a high board fence. Three vines run rampant over the tops of some tall trees. The remainder, situated in an open space, are ...
-How To Grow Ferns Indoors
No plants are more suitable for indoor culture than ferns, and few are more popular. Those who have not had much experience in their treatment will not object to a few hints. There are two methods by...
-How To Have A Pretty Winter Window With Annuals
More than a dozen years ago I began raising flowers. I had no experience in caring for plants and supposed there was no way of getting a collection, except to buy of some florist, so I went to a neigh...
-How To Know Grasses By Their Leaves
By A. N. M'Alpine, with preface by Robert Wallace, 16mo. Pp. 92. 18 plates. Edinburgh; David Douglass. Of all plants, it would seem that grasses are the most difficult to identify by leaves alone; and...
-How To Market Strawberries
As moisture after picking causes all small fruit to decay, you should avoid as much as possible picking while the dew is on or when the plants are wet from rain. By delaying the picking a short time t...
-How To Tell Ripe Melons
In my young days I was laughed at so much for pulling green melons (for I could not decide when ripe by thumping) that I put my wits to work to decide in some other way ; and after experimenting for y...
-Hyacinths After House Culture
Take the good when you lose the best. I know some people who grow hyacinths in earth instead of water for winter flowering, and always discard them in spring as soon as flowering time is over, under t...
-Hybridization Of The Pea
An interesting illustration of hybridization is shown by Mr. Knight, an English horticultural writer, who died about 1838. The following account was published in 1810: Blossoms of a small white gard...
-Hybridizing The Wild Crab
The February number of The American Garden contains valuable suggestions in regard to the improvement of the wild crab of the northwest (Pyrus coronaria) by A. W. Sias. In the spring of 1886, at Ames,...
-Hybridizing The Wild Crab-Apple
It is a conceded point that a man who never fired a gun, knows but little about military affairs. Now, before turning your correspondent over to the tender mercy of our most noble critic, Mr. R. T. ...
-Hydrangea Otaksa. A Japanese Gem
The illustration is from a photograph of a plant of Hydrangea Otaksa growing in the Cornell University conservatories. This plant is about six years old, and at present occupies a 16-inch pot and supp...
-Ideals For Florists
THE Society of American Florists has a high ideal set before it in the address of the retiring president. The Society should be more than a trade organization. Its objects are not only to instruct it...
-Improved Plant House
After an examination of many hot-houses, and much study of methods of heating, a plant house has been designed and built which I think is a great improvement. The rafters and caps are of original desi...
-Improvement In Hoes
Noting A. B. Tarryer's forms of weed hoes (May, p. 263), I send you outlines of the blades of four hoes*I have made and used in my own work. It will be observed that all of my hoes have an important i...
-Improvement Of Roads
This question of roads requires the attention of our ablest men, as it is one of greater importance to the farmer than any question now before the public. Transportation is often a question of profit ...
-In The Flower Garden. Sports-----Things New And Old
I FRANKLY confess to a liking for new things in the floral kingdom. If it was true in Solo-mon's time that there was nothing new under the sun, it can hardly be true to-day. We read of this, that and ...
-Indoor Gardens. The Delights And Possibilities Of Window Gardens
THIS subject, a most interesting one, is by no means easily handled by the practical gardener, for many difficulties present themselves which more or less revolve about the personal equation point. Th...
-Indoor Gardens. The Delights And Possibilities Of Window Gardens. Continued
Give plenty of air, even opening the windows directly upon them when the day is bright and not too cold ; avoid drafts or any great changes in temperature. Use water in the furnace, or better still, h...
-Injuries From Snails
For some years my flowers, plants, grasses, and even trees have shown depredations by some insect or worm. After careful watching I found the depredators to be snails, a shelless kind, that forages at...
-Iowa Experiment Station
Among other matters, this bulletin contains a valuable paper by C. P. Gillette, upon Codlin Moth Experiments. Mr. Gillette controlled a small and isolated plantation of Duchess apples, upon which ca...
-Iowa Experiment Station (2)
Two discussions in this bulletin are of great importance to horticulturists. Experiments with Arsenites is contributed by C. P. Gillette, station entomologist. Mr. Fruits for the Northwest. Gille...
-The Iresines Or Achyranthes. Good Foliage Plants For All Seasons
THE several species or varieties of iresine, or, as they are occasionally called, achy-ranthes, form when taken together a very beautiful genus of stove or warm greenhouse plants, belonging to the nat...
-Irish Potato Culture
Tests are recorded of a number of varieties of potatoes. An experiment with fertilizers gave the following results: (1) Potash, in both forms [muriate and kainit], gave the smallest increase. (2) Sta...
-Is Village Life Worth Preserving ?
A WRITER IN the New York Evening Post (John Tunis) ably discusses some problems of village life, which is synonymous with country life in the minds of many people. We would not have it so; real coun...
-Japanese Floral Art
IN NO other country is the artistic use of flowers so well understood or the art practiced in such perfection as in Japan. This old art is to become a new one in America and Europe. It is old in Japan...
-Japanese Fruit
Japanese fruits are attracting considerable attention from American growers, especially on the Pacific coast. Our illustration (page 13) shows a branch of Myrica rubra, an evergreen fruit-bearing tree...
-The Japanese Oranges
It begins to look as if Japan, having sent to America the great flame-colored kaki, or oriental persimmon, a beautiful group of plums, the loquat, and many other fruits of value, was about to add, in ...
-A Japanese Success. An Orange Which May Be Hardy In Delaware
Not many years back, any orange was simply an orange, with but one main distinction of variety, given as to whether it came from Messina or from Havana. Then the Havana oranges, regardless of size, sh...
-The Japanese Walnut. (Juglans Sieboldiana, Maxim.)
THE JAPANESE walnut, which is now attracting some attention, appears to have been introduced into the United States about 25 years ago. The oldest trees are at Tower House, Shasta county, California, ...
-Jerusalem Artichoke
This is a peculiar plant, or vegetable, whichever it may be called. In some sections of the country the cry comes ; how can we exterminate it ? from another comes the query ; how can we grow it? It is...
-Jessamines
JESSAMINE may be almost any flower in existence, especially as applied by some people, if it be sweet-scented. In literature it has become almost as popular and as general a term as myrtle and iv...
-The Jessie Kerr Peach
My attention was called to this peach about six years ago in the catalogue of a prominent nursery firm at Huntsville, Ala. It was described as being a freestone, but this nursery was careful to say ...
-June Budding
The stocks should be small, not over one-half inch caliper - one-fourth or one-third is better - in free flow of sap, and possessed of leaves or small leafy branches below the insertion of the bud, so...
-Keeping Up A Succession
With a number of vegetables grown in the garden or truck patch, it is quite an item to keep up a supply during the greater part of the growing season. This can be done by making repeated plantings, or...
-Kentucky Experiment Station Potato Experiments
The tests reported in this bulletin concern methods of culture as well as merits of varieties. The trench system of planting was compared with the usual system, the trenches being made eight inches...
-Kerosene As An Insecticide
It was the second year of the Early Rose potato excitement, when we paid a dollar a pound for the seed. And it was the first appearance of the potato bug in Illinois. Determined to save the potatoes, ...
-Lady Washington Grape
We notice that Mr. Augur, in Grape Notes on (page 336, June issue) omits the Lady Washington. The behavior and merits of this variety have determined us to grow in the vineyard most emphatic success...
-Lake Mohonk And Vicinity. As Seen By A Landscape Gardener
THE PLACES in our country that are increasingly becoming known from their picturesque attractions are greater every year, and we hope soon to say greater in the number of those that are being preserve...
-Lake Mohonk And Vicinity. As Seen By A Landscape Gardener (2)
THE ARTIFICIAL features of this famous resort that most attract our attention are the sum-m er-ho uses, owing to the conspicuous po-sitions many of them occupy - not that they are ever obtrusive, alth...
-Late Cauliflower
The cauliflower prefers a deep, mellow, loamy soil, one that has not been previously occupied by any rapid growing crop, and it should be given a good dressing of thoroughly decayed stable manure, plo...
-Legend Of The Chinese Lily (Narcissus Orientalis)
There is a beautiful legend which accounts for the origin of this beautiful species, if any legend can : Once upon a time a father left his property to two sons with the understanding that it should ...
-Lemons In Sleclly
Residents in our citrus regions will be interested in the following excerpt from Fruit Trade Journal: Lemons in Sicily are divided into two classes, the true lemon and the bastard lemon. The true lemo...
-Liberty And A Living
The Record of an Attempt to secure Bread and Butter, Sunshine and Content, by Gar-dening, Fishing and Hunting. By Philip G. Hubert, Jr. G. P. Putnam's Sons., Publishers, New York. Mr. Hubert's bright ...
-Lifting Chrysanthemum Plants
The plants should be lifted carefully, disturbing the roots and ball of soil as little as possible; the pot sufficiently large to take the ball, and large according to the size of the plant; give a so...
-The Lilac
This old-fashioned shrub, which was once found in almost every front yard, is not often called for now, and I do not think it is very generally known that there are a great many new varieties which ar...
-Lilies Not Hardy
The open winter has fairly proven our oft-repeated assertion that lilies are not hardy, and that if we want them to come up to their full measure of strength and beauty, we must protect them against f...
-The Lily Of The Valley
The substance is here presented of what a lady, well versed in floral culture, says about winter culture of the lily of the valley. In large cities, during the holiday weeks, immense quantities of li...
-Liquid Manures. Some Points Which Are Often Overlooked
It is well enough to look some months ahead for the manure needed. Doubly liberal manuring lies at the bottom of big crops. The profit comes from maximum crops ; hence the importance of securing, at r...
-Lirlia Pumila Var. Dayana
The laelia family is highly valued on account of its magnificent flowers. Such species as Z. elegans, L, supertriens and others of the same type are the most common in gardens. The subject of this no...
-A Little Place In The Country
WATER AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR TIME AND FERTILIZERS - GETTING A HELPER - WHAT TO PLANT - CONVERTING OUR LABOR INTO MONEY. Sixth Paper. MAXIMUM of pleasure and profit is to be obtained from the possession...
-A Little Place In The Country (2)
FIRST DAYS OF 1890 IN THE GARDEN - STARTING THE HOT-BEDS - SOWING THE SEEDS - PROTECTION WATERING - METHODS WITH THE DIFFERENT VEGETABLES - OUT-DOOR WORK - IMPLEMENTS. Seventh Paper. ITH the beginni...
-A Little Place In The Country (3)
CARE OF LAWNS - WORK AMONG FRUITS - TRANSPLANTING - THE SPRING GARDEN - EARLY PEAS - BOOKS OF GARDENING. Eighth Paper. WH I L E the winds of March are blowing, the work of the garden can be pursued ...
-A Little Place In The Country (4)
Tenth Paper. IN FAIR MAY, in May fair, in the month of fair May, we should find the hey-day of both work and pleasure in our country home. Now we may smell to sweet flowers, taste the first fruits ...
-A Little Place In The Country. Ninth Paper. Small Fruit Culture
IN THESE papers last autumn we made some suggestions regarding the planting of small fruits. No imperative rule can be laid down as to the proportion of the area which should be devoted to such a purp...
-The Long-Spurred Thorn - (Crataegus Coccinea Var. Macracantha)
Cratagus coccinea, Linn., var. macracantha, Dudley, Cayuga Flora, 33 (1886). THE thorns are among the most varied and attractive of our native shrubs. They possess great merit because of their pictur...
-Look Over The Fence
A CENTURY ago, in 1790, there were in this country many more people living in the country than in the towns. A town is any collection of houses containing in one group 8,000 people. Now, during the ce...
-Looking Backward From A Time When Agriculture Has Become A Better Horticulture
YOU ASK me to put on my seer's cap, transport myself to the glorious future that Edward Bellamy prophesies in his now celebrated novel, Looking Backward, and paint the fields and pastures as they wi...
-Loss At The Michigan Agricultural College
The Botanical Laboratory of the Michigan Agricultural College burned on the night of March 21, the fire originating in the top story by a defective flue. This was the first building erected in this co...
-Low Prices Of Fruit
A grower's opinions. THE question of low prices of fruit discussed by C. W. Idell in the February Garden, is most important, though I differ with him on some points. He is undoubtedly right in condem...
-Low Prices Of Fruit : The Cause And Remedy
CULTIVATION of fruit in this country has attained such proportions that, if we are to believe the statements of some growers, it is no longer profitable. If this is true we should investigate the caus...
-Macomber Pears
These are all chance seedlings on my father's farm, being trees that were left unbudded in the nursery rows, except Grand Isle, which came up in the garden and has never been transplanted. This Grand ...
-Magnolia
Mr. Wiesener, of Fanterroy-aux-Roses, last year exhibited a magnolia which he obtained from a Japanese horticulturist. E. A. Carriere names it M. Wieseneri. It is of undoubted Japanese origin. The flo...
-Mains Experiment Station
The Apple Maggot and Potato-Rot. By F. L. Harvey. Pp. 8. This pest, of comparatively recent introduction into orchards, has been studied during two years, and Professor Harvey recommends the following...
-Making Herbarium Specimens
Living cactuses bear transportation well if young or medium-sized specimens are selected. The entire plant, or, if too large, a joint or cutting, is thrown in the shade for a few weeks to shrivel, aft...
-Making Hot-Beds And Cold-Frames
In making cold-frames we have the choice of two methods. The first, that of making the frame to set on the level of the ground, which is better when the frame is to be used to further the growth of pl...
-Making The Most Of The Garden
We do not refer to the ground, but to the garden - qua garden. Let us, for once, sum the various ways in which it is made useful by diverse persons. There are, first of all, those who like the gay co...
-The Mamillarias
It would be very difficult to find any plants in the whole vegetable kingdom which present such beautiful examples of symmetry as the mamillarias, and in their own family they are also unique in this ...
-Manuring Tomatoes
In reading Professor Bailey's report on tomatoes. I am glad to find a proof that manuring the land is a good practice in tomato growing. This has been my experience. We grew the Ignotum last year and ...
-Marketing Fruits
The following points in the marketing of fruits, by E. Hallister, before the Southern Illinois (Alton) Horticultural Society, are worth careful attention : If you have produced fruit of the best qual...
-The Medlar
An interesting fruit for the home garden is the medlar. It is one of the pome fruits, perhaps more closely allied to the quince than other fruits which we cultivate. It is known to botanists as Pyrus ...
-Melon Notes
The ripeness of a melon is unmis-takeable. The watermelon gives forth a dull dead sound when thumped ; the bottom is hard where the light shade is, and the fruit, when stirred, almost parts from the v...
-Methods Of Marketing - II. More About Packages----How Fruit And Vegetables Are Shipped----Good And Bad Packages
RATES are by all means the most popular packages in the New York markets and with nearby shippers. They are easily handled, and produce can be -packed in them closely and in such a manner that it will...
-Methods Of Marketing - IV. A Grower's Great Success----His Proper Methods----Recapitulation
JOHN DOE, of Blanktown, New Jersey, was left heir to a farm of fifty odd acres of as worn out land as could well be found in the state. Since the days of the revolution, this farm had kept the Does in...
-Methods Of Marketing. - III. Good Packing - Proper Grading Of Produce - Transportation - Early Marketing In New York
GREAT as is the difficulty in having standard packages, the size, shape and capacity of each to be governed by a United States law, as was suggested in our last paper, we note a disposition among the ...
-Methods Of Produce Transportation
The route of shipment must of course be largely determined by the shipper, though when it is possible to choose between several routes he is able to get rates which are moderate. We are of the...
-A Mew Celery Pest
The tarnished plant bug must be added to the list of insect enemies of celery. A recent letter from an extensive gardener and fruitgrower in Kansas informs me that unless he can find some effective re...
-Mexican Tree Bean
In the list of new vegetables for the year we notice this bean, but cannot vouch for its goodness as a vegetable, but must say the plant is worth growing for the beauty of its pods, which are more tha...
-Mill Creek Pomological Society
President H. T. Bigott read a paper upon Theory and Practice, in which he said that so many of the ideas of professors and experimenters were mere theories, that they were of no use to practical men...
-Minnesota Experiment Station
This bulletin is concerned with subjects which belong to the field rather than to the garden, but we cannot refrain from speaking of some interesting notes upon cross-fertilization and variation of ma...
-Minnesota Experiment Station. S. B. Green
This bulletin deals with a variety of topics. Mr. Green conducted, during two years, an experiment to determine the relative values of plowed and unplowed land for onions. An old onion patch was selec...
-Miscellaneous
Nothing sits so gracefully upon children as habitual respect and dutiful deportment towards their parents. One of the hardest tasks ever set a man is to forget the good deeds he has done and to chide...
-The Mission Of Flowers
IT SEEMS strange at first thought that young children and women and old people should care more for flowers than do boys and middle-aged men, yet it is not strange. The spirit of flowers belongs to th...
-Missouri Experiment Station
Analyses of Apples at Various Stages of Growth. Bordeaux Mixture for Grape Rot. Comparative Tests of SmallFruits and Potatoes. By John W. Clark. Pp. 16. Professor Clark caused chemical analyses of Ben...
-Model Peach Orchards
Those orchards may be good models for the Michigan climate, but I would like to show Prof. Bailey some on the Eastern Shore, that show different handling. These remind me of a visit I paid many yea...
-A Model Workshop And Some Useful Articles
NEW cultivators appear to realize the value of a convenient work shop close at hand, in which to do the many little jobs of mechanical work so often needed. There are always articles getting out of re...
-Money In The Garden For Boy And Girl Workers
ARRANGING SEED BEDS----PROPER SOILS----SOWING THE SEED - VARIETIES. Third Paper. DEPENDENCEupon one'sself is a strong essential of work in the garden. We may read volume upon volume of horticultural...
-More About June Budding
Although the practice of budding young seedlings of the peach and some other fruits in the early part of the first summer has been carried on for more than fifteen years, it is yet comparatively a new...
-A Mountain Tramp - I
IF THESE papers are not so entirely horticultural as the readers of The American Garden have been accustomed to look for in their favorite magazine, the writer begs to say in explanation that he found...
-A Mountain Tramp - I. Continued
The Christmas season is near, much as this weather belies it. The green leaves and red berries of the holly gleam from the hillside, while the gaunt arms of the sycamore and the black-gum are festoone...
-A Mountain Tramp - II
IT WAS morning on the mountain. Oh ! You who live in town, do you know what morning means ? When the night rolls away and reveals the world, have you ever beheld the scene new-set, new-set albeit the ...
-A Mountain Tramp - II. Continued
I am sorry to say that their morality is not always on a par with their religion. In some little matters such as temperance in drink, personal chastity, respect for the revenue laws, and for the comma...
-Mulching Of Strawberries
Mulching is necessary to successful and profitable strawberry growing, and I think that its advantages are not as yet fully understood. Though contrary to general practice, I would say mulch as soon a...
-Mulching Vines
In a dry season especially, I have several times found it an advantage to mulch tomato, squash, cucumber and melon vines, and one of the best if not the best material to use for this purpose is partia...
-Mushrooms
America is said to be the most wasteful of all civilized nations as regards food; especially is this true of those fruits of the earth which come to us without toil or expense. It would be a work of r...
-My Fernery
My fernery is not a fernery at all. It is only the successful result of a long series of unsuccessful attempts to possess a cluster of the most fairy-like and pleasing of all our native wild plants. ...
-My Window Garden
A NUMBER of years ago I had a very strong desire to make an attempt at window gardening, but was compelled, like many another, to content myself with a common window. There were two windows in the roo...
-Native Florida Cactuses
THE NATIVE and naturalized species of cactuses growing on Florida soil are nine in number - five species of opuntia, four of cereus ; no other genera are represented It is quite possible that the aver...
-Native Flowers In The South
We have many native plants here, out of which I believe an enterprising florist could make money, by shipping them north. In one of your recent issues I see the sacred lotus of India advertised. This ...
-Native Plants In Cultivation
The North American wild flowers, as a rule, are looking well under cultivation in our grounds this season. The trilliums, especially T. grandiflorum, T, sessile, T. nivale, T. erectum and T. erectum v...
-Native Plums
The Wild Goose is yet perhaps the most profitable of our native plums. Marianna is in no respect superior, and in my opinion, not as valuable; but it may be a valuable stock for better varieties, as i...
-Natures Children In The Greenhouse
Scattered over the pine barrens of New Jersey, in the swamps and even in the white sand, which one would hardly suppose to be capable of sustaining vegetable life in any form, we find some exquisite f...
-A Needed Experiment. A Novel Idea
OUR experiment stations are now under way and we expect them to aid the farmer. There are many things which they might experiment upon, so many, in truth, that the common and practical subjects are li...
-A Neglected Fruit. Worthy Of Trial In The Central And Southern States
The edible-fruited mountain ash, Sorbus domestica, is a beautiful tree, and in France is much admired, says Le Jardin, from which we translate. For our central and southern states it would seem equall...
-Neglected Native Plants
REVIVAL of interest in the wild garden has brought into deserved notice and appreciation many of our native plants, but there are some others, native in the southern states, for which I would like to ...
-Neighborhood Civilities
I had a nicotiana that would not bloom, spite of all the coaxing and manure I lavished upon it. My neighbor had a solanum that, after two years anxious watching, never showed a bud, Let's change, sa...
-Nematode Root-Galls
This is the first number of a series of Science Contributions from the Alabama Station, and it is the most studious and best effort yet made in this country upon the root-knots. The paper is mostly...
-The New American Mulberry
THE New American is one of the very best of the mulberries for cultivation in the north. It is hardy, vigorous and productive, and the fruit is large and of pleasant quality. The fruit is black at ful...
-The New Red Raspberry, Gladstone
The Gladstone raspberry originated with the veteran and well-known horticulturist Charles Carpenter of Kelleys Island, Ohio. He sent us plants to test four years ago. They were given no particular cul...
-The New Tea-Polyantha Rose, "Clothllde Sou-Pert"
I have seen but few roses that commend themselves so highly, or which I would so gladly introduce to all who dwell with the rose, as the subject of this notice-Having frequently read its praises in ho...
-Nicotians Coloaaea
The Nuotiana colossea must be placed in the first rank of the foliage plants exhibited at the Paris Exhibition in 1889. The history of this plant is curious enough. Several years ago I sold some fine ...
-Night Gardens
GARDEN by day discloses only a portion of its beauties, and many people living near gardens are oblivious of the charms of their most familiar surroundings. Plants, like city people, sleep and wake at...
-The Night-Blooming Cereus
The night-flowering cereus (Cereus grandiflorus) has gained a fame, which entitles it to prominent notice, and plants might well be included in every garden, for its flowering is a source of interest ...
-Nitrogenous Fertilizers
IN THE series of articles entitled Fertilizers for the Garden, by Joseph Harris, No. XII, in the May American Garden, criticises the Rural New- Yorker, which, for several years part, has deplored th...
-Nomenclature And Reform
REFORM in nomenclature of varieties makes little progress. The blame for the trifling results is commonly laid at the door of committees or men having the matter in charge, but it is oftener chargeabl...
-Nomenclature Of Vegetables
The Association of American Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations, at its Knoxville meeting in January, 1889, appointed a committee to devise methods for co-operative work in horticulture, and...
-North Carolina Notes
Mr. Little (May, p. 286), must use very small offsets in growing his tuberoses, and live very far north, if they will not make blooming bulbs the first season. Here the trouble is that the large offse...
-Note And Comment. Those Back-Yards
We have them in the country too, friend Stans-bury, and what shall we do with them ? We may possibly, by persistent effort, get rid of the old wagon-wheels, plow-points, barrels and such things, but h...
-Notes By The Way
When a person describes a signal success in raising a particular vegetable, fruit, or flower, or a collection of them, as of roses and lilies together, would it not be well to describe the soil and mo...
-Notes From A Pacific Peach Orchard
THE WAYS of fruit trees seem past finding out. Last year, on this farm, the Peen-to or Flat Chinese peaches were ripe first; this year all the early tribe of white-flesh peaches, such as Briggs' May...
-Notes From A Woman's Garden. November
DURING some of the warm, pleasant days that always come in November we should put our garden in perfect winter order ; for our garden even in the coldest days is a well-beloved spot. It is here, when ...
-Notes From Minnesota
Put your moonflower vines in the sunniest place you have and give them very rich soil if you want them to get ready to bloom before frost comes. I saw this in some floral magazine - Plant the moonfl...
-Notes Of Gourds
GOURD, or a melon, botanically speaking, is not always something good to eat, or in some other way useful. The Latin word cucurbita, or gourd, gives the name to an extensive family of vine-like plants...
-Notes On Agricultural Education
Last year England gave 5,000, and again this year, to assist education and research, and this looks very trifling besides ,what other countries are doing. France in her budget for 1888-9 voted 163,6...
-Notes On Conifers For Kansas Planters
Professor Popenoe prefers, as a rule, to move evergreens, as indeed we do all trees, in the spring, just before the buds open and the shoots push. At this period the conditions are most favorable, be...
-Notes On Egg-Plants
April is early enough in all the northern states for the starting of egg-plants. In fact, better results usually come from late than from early starting. I made several ineffectual attempts at eggplan...
-Notes On Phyllocactuses
There are a number of good garden phyllocactuses, mostly artificial varieties, aside from those described by Professor Bailey in the August issue, p. 448 : albus superbus, white and fragrant ; alexand...
-Notes On Shrubs In Orange County, New York
The past winter and spring, so exceptional in their climatic conditions, were most unfavorable for cultivated shrubbery. After a winter so unprecedently mild that the ground was unfrozen throughout, a...
-Notes On South Carolina Hedges
THE finest cedar hedge I have ever seen (in this country or in Europe) is on one of the old plantations. It is not ante bellum, though, having been planted about twenty years ago. The soil in which it...
-Notes On The Leaves of Liriodendron
By Theodor Holm. Pp.22. Plates IX. Reprint from the Proceedings of the U. S. National Museum. Dr. Holm was attracted to the variation of leaves in the common tulip-tree by a study of the leaves of sma...
-A Novel Entertainment
A very pretty entertainment was recently given by the Band of Hope connected with an English Sunday school. The principal feature of the programme was the rendering of a piece called The Flower Queen...
-Novel Grass Book
This is the neatest hand-book of its kind which has yet come to our table. The mechanical execution of the little book is elegant. The book is an enlargement of a chapter which appeared a few years si...
-A Novel Greenhouse
I have just completed a greenhouse unlike anything I have ever seen and I submit a drawing of a cross-section. The side walls are built of brick, 4 feet high. The ends are solid brick clear to the roo...
-Nursery Stock Vs. Wild Plants
Many of the native plants offered by dealers do not appear to be grown in the nursery. In some cases the demand is so limited that it does not pay grow them, especially when they grow wild near at han...
-Nurserymen's Association. (Continued From Last Month)
George W. Campbell speaking of grapes strongly favored the Woodruff Red. He thought it the best red grape yet introduced for general planting, although the quality is not high. Success in grape cultu...
-Obituary
Ex-President Jules Monges, of the horticultural society of Bouches-du-Rhone, died March 3rd, aged 64 years. Pesident M. F. Senelar, of the horticultural society of Bouches-du-Rhone, died on the 17th ...
-Odds And Ends
What will grow and look nicely in my window this winter ? is a question often asked in early fall. A quiet search in the garden beds, even if there has been a light frost, often brings treasures to ...
-Ohio Experiment Station
Like all Ohio bulletins, this one is suggestive and important. Mr. Green is one of the best testers of varieties in the experiment stations of the country. In this bulletin he has given the results of...
-Ohio Experiment Station. Continued
There is frequently a difference in growth of 25 per cent. in favor of plants from Puget Sound seed at the time of vegetation. This difference continues to be manifest for a considerable period, but d...
-The Old Apple Orchards
They are of no use, according to the verdict usually rendered as the axe is laid at the roots of the old time-honored trees. But is this really so? Why not help them to new life, new blood and a ren...
-Old Garden Lore
IN Gerarde's quaint old Herbal, published in 1597, we find some amusing descriptions of our well-known plants, together with a table of virtues, that are, to say the least, interesting reading. As a...
-The Old Man Cactus
The old man cactus is one of the curiosities of plant life. Cereus or Piloeereus senilis, derives both its botanical and popular names from the large number of long silvery white hairs which cover t...
-Old Plant Lore
In pre-Linnsean botany plants were valued chiefly for their medical properties, and little attention was given to those that had no virtues, other than form and beauty. In the description of plants,...
-An Old-Fashioned Countryside
IT IS now early in May as I write, and the weather is more like the usual California March than in any season I remember. June time will be the one perfect spring-tide, so late and long were the win...
-The Old-Fashioned Gardens
SHALL we keep the old-fashioned gardens where all the good and simple flowers which we loved in childhood grew in unstinted profusion? Or shall we lead against them a crusade of modern gardening and e...
-The Olive In California
THE OLIVE industry promises to be one of the most prosperous branches of horticulture in California. The southern counties were at first thought to be peculiarly adapted to the olive, as to the orange...
-Onion Notes. The Ways In Which Onions Are Propagated And Grown
The soil best adapted to onions is a heavy, sandy loam, but a light clay loam will answer if it is well worked and does not pack or bake. Reclaimed swamp land is excellent if it is perfectly dry, thor...
-Onion Notes. The Ways In Which Onions Are Propagated And Grown. Part 2
THE farmer's institute movement has been the strongest lever ever applied to the elevation of farming. It has spread slowly, but it has never lost an inch that it has once gained. The long period of t...
-Onion Notes. The Ways In Which Onions Are Propagated And Grown. Part 3
In England crops have increased two-fold, in Germany three-fold during the century, while in the United States there has been a continual decrease in yield per acre year by year. The time will come wh...
-Opuntia Fruit As Food. A Novel And Attractive Kind Of Pomology
WHEN we reflect that the tomato, now one of the most common vegetables, was cultivated only as an ornamental plant within the memories of many people now living, and that the now universal potato was ...
-The Orchid Water Lily
Would not our florist friends who wish to introduce rare and beautiful plants to public notice find it just as profitable to tell people just what the plants are which they offer, instead of manufactu...
-Oregon Horticulture
QUIETLY nestling in an alcove of the i Blue mountains lies a beautiful little valley - the Grande Ronde - sheltered from the cold and icy winds of the north, the dry and withering winds of the southwe...
-The Oriental Plums And The Goumi
Out of the 17 varieties of Oriental plums, I fruited 10 varieties last season. I find them much better adapted to the south than any plums which have come under my notice; most of them are curculio-pr...
-The Origin Of Some Vegetable Forms
THE HISTORY of most garden vegetables is obscure. In the oldest writings nearly every vegetable form is noted, and so far as we can learn they were as successfully grown as at the present day. Asparag...
-The Origination Of Varieties. Astonishing Results, Beating Nature With Lightning Speed !
MUCH is said about the getting-up of new varieties of fruits, vegetables, flowers and plants, and it is a grand thing. There is great satisfaction and profit in living in this wonderful age when so ma...
-Our Back Yard - II. The "Secondly" Of A Little Lay Sermon
WHEN we first took possession of what is now our garden it did not merit that name except from its great possibilities, for it then had no existence other than so many square feet of real estate, valu...
-Our Back Yard. A Small Lay Sermon
WE HAVE societies for the furtheranceof many ends which we consider desirable, and we have societies for the prevention of most things we consider undesirable. In fact, it seems impossible in this age...
-Our Importations Of Scions And Plants
During 1877 the writer was in correspondence with Dr. Edward Regel, of St. Petersburg, and Prof. R. Shroeder, of the Agricultural College near Moscow, in regard to the fruits of the steppes east to th...
-Out-Door Botany. A Suggestion From Experience
The foolish man, says Emerson, wonders at the unusual, the wise man at the usual; while Lowell more wittily words the same truth: We think lightly of nature's penny shows, and estimate what we se...
-Out-Door Culture Of Carnations
The carnation, so greatly admired by all when cultivated in the greenhouse, may also be successfully grown out of doors during the summer. The best way to grow these plants is to obtain small thrifty ...
-Out-Door Roses
I have prepared with great care a bed for 60 tea roses to be planted out next spring, and am anxious to get the best dozen varieties for out-of-door culture. So far I am inclined to make the list as f...
-The Outlook For Apples In Michigan
Again will Michigan apples command the high prices of last year, and probably even greater; for our state has the best crop of winter fruit there is anywhere in the Union, albeit the same is not more ...
-The Outlook For Apples In Michigan. Continued
James Dean, New York, discussed the Easter trade. Lilium Harrisii, azalea, hydrangeas (especially H. Otaksa) cytisus (C. Canariensis and C. race-mosus), hyacinths, tulips, narcissus and lily of the va...
-The Outlook For Economic Entomology
THE PAST twenty years have been very fertile with practical results in the warfare against insects. Not only does this period include a remarkable advance in our knowledge of the life-histories of pes...
-The Outlook For Economic Entomology. Part 2
The habits of the larvae having been to a large extent ascertained, it became evident that the removal of the fences across streams, and of stationary logs and snags would, in a large measure, preve...
-The Outlook For Economic Entomology. Part 3
In a like way, the combination of a fungicide and an insecticide for the simultaneous treatment of insects and fungous diseases affecting the same crop, is beginning to be practiced and offers a field...
-The Overshadowing Of Our Homes
THE DANGERS OF CLOSE PLANTING ABOUT LIVING PLACES - FEARS OF ARBOR-DAY PLANTINGS - THE TESTIMONY OF A PHYSICIAN. NO ONE raises a word against our Arbor Days, and few protest against dense shade abou...
-The Ozark Region
The southeastern slope of the Ozark mountains, some four hundred miles in length, is the finest fruit region I ever saw, and even the flat Pea Ridge is very good. The Ozark mountains have a trend fr...
-Pachysandra Procumbens
There is no familiar or common name for this interesting plant. The generic name is from the Greek, meaning thick stamen. The plant belongs to the spurgeworts (Euphorbiacae), where also the better k...
-Pachysandra Procumbens. Flowers Natural Size ; Leaves Natural Size, Damping-Off. Some Good Opinions And Practice Concerning The Malady
DAMPING-OFF is a common and often serious injury to young plants under glass, either in houses or hot-beds. It appears to be a variable difficulty, and there are many opinions concerning it. In fact, ...
-Pachysandra Procumbens. Damping-Off. Opinions And Practice Concerning The Malady. Part 2
But the elements taught us that we did not know what we were about, for, on one occasion, the day after the seed was sown, there was a heavy thunderstorm, and where the water leaked through onto the b...
-Pachysandra Procumbens. Damping-Off. Opinions And Practice. Part 3
From Professor A. B. Seymour, Harvard University In his Enumeration of the Peronosporeae of the United States, Professor Farlow says: In this country the species of pythium have not been sufficien...
-A Page Of Personals
We regret to announce the death, in November last, of James Cassidy, professor of botany and horticulture in the Colorado Agricultural College, and formerly florist to the Michigan Agricultural Colleg...
-Pancratium Or Hymenocallis. Notes From Two Admirers
THE pancratium lily is one of the most useful of all the lily family for an amateur to grow. It is of the easiest culture ; is not at all particular about having the choicest place in the room or gree...
-Pansiesand Mignonette
For autumn flowers, sow pansy seed in any partially shaded spot - it will be better if in some low damp soil - and transplant about the first of September. Pansies make a far more pleasing second crop...
-Passifloras
Two new kinds, both of hybrid origin, have lately been added to this genus. Fortunately both are capable of being grown to perfection in the greenhouse. P. Kewensis was obtained by crossing P. kerrne-...
-The Past And The Future In The World Of Fungi
THERE are comparatively few people who are aware that we have constantly around and about us a host of al-most invisible plants that play as important a part in the economy of nature as the grasses of...
-The Past And The Future In The World Of Fungi. Continued
Since the organization of the Hatch Experiment Stations, the work has received a new impetus, there being economic mycologists connected with a number of these, all of which are doing valuable work. ...
-Patrick Barry
Early on the morning of June 23, Patrick Barry, the great horticulturist, passed peacefully away at his home, in the presence of his entire family. It is impossible to do full justice to the life and...
-Pawpaw (Asimina Triloba)(Fig. 1.)
This fruit, though not extensively used in the wild state, is usually included among those worthy of efforts toward improvement. Dr. Asa Gray regarded it as promising great capabilities, and believed ...
-The Peach And Apricot Orchards Of California
By the latest and best estimates there are now growing in California orchards at least 10,000,000 (ten million) peach and apricot trees, two-thirds of which are peaches, and two-thirds of both species...
-Peach Buds And Their Untimely "Taking-Off."
BEFORE the winter just closed was more than half through, it became evident that the season was to be a most exceptional one, and the peach as a sensitive fruit tree was selected as a subject for micr...
-Peach Culture In Minnesota
It may be of interest to many of your readers to learn how my peach orchard came through the last winter - the fourth winter under cover. Small one year old trees when set are now very large of their ...
-Peach Culture. With Particular Reference To Michigan Practices
Clean cultivation, abundant fertilizing, thinning of fruit, warfare against insects and yellows, honest and tasteful marketing - these are the prime essentials to successful peach culture. These mean ...
-Peach Disease
A new peach tree enemy has appeared upon the Michigan lake shore in the shape of a fungus which attacks the young shoots, causing the trees to drop their leaves and the shoots to become discolored. Pr...
-Peach Growing In Florida
By fames DePass, and Entomologist's Report, by James C. Neal. Pp. 16. The article upon peach growing is not the result of experiment station work, but is given in lieu of other matter, as the teaching...
-Peach Growing In The Cold North
The peach and apricot must be protected here in northern Vermont. No method of protection that I have ever known is practicable, and at the same time cheap and easy to manage, except the one I shall h...
-Peach Yellows
The interest taken in Dr. . F. Smith's bulletin on peach yellows, issued from the Department of Agriculture, may be measured by the fact that second-hand book dealers are selling it for $1.50, the or...
-Peach Yellows In Michigan. The Disease, The Law And The Result
THIS most fatal scourge of the Michigan fruit grower first made its appearance in the peach belt on the east shore of Lake Michigan about twenty years ago. It began in the southern portion of Berrie...
-Pear - The Worden
Schuyler Worden, of Oswego. New York, the originator pear ox unusual promise, our. Worden writes : It is a seedling from the Seckel. The tree has fruited five years ; is an upright grower ; bears it...
-The Pear And Cherry Slug
By F. H. Hillman. Pp. 4. Illustrated. Mr. Hillman finds that the cherry slug (Selandria cerasi) is coming to be very destructive in Western Nevada. He recommends a spray of London purple or Paris gree...
-Pear Stocks, And Some Parasitic Fungi Of Texas
By T. L. Brunk and H. S. Jennings. Pp. 29. Illustrated. Professor Brunk has undertaken an investigation to show what influence the stock may have upon certain varieties of pears. He has undertaken to ...
-Pears For Profit. Notes From A Successful Hudson River Grower Before The Oswego Horticultural Institute
THE PEAR is still essentially a luxury, and all luxuries are profitable to grow when one knows how to handle them. Pear culture, in common with all fruit culture, is increasing, yet the conditions for...
-Peat Moss As A Manure Absorber
Many suburban residents who keep one or more horses, find themselves possessed of at least a greater bulk of manure, than they can well turn under or use in their gardening operations. Straw, which is...
-Pennsylvania Experiment Station
Professor Butz asks, Should farmers raise their own vegetable seeds ? and answers the question in the negative. The question in its scientific aspect presents itself in the following form : Are s...
-Pensacola In August
One of the most delightful and unique places in Florida, or the south, is the city of Pensacola. Even Tallahassee and St. Augustine cannot excel it in the beauty of its gardens and streets. The fences...
-A Pernicious Weed In Manitoba
I send you a specimen of a dreadful weed, which we think was introduced in seed grain a few years ago. There seems to be no way of getting rid of it. It is called here stink weed, I suppose from its...
-Persimmon {Diospyros Virginiana)
Those who know the persimmon only as it is seen in abandoned fields and along roadsides at the south, can form but little idea of the capabilities of this tree for improvement. The development of the ...
-Peter Henderson
Peter Henderson, so widely known as a seedsman, gardener and florist, died at his home on Arlington Avenue, Jersey City, on Friday, January 17th, ultimo. Although he had been suffering from an attack ...
-The Phylloxera
The phylloxera has invaded the Department of the Marne, whence comes all the French champagne. The phylloxera has appeared on the Rhine, and the vineyards of Mayence, Buberich and other places are at...
-Pinus Lambertiana
Although in the California Sierras this noble tree attains a height of between 200 and 300 feet, and a diameter of trunk of 10 to 20 feet, here in the the east it betrays no sign of the vast proportio...
-Pitch-Pine Baskets For Orchids. Notes Translated From "Le Jardin."
THE USE of baskets of pitch-pine is constantly growing more common among our cultivators. These baskets have long taken the place of pots for very many of the orchids, which, being by nature epiphytes...
-Plant Diseases, Injurious Insects And Remedies
Several investigators have recently issued reports upon comparatively well known diseases and insects, with the most approved remedies for them. These reports are invaluable to anyone who grows a plan...
-The Plant Houses At Kew. A Prospective View Of New York's Future Botanic Gardens (?)
THE ROYAL GARDENS at Kew stand foremost in the world as a horticultural establishment. There is scarcely a corner of the globe where its fame has not reached, as proved by the many donations of plants...
-Plant Humor
There are awe-inspiring plants like the night-blooming cereus and the Easter lily, and there are also cheerful, mirth-provoking plants. Look at the hanging-basket of pink and white oxalis. They are th...
-Plant Patents
This is an amusing world. What would men do without the Agricultural Department to find fault with ? and yet they are always calling out for it to assist in some of their pet schemes. They denounce th...
-Plums, Prunus Americana, P. Anguslifolia (P. Chicasa)
Many varieties of these two native species are already in cultivation, and are proving better adapted to large portions of the country than the well-known varieties of Prunus domestica. For the southe...
-Pollinating Kit (Figs. 3 And 4)
So many little articles are needed in the pollinating of plants that I have found a kit for holding them indispensable. My first outfit was a half-bushel apple basket, which was soon displaced by an o...
-The Pomelo, Shaddock Or Grape-Fruit. Citrus Aurantium,, Var. Decumana And Pomelana
THE SHADDOCK has been distributed over a very wide range of country. Seeman says that it is extremely common about the Fiji Isles, covering the banks of the rivers. De Candolle says In China the sp...
-Pomological Illustrations
IT IS, perhaps, evident to nearly all those who peruse the horticultural reports, magazines and newspapers of the day, that the pictures of fruits found in them are far from representing them as they ...
-Potato Scab
In Zeitsih des Landwirthsch, Central Vereins der Provins Sachsen, January, 1889, Dr. J. Kuhn discusses the prevalent ideas respecting potato scab. The theories that the presence of a large amount of i...
-Potatoes From North And South
CAREFUL reading of the article by L. H. Bailey in the November Garden fails to convince me that the influence of latitude upon potatoes'* has so much to do with the yield as he claims. One experiment...
-Potatoes In The South
VALUABLE DETAILS OF THE CULTURE OF EARLY POTATOES----SECOND CROP SEED. BOUT Memphis, the potatoes planted are Early Rose, Peerless, Early Ohio and Triumph. After several years trial, however, we fi...
-Pototo Synonyms
D. B. Harrington, the potato specialist, now of Delavan, Wisconsin, gives us the following synonyms in varieties of potatoes: I have brought Early Rose under the following distinct names - Early Rose...
-Practical Entomology
Pp. 24. Professor Lake's experiments upon spraying apples and pears with London purple for the codlin moth, give some interesting results. Four sprayings were given, the last one being August 12. The ...
-Prairie Soil And Moisture
It is known that the black soil of the prairies is very rich in humus or nitrogen, strong in potash, and with a sufficiency of the phosphates for all common crops, and beside these qualifications it i...
-Preservative Fluids For Fresh Fruits
The Sulphuring of Dried Fruits. By E. W. Hilgard. Professor Hilgard discusses the requisites of the ideal material for preserving fruits for fairs and museums. Such preservatives must prevent fermenta...
-Prevention Of Apple-Scab
Professor Goff, working under direction of B. F. Galloway of the Department of Agriculture, has had phenomenal scccess in the treatment of the apple-scab. The Fameuse, which scabs badly in the west, w...
-Preventive Measures Against Smut
Dr. Julius Kuhn in Mitteilungen des Landwirthschaftlichen Instituts de Universitat Halle for March, 1889, advises the following treatment of grain seed as a preventive of smut: The seed is first soake...
-Profit In Northern Strawberries. The Testimony Of One Who Makes It
There is great difference of opinion as to the best mode of cultivation of the strawberry, probably owing to diversity of soil and locality. The following method, according to my experience, is to be ...
-Promising Wild Fruits - I. The Outlook
GREAT as has been the progress of pomology in this country within the past fifty years, the people of the United States are still scantily supplied with fruits. The European species, which have been o...
-Propagating Dracaenas And Nepenthes
Dracaenas require strong heat and abundance of moisture. Various methods are in use in propagating them. Old plants frequently become too tall to be entirely satisfactory, as their habit of growth pro...
-Propagation And Culture Of Coleus
DID I simply intend to give instructions regarding the particular manner in which cuttings of coleus should be made, and how treated subsequently, so as to insure their rooting, I would merely say, ta...
-The Propagation Of Cactuses
A phyllocactus should bloom when two or three years old ; many of them bloom the first year from cutting, depending on the care which the plant has had. In order to induce blooming, the plants must no...
-The Proper Use Of Evergreens. Archeology Of Horticulture----A Modern Renaissance
IN CONSIDERING the value of evergreens for general planting, it is the wise generation that profits by the experience of the past. I would call attention to certain matters which in past years attaine...
-Protecting Blackberries
Where you can't grow peaches, winter protection is necessary, even with the hardy varieties. They may pass a winter unharmed at 2o below zero, but when you freeze a plant sixty nights and thaw it...
-Protecting The Forests
During the eighth annual meeting of the American Forestry Congress (now The American Forestry Association, a most decided improvement) held in Philadelphia last October, resolutions were adopted by wh...
-Protection From Mice, Borers And Birds
I frequently cut across lots in going to the corners, and thus pass through a neighbor's young orchard, where he has put wire netting around the base of his trees to keep the mice away, and it occ...
-Protection To Plantsmen
THE most important discussion now before the horticulturists of the country is the agitation looking toward the protection of originators or owners of new varieties of plants. This agitation is by no ...
-Protection To Plantsmen. Continued
LUGUBRIOUS, our neighbor across the way, to whom we read this last burst of emotion, shrugged his shoulders and said : That's all very well for you fine chaps, but by the time you peg away all day I ...
-Protection To The Originator Of Varieties
CONTROL of new varieties by the originator has been a prolific source of discussion for a few years. Inventors are protected by patents and authors by copyrights ; should not originators of varieties ...
-A Protest Against The "Novelties."
ALTHOUGH I have been many years in my present business, and have had much experience in selecting seeds, yet there is no part of my entire year's work that I attend to with such a dislike, as the sele...
-Pruning Evergreens
It is commonly thought that evergreen trees cannot be safely pruned to any great extent. Perhaps it is just as well that this idea so generally prevails, as it serves to rescue the beautiful natural f...
-Pruning Fruit Trees
PROFESSOR BAILEY'S article on peach cul-Picture, with particular reference to Michigan practices (March American Garden), is a practical one, and is good enough, with some modifications, for all this ...
-The Purple Beech
0UR illustration, page 591, shows a good specimen of the purple or copper beech growing upon the grounds of F. W. Bruggerhof (of the firm of J. M. Thorburn & Co.), at Stamford, Ct. The purple beech is...
-Puzzle Posies
Puzzle Posies Address all correspondence relating to this department to James H. Green, Danville. Va. NO. II. Whate'er I plant, like corn on barren earth, By an equivocal birth Seeds and runs up t...
-Quality And Quantity. An Amateur's Experience With Fruits, And A Query Of The Future
FRUITS have always been my first love. As a boy, I drew mental pictures of t h e orchards and small fruits and arbors I should have when old enough to shift for myself. Everything should be neat and a...
-Questions By An Amateur
ANSWERED BY AN OLD HAND AT THE PLAY WORK - PLANTS FOR AN EXPOSED POSITION - HARDY FLOWERING AND HERBACEOUS PLANTS - OVER-SHADED CHRYSANTHEMUMS - CHOICE LILIES. I am a subscriber to and constant r...
-A Race Of Flowerless Plants - I. Fungi - What They Are And How They Live
It is difficult to make a definition that will include all fungi and exclude all other organisms, because of certain exceptional cases. But it may be truly said that a fungus contains no leaf-green, a...
-A Race Of Flowerless Plants - II. The Metamorphoses Of Fungi - How Different Forms Change Into Each Other
METAMORPHOSIS, or entire change of form, is a familiar phenomenon in insects. The caterpillar becomes a chrysalis, the chrysalis a moth. In some birds, the plumage of the adult is very different from ...
-The Metamorphoses Of Fungi - How Different Forms Change Into Each Other. Continued
The black rot of the grape (Figs. 12-15) does not ap-pear to be quite so intricate as the black knot. Two of its forms are especially important. (1) the sack spores, shown in a cavity, somewhat magnif...
-A Race Of Flowerless Plants - III
YEAST AND BACTERIA - PUTREFACTION AND FERMENTATION----PEAR BLIGHT. IN THE first article of this series mention was made of some fungi which do not have mycelium, one of them being the yeast-plant. Th...
-A Race Of Flowerless Plants - IV. How Fungi Are Dispersed, With Hints For The Cultivator
Animals as a rule have the power of locomotion, at least during some period of life. Plants as a rule have not the power of locomotion at any period of life, the principal exceptions being the adult f...
-How Fungi Are Dispersed, With Hints For The Cultivator. Continued
A recent writer in the Annals of Botany has taken great pains to show that the large stink-horn fungi have their spores carried by insects, and are especially constructed with this object in view. He ...
-A Race Of Flowerless Plants - V. How Fungi Injure Plants
IN EARLIER times the opponents of the germ theory of disease in plants were commonly ready to admit the presence of a fungus - in fact, to determine its presence was a simple matter of observation; ...
-Races Of The Currant
THE September number of The American Garden is before me, and I have read with care Professor Bailey's estimate of the value of the Victoria and the Crandall currants, and the thought occurs that some...
-The Radish - Interesting And Valuable Points For Seed Growers And Seed Users
The articles thus far in this series have been, in the main, devoted to principles rather than practice. Principle is the corner-stone upon which practice rests. Unless this is clearly understood, the...
-Rapid Growth Of Trees
I have always contended that whenever it shall be proved profitable to grow trees for timber, the universal genius of our people for seeing a dollar, though in a distance, would give us all the timber...
-Raspberries
The same care and attention should be used in picking and packing this fruit as in strawberries. For black-caps, use pint baskets, but for the red varieties one-thirds and half pints should be used, a...
-Rattlesnake Plantain
I have a goodyera which was brought to me in the winter of 1888-9 from the woods, its bright evergreen leaves, curiously netted with white, having attracted attention from contrast with its gloomy sur...
-Reasons And Rules For Curved Drives
The chief reason why drives and walks should be curved in all places which make any pretense of natural landscape, is because such drives increase variety; and variety here, as elsewhere, is the spic...
-Recuperative Power Of Trees
A very large holly, or rather clump of hollies, grew upon the edge of a marsh on the Rappahannock river. The very high tides and heavy rains of the past year so loosened the roots in the soft, yieldin...
-Red Cedar
What is said on page 114. with regard to the slow growth of this tree, may apply to the Virginia variety ; but it is not true of the Rocky Mountain kind. I have scores of four-year-old seedlings of th...
-Red Raspberries
I would give less space to them than to any other of the cane fruits. I would give rather more to the black-caps, and still more to the very best varieties of blackberries. There are few markets in wh...
-The Red-Flowering Dogwood
Among our collection of new and rare ornamental trees and shrubs, none have given us more pleasure and satisfaction than the beautiful red-flowered dogwood. It has bloomed before for us, but as the pl...
-Refrigerator Cars And Cold Storage For Fruits
THE value of artificial cold air, as applied to refrigerator cars, cold storage warehouses, residences and other purposes, can not be too highly appreciated. The subject has not received the attention...
-Reinforcements For The Enemy (Insects and Fungi)
INSECTS and fungi appear to be increasing. In fact, they are increasing, if increase is measured by the experience of the horticulturist. We can scarcely suppose that, taking nature altogether, specie...
-Reliable Seed-Cases (Figs. 6 And 7)
It requires the loss of but one season's seeds by mice to convince the experimenter that tin seed-boxes are a necessity. Fig. 6 represents a box which we find exceedingly useful. It is 9 inches long,...
-Remedies
It has been assumed by most writers that we cannot successfully attack the rose chafer in any of its earlier states. To search for the eggs in the ground would be impracticable. It does not, however, ...
-Remedies For The Striped Cucumber Beetle
There are probably few injurious insects for which more remedies and preventives have been recommended than for the striped cucumber beetle (Dia-brotica villata), the everywhere abundant yellow bug ...
-Remedy For Melon And Cucumber Peats
Mix one teaspoonful of paris green with three gallons of water ; as the plants get stronger, strengthen the mixture by mixing one teaspoonful of the paris green with two gallons of water ; stir well s...
-Report Of The Horticulturist And The Chemist Of The Maryland Experiment Station
Report of the Board of Trustees for the year 1889. Pp. 26-94. Wm. H. Bishop and Harry J. Patterson. The greater part of Mr. Bishop's report is upon tomatoes. Sixty sorts were grown. The causes which d...
-A Retrospect Of Fifty Years, And The Hope For The Future
A BOY of twelve summers, clad in two curtailed garments of home spun, reaching up to the handles of a Peacock plow which would persist in going into the beam after some neglected stone or beech root, ...
-A Retrospect Of Fifty Years, And The Hope For The Future. Continued
It is no wonder that Uncle Sam has won every war in which he has engaged ; the eye and hand of his boys had yearly training in throwing those guinea-egg apples which nobody ever ate and which defied t...
-Rhode Island Experiment Station
The larger part of this bulletin considers methods of planting and tests of varieties of potatoes, by L. F. Kinney. This season, two-eye pieces planted 18 inches apart has given the best results; t...
-A Rhododendron Forest In New Hampshire
THE great laurel, Rhododendron maximum, which occurs in great abundance in the Alleghany mountains from New York to Georgia, is a rare plant in the New England states. The stations where it is found a...
-Rockeries
A FEW summers ago I watched with much interest the construction of two rockeries in a neighboring garden. The first step taken was to saw off the top of a noble tree that overshadowed the proposed sit...
-Rockeries And Fern-Beds
Rockeries And Fern-Beds are desirable additions to any lawn if rightly managed, but I know of no more favorable situation for ferns than the narrow strip of ground between the foundation stones of a h...
-Rocky Mountain Red Cedar
Professor W. F. Massey asks what is meant by Rocky mountain red cedar (May, p.. 311). It is merely a marked variety of the common red cedar (Juniperus Virginiana). That it is truly indigenous to the R...
-Root Galls In Forcing- Houses
Disastrous results sometimes overtake forced tomatoes and cucumbers and other plants, in consequence of galls or knots forming upon the roots. These knots are due to a minute true worm, or nematode, a...
-Rosa Rugosa Hybrids. A New Departure In Roses
AN ILLUSTRATED account of the first hybrids with Rosa ru-gosa appeared in the June American Garden of last year. No less than a thousand seedlings have been raised, most of which, however, have succum...
-Rose Buds On A Mission Of Charity
In a large hospital a young girl has wasted away day by day with consumption. Visiting ladies supplied her with books, delicacies, ect. She always had a pleasant thank you for these kindnesses, but ...
-The Rose Chafer
NATIVE North American insect, there is every reason to believe that this rose chafer, or rose bug, as it is more generally called, has increased in number with the progress of horticulture, for the pe...
-Rose Hedges. E. F. S
In the selection of roses for hedging, the hybrid perpetual class should be used in your section. In the selection of varieties, there are many which answer the purpose. The plants should be set about...
-Rose Notes
One new rose from France, exhibited at the fall shows, the Mme. Pierre Guillot, gives promise of popularity in its pretty buds, canary colored at the base and pink in the center. John May speaks very ...
-Rose Rusts
NO FUNGUS is more familiar to the horticulturist than that which constitutes the orange rust of the blackberry. For this reason I wish to refer to it in order to call attention to a certain rust of ro...
-Rose Seedlings And Cross Fertilisation
In the German Rosen Zeitung, Dr. Muller, who has engaged in the propagation of new seedling roses for the last six years, gives the following directions for hybridizing and seedling culture: Before th...
-Roses At Kew
In the article on Kew there is no mention of the grand collection of roses to be seen there. I went there in the latter end of last June, just when they were in all their glory. No one can describe my...
-Ruellia Macrantha
When we first tried this plant it was very much inclined to throw up long-jointed shoots and at flowering time the leaves turned yellow and dropped, leaving bare stems with only a tuft of leaves at to...
-The Rural New-Yorkers Answer To Joseph Harris
Mr. Joseph Harris's article on Fertilizers for the Garden in the May number of this journal is no doubt as sound as a dollar in the general principles which it advocates ; but the instances which he...
-The Rural New-Yorkers Answer To Joseph Harris. Continued
On a portion of the same impoverished field upon which the potato trials alluded to were made, the effects of a dressing of 150 lbs. to the acre of nitrate of soda on corn were plainly visible 50 feet...
-The Russian Apricot. Opinions And Experiences Of A Much Debated Fruit
THE RUSSIAN apricot has been the subject of much diverse discussion during the last decade. By many it has been denounced in unmeasured terms, and , by others it is considered one of the most valuable...
-The Russian Apricot. Opinions And Experiences. Part 2
From R. G. Chasb & Co., Geneva, N. Y Russian apricots have proved hardy in this locality. We regard the Alexander, Budd, Alexis and Catherine as the best varieties. They seem to do well in our stiff ...
-The Russian Apricot. Opinions And Experiences. Part 3
Horticultural Society ( Pp. 390-462, 1887-8) Russian apricot trees have been planted and fruited. The tree is very hardy. I can see no reason why it will not prove profitable. - Geo. A. DeGroff, Mar...
-Russian Mulberry
How I boasted of my first 50 trees of Russian mulberry ! They had just been offered to the public, and I was taken by those catalogue cuts which look for all the world like a brace of grubs for bait, ...
-Sand Cherry (Prunus Pumila)
This is a dwarf trailing shrub, seldom over two feet high, found in greatest abundance on the sandy plains east of the Rocky Mountains, but occurring in favorable situations eastward to the Atlantic. ...
-The Satsuma Orange
I have fruited the Satsuma seven years. I have a hundred times written men who were planting or budding groves, You do not want more than a half dozen trees of Satsuma. They.are like so many Japane...
-The Satsuma Orange Again
IN THE winter of 1882 I planted some seeds of the ordinary sweet orange, and when the young trees from these seeds were large enough I budded up a number of them with several e finest varieties, and a...
-The Satsuma Orange Discussion
I was much interested in the article headed '* A Japanese Success, in the May issue of The American Garden. I recognized the reputed author as an expert in the art preservative of all arts, but the...
-Saving And Cleaning The Seed
The tomatoes should not be picked for seed until perfectly ripe; then gather and grind in a machine made for the purpose. The best machine is made with a cylinder about a foot in diameter, with wooden...
-The Saving Of Corn For Seed
The Saving Of Corn For Seedis an important work, and one generally overlooked. It is the common practice to select the best ears at the time of husking. This is good so far as it goes, but is attended...
-Say's Rose
Plate 1. - Rosa Sayi, Schweinitz, Keating in Long's Exped. App. 4,113 (1825). Rosa Sayi is one of the most attractive of our native wild roses. Although first described so long ago as 1825, it has no...
-The Scarlet Geranium
The scarlet geranium, as it is called, or Pelargonium zonale, has become a general favorite with all classes of people. Its various shades of color, from brilliant scarlet to pure white, are most attr...
-Science
THE orchard, the vegetable garden and the ornamental garden are old institutions, and many of the practices and traditions of them are nearly everywhere familiar. Collectively they constitute horticul...
-Science. Continued
Practical knowledge of the results of cross-fertilization may almost be said to date from the latter work. This knowledge has been extended and epitomized in Focke's Die Pflanzen Mischlinge. Darwin'...
-Scientific Grape-Growing In France. The Viticultural Station Of Villefranche
THE greater part of the agricultural, and especially the viticultural, regions of France possess scientific establishments, agricultural schools or stations which, by their work, their researches and ...
-The Scolopendriums
Of all the delightful plants found in my youthful rambles among the hills, there was none that roused such a sense of the mysterious and whetted the edge of search to the extent that did the Walking f...
-Screens, Tanks And Stands For Flowers
The number of our manufactures of screens is considerable, and very durable and solid shades are now made at moderate prices; but we are to-day seeking to avoid the use of screens placed directly upon...
-Sea Daffodil
PRETTY as a picture is this beautiful bulb, which is hardy south of Virginia, and variously known as hymenocallis, pancratium, Spanish Lily, Spider Lily, etc. It is one of the most desirable noveltie...
-The Season In The South
The Sunny South has deserved its title this season, at all events; day after day and week after week, we have enjoyed clear, balmy spring weather, with no suggestion even of winter. Heavy dews alone...
-Seed Tests
The North Carolina Station has given particular attention to seed tests of late, and has called public attention to the value of this sort of labor. The present bulletin gives the results of many test...
-Seed Warranty
THE liability of seedsmen for losses that may occur from seeds sold that fail to germinate, or to produce such results as the purchaser had a right to expect, or had hoped to reap, is a subject of vit...
-Seed Warranty. On Page 480 Of The August
Number of The American Garden I notice an article by Seed Grower'* upon the law of warranty in regard to seeds sold that fail to germinate or to produce such results as the purchaser has a right to e...
-Seeded Butter
For winter forcing none of them equals the Grand Rapids. Its upright habit admits of close planting, and it matures two weeks quicker than Tennis Ball or Boston Curled. In the open ground, the sorts ...
-Seeds And Seed-Growing. The Tomato (Lycopersicum Esculentum)
IN THE whole list of garden vegetables, there is none so susceptible to treatment as the tomato; none better repays good attention; none shows neglect so plainly, both in quantity and quality of fruit...
-Seeds In Dated Papers
Seeds In Dated Papers is the subject of a short article in one of our valued contemporaries, the Country Gentleman, written to show how much the buyer suffers at the hands of the merchant in the purch...
-Seventh Annual Report Of The Massachusetts Experiment Station For 1889
In this report Professor Humphrey gives an account of some experiments upon potato scab. The following are results of field treatments : 1. Deep planting appears to tend to diminish the development o...
-Shade Trees Versus Crops
I have recently seen an editorial in some agricultural journal which took the broad ground that farmers could not afford to plant shade trees by the road-side, because the trees take so much nourishme...
-Signs For Choosing
My neighbor, a business man, asked me to name a man to do small jobs for him abou the house throughout the winter. He wanted some one he could rely on, and as the pay was sure and liberal, I was inter...
-Sister Gracious' Window Garden
TH E sitting room was long and narrow, with a bay window filling one end, with plenty of sun for my beloved plants. I made a plan, and then sent for a carpenter. First, the inside blinds were removed,...
-Small Fruits And Vegetables
For the farmer's garden, Professor Troop recommends the following strawberries: Bubach, Cumberland, Wakefield, Logan, Haverland and Henderson. Texas Grape Book. Potato Experiments In Tennessee. Swe...
-Snow In California
I read that you have snows in northern California this winter two to sixty feet deep. How is this ? I have always understood that there is little difference between the winter temperature, of norther...
-Snow-Plant
Closely allied to the chim-aphillas is the remarkable Sarcodes sanguima, or snow-plant of the SierraNevadas (Fig. 5). It is a low and fleshy plant, growing from three to twelve inches high, and entire...
-The Snowdrop
The snowdrop is the most welcomed of the early spring flowers, and we look cheerfully forward to the time when we shall gather our first blossom. After a hunt amidst leaves and snow we find it bravely...
-Some Aspects Of Old Orchards
Faces In Trees - The Revivifying Of Neglected New England Farms TO ONE who rambles often through the woods and fields of our northern states, old orchards form an interesting and suggestive study. On...
-Some Bedding Plants
One of our prettiest bedding plants is the double white petunia; for an oval bed four feet in length, five well-rooted petunias will be sufficient. Have them well scattered over the bed, so that the g...
-Some Cactus History
The word cactus or cactos was used by Tbeophrastus for a spring plant of Sicily, probably the garden artichoke. Linnaeus used the word as a generic name, and made all the kinds which he knew species o...
-Some French Orchid Holders
The unsightly shapes of the receptacles that orchids are commonly grown in with us, have long been an irritation to flower lovers with aesthetic tastes and have perhaps been an unconscious cause of th...
-Some Fungous Diseases Of The Spinach
By Byron D. Holsted, Pp. 15. Illustrated. Dr. Halsted is the first of our botanists to make a study of spinach diseases. He finds four specific diseases in New Jersey on the forced crop. The mildew (P...
-Some Fungus Diseases Of The Cranberry
This is the first experiment station bulletin to treat of the cranberry. It considers two diseases, one of which is new. The cranberry gall-fungus is the name which Dr. Halsted gives to a new disease ...
-Some Good Old-Fashioned Plants
I agree with Conference Corner for May about the Nigelta Damascena, or love-in-a-mist. also called ragged lady. But in connection with it, I would notice Nigella sativa, garden spice. There was ...
-Some Good Varieties Of Lettuce
I judge these varieties from the standpoint of the market gardener, who has need to study the market and find out kinds most acceptable to the consumer. The things most desired are tenderness and size...
-Some Good Yuccas
THE group of yuccas, of which the cut (page 661) shows a member, has afforded our household and friends a great deal of pleasure for very little pains. About four years ago I obtained from John Saul, ...
-Some Hints
My first recollection of a cactus was of a night-blowing serious which my mother had. It was much older than I was, so they said, and for twelve weary summers and thirteen blustering winters I stubbed...
-Some Hints About Insects
Some insects, the com-mon green aphis or plant louse for instance, are so nearly omnipresent that it is scarcely within the range of possibility to do anything more than keep them in check. Others can...
-Some Implements And Devices
Several devices for the facilitation of garden labor have grown out of my practice during the last two or three years. They are mostly very simple, yet I find them useful, particularly for work which ...
-Some Literature. Valuable Information From The Government
Of making many books there is no end, and of the fashioning of bulletins there is no limit, and no precedent. There are kinds to suit all tastes, and and no tastes. The most entertaining are the bul...
-Some Native Orchids
IF THE forty seven species and varieties of orchids said to have been found in New England, not all are showy. A few have flowers which have no special attraction so far as color is concerned. The bot...
-Some Needs Of Gardening
As trucking means trafficking, we deem truck-farming an improper term, and prefer to include in the class market-gardeners'* all that portion of the cultivators of the soil to whom the above term is ...
-Some Notes Of Roses
In the first place let the amateur buy only the more hardy roses, consulting some reliable catalogue for the necessary information, or an experienced rose grower. It is foolish and altogether unwise t...
-Some Relations Of Botany To Horticulture--The Botanist Is Willing To Climb The Garden Fence
PROFESSOR TRACY, in 1877, made the statement before the Michigan State Horticultural Society, that horticulture had advanced but little in the past 150 years, except in two directions. The greatest pr...
-The Botanist Is Willing To Climb The Garden Fence. Continued
The man who knows the structure of a tree and how it grows, would at least be amused at the following statement, once made by a practical man at a meeting of a state horticultural society. To kill t...
-Some Studies Of Root-Grafting
THE PRACTICE of grafting upon pieces of roots originated with Thomas Andrew Knight so long ago as 1811. His first experiments were upon pears, but he extended the operation to some stone fruits. Knigh...
-Sorghum Slight
Professor W. A. Kellerman in the first annual report of the Kansas Experiment Station describes a blight of the sorghum plant, which is characterized by reddish blotches on the leaves, leaf sheaths an...
-Soups
I hesitated to make soups for several years after beginning housekeeping because all the writers for young housekeepers made me think it was too formidable an undertaking, requiring extraordinary care...
-Southern Floriculture
A Guide to the Successful Cultivation of Flowering and Ornamental Plants in the Climate of the Southern States. By James Morton. 16mo. Pp. 312. Illustrated. Clarksville, Tenn: W. P. Titus. A book on ...
-The Sow-Bug
The animal commonly known under this name is no bug at all, but belongs to the class Crustacea, which includes the lobster, crab, etc. These differ from the class Insecta principally in the method of ...
-The Spanish Llly, Hymbnocallis. Clematis Culture
FEW CLEMATISES, with all their varied colors and freedom of growth, are seen in cultivation, where thousands should be. The price need not be any drawback now, as within the last few years it has been...
-Sparrows And Sparrow Laws
There are few observers who will agree with our correspondent from Indiana. It appears to be an established fact that the English or house sparrow drives off our best native birds. This fact is set fo...
-Sphaeralcea Emoryl
I grew and flowered this plant a dozen years ago. It is a herbaceous perennial, indigenous to the eastern slopes of the Sierra Nevada, perfectly hardy here, and a good grower and profuse and continuou...
-The Spiraeas
Scarcely a genus of hardy shrubs is so rich and beautiful in its different species as the astilbe and spiraea. They are so numerous that many attractive sorts must be excluded from even the most liber...
-Spoils Rural Beauty
One of our artists was in an ambitious rural town not long ago, and his attention was directed to a scene which suggested the accompanying sketch. It is a warning to keep rural and not ape city ways....
-Spraying With The Arsenites
Professor Cook has varying results with spraying for the curculio. He finds that the insect is destroyed when rains are infrequent, but frequent showers wash the poison from the smooth fruits. He find...
-Spring In California
Thus came the lovely spring, with a rush of blossoms And music; Flooding the earth with flowers and the air with melodies Vernal. IN THE Golden state, the advent of spring time is less gradual ...
-The Spring In California (2)
Our floods seem to be over. It has been a long, dreary, wet spell, the longest ever known in the state. Now that we have had a chance to look over the ruins during the ten bright days past, we find th...
-Sprouts And Cions
President McA an of the Ontario Fruit Grower's Association, finds sulphur, applied freely twice during the season to the soil beneath his grape vines, a perfect protection against mildew and thrips. ...
-Sprouts And Scions
Isn't It about time for horticultural writers to stop writing about the ease with which 300 or 400 bushels of strawberries can be grown on an acre ? And how about the eternal caution not to plant ear...
-The Stag Horn Ferns
This small genus of about a half a dozen species is one of the most extraordinary among plants that are cultivated for the attractions of their foliage alone. They have been called the grandest among ...
-The Star-Apple Or Caimite
* * * And what is next, like an evergreen peach, shedding from the under side of every leaf a golden light - call it not shade? A Star Apple. - Kingsley. A tropical fruit worthy of much greater att...
-Starting The Plants
The usual custom of sowing tomato seed thickly in the greenhouse and hot-bed, is one that should not be followed, as the plants grown in that manner are usually inferior to those that nature produces ...
-Stinking Smut Of Wheat
Prof. J. C. Arthur, in Bulletin 28, Indiana Agricultural Experiment Station, exhaustively describes this disease of wheat and other cereals, known otherwise as bunt. It differs from ordinary black smu...
-Stock Seed
The importance of saving stock seed should not be overlooked by the seed grower; upon him rests the responsibility of purity and perfection of the variety. For this purpose, a few plants should be set...
-On Storing The Furnace
In both these systems the universal fuel has been, until within the past few years, hard or soft coal. Now, after the steam or hot-water boiler has been set up, the whole question of the economy of fu...
-The Story Of Trailing Arbutus
But fairer than all flowers, First-born of sun and showers, Is the Arbutus, jewel of the spring. - H. H. LISTEN to the story of the arbutus, if you would know what it is, where it grows, how and wh...
-Strawberries
Of 25 kinds of strawberries tried at the Kentucky Experiment Station, upon a rich garden soil underlaid with clay, Bubach No. 5 alone receives a perfect mark in a scale of 10 for market purposes. For ...
-Strawberries In Central New York. A Practical Experience
Eight years ago I came into possession of four acres of land on which I am growing fruits and vegetables. Three acres are of a deep clay loam, underlaid at a depth of three feet with solid rock, no pa...
-Strawberries in Northern Jersey
The strawberry season of 1890 with me, as compared with that of 1889, has been abbreviated at both ends, commencing three days later and ending three days earlier. Jessie and Pearl were my principal ...
-Strawberry Book
By George Vasey and J. N. Rose. Contributions from the U. S. National Herbarium [ Dept. Agriculture] No. III. 1 plate. The botany of Lower California is little known. Dr. Palmer and Mr. Brandegee hav...
-Strawberry Growing In Florida. Strawberries Are Grown In
Florida for home consumption only to a slight degree; they are mostly produced for shipment to the north, hence there is very little scientific interest attaching to the pursuit so far as the discover...
-Strawberry Raising For The Girls
The farmer is so busy and has so many things to attend to that the strawberries will not be likely to get the care that they need. It is quite a science to raise large crops of fine berries; one must ...
-Strawberry. Jessie
The unfavorable frosts of last May hardly gave us a successful year for strawberries, yet the comparative merits of the new varieties may be relied upon : Jessie As this is the home of the Jessie, w...
-A Study Of Tomatoes
As one among such special crops, the culture of tomatoes holds a high rank. Statistics sufficient to give definite information in regard to the money value of this crop in Virginia have not yet been ...
-Study Your Conditions
Just as complete failure may come from want of adaptation to the existing conditions as from any other cause. A multitude of things need consideration in determining what shall be our line of work. Am...
-Stumps
Get out the stumps, that is the first step towards improvement! Yes, get them out of the ground, but not off the grounds if you have a cultured mind and eye, for both will be gratified by a right us...
-Sturtivant's Tobacco And Sulphur Fertilizer
Experience with this fertilizer the past season has given me a very favorable impression of it, though the results of a single trial of any such article do not offer conclusive proof of its value. Two...
-Subscriptions For Other Publications To "The American Garden" Subscribers At Reduced Rates
We will send any of the following publications in club with The American Garden at the price named in the last column. Any publications not on the list will be priced on application . Publi...
-Substitute For Glass (Conferencecorner, August)
Having tried various methods and forms, I wish to state my decided preference for either cloth or manilla paper, saturated with pure raw linseed oil, without the addition of any other material. Cloth...
-Substitutes For Parsley
It is well known that parsley is a slow-growing though a useful culinary garden herb and universally used. It can be kept green in the ground all through the winter by proper care, but few give it the...
-Sundry Investigations Made During The Year
The Cornell Station has adopted the practice of devoting the last bulletin of each year to the various experiments of the year which are too short for independent publication. Several matters of horti...
-Sweet Corn And Climate
I notice that The American Garden is quoted as saying that sweet corn grown on the south side of Long Island is not as good as the same variety grown elsewhere ; the difference being attributed to cli...
-A Talk About Melons. The Cantaloupes Of All Kinds - Fancies And Ideals - Melon Seeds
A PERFECT cantaloupe ! have you the recollection of one ? Then you will treasure it in your memory, for in its full perfection it is a rarity, and in the estimation of some, it has no equal in our sum...
-Melons. The Cantaloupes Of All Kinds - Fancies And Ideals - Melon Seeds. Continued
My own cantaloupe tests have been made with seeds from France, the north and south of Italy, Tripoli, Turkey, Turkestan, southern Russia, Russian Georgia, Cappadocia, Armenia, the valley of the Euphra...
-Tangled Gardens
IT IS a singular fact that the gardens which the poets oftenest praise are those in which no rule of landscape gardening and no method have been consciously employed. A rhapsody of one of our great pa...
-Tarrytown Letters
IT MUST have been some time last August that Mrs. Tarryer decided that there were no grass gardens conducted on legitimate principles, and resolved to make a show of hers. She took full counsel with L...
-Tarrytown Letters. Part 2
One of Mrs. Tarryer's Girls with a Weeding Thimble. Tarryer says Lady Schnipticket showed her the stubs of sixteen checks in one day, all drawn in favor of Scotchmen ! Should the weather prove hot, ...
-Tarrytown Letters. Part 3
Right here was a change : Mrs. Tarryer sat down, and the reporters will have it that M'Tavish began to speak, but I vow it was Uncle Sam, though I admit that M'Tavish wore that day one of the late Col...
-Tasmanian Apples
The Tasmanians have some very fine apples, of which the best approved in this market are the Scarlet Pearmain, the Scarlet Nonpareil and the Sturmer Pippin; some of the former have fetched 18s. per bo...
-Taste In Gardening
Why is it that a lady may have good taste as regards dress and trimmings, and yet when she attempts to beautify the garden, make such ridiculous mistakes! For instance, she may paint her boxes or flow...
-Tender Plants Without Artificial Heat
HAVING had considerable success in growing a large number of tender plants, without artificial heat except two windows in the house, I will try to tell your readers how it is done. Starting about Jun...
-Tennessee Experiment Station
Dr. W. E. Stone reports in this bulletin a useful and thorough chemical examination of the strawberry. Twenty varieties were examined, but the differences in composition between varieties are probably...
-Tested Russian Apples
THE CALL of Minnesota, in 1867-8, to the National Department of Agriculture, for an importation of apple trees from the country that had supplied the only good varieties (Oldenburgh and Te. tofsky) wh...
-The Testing Of Varieties
WE DOUBT the expediency and the value of much of the testing of varieties at experiment stations. It is evident to anyone who has carefully observed the behavior of plants that variations in numberles...
-Tests Of Currants. Seedlings----Crandall - Fay
TESTING, digging up and throwing away seedling currants have been my experiences for years. It has been rather discouraging work, but the student of plant life knows how firmly fixed in their habits o...
-Then And Now
AS THE world progresses, new and more difficult problems present themselves, and a good working knowledge of nature's modes of action becomes more and more necessary. But no amount of knowledge will ...
-There Is Money In The Garden For Boy And Girl Workers
WORKING ON A SMALL CAPITAL - HOW TO START - GETTING ORDERS - MAKING HOT-BEDS - PLANTS FROM BIG GARDENS. Second Paper. WORK, the results of which can be measured by the standard of money, is always m...
-Thinning Out Plants
Many of our readers are actively engaged in gardening operations. To such we would say that there is no more important work than the thinning out of plants in the seed-bed, from which they are to be t...
-Thinning Out The Sparrows
It is already too late to think of ever destroying the sparrow. We can only palliate by thinning the flocks; the legislature of New York has repealed the law protecting them, but this is not enough. O...
-Thirteenth Report On Injurious Insects, 1889
By Eleanor A. Ormerod, Consulting Entomologist of the Royal Agricultural Society of England. The first article called in the April American Garden. A disease which has appeared in many parts of Englan...
-Thoughts At Niagara
IF ADAM and Eve had started in life outside the Garden of Eden, and had subsequently been ushered into it through an opening in a high board fence, at which opening stood a gate-keeper, demanding twen...
-Three Hardy Cherries
We commenced sending out for trial in 1884 three varieties of the cherry well known in Western Europe, but originally introduced from South-central Asia, viz: Shadow Amarelle, Spate Amarelle, and Larg...
-Timely Hints For The Kitchen Garden
A northern garden excels in crops that require a cool damp soil, like celery or cauliflower. The best location is a gentle slope to the south, with the orchard and fruit trees, if any, on the north bo...
-Tobias Seedling Apples
When white men first settled Grand Isle they planted fruit-seeds, espec-ially those of the apple, and the fruit of the trees so raised was of course of varying quality. A few proved to be very valuabl...
-Tomato Culture Under Glass
TO SUCCESSFULLY grow the tomato under glass requires careful exercise of judgment on the part of the grower, rather than strict adherence to any set rules. The following notes, however, are offered as...
-The Tomato Worm Parasite
I am frequently asked concerning the origin of the peculiar egg-like objects often seen on the backs of tomato-worms, and shown in the accompanying illustration. These are not eggs, however, but are t...
-The Tomato. Showing The Importance Of Local Experiment Stations
The report of Prof. Bailey, of the Cornell University Experiment Gardens, is not only interesting reading, but highly important from a horticultural standpoint. It is valuable for what it says, and do...
-Tomatoes
I would like much to get seed of those tomatoes which ripened for Mr. Hallock in 115 days. The tomato has always been a hobby of mine, and I generally succeed in beating my neighbors (the prospect now...
-Tomatoes At Cornell Experiment Station
Bulletin X, of Cornell University Agriculture Experiment Station gives the results of Professor Bailey's experiments with tomatoes. In most of bis conclusions we heartily coincide. The writer has long...
-Tomatoes In 115 Days
Professor Massey doubts (July issue, p. 434) the possibility of any one being able to fruit the tomato within 115 days from seed, and states that he has yet to see the tomato that will yield ripe frui...
-Tools - We Have Too Much People And Too Few Tools
ALL of the wheel-hoe people, apparently, have got our range, and are showing their sympathy by firing circulars at us from all points of the compass. This is as it should be. But while the good work o...
-Top-Grafting Old Trees. The Construction Of The New Top
April is early enough, in the northern states, for grafting out of doors. It is only those who make top-grafting a business who need to begin in the raw days of March. In fact, the ideal time for out ...
-Tore About Horticulture For Women
THE subject of horticulture as a business for women has been discussed in a very able manner in so many of the leading periodicals of the day that further detail may seem superfluous. I notice, howeve...
-A Trade Suspicion Confuted - Mrs. Tarryer's Weeding Thimble, And How It Works
ROM the way trade and magazine writing goes nowadays, many excellent people have supposed, in spite of Mrs. Tarryer's desires to the contrary, that the illustrated letters in the May and June numbers ...
-Training Fruit Trees
THE European methods of training fruits to trellises and walls are looked upon as wholly inapplicable to American conditions, yet they can often be employed to good advantage. It is true that our clim...
-Tree Bark
For the tat of the field is man's life. This being a well authenticated fact, how faithfully man should care for, and tenderly foster the precious life of the tree. The bark is the life-guard of all...
-The Tree Planting And Fountain Society Of Brooklyn [N. Y.]. Pp. 44
In the spring of 1882 a number of citizens of Brooklyn, interested in having the streets of the city beautified with shade trees, met * * to consider 'the most practical method of establishing a regu...
-The Tree Tomato. Cyphomandra Betacea.
THE tree tomato is widely dis-seminated over the earth and has attracted considerable attention in tropical and subtropical countries. Its value for commercial forcing in our northern houses is yet to...
-A Trick Of The Trade
One house receives a whole car-load and sells it out at as good rates as possible to other houses, acting in that case as a jobber. Before the whole car-load is sold he has ordered by telegraph anothe...
-The True Grasses
By Edward Hackel. Translated from Die Naturlichen Pflansenfamilien, by F. Lamson-Scribner and Effie A. Southworth. Illustrated. Pp. 228. Henry Holt & Co. This translation presents to English readers t...
-Try The Vegetable Novelties
I have experimented with many vegetable novelties in the past few years, with an experience of many disappointments and pleasures. But as I buy novelties in small lots, planting a few seeds of each, t...
-Turtles As Snail Catchers
In my fern case there were snails; their tracks smeared the glass, and some of the choicest ferns and begonias were bitten off and utterly ruined. Of course, I turned to my American Garden for relief,...
-Twenty Cents Worth Of Window Plants
Many people would like flowering plants in the house, but do not feel they can afford the expense of buying potted plants. Besides the cost of such plants, it often happens that a plant transferred fr...
-Two French Entanglements
Two interesting and somewhat amusing notes concerning America appear in a late number of a French horticultural journal (L'Illustration Horiicole). The one speaks of the mystic nymphssa of the Nile, w...
-Two Good Labels (Figs. 11 And 12)
After considerable experimenting with field labels for vegetables and small fruits, I have adopted a soft and clear white pine label 2 ft. long, 3 in. wide and 1 in. thick, sharpened at the mill. Th...
-Two Humble Flowers
IN FLORICULTURE as in all else, the tendency seems to be toward that which makes the most show. People need to be educated to know that there is pleasure in little things. Perhaps it was for this, tha...
-Two Methods Of Grafting
The season for indoor grafting is upon us, and the discussion of ways and means is now in order. I venture, therefore, to call the attention of the readers of The American Garden to a comparison of tw...
-Two Private Chrysanthemum Shows
Why is it that many refined people of ample means make their homes so attractive in winter as well as in summer that they choose to live in them the year round, in preference to having a city home for...
-Two Society Wrinkles. Novelty And Beauty
Under the name of a Boston baked bean party, a novel sociable furnished a deal of amusement to a party of young people during the present winter. Those receiving invitations were not...
-Two Strawberry Diseases
This is a technical paper, dealing chiefly with some very important discoveries in the life history of the leaf-blight. The leaf-blight or sun-burn of strawberries is caused by a fungus, Spharella f...
-U. S. Department Of Agriculture
Mr. Munson has long been a close student of grapes, both in their economic and botanical features. He has traveled over a great part of the Union to see them growing in their natural conditions, and f...
-United States Department Of Agriculture
The Root-Knot Disease of the Peach, Orange and other Plants in Florida, due to the work of Anguillula. By J. C. Neal. Pp.31. XXI P/ates, mostly colored. The root-knot disease of many plants, particula...
-Variations Of Prunus Padus
The bird cherry as found in eastern nurseries, introduced from west Europe, has not proved hardy in central Iowa, and I know of no good specimens north of the 40th parallel in the prairie states. Find...
-Varieties Of Plums For Massachusetts
Varieties Of Plums For Massachusetts are discussed as follows by J. F. C. Hyde: There are many good varieties of this fruit, but for market we should advise the planting of very few sorts. We have fo...
-Various Plants
There are many plants that are so hardy that they will flourish with but trifling care and attention, and without many of the advantages demaded by others which are more delicate in habit. But all sho...
-Vegetable Gardening For Women. By One Who Loves The Garden And Works In It
THERE is every reason why anyone who has a piece of ground large enough should have an abundance of fresh vegetables and relishes. In the spring, when you clean out the cellar, save a few rutabagas or...
-Vegetable Gardening In Florida
In south Florida, a vegetable plot can be prepared and planted any month in the year, and by successive plantings, the table can be continually supplied with healthful and toothsome food without missi...
-Vegetables - Comparative Tests; Methods Of Culture
By L. R. Taft. Pp. 43. The result of a test of 75 sorts of potatoes show that Gardner's Early, fit for digging July 24, yielded at the rate of 275 bushels per acre. Premium, July 26, yielded 221 bush...
-Vegetables In Pennsylvania
It is cause for congratulation that the farmers are devoting greater attention to the vegetable garden. Certain vegetables are being grown for general use, which a few years ago were only to be found ...
-The Vermont Beauty
The Vermont Beauty was described in the Rural New-Yorker under the name of Macomber, but the introducers, W. P. Rupert & Son, of Seneca, N. Y., have given it the above name. It was the last to come in...
-The Vicar Of Wlnkfleld
The Vicar pear has not been valued as it deserves. As the tree grows larger it bears larger and better fruit. Few pears are handsomer or better flavored than a good specimen of the Vicar. But its good...
-A View At Dosoris. A Practical Lesson In The Grouping Of Trees
We would call attention to one of the best examples of hardy landscape planting to be found in America. The view is taken from one of the lawns at Dosoris Island, the residence of Charles A. Dana, Gle...
-Vol. XL. December, 1890. No. 12. Novell
Chapter I THE Black Ridge stage rattled down the last stony hill in a cloud of choking dust. Ten minutes more and the long weary ride would end at the village store. It was a hot July day, and yet ev...
-Novell. Chapter II
Mebby you 're right, Retire. I never would have believed it. I always said, Deacon, there was more flies ketched with 'lasses' 'n vinegar. That little Bos-tin woman just tamed those 'Tater Hill bo...
-Novell. Chapter III
Tell you, Retire Hopkins, it's the softest winter we 've had these twenty year. Anyways, it's pretty near as soft as any you ever see. Here 'tis 24th day of December and not a mite of snow. And no...
-Water As An Insecticide
I find that I am daily placing more reliance upon water as an insecticide. Not long since it was my misfortune to procure a lot of plants which were badly infested with the mealy bug Various reputed r...
-Weeding And Weeders
A Chapter On Weeding And Weeders, Human And Implemental Mrs. Tarryer As A Weed Exterminator And Trainer Of Farmers' Wives----Getting Near To Nature----Old Loudon And Mrs. Tarryer Do Not Agree. THOUGH...
-Weeding And Weeders. Continued
Among Mrs. Tarryer's first studies of weedingtools for herself, when people were learning to buy instead of making what they want in this country, she had a bayonet-hoe in its rudimental modern trade ...
-The Western New York Horticultural Society
Proceedings of the Thirty-fourth Annual Meeting, held at Rochester, January 22 and 23, 1890. John Hall, Secretary. Pp. 1889. The Western New York Horticultural Society is in many respects the best hor...
-Western New York Horticulturists
ALTHOUGH the past year has been rather a bad one for fruit growers in New York, they do not seem to be at all discouraged. About 200 of them met in Rochester in January at the 35th annual meeting of t...
-What Grapes Shall I Plant? Varieties For Home And For Market
RAPE culture is full of interest to the careful cultivator. In gardening, selection of varieties is all-important, given soil and location. This pertains with all fruits, grapes not the least. It is a...
-What The Manufacturer Does For Us
The manufacture of hot-water and steam heating apparatus has been carried to a very high degree of excellence, and our best makers of boilers now give us apparatuses that economize the heat of the fir...
-Where Grapes (Vitis Vinifera) Succeed
Upon my way to Puget Sound, I tarried sometime in the Columbia valley. It did not take long to discover here a rival to California. In some important respects this region appears to be a superior wine...
-Who Is The Theorist!
THOSE theoretical fellows, the experimenters and professors, cut a strange figure in the minds of many good people. It is the especial function of certain speakers at the winter meetings to ridicule...
-Wholesale Market For The Sale Of Cut-Flowers. Notes Of An English Experience
A question was asked at one of the florists' conventions as to the advisability of having a wholesale market for the sale of cut-flowers in our large cities. It was replied that it would depend largel...
-Wild Crab (Pyrus Coronaria)
No one will contend that our present cultivated varieties of the apple meet all the requirements of apple culture in the United States. There are too few long-keeping varieties of high quality, especi...
-The Wild Crab For The Northwest
This vast fertile country is dotted all over with fine native groves, heavily laden each year with strictly winter fruit, known to the botanist as Pyrus coronaria. That this will prove to be the riche...
-Wild Flowers And The Schools
One of the local papers of Santa Cruz offered last spring a prize for the best collection of wild flowers made by the pupils of any one of the public schools of that county. Sixteen of the 54 public s...
-The Wilson Strawberry. An Experience Meeting To Discuss Once More The Most Famous Of American Strawberries
STRAWBERRIES are always interesting, from whatever direction we regard them. We love the white blossoms in the sweet new spring days, we admire the long, straight, cozy rows, and who does not dote upo...
-The Wilson Strawberry. An Experience Meeting To Discuss. Part 2
From W. A. Brown, Benton Harbor, Mich The first strawberries from St. Joseph, Mich., for the Chicago market were grown in 1862. The Hovey, Early Scarlet, Peabody and Wilson were planted. The Wilson ...
-The Wilson Strawberry. An Experience Meeting To Discuss. Part 3
From F. H. Hale, So. Glastonbury, Conn My first venture in strawberry culture was more than twenty-five years ago with Wilson's Albany, Hovey Seedling, and two or three others, and ever since that t...
-Windbreaks For Oranges
I have been much interested in the bulletin on windbreaks from the Cornell Experiment Station. I have given a good deal of attention to the sheltering of orchards by belts of timber, and have found th...
-Window Boxes
Make of inch boards a box eight inches wide and eight inches deep, and just the width of the window ; bore several holes one inch in diameter, through the bottom for drainage, as window boxes require ...
-Window Garden Notes
SHALL not attempt to give any hints or instructions to those who have bay windows and plenty of money to expend on plants for their em-lishment, but solely to those are amateurs, with ordinary dows wh...
-Wine-Making And Grape-Growing
AN ACCOUNT OF METHODS IN THE FAMOUS KEUKA LAKE REGION OF WESTERN NEW YORK, BY THE SECRETARY OF THE PLEASANT VALLEY WINE COMPANY. HOW shall we make wine from grapes ? That depends entirely upon what k...
-Wines And Vines Of California
A Treatise on the Ethics of Wine Drinking. By Frona Eunice Wait. Pp. 215. Illustrated. San Francisco: The Bancroft Company. 50 cents. The state of California exports to the Atlantic coast as much wi...
-The Winter Aconite
The botanical name of this pretty little plant is Eranthus hyemalis. The generic name is very appropriate and signifies spring flower. This is about the first plant to unfold its flowers in the spring...
-Winter Care Of Amaryilis (Hippeastrum)
In bringing your bulbs out from their resting place to ornament the window garden, repotting is not absolutely necessary unless the pots are overcrowded with roots, in which case, give them a pot one ...
-The Winter Flora Of California
One familiar with the names of California native flowers, on looking over the catalogue of some great eastern flower firm, is surprised to notice how many beautiful flowers this state has given the wo...
-Winter Salads
Cabbage, celery, etc., prepared by any of the following methods will be found an appetizing addition to the winter bill of fare : Cabbage And Celery Salad Chop the vegetables very fine, using two pa...
-Winter Spinach
AMONG market gardeners winter spinach is an important crop requiring careful preparation of soil, good seed, timely sowing, in a suitable place for withstanding exposure of winter. If successfully win...
-Wisconsin Experiment Station
A portion of this bulletin is devoted to potato experiments by Professor Goff. In tests of methods of cutting potatoes, it was found that the total yield was directly in proportion to the bulk of see...
-A Woman's Floral Colony
One of the garden spots of California is on the sheltered slope of San Mateo county, twenty-five or thirty miles south of San Francisco. This is the region west of the Bay that corresponds most nearly...
-Women As Raisin Growers
A great many California women are investing in raisin vineyards. The favorite plan is an incorporation to secure the land. Stock is issued, and assessments levied upon it. The expense of land, water, ...
-Women In Horticulture
Certainly, they could engage in that business just as appropriately as in any other. Indeed it would be much better to do so than to engage in making shirts at 75 cents a dozen while finding their own...
-A Wonderland Of Cactuses. Novelties, Curiosities, Beauties - Experiences Of A Cactus Fancier
IT IS not saying too much to assert that cactuses are now about as popular as orchids ; indeed, we do not hesitate to say that there are, in this country, more cultivators of the former than of the la...
-A Wonderland Of Cactuses. Experiences Of A Cactus Fancier. Continued
Cereus grandiflorus, the night-blooming cereus, is perhaps the best known of all the cactuses. Its rapid growth, ease of management and the enormous night opening flowers have made it popular. It is n...
-Wood's Lessons In Botany
Revised and edited by Oliver R. Willis. A. S. Barnes & Co., N. Y. Illustrated. Pp. 220. Professor Wood's books have all been useful and popular, and the present treatise, which appeared originally as ...
-Work In Horticulture
Professor Brunk gives notes upon a great number of varieties of grapes, together with descriptions of vine diseases, and two actual specimens of diseased leaves. A useful feature of this grape test is...
-Work Of The Season
Now has begun the season when the plants are potted, ready for their winter quarters. Everything that is to be kept in a growing condition should be properly prepared early in September. Then there ar...
-Yellow Lady Slipper
Who that has lived in the country has not seen and admired the fairy moccasins that might have been worn by some dusky Cinderella of the past, when the Indian roamed unrestrained and unpersecuted over...
-A Yeoman Of Henry Seventh's Time
My father was a yeoman, and had no lands of his own, only he had a farm of 31, or 41, by year at the uttermost, and hereupon he tilled so much as kept half a dozen men. He had walked for an hundred ...
-York Chinese Gardening
T|HE IMMENSE range of vegetable production in China is represented in this country to an increasing extent in different localities. The Chinese gardens of San Francisco and at the south already form a...
-Zinnia Tenulflora
A remarkably pretty variety of the zinnia family, and deserves recognition in every garden. The flower-heads are on long cylindrical peduncles ; stems erect. Dwarf in habit, a good grower, requir-i n ...
-Acclimation - And So Ho Will
Acclimation It does not seem to be generally understood that there is certainly something in acclimation, though just how far may be a question. It is often argued that the potato is just as suscepti...
-Anemone Patens, Var. Nuttalliana - Apple Instructions
Anemone Patens, Var. Nuttalliana This is the American pasque flower, and is found in the western prairies in early spring. It closely resembles a minature clematis no more than six inches high ; but ...
-An Apple Story - Aquilegias
An Apple Story The Middletown (N. Y.) Press launches forth the following item for the benefit of studious horticulturists: An apple tree on the premises owned by John Bransfield has attracted consid...
-Arnebia Cornuts - Authorization [To Import Foreign Vines]
Arnebia Cornuts The Continental European novelty that seems to be attracting the most attention just now is the Arnebia cornuts, in course of distribution by Ernst Ben-ary, of Erfurt, Germany. It is ...
-B. S. Williams Memorial Fund - A Beautiful Carnation
B. S. Williams Memorial Fund A committee of prominent horticulturists, in England, is soliciting funds to be employed in creating prizes for orphans of gardeners, and which shall constitute a memoria...
-Beet, Reine Des Noires - A Bong Of Roses
Beet, Reine Des Noires It is long since we have been able to make known a variety of beet uniting, in so high a degree, the useful and the agreeable. This beet possesses an ample, very ornamental fol...
-Books On Small Fruit Culture. J. H. T - Burying Lemons
Books On Small Fruit Culture. J. H. T We refer you to Fuller's Small Fruit Culturist, Barry's Fruit Garden, and Thomas' American Fruit Culturist, all of which may be obtained of The Garden Publ...
-Butternut Pickles - Callas In California
Butternut Pickles Gather the nuts before the shell is woody; when a large needle can be thrust into them they are still sufficiently tender. Make a strong brine and while boiling hot, turn it on the ...
-Camellia Alba Plena - Carnation
Camellia Alba Plena Mr. Lathan, of Eddisburg, near Liverpool, has a specimen of this camellia which has grown to an enormous size. It is 19 feet in height, the trunk measures 2 feet in circumferenc...
-Carnations As House Plants - Champlain Raspberry
Carnations As House Plants Again we say Don't. The temperature suited to the carnation is the one just above the freezing point, with all the light possible; that of the dwelling-house is both too wa...
-A Chance For The "Novelty" Makers - Chinquapin (Castanta Pumila)
A Chance For The Novelty Makers Professor Bailey recently showed the writer a curious instance of the peculiarities of grafting. A tomato vine had been grafted on a potato stalk. The tomato vine wa...
-Chironia Peduncularis - Citrus Trifoliate
Chironia Peduncularis Described originally by Dr. Lindley in 1835, this plant appears to have been but little cultivated ever since. It was re-introduced to Kew by seed recently brought from the Cape...
-Clematis Stanley - Controlling The Yellows
Clematis Stanley Within the last few weeks this species has flowered here for the first time. It is a native of the Transvaal and other parts of south Africa, and is named in honor of the famous trav...
-Cooking Cauliflower - The Cranberry Crop
Cooking Cauliflower Cauliflower is a vegetable easily raised, and would be more generally used if it was better known. A dozen can be raised in a small space on the north side of a house. Soak them i...
-The Crandall Currant - Currants And Gooseberries
The Crandall Currant (Am. Garden, Sept., page 309.) Frank Ford & Sons, introducers of the Crandall Currant, send fine photographs of the variety in full bearing, together with notes, from which we ma...
-Curry Powder - Destroying Weeds In The Lawn
Curry Powder Take one ounce each of ginger, mustard and black pepper, one-half ounce of cardamon, three ounces each of coriander and turmeric, quarter of an ounce each of coriander and cumin seed. Po...
-The Destruction Of Caterpillars - Do Fruit Trees Come True From Seed?. A.G.F. Keeseville, N. Y
The Destruction Of Caterpillars The Prefect of Meurthe-et-Muselle has given out a notice, based on the law of the 24th of December, 1888, requiring all proprietors, farmers, tenants, corporations, an...
-Dr. Hoskins Pear - The East Cannot Compete With The West
Dr. Hoskins Pear Dr. Hoskins Pear has been called a seedling of Flemish Beauty because it resembles that sort. But its parentage is not known. It is the largest of our seedlings, and by a careless ob...
-Economic Fungi - Egg Plants
Economic Fungi A series of Specimens designed chiefly to Illustrate the Fungous Diseases of Useful and Noxious plants. Fascicle I. Nos 1 - 50, Edited and published by A. B. Seymour and F. S. Earle. T...
-Egyptian Cotton Plant - Estimate Of Potatoes In 1826
Egyptian Cotton Plant Reporting on the trade and commerce of Alexandria during the year 1889, Vice-Consul Alban refers to the increased cultivation of a new variety of cotton plant, known as Mitafife...
-Eupatorium Probum - Fall And Winter Treatment Of Asparagus
Eupatorium Probum This plant, which has for some time been grown in one or two places under various names was described and named as above by Mr. N. E. Brown. It is a welcome addition to the eupatorj...
-The Farmer Knew Better - Forcing Christmas Roses
The Farmer Knew Better What is that? asked the farmer of the musician, pointing to his tuning in strument. That is a pitch-fork, was the reply. You must take me for a jay, commented the farme...
-Fresh Flowers - Fruit Notes
Fresh Flowers We cannot make a hedge so tight About the flowers we plant and prize, But some wild bird with canny eyes Shall see, and wing a happier flight. As soon as one red bud shall ope, The e...
-Fruit Shipping - Gardening Under Difficulties
Fruit Shipping The scheme adopted by the Chicago & West Michigan railway for running its fruit train provides that shippers are to load into the cars, and the station agent is to act as receiving age...
-Gathered To The "Fruit" - Glands On Catalpa Leaves
Gathered To The Fruit In regard to Mr. Drum's criticism in Conference Corner for Sept., I should have explained that the expression to which he refers was only the printer's translation of my wre...
-Glazing Vineries - Good Decorative Plants
Glazing Vineries A few years ago a novel system of glazing cold vineries was advocated in which, instead of the usual lapping of the glass, the edges are left apart half an inch or less. This gives t...
-Grafting And Budding The Laurel. A. A. G - A Greenhouse Turtle
Grafting And Budding The Laurel. A. A. G The native laurel can be budded on its own stock only, and that is done in the greenhouse in the winter. At best it is a difficult operation. Possibly the bes...
-Grottos And Rockeries - Hardiness Of Seedling Peaches
Grottos And Rockeries The gardens of the Trocadero enclose some very fine examples of the art of the grotto-maker. For the imitation of nature, resources of all kinds are at hand. First, one can phot...
-Harvard's Garden Of Glass - Heating Of The Green Houses
Harvard's Garden Of Glass The botanical department of the college has been receiving during the year a very valuable collection of glass flowers. They are made by a secret process by a firm named Bla...
-Her Majesty Pink - Horticultural Specimens
Her Majesty Pink A quantity of cut-flowers of this variety was shown at the Royal Aquarium on the 21st of May, when a first-class certificate was awarded it. The flowers are large, double, pure white...
-Horticultural Statistics - How To Grow Strawberries For Farmers, Village People And Small Growers
Horticultural Statistics The nth census reports are to contain very full statistics relating to horticulture. Mortimer Whitehead is in charge of the agricultural matter of the census, and he has conf...
-How To Keep Pickles Green - Hydrangea Hoses
How To Keep Pickles Green Put the cucumbers in strong brine as fast as they are gathered from the vines. When you have enough drain off the brine. Line a kettle with the young leaves of grape vines a...
-Hydrangea Stellata Fimbriata - Importation Of Date-Palms
Hydrangea Stellata Fimbriata This variety is a new form of H Horiensia. The flowers are large, and white in color except near the center, which is bright red. The umbels are 9 to 10 inches in diamete...
-Importations Of Bulbous Plants From Japan - Insect Remedy For Slugs And Snails
Importations Of Bulbous Plants From Japan The following figures show what proportion the exportation of bulbous plants from Japan has assumed. In the month of August, 1889, there were shipped from Y...
-Inspiration - Japanese Wine Berry
Inspiration I walked to-day in my garden. The sweet peas and phlox so bright Had lifted their heads in gladness, And turned to the welcome light. The rain drops had fallen gently In the evening t...
-Jersey Notes. Remedy For Cabbage Worm - The Largest Orchid Known
Jersey Notes. Remedy For Cabbage Worm A friend who kept Guinea hens last season and allowed them to run in his cabbage patch says they kept the plants entirely free from worms. Justicia Carnea Just...
-Late Chrysanthemums - Leaf Spot Of The Rose
Late Chrysanthemums About two years ago I got a dozen chrysanthemums from Mr. Henderson; amongst them was one the label of which I lost. It did not flower that year, but the next year it bloomed abou...
-Lee's Favorite Potato - Lilies And Rosea
Lee's Favorite Potato We planted the last spring, Puritan, New Queen and Pearl of Savoy, all of which were sent out as extra early varieties, and found Lee's Favorite earlier than any. We have before...
-Lilium Henryi - Lonicera Sempervirens
Lilium Henryi Last week this lily flowered at Kew for the first time in Europe. It was sent by Dr. Henry from Ichang, in China, and although in its present condition it is inferior to many others, it...
-Machine For Hilling Celery - Masdevallia Fulvescens
Machine For Hilling Celery A Michigan man has patented a machine for doing this laborious work. On a frame like that used on a riding cultivator, two mold-boards turning towards each other are hung, ...
-Mcmahan's White Apple - Mimusops Elata (Sapotaceae)
Mcmahan's White Apple The Prairie Farmer says that the apple that attracted the most attention, among the multitude of fine varieties at the late horticultural convention in Madison, Wis., was McMaha...
-Mirrors At Floral Exhibitions - Montlucon Sugar Pear
Mirrors At Floral Exhibitions At the Ghent exhibition of 1888, a large number of mirrors were used in the orchid department, and again in the same department at Berlin in 1890. In both cases the effe...
-Morning Glories - Musa Sumatrana
Morning Glories In looking for beautiful plants for the window garden, in winter, or at any time for that matter, do not overlook the importance of this little old, well-known, and ever beautiful ann...
-Myrica Rubra - Not Manettia Cordifolia
Myrica Rubra This is a new fruiting shrub from Japan, and deserves to be grown in our cool houses for its fine evergreen foliage as well as for its fruit. The latter is dark red and very agreeable to...
-Note On Pyrus Coronaria - Number Of Florists In Chicago
Note On Pyrus Coronaria The American wild crab, Pyrus coronaria, is one of the many neglected wild fruits of this country. It varies considerably in its wild state, and some of its variations make to...
-Nurserymen's Convention - Origin Of "Sub-Rosa"
Nurserymen's Convention Our friends propose, at this session of their Association, to have on hand good speakers who will read papers on subjects of interest to the trade. Professors Roberts, Bailey,...
-Paper Berry Baskets. L. D. W - Peaches In Minnesota
Paper Berry Baskets. L. D. W We consider the paper berry baskets most desirable, and they will usually help sell the berries. After all, their general adoption will be slow until consumers are willin...
-Pears - Pennsylvania Road Suggestions
Pears In all parts of the world the pear seems to do best on high and dry ground with plenty of air movement and air drainage. The college grounds are not naturally pear soil, and a large portion of...
-Pickles And Preserves - Canning Corn - Plant-Lice Infesting The Apple
Pickles And Preserves - Canning Corn Those who have had trouble in keeping canned corn should try the following recipe: Take corn as soon as it is old enough for roasting (if too old the kernels will...
-Plants Collected In 1889 At Socorko And Clarion Islands, Pacific Ocean - A Practical Hint To Onion Growers
Plants Collected In 1889 At Socorko And Clarion Islands, Pacific Ocean By George Vasey and J. N. Rose. Reprint from the Proceedings of the U. S. National Museum. In 1889 the United States Fish Commis...
-Preserving Fruits - Protea Nana
Preserving Fruits The fruits in the exhibit of California on Wheels are said to be preserved as follows : Thirty gallons of filtered water are placed in a barrel, and on the water is placed a tin p...
-Prunes - Quinces, Peaches And Cauliflowers. Quince Preserves
Prunes Some of the eastern prunes have also exceeded expectations in size and quality of fruit and hardness of tree. Of those well and widely tested, the Black Prune and the Ungarish have been most l...
-Races Of Peaches For The South - Red Cherry (Prunus Pennsylvanica)
Races Of Peaches For The South A Louisianian regards the Japan Blood peach as a decided improvement in every way to the early peaches, such as Beatrice and Alexander. He further declares that the J...
-Remarks By The Editor - Rose Enemies
Remarks By The Editor Mr. Tarryer mentions no names, but many favorite wild beauties will occur to the lovers who go far to seek, or pine in the absence of them. Arbutus, of course, is one his party ...
-Rose Experiments - Sans Fences
Rose Experiments Who is to be the pioneer of seedlings in the rose department ? The opportunity is wide for the production of seedlings of free-blooming varieties which shall be hardy enough to withs...
-Satsuma Again - A Serious Rose Pest
Satsuma Again Almost an ignoramus in regard to oranges, and without any intention of disputing Dr. Phelps' conclusions respecting this Japanese variety on page 431, July Garden, I yet wish to inquire...
-She Loved To Groan - Single-Pole Grape Training
She Loved To Groan Aunt Mary - What a cold-hearted world this is! I was so sick all night and not a soul in the house came to see what was the matter with me. Ella - That's not it at all, auntie; we...
-Six Ways Of Setting Strawberry Plants - Soil For Plums
Six Ways Of Setting Strawberry Plants Fig. 1. A Header. Fig. 2. Too Near the Sun. Fig. 3. Too Near China. Fig. 4. Tight Shoes. Fig. 5. Too Shallow. Fig. 6. Good ! Skunk Cabbage ( ...
-Solanum Jasminoldes, Var. Grandiflorum - Speckled Gage
Solanum Jasminoldes, Var. Grandiflorum Solanum Jasminoldes, Var. Grandiflorum, is just what its name implies, a grand flowering plant; in the much desired class of trellis plants it has no rival, gro...
-Spinage Disease - Steam Or Hot Water
Spinage Disease A new fungus has been discovered upon spinage in New Jersey, by Dr. Halsted and by him named Eniyloma Ellisii, in compliment to J. B. Ellis, the noted mycologist. The infected leave...
-Strawberries At Benton Harbor, Michigan - Sugar
Strawberries At Benton Harbor, Michigan The yield of strawberries in the vicinity of Benton Harbor is said to have been so large the past spring that hardly one-third of the crop could be disposed of...
-Sweet Pickled Cucumbers - Tested Russian Fruits At The West
Sweet Pickled Cucumbers Select ripe cucumbers of uniform size, pare, and remove the seeds. Make brine strong enough to support an egg, pour over the cucumbers and let them stand nine days, stirring e...
-Three Best Plums - Tobias Gage Plum
Three Best Plums Charles A. Green names the three best market plums for western New York as Bradshaw, Lombard and Reine Claude. Three Good Russian Plums We have grown Moldavka larger than Lombard, ...
-A Tomato House. Training The Young Plants - Treatment Of The Calls Lily. M. I. S
A Tomato House. Training The Young Plants All things considered, however, the Lorillard is, perhaps, the best forcing tomato. It is uniformly of medium size, good quality, handsome color, and is prol...
-Tree Paeonies (Paonia Moutan) - Trouble With Melons
Tree Paeonies (Paonia Moutan) We shall be obliged to do without these beautiful flowers this season. The warm weather in February, followed by the severe cold weather in March, killed the flowering b...
-Tulip Sport - Use For Beans
Tulip Sport A neighbor of mine has in blossom a tulip bulb which has on the one stalk, which proceeds from the crown of the bulb, four distinct and well formed double blossoms. The stem is a unit for...
-The Usual Fats - Vegetable Notes
The Usual Fats Where is the dashing boarder who used to be the life of the table when I was here before, Mrs. Liver-more? asked an old patron of the house, addressing the landlady. I married him,...
-Vines For Mexico - Way Of Propagating Hydrangea Paniculata
Vines For Mexico It is said that the Mexican Government has lately ordered 1,000,000 grape cuttings from California, and will distribute them free to all who wish to plant them in Mexico. Virginia C...
-What Makes The Difference ? - White Egg-Plant
What Makes The Difference ? A splendid bush of the Mrs. John Laing rose, which has been filling the house with pleasant odor from its many blossoms, is standing in the window. This rose is only of re...









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