Grand Single Tulips For Beds

Keizerkroon

Crimson-scarlet and gold.

Kohi-Noor

Deep red.

La Remarquable

Purple.

Leonarda Da Vinci

Orange, edged yellow.

Coleur Ponceau

Cerise-crimson and white.

Brilliant Star

Scarlet, black centred.

Enchantress

Wine-red and rose.

Fabiola

Rosy-violet, with white feather markings.

Flamingo

White, flaked with cherry.

Joost Van Vondel White

Immense white.

Le Reve

Cream and rose blend.

L'Unique

White and lemon striped.

Golden Queen

Rich gold.

Thomas Moore

Apricot-orange.

Van Der Neer

Purple.

Van Berghem

Rose.

Proserpine

Salmony rose.

Prince Of Austria

Orange-scarlet.

Ophir D'Or

Lemon-yellow.

M'Kinley

Vermilion-orange and carmine.

Potter

Dark violet.

Grand Double Tulips For Beds

Turban

Violet, with yellow centre.

Rose D'Amour

Pale rose.

Brimstone

Lemon shaded with salmon.

Cherry Ripe

Cherry-red.

Imperator Rubrorum

Scarlet-crimson.

Lacq Of Haarlem

Rosy-violet.

Le Matador

Orange-scarlet.

Couronne Des Roses

Deep rose.

Boule De Neige

White.

Agnes

Scarlet.

Tournesol Red

Scarlet with yellow edge.

Duke Of York

Dark rose, bordered white.

The following list suggests a few varieties of the long-stemmed, hardy, late-blooming 'Darwins':

Some Handsome Darwin Tulips

La Tulipe Noire

Black.

City Of Haarlem

Vermilion.

Franz Hals

Blue violet.

Clara Butt

Pale rose.

Whistler

Blood-red.

W. Copeland

Heliotrope and rose.

Pride Of Haarlem

Carmine.

Gustave Dore

Rose.

Leopold De Rothschild

Chestnut.

Erguste

Deep heliotrope.

Bronze Queen

Bronzy-gold.

Kate Greenaway

Lilac and white.

Antony Roozen

Rose, with blue and white centre.

Baronne De La Tonnaye

Rose and white.

Cordelia

Carmine-violet. Scented.

Dorothy

Heliotrope-shaded salmon-lilac.

Mr. Farncombe Sanders

Cherry-scarlet and white.

King Harold

Deep crimson and violet.

Rev. H. Ewbank

Heliotrope-grey and white.

Salmon King

Cochinealried, white centre.

The Bishop

Purple-blue. Expensive.

The Sultan

Maroon-black.

It is noteworthy that Darwin Tulips can be pressed into service for the wild garden, or positions in semi-shade; although not seen at their best except in sunshine they are willing to live and bloom in well-drained ground even beneath tall deciduous trees, the white-and-lilac, heliotrope, and violet, with the black, in the brightest glades, the vermilion employed to cheer banks of the hedgerow, perhaps, with pinks, bronze-golds and carmines edging mossy tracks up hill and down dale.

Tulips can be raised from seed, sown from October to February, in pots in frames. It is best to plunge these to the rims in cinders, so that by moistening this bed occasionally the soil in the pots is just prevented from drying up. As soon as leaves have come and died down for the first time, the tiny bulbs should be taken up, stored for a month or so, then planted in a prepared bed or border in the sunny garden. By setting them in drills or lines, 6 inches row from row, 2 inches bulb from bulb, and fixing a label at either end of the row, the gardener will finish his job neatly, and be able to weed without imperilling the baby Tulips. Next time the bulbs have produced leaves and these have withered, replanting, after a month or two's storing, should give each bulb an inch more room. Any offsets should be broken off and planted separately. So culture continues, with increase of space, for 4 to 7 years. Juvenile blooms may appear in the fourth season, but first blooms are usually self-coloured, and give no idea of what a plant will ultimately bear: streaks, blotches, shadings, edgings, appear in later years, to determine both the character and the value of the blossom.

Another method of culture allows the youthful Tulips to die down and merely be mulched over with fresh compost the first year, not being lifted, dried, and replanted, till after the second leaf production.

Seed is ready to harvest when the capsule containing it is cracking ready to burst. This will be about the middle of July. The pods must be kept in a dry place and not opened till the seeds are required for sowing.