Insect Pests Of Fruits, Flowers, And Vegetables (Part 5)

Name of Pest.

Resting Period (Pupa Stage).

Destructive Period (Caterpillar and Perfect Insect Stage).

Plants Attacked and Remedies.

Pear Sawfly (Eriocampa limacina).

Oct. to May.

May to Oct.

Black slimy caterpillars feed upon under surface of Pear leaves, Roses, etc. Spray freely with nicotine and quassia washes early in season. Cultivate soil well in dormant season.

Pear Sucker (Psylla Pyri, fig. 129).

Winter.

Spring and Summer.

Young leaves of Pears when coming into bloom. Nicotine washes in

Phylloxera vastatrix. See Vine Louse.

summer, and caustic in winter.

Plum Aphis (Aphis Pruni).

Sept. to April.

May to Aug.

Mealy - covered pests suck juices from leaves of Plums, and leave excreta on surface, and curl leaves. Spray freely from May onwards with nicotine, quassia, or other solutions.

Plum Grub (Carpocapsa funebrana, fig. 134).

Oct. to May.

June to Sept.

Caterpillars attack fruits, and pierce flesh to stone. Treat as for Plum Sawfly.

Plum Sawfly (Hoplo-campa fulvicomis).

Autumn to Spring.

Mar. to July.

Feeds upon young Plum fruits and destroys them. Collect fallen fruits and burn. Cultivate from autumn to spring.

Plum Weevil. See Red-legged Garden Weevil.

Raspberry Beetle (By-turus tomentosus, fig. 136).

Autumn and Winter.

Spring and Summer.

Fruits of Raspberry. Burn all diseased fruit, and hoe well round stools at intervals during the year.

Raspberry Moth (Lam-pronia rubiella, fig. 135).

Oct. to April.

April to Oct.

The pink larvae, about 1/4 in. long, feed on flower and leaf buds and pith of shoots. Destroy injured shoots which may contain grubs. Cultivate soil well in dormant season, and dust freely with lime or soot.

Raspberry Weevil (Oti-orhynchus picipes). See Red-legged Garden Weevil.

Red - legged Garden Weevil (Otiorhynchus tenebricosus).

Red Spider (Tetrany-chius telarius; also species of Bryobia and Tenuipalpus).

May to July.

Autumn to Spring outside.

Aug. to April.

Jan. to Dec. under glass.

Larvae feed upon roots of Gooseberries, Currants, Raspberries, Strawberries, Vines. Hoe ground frequently, and dust with lime or soot.

Tiny mites infesting under surface of leaves of many plants in the open air and under glass. Syringe thoroughly with clean water or nicotine solution.

Root Aphis (Traina troglodytes).

Oct. to April.

May to Oct.

Feeds upon the roots of Jerusalem Artichokes and other plants. Best kept down by cultivation and hoeing.

Rootgall. See Eelworm.

Name of Pest.

Resting Period (Pupa Stage).

Destructive Period (Caterpillar and Perfect Insect Stage).

Plants Attacked and Remedies.

Rose Aphis (Siphono-phora Rosœ, S. rosa-rum).

Oct. to Mar.

April to Sept.

Attacks leaves and young shoots of Roses in open air and under glass. Syringe freely with nicotine or quassia solutions.

Rose Chafer (Cetonia aurata, fig. 139).

Oct. to Mar.

April to Oct.

The fat, hairy, whitish grubs feed on roots of various plants, and the beetles feed on the flowers of Roses, Strawberries, etc. Remedies as for Cockchafer Grub.

Rose Sawflies (Hylotoma liosce, Emphytus cine-tus, figs. 133 and 137).

Oct. to Mar.

April to Sept.

Larvae eat leaves of Roses. Some Rose Sawflies roll the leaves up into shelters. Syringe early and frequently with nicotine or quassia washes. Cultivate from Oct. to March.

Rose Tortrix (Lozotcenia Rosana).

Aug. to Mar.

April to July.

Larva roll up leaves of Roses and other plants, and feed upon the flower buds. Remedies as for Sawflies.

Silver Y Moth (Plusia gamma, fig. 140).

Oct. to Mar.

April to Sept.

Green caterpillars feed upon leaves of all kinds of plants. Spray with nicotine and other washes early; dust with lime or soot. Cultivate ground well in dormant season.

Slugs and Snails (Limax ater, L. agrestis, Helix Jiortensis).

Jan. to Dec.

Troublesome under glass and in open air. Catching by hand under glass, or strewing stages or soil with soot or lime as in open air. Use hoe frequently outside, and encourage thrushes, blackbirds, etc.

Slug Worms(Eriocampa limacina, E. liosce, fig. 138).

Oct. to June.

July to Oct.

Larvae destroy leaves of Pears, Roses, etc. See remedies under Pear Sawfly.

Small Ermine Moth (Hyponomeutapadella, fig. 117); H. euony-mella, H. malinella.

July to Mar.

April to June.

Caterpillars live in colonies in webs, and destroy leaves of Apples, Hawthorns, Euonymus, etc. Syringe freely in May with Paris green, nicotine, or other poisonous washes. Collect cocoons from plants in July and August. Cultivate ground during dormant season.

Snowy Fly (Aleyrodes vaporariorum).

Jan. to Dec.

Minute larvae infest leaves of Cucumbers, Ferns, Tomatoes, etc, and perfect white insects soon develop. Fumigate and syringe with nicotine.

Spittle Fly or Frog Hopper (Aphrophora spumaria, fig. 142).

Oct. to April.

May to Sept.

Larvae embedded in spittle-like froth suck juices from tender shoots of many garden plants. Brush off pests or squeeze between fingers. Afterwards spray with nicotine or quassia solutions.

Thrips (Thrips minutis-sima, T. pisivora, T. cerealium, etc, fig. 148).

Autumn to

Spring in open air.

Jan. to Dec. under glass.

The dull yellow larvae of several species attack under surface of leaves of many crops in open air and under glass when air is very dry. Syringe plants under glass with water or quassia solutions; also in open air; and hoe freely.

Spotted and Striped Pea Weevils (Sitona crinita and S. lineata).

Fig. 132. - Spotted and Striped Pea Weevils (Sitona crinita and S. lineata).

1, Spotted Pea Weevil (nat. size); 2, magnified. 3, Striped Pea Weevil (nat. size); 4, magnified. 6, Leaf notched by Weevils.

Rose Sawfly (Emphytus cinctua) 1, Insect enlarged. 2, Leaflet, showing larvae.

Fig. 133. - Rose Sawfly (Emphytus cinctua) 1, Insect enlarged. 2, Leaflet, showing larvae.

Plum Grub and Moth (Carpocapsa funebrana).

Fig. 134. - Plum Grub and Moth (Carpocapsa funebrana).

1, Fruit with grub. 2. Grub descending from trees (with enlarged head). 3, Moth.

Raspberry Moth (Lampronia rubiella).

Fig. 135. - Raspberry Moth (Lampronia rubiella).

1, Moth (magnified); 2, nat. size. 3, Caterpillar (nat. size). 4, Caterpillar (enlarged). 5, Caterpillar (greatly magnified and nat. size). 6, Chrysalis (greatly magnified).

Raspberry Beetle (Byturus tomentosus).

Fig. 136. - Raspberry Beetle (Byturus tomentosus).

1, 2, Raspberry Beetles (magnified); 3, nat. size. 4, Maggot (magnified); 5, nat length. 6, Infested Raspberry fruit.

Larvae of Rose Sawfly (Hylotoma Rosœ).

Fig. 137. - Larvae of Rose Sawfly (Hylotoma Rosœ).

Slug Worm or Sawfly (Eriocampa limacina), showing enlarged insect, and larva on leaf.

Fig. 138. - Slug Worm or Sawfly (Eriocampa limacina), showing enlarged insect, and larva on leaf.

Rose Chafer (Cetonia aurata) 1, Beetle. 2, Caterpillar. 3, Cocoon. 4, Pupa.

Fig. 139. - Rose Chafer (Cetonia aurata) 1, Beetle. 2, Caterpillar. 3, Cocoon. 4, Pupa.

Silver Y Moth (Plusia gamma).

Fig. 140. - Silver Y Moth (Plusia gamma).

1, Eggs. 2, Caterpillar. 3, Chrysalis in cocoon. 4, Moth.

The Turnip Fly or Beetle (Phyllotreta nemorum).

Fig. 141. - The Turnip Fly or Beetle (Phyllotreta nemorum).

1 and 2, Insect (nat. size and magnified). 3, Insect feeding. 4 and 5, Eggs on under side of leaf. 6 and 7, Maggot advancing in growth. 8 and 9, Maggot full-grown (nat. size and magnified). 10 and 11, Pupa (nat. size and magnified).

Spittle Fly (Aphrophora spumaria), showing insects and frothy spittle on shoot.

Fig. 142. - Spittle Fly (Aphrophora spumaria), showing insects and frothy spittle on shoot.