A large and popular genus of hardy herbaceous perennials, mostly grown by nurserymen for border decoration, the chief trade being done in the "roots". Some species, however, like A. fulgens (or A. hortensis, fig. 183), are extensively grown in the Scilly Isles, for the production of early cut flowers, as may be judged from the illustration. The scarlet blossoms are picked in the bud or half-open stage in January, and are tied up in bunches, packed in shallow boxes or baskets, and thus sent to the English markets. As a market-garden crop that produces brilliant bloom early in the year, Anemone fulgens may be recommended to growers in the mildest parts of Ireland and other places. There are several fine forms - both single and double - now in cultivation, including the stellata and pavonina forms. They flourish in good and well-drained garden soil, and about 140,000 could be grown on an acre. They are increased by division of the tuberous roots, and may also be raised from seeds. These should be sown as soon as thoroughly ripe, in specially prepared beds of clean and rich gritty soil, or in cold frames, where the seedlings can be attended to easily. The young plants may be transplanted in autumn if large enough, or in spring. Apart from its value as a cut flower for market, a good trade is also done in the tuberous roots, principally in the autumn, when bulbous plants generally are being purchased. The Poppy Anemone (A. coronaria), of which there are also numerous varieties, including the magnificent "St. Brigid" strains, requires a much richer soil, and even warmer and more sheltered situations. An enormous trade is done in the English markets in the blossoms imported from the south of France early in the year. Where cold frames are extensively used, it might be well to utilize some of them for the early production of these two kinds of Anemones, but competition with blooms from the Riviera must be taken into account.

Anemone hortensis.

Fig. 183. - Anemone hortensis.

PICKING ANEMONE FULGENS IN FULL BLOOM IN JANUARY IN THE SCILLY ISLES.

PICKING ANEMONE FULGENS IN FULL BLOOM IN JANUARY IN THE SCILLY ISLES.

CLUMP OF CHRISTMAS ROSES FORCED INTO EARLY BLOOM.

CLUMP OF CHRISTMAS ROSES FORCED INTO EARLY BLOOM.

Other species of Anemone in which a trade is done, chiefly in the roots or seeds, are: A. alba, 6 in., white; A. albana, 6 in., yellowish; A. alpina, 1-2 ft, white to purple and yellow; A. angulosa, 6-12 in., sky blue; A. apennina, 6 in., sky blue, with a white variety; A. baldensis, 6 in., white; A. blanda, 6 in., deep blue, with several charming varieties; A. Halleri, 6 in., purple or deep lilac; A. Hepatica, 6 in., blue, with rose and white varieties; A. japonica, 2-3 ft., with white and purple varieties, a splendid and popular border plant; A. narcissiflora, 1 ft., white to purple; A. nemorosa, 6-8 in., white, the British Wood Anemone, with its blue variety Robinsoniana or coerulea and double-flowered form; A. pal-mata, 6 in., golden yellow; also a white variety; A. Pulsatilla, 6-12 in., purplish, hairy, the Pasque Flower, with several varieties; A. ranunculoides, 6 in., yellow; A. rivularis, 2 ft., white; A. sylvestris, 6-18 in., white. Most of these are easily grown, and may be increased from seeds or division.