The garden varieties, still known under the name of Amaryllis, have been evolved from the South American species H. vitattum, H. Reginoe, H. par-dinum, and U. Leopoldi, by crossing and intercrossing during the past eighty years. Some magnificent varieties are now in cultivation, but the trade is confined almost exclusively to a few nurserymen. Attempts have been made to popularize Hippeastrums as market plants, but without much success. The plants are easily raised from seeds, and the bulbs attain flowering size in from two to three years. Established plants may be kept green throughout the year, but it is usual to give them a rest. When growth commences, the bulbs are repotted into pots not too large, and a rich compost of fibrous loam, leaf mould, and old cow manure, with a dash of silver sand, is used. The atmosphere is kept warm, and also moist by frequent syringings. Water is supplied abundantly during growth, but is gradually lessened as the plants go to rest. Fine specimens have leaves 3 to 5 ft. long and 3 to 4 in. broad, while the flowers are from 6 to 10 in. across. (See The Bulb Book, p. 275).

Hippeastrum (Amaryllis).

Fig. 282. - Hippeastrum (Amaryllis).

HIPPEASTRUMS GROWN FOR THE FLORIST TRADE.

HIPPEASTRUMS GROWN FOR THE FLORIST TRADE.