The beautiful garden forms (fig. 301) have arisen by the crossing and intercrossing of such species as S. Dunni, S. Rexi, and S. parviflora, the two first hybrids being known as Kewensis (S. Dunni x S. Rexi) and Watsoni (S. Dunni x S. parviflora), in commemoration of the Royal Gardens, Kew, where they were raised by Mr. W. Watson, the present curator,and general editor of The Gardeners' Assistant Both these hybrids were figured in The Gardeners Chronicle, August, 1887, pp. 214, 247. The original Kew hybrids were taken in hand, and have since been crossed with other species like S. par-viflorus, S. Fannini, and S. Wendlandi. The flowers of the garden forms display great variation in colour, the individual blooms being more or less drooping, tubular, and beautifully striped. By sowing seeds in February and March on gritty soil, and in a temperature of 70° to 75° F., plants can be obtained to flower by the following August, and continue to bloom during the autumn and winter months. The treatment given to Gloxinias will suit Streptocarpuses perfectly. The coloured Plate will give an idea of the beauty of the flowers.

HYBRID STREPTOCARPUS.

HYBRID STREPTOCARPUS.

[Three-fourths natural size).

Streptoearpus.

Fig. 301. - Streptoearpus.