Fruit is grown to a limited extent in almost every county from Caithness to Wigtown, but the bulk of the fruit is grown in the counties of Fife, Midlothian, Haddington, Aberdeen, Forfar, Lanark, and Perth. The following figures show the movement up and down of the industry in these counties since 1897: -

1897.

1910.

Small Fruit. Acres.

Orchard Fruit. Acres.

Small Fruit. Acres.

Orchard Fruit. Acres.

Fife ......

161

54

206

34

Midlothian ...

268

62

227

66

Haddington ...

392

143

337

94

Aberdeen...

354

10

335

20

Forfar ...

197

33

396

23

Lanark

1967

722

2102

736

Perth......

852

528

2477

560

The Fifeshire orchards are for the most part confined to the village of Newburgh. Small-fruit plantations are scattered over the county. The centre of fruit culture in Forfarshire is Kirriemuir, the "Thrums" of J. M. Barrie's books. The weaver village of other days has become not only a thriving manufacturing town, but a veritable fruit garden. Some years ago the farm of Knowehead, situated on the brae above the village, was purchased and divided into small holdings. Every holding is now a fruit garden. A flourishing Fruit-growers' Association disposes of the fruit. The progress of the movement may be seen from the gross tonnage of fruit dispatched from the Kirriemuir railway station since 1906. These are the figures: 1906, 61 tons; 1908, 110 tons; 1909, 324 tons; 1910, 378 tons. Scotch raspberries are mostly consigned in hundredweight barrels to preservers in the United Kingdom for jam purposes. The fruit growers of Kirriemuir have developed the Raspberry industry along a new and a more profitable line. They are the largest consigners in Scotland of punneted raspberries to the English market. The best-known fruit district in Aberdeenshire is on the banks of the Dee, immediately north of the city of Aberdeen. Specially fine strawberries are grown in this district, which come into the market after the southern strawberries are done. Both Raspberries and Strawberries are grown, though not to a large extent, at Banchory. Mr. Maconochie, once member of Parliament for East Aberdeenshire, was anxious to develop fruit culture in his constituency. It was begun on the low-lying lands of Buchan, but is making little progress. The Lothians are more noted for their market gardens than their fruit fields. Some of the finest market gardens in the country are in the Lothians. Much of the Lothian fruit which finds its way to the Edinburgh market is grown in market gardens. There is only one district, the district round about the village of Ormiston, where there is a congregation of fruit growers.