Let us assume that a man contemplates starting a market garden on a small scale, and that he intends to grow Apples, Pears, Plums, Gooseberries, Currants, Raspberries, vegetables of various kinds, and Mushrooms, also bedding stuff, Chrysanthemums, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, and bulbous plants under glass, with catch crops of various things between.

Having made up his mind what he intends to do, he must find the necessary land. He then has to consider whether it will be better to purchase an established garden, or to make a fair start and carry out his own views on an open and suitable piece of ground, well situated so far as railway facilities, etc, are concerned. If a young man, it will be wiser to start his market garden on modern principles rather than hamper himself with an oldfashioned and perhaps tumbledown place. If, however, he should meet with a fairly recently established market garden, with fruit trees and bushes properly planted at reasonable distances apart, and, if the glass structures have wide panes of glass and not too much heavy timber, good boilers and piping, it may be wise to invest in such a place. As a rule it is unwise to take over very old gardens with worn-out trees and bushes, as such a place can never be brought up to date except by completely grubbing up and replanting. This would cost an enormous amount of money, besides which it might be prohibited by the terms of lease, which in most cases have been drawn entirely in the interests of the ground landlord and to the distinct disadvantage of the tenant, chiefly owing to the intense ignorance of horticultural practice on the part of the legal advisers.

Assuming that a market garden such as we have described is to be started from the beginning, unhampered with legal restrictions as to the number of fruit trees or bushes that must be planted to the acre, and untrammelled with any predecessors' errors, the following estimate as to capital outlay will be found approximately correct: -

Table I

Estimate as to the Approximate Cost of Establishing a Freehold Market Garden of 10 Acres.

s.

d.

Purchase of 10 ac. freehold land at 50 ...

500

0

0

Dwelling house and offices...

500

0

0

Packing shed, stables, etc....

150

0

0

2 horses and harness at 40...

80

0

0

1 large wagon...

40

0

0

1 small wagon..

20

0

0

Spades, forks, hoes, dibbers, rakes, wheelbarrows, ploughs ...

25

0

0

Fencing...

500

0

0

8 greenhouses, 100 ft. by 12 ft, and piping...

1000

0

0

Miscellaneous...

100

0

0

Total ............

2915

0

0

The total initial cost of establishing a freehold market garden of 10 ac. may be thus about 3000. The question of fencing is important. If the site selected is not already properly protected by walls or hedges it will be necessary to spend a large sum in fencing material. If this can be saved, of course, so much the better. In any case we will assume that 3000 is necessary to make a start. Then comes the question of annual expenses, which may be stated as follows: -