The volume or cubic contents of any body is found by solid or cubic measure, a practical knowledge of which is most useful to commercial gardeners. Before proceeding to give examples, the following tables may be noted: -

1 cub. ft. = 1728 cub. in.

27 cub. ft. = 1 cub. yd. = 46,656 cub. in.

1 cub. ft. of water = 1000 oz. avoir, (really 997137 oz.) = 625 lb.

1 pt. of pure water weighs 1 1/4 lb.

1 gal. of water = 10 lb. = 277 cub. in.

oz.

cub. in.

gill.

5 =

8.664 =

1

pt.

20 =

34.659 =

4 =

1

qt.

40 =

69.318 =

8 =

2 =

1

gal.

160 =

277.274 =

32 =

8 =

4 =

1

pk.

320 =

554.548 =

64 =

16 =

8 =

2 =

1

hush.

1,280 =

2218.192 =

256 =

64 =

32 =

8 =

4

= 1

qr.

10,240 =

17745.536 =

2048 =

512 =

256 =

64 =

32

= 8

= 1

Thus, to find the cubic contents of any square or rectangular solid body, the length, width, and depth are multiplied together. Thus, 1 cub. ft. = 12 in. by 12 in. by 12 in. = 1728 cub. in.

An acre of soil contains 43,560 sq. ft., and at 1 ft. deep is considered to weigh on an average 3,000,000 lb. Therefore 1 cub. ft. of soil weighs on an average 3,000,000/43,560 = 69 lb., nearly. 1 cub. yd. of soil weighs about

1863 lb. = 16.6 cwt. In practice it is reckoned as 1 ton.

In applying these figures to well-known things in gardens and nurseries the following examples may be taken.