A very graceful tree of small size is the Laburnum (Laburnum vulgare). It is not used much in this country, but is popular in England. It is tall and slight with delicate green foliage, and the branches bend over gracefully and nod with racemes of yellow flowers. Laburnum does well in partial shade and needs a great deal of moisture, so that in dry Summers it should be plentifully watered, and the foliage sprayed. This tree is worth growing and is a good one to have in the garden; it is really a garden tree. Plant it in a corner near a hedge or a fence post, and place Foxglove around it to hide the trunk, which is generally bare for several feet. Or it is very nice swinging gently over a garden seat; it blossoms in June.

The native Hawthorn (Crataegus coccinea) is an attractive tree with red flowers not unlike the English Hawthorn. Hawthorns may be used for pleaching, that is, interweaving their branches overhead. There is a pleached Hawthorn arch at Holly House, Peacedale, Rhode Island, the home of Roland Hazard, Esq., which Mrs. Earle has pictured in her "Old Time Gardens." Another variety, Crataegus crus-galli, makes an excellent hedge as its thorns effectually keep off cattle, dogs, etc., but it is not used for this purpose to any extent, perhaps because it is rather slow to start, and everybody nowadays seems to be in a hurry.

Old Box Archway; Flushing, Long Island.

Old Box Archway; Flushing, Long Island.