Lavender, a grey-green shrub-like plant, probably has more tradition and sentiment connected with it than any other flower. It thrives in England in light, warm soils. It is apparently difficult to raise from seed, so that it is better to procure plants from the nurseryman which may be increased by division. Protection should be given them in Winter in this climate, and they should be planted in a very warm, sunny position, on the slope of a bank or terrace. There is a white-flowered variety that is just as sweet as the blue and blossoms at the same time, so that if the two are combined the clump will be more interesting.

Lavender.

Lavender.

The best place to plant seeds is in a cold frame; not that the protection of the glass is necessary, but in a frame the seed bed is protected and the young seedlings are kept safe. The amount of moisture may be regulated, which is an important thing, and heavy rains that are so often disastrous to seeds in the open ground may be kept off. Sow the seeds in drills and transplant when two inches high to another frame. To keep off cats and dogs and chickens a lattice of laths may be made and laid over the top of the frame.

It is a good thing to have some annuals, not only to use for cutting but also for filling out the flower garden when something happens to the established clumps, as something very often will in the best regulated gardens.