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Design In Landscape Gardening | by Ralph Rodney Root, Charles Fabens Kelley



This book is based largely upon lectures offered in the department of landscape gardening at the University of Illinois. The subject of plant color and the theory of color planting is given to the public with some reluctance. In spite of much time and study it still seems inadequate. The subject is, however, presented from a new standpoint and it is hoped that other workers in the same field may make much further progress along the way here pointed out.

TitleDesign In Landscape Gardening
AuthorRalph Rodney Root, Charles Fabens Kelley
PublisherThe Century Co.
Year1914
Copyright1914, The Century Co.
AmazonDesign in Landscape Gardening

By Ralph Rodney Root, B.S.A., M.L.A., Assistant Professor of Landscape Gardening. In charge of Professional Course, University of Illinois

And Charles Fabens Kelley, A.B., Assistant Professor of Art. Head of Department of Art, Ohio State University

Design In Landscape Gardening 2THE RHODODENDRONS

Painted by Hobart Nichols

The Rhododendrons

Country Place of Professor Charles S. Sargent, Brookline, Mass.

-Preface
It has seemed to the authors that there is a real need for a book which will sum up, in a compact way, the most definite principles of design as applied to Landscape Gardening. As in all subjects rela...
-I. Elements of Landscape Design
At the present time in America people are much more sensitive to their home surroundings, as far as appearances are concerned, than they were thirty years ago. Then their intelligent interest stopped ...
-Architecture
Architecture has been defined as everything from frozen music to the art of beautiful building. Whatever it may be, it must be useful as well as beautiful in order to fulfil its purpose satisfacto...
-Sculpture
Sculpture has always played a very important part in garden design, as well as in almost all types of monumental and public planting. Less formal than architecture, it may be used to great advantage a...
-Painting
Various schools of painting have had a profound influence upon landscape design, particularly in England. The influence seems to have been exerted chiefly in the decorative composition of mass and spa...
-Agriculture
In agriculture the landscape-architect is concerned primarily with the relation of the plant te the soil. He considers carefully such questions as soil drainage and soil composition, from the physical...
-Horticulture
In horticulture the landscape-architect is concerned with a study of the plant as an individual, its growth, propagation, the formation of new varieties, pruning, spraying, and the best methods of pla...
-Engineering
Engineering in landscape problems concerns the lay of the land, the alteration of grades, the construction of topographical work, drainage, and the building of walks, bridges, and drives. Before the l...
-II. Design
It will perhaps be advantageous to give a brief summary of design in general before the specific subject of design in landscape is approached. The underlying principles of design are found in all bran...
-Design. Part 2
Landscape design as an art is less artificial than any other form of design because it deals almost entirely with natural objects in formal or informal combinations. The landscape-designer uses trees ...
-Design. Part 3
The naturalization of a feature may be carried to absurd extremes. For instance, an Italian well-head might be introduced into Norman-English surroundings. If the landscape-designer felt that the nati...
-Design. Part 4
It is remarkable to note how few people have grasped this very simple principle. In many of our cities, particularly in the Middle West, it would seem as if the owners had scraped away from the buildi...
-Design. Part 5
This does not mean that there should be a careless and unstudied use of line in informal design. On the contrary, it is often more difficult to design satisfactory lines of this type. Freedom in appea...
-Design. Part 6
A thorough knowledge of the plants at one's disposal, and their characteristics, will be indispensable in suggesting means of accent to the designer when he is considering horticultural accents. As a ...
-Design. Part 7
When architectural features are used as garden accessories, or to fulfil some similar function, it is not necessary, or indeed really desirable, that all be exactly alike. The general masses should be...
-Design. Part 8
The basis of the design scheme in every piece of landscape work is geometrical, whether symmetrical or not, and the first consideration in designing the circulation is the handling of the traffic in t...
-Design. Part 9
It will be seen that the composition of the planting masses is nothing more nor less than the thoughtful and satisfactory location of areas. Balance, rhythm, and repetition enter here as dominant fact...
-III. Color
All objects perceived by man, whether natural or artificial, are visible because of their color, and because of that alone. A thing is visible because it is darker or lighter than something beside or ...
-Color. Part 2
This stimulus is frequently taken advantage of in winter planting, where a background of dark evergreens is relieved and brightened by the bare red branches of the dogwood (Cornus siberius) or berry-b...
-Color. Part 3
Consider two groups of colors, one with the dominant note the same for all its members, but with the modifying notes different; the other with different dominants, but possessing the same modifier. As...
-IV. Planting
A thorough knowledge of plant materials and their possible uses in landscape work is of great importance to the landscape-designer, inasmuch as most of the effects he desires to create, in the working...
-Planting. Part 2
Where plants are used in an esthetic way they fall into three classes of treatment: first, they may be employed to aid in an architectural scheme, being interesting chiefly on account of their form, a...
-Planting. Part 3
Plants are grouped as annuals, those that die every year; biennials, those that generally flower the second year and then die out; and perennials, lasting many years; greenhouse plants, which must be ...
-Planting. Part 4
Informal planting allows a much wider range of shape, scale, and color in the same planting scheme than does the formal. Informal planting may be seen close at hand or at a distance. If it is always ...
-Planting. Part 5
Shrubs are divided into three classes according to their height: a, low; b, medium, and c, high. Height is a primary consideration in all planting schemes, as it determines the scale of the entire pla...
-Planting. Part 6
In arrangement, the blossoms may be individual, as in the rose of Sharon (Fig. 33), or massed, as in the elder (Fig. 34), and this will affect the problem to a considerable extent. For use in gardens ...
-V. Problems
Landscape problems fall naturally into groups or classes, and the landscape-designer is bound to come into contact with a greater or less number of these groups. Within the groups themselves there is ...
-An American Home
The typical American home may be defined as a suburban residence costing from four to fifteen thousand dollars, and having a lot from sixty to two hundred feet wide. It is planted more or less intelli...
-Small Places
One of the greatest needs for planting exists among simple and cheap surroundings, and the very inexpensive place may be helped by planting even more, perhaps, than its showy and elaborate brother. On...
-School Grounds
In this so-called age of the child a great deal of nonsense is being talked on all sides by more or less well-informed enthusiasts about the duty of the public to the rising generation. Amid a vast ...
-Golf-Course
In laying out a golf-course (Figs. 45, 46) the final appearance of the design will depend directly upon the clearness with which the purpose has been kept in view, and the ingenuity with which the top...
-A Country Estate
Country estates are of two sorts, those in which farming is the primary consideration, and those where no income is to be derived from the farming, making the economic feature of secondary importance....
-VI. Garden Design
In a country where gardens are the exception rather than the rule, it is disappointing to find that the existing specimens are not always such as would inspire a man to acquire one of his own. There i...
-Garden Design. Part 2
Up to the seventeenth century landscape gardening was essentially garden design. Garden design in turn was really included in the profession of architecture, and almost all the architects of the time ...
-Garden Design. Part 3
In the castles of feudal times considerable space was left between the building and the fortified walls, and in some cases a court was used to give light and air, and to accommodate the peasantry and ...
-Garden Design. Part 4
FIGURE 57. GARDEN TEMPLE AT MONTACUTE HOUSE, ENGLAND. Pleasure gardens are divided into two classes according to whether their emphasis is architectural or horticultural. In the architectural c...
-Garden Design. Part 5
New Orleans is warm the year around, with plenty of rain and moisture, giving a large range of plant material, and even permitting the use of some vegetation of a tropical character. In Southern Ca...
-Garden Design. Part 6
Within the major limitations of formal and informal, architectural and horticultural emphasis, position and topography, there is considerable scope for the exercise of imagination by the garden-design...









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