The following remarks and suggestions are given in continuation of my letter in the Florist (No. xxvi. p. 46) on the subject of these interesting flowers; and I shall now plainly suggest what I think would prove highly beneficial to all parties concerned.

I. That there be two exhibitions in 1850; the one to be held in or near London at one of our metropolitan floricultural shows; the other to be held in the North of England, say about 150 miles from London, in such town and at such time as the growers of the North themselves may select.

II. That the boundary-line I have proposed be the division by which to know the Northerns from the Southerns; and, to avoid neutrality, let every town through which the said line passes be considered a northern one.

III. That there be Six Classes open to all England at each of the proposed two exhibitions, viz.

Class 1. For six blooms of dissimilar varieties of Northern-raised Carnations. Class 2. For six blooms of dissimilar varieties of Northern-raised Picotees. Class 3. For six blooms of dissimilar varieties of Southern-raised Carnations. Class 4. For six blooms of dissimilar varieties of Southern-raised Picotees. Class 5. For the Premier Carnation Prize (the best stand of Class I. and the best stand of Class III. alone to compete in this class); and Class 6. For the Premier Picotee Prize (the best stand in Class II. and the best stand in Class IV. alone to compete in this class).

IV. That there be a subscription opened in every interested locality; and all sums collected be lodged with a general treasurer, thus forming an All-England Carnation and Picotee Fund.

V. That the prizes offered to the several classes range in the following order (higher or lower according to the amount collected), viz.

Class 1. For The Best Six Blooms Of Dissimilar Varieties Of

Northern-raised Carnations ....

2

0

0

For the second best ditto .....

1

10

0

For the third best ditto .....

1

0

0

For the fourth best ditto.....

0

10

0

5

0

0

Class 2. For The Best Six Blooms Of Dissimilar Varieties Of

Northern-raised Picotees ....

2

0

0

For the second best ditto.....

1

10

0

For the third best ditto.....

1

0

0

For the fourth best ditto.....

0

10

0

10

0

0

Class 3. For The Best Six Blooms Of Dissimilar Varieties Of

Southern-raised Carnations.... .

2

0

0

For the second best ditto ....

1

10

0

For the third best ditto ....

1

0

0

For the fourth best ditto.....

0

10

0

15

0

0

Class 4. For The Best Six Blooms Of Dissimilar Varieties Of

Southern-raised Picotees .... .

, 2

0

0

For the second best ditto ......

1

10

0

For the third best ditto .....

, 1

0

0

For the fourth best ditto.....

0

10

0

Carried forward . . .

20

0

0

Brought forward ....

20

0

0

Class 5. Premier Carnation Prize ..... (The best stand in Class I. and the best stand in Class III. alone to compete in this class).

2

10

0

22

10

0

Class 6. Premier Picotee Prize

(The best stand in Class II. and the best stand in Class IV. alone to compete in this

2

10

0

25

0

0

And supposing that the above be approved as the schedule of prizes for the Southern Exhibition (which of necessity must be the first), that an exact counterpart be adopted, without alteration, for the Northern Exhibition.

VI. That the flowers be shewn on cards in raised tubes, so as fully to display the pods.

VII. That uniform stands and cards be provided.

VIII. That every Northern and every Southern contributor to the fund give in the name of a gentleman to act as censor, the majority of votes to decide the election of such censors; and that the two so chosen have the power to call in a third, or referee, if they desire.

IX. That there be no appeal from the censors' award; and Lastly, 'That such other regulations as may be considered necessary (not being contrary to the spirit of the foregoing) be added to these rules.

And now, gentlemen, Carnation and Picotee growers of England, let me here state that I desire to assume little and dictate less; nor have I knowingly made any arbitrary suggestion. It is for you to decide yes or no in this interesting cause.

There can be little doubt about readily obtaining an amount sufficient to carry out the schedules after the above form; a sum of fifty pounds pays the prizes, and I know little else, except the censors' travelling expenses, that could form any item of expenditure; for I take it, that in a truly national affair, as I wish this may be, all growers and exhibitors will readily offer their gratuitous services (and contribution) in each and every floral district.

I am, Growers of England,

Your brother Exhibitor,

John Edwards.* Wace Cottage, Holloway, Middlesex.

* As we understand a copy of Mr. E.'s communication has been sent to all our contemporaries, no excuse can be pleaded for ignorance on the part of those interested. - Editor.