In this instance I shall make free with an article of my own in the Gardener's and Farmer s Journal, published in May 1847. Some of the readers of the Florist may not have seen that paper at the time; and as I have nothing to add to what was then expressed relative to the present plant and A. lobatum, I shall give them entirely as they there stand. It is true, I then omitted to notice the beautiful Fern known by the name of A. Lonchi-tidoides, which appears to partake of my A. aculeatum and the A. Lonchitis; but I think more of the former. Light sandy loam suits them all, and they are not particular as to situation.

I have had the above Fern under constant cultivation for nearly thirty years; during which long period it follows that I must have had many opportunities afforded me of observing its progress in every stage of growth, even from the development of the reproductive organs (which, by the way, I may just as well here observe, have much the appearance, like many other Ferns in that state, of Junger-mannia pinguis, and are apparently analogous to the cotyledons of phanerogamous plants, and, like them, are different in appearance and substance according to their respective genera,) to fronds of from three to five feet high, and invariably found it to keep sufficiently distinct from its relative, A. lobatum. At no very remote period they were both extremely plentiful in this part of West Kent, sometimes growing together, but more frequently individually, and many miles apart. However, at the present time they are rarely to be found. If I am not greatly mistaken, my recorded A. aculeatum, in another place, is now the A. lobatum of another.

Be this as it may, it matters but very little, either to the object I have in view, whether it be called A. aculeatum or A. lobatum; as either name, in my opinion, may with equal propriety be applied to it, and in both the pinnules are more or less lobed; only that I consider it of the very highest importance that man and man should understand each other on all subjects connected with science. But there now appears to be room left open between the present plant and A. lobatum for a third or intermediate species, namely, A. angulare, which is vet, I fear, involved in a considerable degree of uncertainty, if not altogether questionable. At least, the plants forwarded to me for A. angulare proved to be truly identical with my A. lobatum; for I could perceive nothing on which to fix a specific distinction. It is true, they were noble specimens, five to six feet high in the frond, and doubtless had been growing under very favourable circumstances; still the true character of A. lobatum was not in any way shaken: the same plant growing under cover of a thick hedge-row will appear far less dilated in its fronds than when in exposed situations, where it is usually not so tall, but more spreading.

My correspondent's A. angulare, therefore, offers no real specific difference between it and my A. lobatum, as the pinnules in both are conspicuously petioled and of the same shape; but in my A. aculeatum the pinnules are really decurrent, even down to the general rachis, and very different in shape. Besides, A. aculeatum is altogether a more rigid plant, more shining and narrower in the frond than A. lobatum; consequently I should say, unite A. lobatum and A. angulare: but if we do the same thing with A. lobatum and A. aculeatum, we must serve many, very many indeed, of other species the same way, which are not, in my opinion, quite so distinct as they appear to be.

By the above it will clearly appear that I am not yet prepared conscientiously to subscribe to a third or intermediate species, notwithstanding that I may be opposing my opinion to that of higher authorities. At a time when British Ferns are becoming necessary appendages to almost every well-regulated plant-department in this country, it is incumbent on those who may professionally be called upon, and consequently under the necessity of naming them, to be particular in respect to both generic and specific characters; as I know well, from long experience, that nothing can possibly more dishearten their admirers than a perplexing and confounding arrangement of characters; and more especially when some of them have no real, or, to say the least, a doubtful foundation. I perceive by my son's notes that my A. lobatum is extremely plentiful in those parts of Sussex which he recently happened to visit; but he did not see a plant of A. aculeatum. Now, if they were different forms of the same plant, as some suppose them to be, he must have observed something of the transition from the one state to the other.

We have in A. dilatatum several apparently different forms from the original, which in some degree warrant a separation; but so far as A. lobatum is concerned, I doubt it much.

Foot's Cray. R. Sim.

My opinion, may with equal propriety be applied to it, and in both the pinnules are more or less lobed; only that I consider it of the very highest importance that man and man should understand each other on all subjects connected with science. But there now appears to be room left open between the present plant and A. lobatum for a third or intermediate species, namely, A. angulare, which is yet, I fear, involved in a considerable degree of uncertainty, if not altogether questionable. At least, the plants forwarded to me for A. angulare proved to be truly identical with my A. lobatum; for I could perceive nothing on which to fix a specific distinction. It is true, they were noble specimens, five to six feet high in the frond, and doubtless had been growing under very favourable circumstances; still the true character of A. lobatum was not in any way shaken: the same plant growing under cover of a thick hedge-row will appear far less dilated in its fronds than when in exposed situations, where it is usually not so tall, but more spreading.

My correspondent's A. angulare, therefore, offers no real specific difference between it and my A lobatum, as the pinnules in both are conspicuously petioled and of the same shape; but in my A. aculeatum the pinnules are really decurrent, even down to the general rachis, and very different in shape. Besides, A. aculeatum is altogether a more rigid plant, more shining and narrower in the frond than A. lobatum; consequently I should say, unite A. lobatum and A. angulare: but if we do the same thing with A. lobatum and A. aculeatum, we must serve many, very many indeed, of other species the same way, which are not, in my opinion, quite so distinct as they appear to be.

By the above it will clearly appear that I am not yet prepared conscientiously to subscribe to a third or intermediate species, notwithstanding that 1 may be opposing mv opinion to that of higher authorities. At a time when British Ferns are becoming necessary appendages to almost every well-regulated plant-department in this country, it is incumbent on those who may professionally be called upon, and consequently under the necessity of naming them, to be particular in respect to both generic and specific characters; as I know well, from long experience, that nothing can possibly more dishearten their admirers than a perplexing and confounding arrangement of characters; and more especially when some of them have no real, or, to say the least, a doubtful foundation. I perceive by my son's notes that my A. lobatum is extremely plentiful in those parts of Sussex which he recently happened to visit; but he did not see a plant of A. aculeatum. Now, if they were different forms of the same plant, as some suppose them to be, he must have observed something of the transition from the one state to the other.

We have in A. dilatatum several apparently different forms from the original, which in some degree warrant a separation; but so far as A. lobatum is concerned, I doubt it much.

Foot's Cray. R. Sim.