"Ye fostering breezes, blow! Ye softening dews, ye tender showers, descend ! And temper all, thou world-reviving sun, Into the perfect year !

* * * *

Then spring the living herbs, profusely wild, O'er all the deep-green earth, beyond the power Of botanist to number up their tribes".

Thomson.

There is not a month in the whole circle of the year more fraught with importance to the gardener than the present one; for the calk upon our attention are nearly as numerous as "the living herbs, profusely wild," of the botanist, and none will bear absolute neglect. First in consequence, because upon it depends the beauty of the parterre during the whole of the summer, is the filling of the flowerbeds. For many reasons it is advantageous to do this early in the month; while, on the other hand, the too-frequent recurrence of biting easterly winds and killing frosts, after a week of genial weather had beguiled us into the belief that summer was come, make caution and foresight necessary, as the mischief caused by over haste might be irremediable, Plants of low stature can be readily protected by hoops and mats when in masses; such, therefore, should be first turned out, commencing with the hardiest kinds, as Verbenas, which may be planted immediately, if the weather promises favourably. In bedding Verbenas, regard must be had to the different habits of the different varieties.

Some partake of the character of the old Melindres, - that is, have slender stems, which grow close to the ground, - and such should occupy smaller beds, and also be planted more thickly than robust growers like Robinson's Defiance. After the planting is completed, let all the shoots that are long enough be pegged down in a regular manner; and, if the weather is dry at the time, a sprinkling of water will clean and freshen the foliage.

The shrubby Calceolarias are also comparatively hardy, and will consequently bear early planting; besides, it is advisable to turn these plants out before the roots get pot-bound, - that probably being one cause of the sudden deaths to which Calceolarias are subject after planting. Cuphsea platycentra, C. strigulosa, Xeja gracilis, Gazania uniflora, Salvias, Nierembergias, Petunias, Scarlet Geraniums, etc. may next be proceeded with; leaving the Heliotropes, Lantanas, and any others that are either known or suspected to be impatient of cold, till later in the month.

Of the Heliotrope, several new seminal varieties have been obtained from the continent, neither of which, however, is likely to take the place of the old kind in the flower-garden, although they may be cultivated for the sake of variety. The one called Voltaireanum is the most distinct, its colour being a dark smoky blue.

Two new bedding-plants have lately made a great stir in the floricultural world; and the prevailing rage for any thing new caused one of them (Plumbago Larpentse) to be readily purchased at three guineas a plant; but one season's experience proved this costly novelty to be perfectly useless for culture in the open ground. The other (Zauschneria californica) is a trailing herbaceous plant, nearly or quite hardy. The colour of the flowers is red, and individually they are showy, but they appear to be produced too sparingly to make an effective bed; moreover, its colour and habit bring it into direct competition with the Scarlet Verbenas, to some of which it is infinitely inferior in showiness. Another plant, called Abronia urn-bellata, introduced by the same collector as the last, is a desirable thing for baskets, etc. on account of its numerous heads of fragrant pinkish flowers; its loose straggling habit, however, unfits it for bedding.

It is to be regretted that the stature of the noblest flower of autumn - the Dahlia - precludes its admission into a symmetrical flower-garden, except for a central bed; but in all situations where it can be introduced with propriety, either singly, at the back of borders, or in groups upon a lawn, the Dahlia ought never to be omitted. To such of our readers as have not an opportunity of seeing large collections, the following list of the best sorts noticed at the metropolitan exhibitions last autumn might be useful as a guide in purchasing. We purposelv exclude the newest and most costly varieties, and give those only that can be procured at a moderate price. The height which the different sorts attain under ordinary culture is taken from Mr. C. Turner's Catalogue.

feet.

Turner's Mr. Seldon, colour rosy and lilac .....

3

Stein's Richard Cobden, dark maroon .....

3

Turner's Scarlet Gem, scarlet

3-4

Drummond's Mynn, crimson

4

Collison's Shylock. scarlet .

3

Batteur's Toison d'Or, pale bluff

2-3

Oakley's Gem, white and lavender

3

Collison's Andromeda, buff and pink . . . . .

4

Whale's Marchioness of Cornwal-lis, blush .

3

Barnes's Fearless, lilac

5

Turner's Privateer, yellow and red

3

feet.

Turner's Grenadier, ruby crimson

5

Gaines's Princess Radziwil, white and purple ....

3

Dodd's Miss Chaplain, peach, tipped with crimson

3-4

Salisbury's Beeswing, ruby .

3-4

Procktor's Bermondsey Bee, purple

3

Drummond's Duke of Wellington, orange .

Scaler's Marquis of Worcester, white and crimson .

4

Turner's Berryer, dark maroon .

4

Barham's Beauty of Hastings, white, tipped with crimson

3

The twenty kinds named above can be bought for about thirty shillings; and thev will make a very handsome bed, if the heights are properly arranged and the colours judiciously mixed. Those which follow are what are called fancy Dahlias, - a new class which is rapidly rising in importance among Florists. Young purchased plants ought not to be ventured out till about the middle of this month, but old tubers might be divided and planted immediately.

feet.

Sieckmann's Gasparine Furstin Reuss, maroon, with white tip .

3

Salter's Conspicua, white, and violet purple ....

5

Wachy's Madame Wachy, purple and white ....

2-3

Ressequier's Adolph Dubras, nankeen and white..

3

Batteur's Striata Perfecta, lavender, striped with purple ....

3

feet.

Keynes's Rainbow, scarlet and white ....

3

Huidoux's Empereur de Maroc, maroon, with white tip...

3

Keynes's Sunbeam, red and white..

4

Elphinstone's Mrs. Shaw Lefevre, dull red and white ....

4

Dodd's Miss Blackmore, light purple and white...

3

When the principal planting for this season is finished, it will be necessary to begin making provision for next, by sowing seeds of hardy perennial and biennial herbaceous plants, including the Bromp-ton and the Queen Stocks, Sweet William, Sweet Scabious, Holy-hocks, etc. These are to be sown in drills; and if the young plants are taken up when large enough, and replanted at greater distances, they will acquire sufficient strength to be removed to the flower-beds either in autumn or spring, as may be most suitable. In a future paper a list shall be given of select herbaceous plants.

All who have a greenhouse should now sow seeds of tender annuals for its decoration during the end of summer and beginning of autumn, until the time arrives for taking in its usual occupants; but for this purpose a pit or frame is requisite, in which to raise the young plants. Cockscombs, Balsams, Globe Amaranthus, Lobelia ramosa, Rhodanthe Manglesii, etc. are suitable things to sow now.

J. B. Whiting.