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The Florist And Garden Miscellany



Lovers of flowers and gardens, come one, come all; take a part in our labour, and we promise that you shall partake of the reward. Let us have a work that, as our organ, shall speak better things than acrimony, jealousy, and selfishness, - that shall proclaim the existence amongst us of that spirit of charity so beautifully described in Holy Writ: "Charity en-vieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil; rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth."* We wish this spirit to pervade our periodical; and earnestly invoking the aid we require, we enter upon the second year of our labours with no proprietary to hamper us, our motto being, "Open to all, fettered by none".

TitleThe Florist And Garden Miscellany
AuthorMiscellaneous
PublisherChapman And Hall
Year1849-1850
Copyright1850, Chapman And Hall
AmazonAll New Square Foot Gardening: Grow More in Less Space!

1849

To Her Grace The Duchess Dowager Of Northumberland, The Distinguished And Liberal Patroness Of Floriculture, This Volume Of The Florist And Garden Miscellany Is Most Respectfully Dedicated By The Superintendent.

1850

To Those Ladies Of The United Kingdom Who By Their Personal Exertions Hate So Largely Promoted The Circulation Of The Florist And Garden Miscellany, This Volume Is Gratefully Dedicated By The Superintendent.

-"Pyramidal Pelargoniums, Six Or More Feet In Height!"
Originality seems to be the order of the day; men are novelty-mad, and gardeners are bitten. In the leading article of the Gardeners' Journal of the 16th ult. I see a recommendation elaborately enf...
-Abelia Floribunda
The genus Abelia belongs to the Natural Order of Caprifoils, and contains some pretty species; but none handsomer than the subject represented by our plate. It was found by Galeotti in the Cordillera ...
-Allamanda Cathartica
This being one of our most beautiful autumn-flowering stove-plants, and as I have been very successful in its cultivation, perhaps a short account of my mode of treating it may not prove uninteresting...
-Amateur Tulip Society
The annual exhibition of this society took place on the 26th of May, at the Horns Tavern, Kennington. It was attended by most of the leading cultivators of this favourite flower, which was produced in...
-The Amateur Tulip Society's Annual Meeting
This was held at the Horns Tavern, Kennington Common, on the 20th May. The flowers were neither so fine nor so numerous as we have often seen; the general complaint of uncongenial weather prevailed; a...
-American Plants
Perhaps no flower is attracting so much attention at the present moment as the Rhododendron. That it is deserving of all the praise which has been bestowed upon it, or that can be said or written in i...
-Anomatheca Cruenta
The adaptation of this bulb for a small mass-bed is, I think, not sufficiently known or appreciated. It will do very well planted in March in the open bed; but is greatly strengthened and improved by ...
-April. Horticultural Literature
It is one of the features of the present day, that every pursuit and calling of importance has its organ devoted to the diffusion of information on subjects connected with it. Horticulture, so far fro...
-Arbours
The pretty drawing of a rustic summer-house in the last Number of The Florist, and the invitation to those who may be inclined to offer suggestions on the subject, tempt me to make a few remarks...
-Aspidium
It is necessary here to observe that the genus Lastrsea is very justly established on the ruins of Aspidium, in consequence of the marked difference in the structure, etc. of the indusium or involucre...
-August. Our Tulip Ramble
At Wace Cottage, Hollow ay, where our indefatigable correspondent Mr. Edwards does what he recommends our readers to do, we found good specimens of Arlette, Bacchus, David, Coronation, Cerise blanc, D...
-Auriculas
The extreme mildness of the recent months has caused many of these plants to push up their bloom-sterns. It will not be advisable to cut them off, for, if allowed to remain, the greater number will su...
-Auriculas (2)
The flowering time of these plants is now on the decline, and in some localities quite over. I have ever found Auriculas make the strongest plants, and produce the finest blossoms, when potted immedia...
-Auriculas (3)
Some time this month Auriculas may be removed to a southern or western situation for the winter season; the latter is preferable. The situation chosen should be got in readiness, taking every precauti...
-Autumn Flowers, Etc
Who shall despise the labours of the Florist? I ask the question as I sit with a large bouquet of flowers before me, consisting of a variety of Ferns for a background, Roses, Antirrhinums, Pentstemons...
-The Bear's Ear, Or Auricula. Copy Of A Manuscript Dated 1732
The Auricula requires a soil sufficiently rich for it to feed on (for 'tis an avoracious vegetable), and that will retain coolness at the same time, for which reason I use the following composition. ...
-The Bear's Ears, Or Auricula. Copy Of A Manuscript Dated 1732
People are of different opinions concerning the place where the Auricula was first found; some asserting that it was brought from the Alps; some that it came from a certain part of France; whilst othe...
-The Bear's Ears, Or Auricula. Copy Of A Manuscript Dated 1732. Of The Pures, Or Self-Coloured
Those Auriculas are called pure, or self-coloured, that have but one colour besides that of the bottom; that, for example, are either red, crimson, of a fine colour, purple or violet; for those that a...
-Bedding Calceolaria
I beg to recommend to your readers Calceolaria Kentish Hero as a bedding-plant. It is one of the very best for the purpose with which I am acquainted. I took up a bed of it on the loth of last Novembe...
-Bedding-Out Plants
Previous to planting these out in the borders, they ought to be well hardened off, by being gradually inured to the full influence of light and air, and more particularly those which have been propaga...
-Bedding. Out Pelargoniums
It has been a source of regret that the finest varieties of Pelargoniums have hitherto not been found available for the decoration of our flower-gardens. Who can contemplate the splendid display of th...
-Budding Roses
Amateurs who provided stocks, and planted early, will find some of them pushing shoots all up their sides; these should be removed, with the exception of two or three growing in opposite directions ne...
-Calceolarias
Give these that general attention all succulent plants require at this season. Cut off all fogged and decayed foliage, and keep the plants clean from insects. Shift all seedlings when the pots are fil...
-The Calceolaria (2)
What vast numbers of very beautiful flowers of this interesting tribe; of plants are raised from seeds annually ! But what becomes of them afterwards? There is not one in twenty we either see or hear ...
-The Calceolaria (3)
The Calceolaria being a special favourite of mine, and having received a pressing invitation from my excellent friend Mr. Wilcke, of the Wingrove Nursery, Newcastle-on-Tyne, to inspect several collect...
-Calendar Of Operations For April
Auriculas claim the particular attention of the amateur from the beginning till the close of the month. Protection from storms of rain, covering from night frosts, watering, etc. must still be continu...
-Calendar Of Operations For February
Auriculas, through the month of February, will require careful protection from cold winds, etc. As the fibres of these plants begin to move in the early part of the month, a mat or two should be throw...
-Camellia Japonica. Countess Of Ellesmere
Messrs. Jackson and Son, Nurserymen, Kingston-on-Thames, are the raisers of the variety which forms our Illustration. It is one of many they have raised from seeds saved from some of the finest-petall...
-Carnations
Flora's Garland, 16; Beauty of Woodhouse, 14; Prince Albert (Hales), 12; Ariel (May), 11; Count Pauline, 10; Hamlet, 9; King of Scarlets, 9; Admiral Curzon, 8; Brutus, 7; William Penn, 7; Lord Harding...
-The Carnation (2)
The fairest flowers o' the season Are our Carnations and streak'd Gillyflowers. Shakspeare. Parkinson, in his Paradisus, published in 1629, says Miller, in his Gardener's Dictionary, has give...
-Carnations And Picotees
Those who are in the habit of attending floricultural exhibitions, and choosing for themselves, will hardly thank us for the following lists of flowers, which they may have seen over and over again; b...
-Carnations And Picotees (2)
All the shoots too high up the plant for pegging down having been piped about the middle of June, proceed to layer the general stock; use light sandy soil, and peg them securely after making a clean i...
-Carnations And Picotees (3)
Best twelve Carnations and best twelve Picotees, compiled by Mr. Edwards from returns obtained from the following gentlemen, viz. Messrs. Bragg and Turner, Slough; Barringer, Bedford; Creed, London; E...
-Carnations: With A Notice Of The Raisers Of The Varieties Figured Last Month
The correctness and beauty of the last plate prompts me to offer a few remarks upon this ancient Florists' flower, of which the poet well says: Let yon admired Carnation own Not all was meant f...
-A Chapter On Roses
[Extracted from our Transatlantic contemporary, the Horticulturist, a clever periodical, edited by Mr. Downing. - Ed.] A fresh bouquet of midsummer Roses stands upon the table before us. The mornin...
-A Chapter On Roses. Part 2
The ambitious inhabitants of the land watered by the Nile have sent thee, O Caesar, the Roses of winter as a present, valuable for its novelty. But the boatman of Memphis will laugh at the gardens of...
-A Chapter On Roses. Part 3
In this whirlpool of rank, fashion, and sentiment, the poor novitiate Rose-hunter is likely enough to be quite wrecked; and instead of looking out for a perfect Rose, it is a thousand to one that he f...
-Chater's Nursery-Grounds, Saffron Walden
[From a Correspondent]. Most of the readers of The Florist are aware that some of the finest Hollyhocks that have been sent out have issued from this establishment. In No. XVI. a list of eighteen o...
-Chinese Dahlias
Some thirty or forty years since, before Mr. Chater's time, Chinese Hollyhocks took well-merited precedence of all other Hollyhocks. Now I see by the advertisements of Messrs. Turner, Youell, and othe...
-Chiswick And Regent's Park Exhibitions
The former was held on the 8th ult., and the latter on the 12th; and as most of the exhibitions at the one place were present at the other, we will, as before, give our readers a general rather- than ...
-The Choicest Pansies Shewn In The Several Collections At Hammersmith
White-Ground Varieties Queen of England (Fellowes), Almanzor (Le Messurier), Helen (Hunt), Mrs. Beck (Turner), Miss Thomson (Thomson), Duchess of Rutland (Thomson), Penelope (Thomson), Caroline (Th...
-The Chrysanthemum
So fine and so long an autumn has done much to increase the taste for this flower. In the cottage and the nobleman's garden, out of doors or within, the Chrysanthemum has been unusually gay this seaso...
-Cinerarias
Lovers of the Cineraria will not be displeased to hear that their favourite will stand forcing, and that, for the future, as fine a show of Cinerarias may be obtained at Christmas, with a little extra...
-The Cineraria (2)
The Cineraria belongs to the natural order of Composites, one of the most extensive families of the vegetable kingdom; hence it has been found difficult to settle satisfactorily the various genera inc...
-Cinerarias (3)
Seed may still be sown where late flowering plants are required. Continue to take off suckers from the old stools, where a sufficiency is not already obtained, or where a succession of flowering plant...
-Conclusion
We must not bring this volume to a close without tendering our sincere thanks to all those whose contributions have given such value to its pages. We need not allude to them individually; they have th...
-Coronilla Glauca
This, although nearly, if not altogether, hardy, well deserves attention as a winter flowering pot-plant. It is not very showy, its colour being a somewhat faint yellow, but it flowers abundantly from...
-Cottagers' Prizes; Hares, Insects
I fear my scrappy way of writing will not please your readers; but I wish to give vent to a thought or two. First on cottagers' prizes at horticultural exhibitions. I have long wished to say a word or...
-Covering For Pits And Frames
Few things in the gardening world are so ill adapted for the purposes to which they are applied as Russian mats. They are expensive in the first instance, and they last but a few months; they are trou...
-Crimson Bizarres
Count Pauline (Holmes'). Edgar (May's). Great Britain (Elv's). Lord Milton (Ely's). T. Sharp, Esq. (Holliday's). Thomas Hewlet (Holliday's). Pink And Purple Bizarres Lady of the L...
-Crinum Careyanum
This beautiful plant was brought to light by Dr. Carey, late of Serampore; and I had the pleasure of naming it after one of the best, the most amiable, gifted, and indefatigable of men; whose virtues ...
-The Crocus
Between the Dahlia show and that of the Auricula there occurs a weary waste in the life of the florist, the intervening moiety of the year being devoid of those cheering hopes and spirit-stirring anxi...
-The Cultivation Of Achimenes
Few plants are more interesting than Achimenes, and few better reward the cultivator for his care and skill. We first had A. cocci-nea, which still keeps a firm hold of our affections; and, indeed, ho...
-The Cultivation Of The Balsam
As this is one of the most beautiful and useful plants we have for rendering the greenhouse gay when its ordinary occupants are out of doors, a few words on its management may not prove uninteresting....
-Cultivation Of The Carnation And Picotee
The mode of cultivating these beautiful flowers has been so often given to the public, that it may appear something like presumption in me to offer any thing with a promise of being either new or inte...
-Cultivation Of The Carnation And Picotee (2)
The plants having been taken from the parent stock a month since, as recommended in the last Number of The Florist, are established in small pots, and never have we had finer or more healthy ones. The...
-Cultivation Of The Carnation And Picotee (3)
If the part of the garden where the pots containing the Carnations are to stand has not been well drained and covered with a coat of clean gravel, it would be better to place them in rows on strips of...
-Cultivation Of The Chinese Primrose
The Chinese Primrose (Primula sinensis, or pramitens) is a common plant, yet perhaps hardly so much prized, or so well cultivated, asi t deserves to be; for though wanting the gaiety and variety of co...
-Cultivation Of Trichomanes Speciosum, Or The Irish Fern
Amongst all the Ferns grown at the present time, this species seems most to baffle the skill of cultivators. It is one of the scarcest of British plants, and is found at the Lake of Killarney in Irela...
-The Culture Of Chorozemas
BY MR. M'ARDELL, FOREMAN, CASTLE-HILL GARDENS. The Chorozema is generally considered difficult to cultivate; but it can be grown well by pursuing the following method. The soil should be a sandy pe...
-The Culture Of Gesnera Zebrina
The following is my mode of cultivating this plant for decorating the conservatory late in summer, or for ornamenting the drawing-room table. As soon as it has done flowering, it is dried off gradu...
-Culture Of Hyacinths In The Open Ground
Hyacinths are but little known in England, except as forced in glasses or in pots, or as a border flower; and a general impression prevails that our climate is unsuited to their growth, except for the...
-Culture Of The Camellia
The beautiful glossy foliage of the Camellia, when in health, as well as its glorious flowers, deservedly gain for it a conspicuous place in every greenhouse; yet, notwithstanding this, I am afraid th...
-The Culture Of The Petunia From Seed
It is but within these last few years that this admirable class of flowers has been brought into general notice, and during that time great improvement has taken place in the symmetry and substance of...
-Culture Of The Ranunculus
Having seen several letters on the cultivation of the Ranunculus in The Florist, I am induced to give you the fruits of about twenty-seven years' amateur practice in the growth of that beautiful pet-f...
-Cuphea Platycentra
As a bedding-plant, this prettiest of all the Cupheas deserves a place in every flower-garden. It is true that a great many flowers are more showy in the distance than this; but upon closer inspection...
-The Dahlia
Those who are curious about the early history of our fashionable garden plants will find an excellent account of the introduction of this truly noble flower, than which we have nothing of its season h...
-Dahlias (2)
Cuttings of new varieties, or others much valued, should now be put in in large numbers. There is much less trouble in striking them early in the season, before the sun has great power; yet there is a...
-Dahlias (3)
Having disposed of the Carnations and Picotees, the chief interest now will be centred in the Dahlia beds. Frequently thin-out superfluous shoots, so that much may not be cut off at a time. The propor...
-The Dahlia Season Of 1850, And Its Results
To the article I sent you for insertion in last month's Florist, you were pleased to add some comments of your own on the cover. Now, in reply, I can only state, that for many reasons a correspondent'...
-December. The Superintendent To The Readers Of The Florist And Garden Miscellany
With the present Number we conclude our Third Volume, the last of the First Series; and have much pleasure in announcing that our arrangements are all completed for commencing anew on January the 1st...
-Descriptive Notice Of New Ranunculuses
We recommend our readers interested in the culture of the Ranunculus, and who intend to improve their collections, not to delay their purchases. It is true, the roots will not be required for planting...
-The Destructiveness Of Hares And Rabbits
But few persons have experienced the devastations committed by these pests of the country in an equal manner with myself. The nursery being exactly opposite to a large game-preserve, for many ye...
-Detailed Reports Of Exhibitions, Metropolitan And Provincial
Considerable dissatisfaction is felt at our not inserting, in detail, reports of exhibitions which we attend personally, or of those held at a distance, and of which particulars are forwarded to us by...
-Dr. Hooker
The many friends of Dr. Joseph Hooker (says the Editor of the Gardeners' Chronicle) will rejoice to know that the last Indian Mail, Oct. 6th, has brought intelligence of his perfect safety amidst the ...
-Eighteen Fine Verbenas
Bride, white, large truss; Briseis, rosy purple, distinct and striking; Chauvierii, crimson, with a dark centre; Defiance, scarlet, fine large truss, strong habit; Duchess, blush, with pink centre; Ec...
-The Epacris
Heaths and Epacrises are generally named in the same breath, so closely do we associate the two genera; but we need hardly state that they belong to different natural orders, which are very dissimilar...
-Epacrises
Those who keep their Epacrises in a miscellaneous house (usually of somewhat higher temperature than the heathery), will have many varieties now bursting into flower, shedding a cheerful aspect over t...
-Epacrises (2)
Before this paper will be in the publisher's hands, all fear of a return of frosty nights will have passed away; and those plants that have broken strong, and made young growth of tolerable consistenc...
-Epacrises And Ericas
Presuming the recommendation of last month has been acted upon, and the plants neatly arranged according to their respective heights, with plenty of room to admit the free circulation of air between e...
-Ericas
The early blooming varieties will this month begin to swell their flower-buds, and the later ones make growth preparatory to commencing the same process. These indications, however, should not be enco...
-Ericas (2)
The autumn-blooming varieties, as well as stock plants, having ere this received their annual shift, and the spring-blooming ones being in the full radiance of their floral loveliness, the admiring cu...
-Erinus Lychnidea
Few plants are better calculated to delight a certain class of amateur growers than this simple and somewhat rare Figwort. It is true that many admirers of gaudy flowers might only give it a contemptu...
-Erythmna Laurifolia
This coral tree is unquestionably one of the most splendid objects which a garden can possess. It is a native of South America, and has been long in cultivation, but, like many other plants, when firs...
-An Essay On Flowers
BY H. T. TUCKERMAN, NEW YORK.* Floral apostles! that in dewy splendour, Weep without woe, and blush without a crime, Oh, may I deeply learn, and ne'er surrender, Your lore sublime. Horace ...
-An Essay On Flowers. Continued
The Venetian painters must have studied colour in the hues of flowers; for the brilliant, distinct, and warm tone of their works affects the spectator exactly as these rainbow gems; especially when th...
-An Essay On Flowers (2)
The Orientals, adepts in voluptuous ease, place vases of flowers around their fountains; and as they lie upon divans, their eyes close, in the refreshing siesta, with these radiant sentinels for the l...
-An Essay On Flowers (2). Continued
Thus have flowers an utterance everywhere and always; the wild Columbine, on its thread-like stem, that hangs on the stony cliff; the fungus, that swells from the mouldering trunk of gigantic forest-t...
-Exhibition Of Industrial Products In 1851
I hope that a very large niche will be allotted in the proposed Exhibition for the products of floricultural industry. Although all the exhibitions of French industrial products held at Paris were ado...
-Fancy Dahlias
These have of late been so much improved, both in form and colour, that we imagine few flower-gardens will in future be without them, for they promise to become even greater favourites than the usuall...
-Fancy Pelargoniums
This class of flowers has latterly been raised into considerable importance; and from the improvements effected by superior cultivation and raising new varieties from seed, they have become a very att...
-February. Ericas
Heaths belong to a Natural Order which contains some of the most beautiful plants of which we have any knowledge. In addition to the interesting forms of their blossoms, Ericas themselves may be said ...
-Ferns
This lovely tribe of plants deserves especial cultivation, so remarkably elegant are the forms of their foliage, so refreshing to the eye their lively green tints, and so graceful their disposition; g...
-A Few Good Flowers In The Northern Counties
The Northern Florists are frequently complaining that they are badly represented, or rather not represented at all, by the metropolitan periodicals; that no Northern productions are fairly noticed in ...
-A Few Remarks On Hardy Border Plants
The time has arrived when our flower-gardens begin to put on their spring garments, when Crocuses, Scillas, and Snowdrops, together with the Violet and Periwinkle, peep forth in all their varied colou...
-A Few Select Stove-Climbers
Stephanotis Floribunda This is certainly one of the most lovely stove-climbers ever introduced. It has charming waxy-white flowers, which are borne in large umbels, and in great profusion, from the...
-A Few Words About Roses
Nothing in floriculture has marched so rapidly and steadily onward as an improved and common-sense taste for Roses. It is only a few years since all the gardening world used to talk of the 2000 variet...
-A Few Words To Beginners
[The following article, abridged from an American paper, so well illustrates the evil results of neglecting to follow our oft-repeated advice, Whatever you cultivate, let it be the best of its kind,...
-Floral Reminiscences. Tulips In The Midland Counties
In order to aid the good cause of floriculture, I am most anxious to lend you some assistance; and as every district in the kingdom has its favourite flowers, its seedlings, and peculiarities, so the ...
-Floral Tastes And Their Results. No. II
We shall pursue the plan recommended by writers on logic and rhetoric, and sanctioned by being the most natural one, and arrange the advantages arising from a love of flowers in an ascending series, b...
-Floral Tastes And Their Results. No. III
The connexion between the exercise of industry and skill, and a certain measure of success, may be considered as a law which, although not without exceptions, is sufficiently regular to become a stimu...
-Floral Tastes And Their Results. No. IV
That a certain refinement results from intercourse with works of art is manifest to the most cursory observer of the habits of mankind. When the Roman poet affirmed that the diligent study of the li...
-Floral Tastes, And Their Results
The object of a short series of papers, with the above title, will be to assert those higher claims which floriculture has upon the notice and respect of intelligent and moral beings. Like every other...
-Floral Tastes, And Their Results. No. IX. The Bearing Of Floral Tastes On The National Welfare
If the readers of the Florist have honoured our essays with a perusal, and will call to mind what has been said in preceding papers, it will be evident that the pursuits of the gardener have an import...
-Floral Tastes, And Their Results. No. V
Having noticed some of the minor, though interesting and important benefits resulting from the culture and love of flowers, we may pass on to the higher aspects of the subject. As a branch of the grea...
-Floral Tastes, And Their Results. No. VI
Tiie religious is the noblest style of man. To hold communion with our Creator, and to refer every thing we do to his will and pleasure, is to make the closest approximation to present happiness, and ...
-Floral Tastes, And Their Results. No. VII. Flower-Shows, And Their General Influences
All that has been said in preceding papers of the results of a love of flowers and floriculture concerns man as an individual, and would be true if, like Robinson Crusoe, he tended his garden in solit...
-Floral Tastes, And Their Results. No. VIII. Flower-Shows: Their Influence On The Labouring And Poorer Classes
Horticultural Societies in rural situations are often established for the sole benefit of cottagers, whether mechanics or labourers; in other instances they contemplate all classes of society, and adm...
-Floriculture
Such of our readers as may have the British Classics at their elbow will be spared the trouble of referring to The Tatler, No. 218; whilst those who, unhappily, do not possess these depositories of th...
-The Florist's Farewell To The Year
The months are gone I've spent in Flora's bowers; The Sun once more his yearly course hath run; Fallen are the leaves, and withered lie the flowers I longed to see when first the year begun. Alas, ...
-The Florist. Prefatory Observations
We cannot commence our Second Volume without expressing our hearty thanks for the assistance we have received in various ways, and from so many quarters; and we venture to solicit a continuance of the...
-Flower-Basket
It is much the fashion in this our day to adorn the garden with vases, stands, baskets, etc. of flowering plants; and the main thing is to have them well filled throughout the season; in fact, t...
-Flowers By The Sea-Side
There is no point on which parties residing by the sea-side are more entirely agreed than that it is useless to attempt the cultivation of flowers in spots adjoining the shore. In some situations expo...
-Fragments For The Florist
A glimpse of spring in mid-winter is most agreeable. There are two pretty shrubs which give us this, putting forth their tiny green leaves in mild weather soon after Christmas: these are, Ribes speci-...
-From Our Note-Book
Green Leigh's Col. Taylor; Page's Champion; Yates' Morris Green Hero (new); Lightbody's Lord Lyndoch. Grey Cheetham's (not Metcalfs) Lancashire Hero; Fletcher's Ne-plus-ultra, Conqueror of Eu...
-From Our Note-Book (2)
Hoses Camuze de Craix, Cerise Blanc, Mary Lamb (Zueil), and Ponceau tres Blanc (Dutch). Byblcemens Camorine, Claude, Duke of Northumberland, General Bour-navelde, George the Fourth (Holmes); ...
-From Our Note-Book (3)
Lightbody's Zedina, Ashwelthorpe, Blanche, Colonel Dennie, Lady Sale, Princess Royal, James Montgomery, Dr. Horner. List Of Verbenas, By Mr. Parsons, Enfield; Mr. Turner, Slough; Mr. Wyness, Buckin...
-From Our Note-Book (3). Continued
Oncidium Papilio major; from Trinidad; scarce. Free bloomer; spikes about 18 inches high, and keeps flowering all the year: in a slate pot with peat and crocks. Phalamopsis grandiflora; from the Ph...
-Fuchsias
Those plants which were first put to rest should be the ones selected for forcing into early flower; these may now be potted, cutting back their roots pretty hard, and using a small size pot, to be sh...
-Fuchsias (2)
Should the month prove genial, Fuchsias that have been in a cold frame through the winter will begin to push: turn them out, reduce the ball, cut back the roots, and repot, allowing only a small amoun...
-Fuchsias (3)
This brilliant and most charming genus is now rapidly developing its floral beauties; to heighten the effect, and add to the graceful tout ensemble, arrange and support all straggling growths in as ne...
-Fuchsia Spectabilis
We observe that Messrs. Veitch and Son, of Exeter, are sending out their new Fuchsia Spectabilis, a drawing of which will be found in No. VI. of this work, and which is quite correct, with the excepti...
-Gladioli
I have read Mr. Brown's excellent article on this subject in your last Number with much pleasure, and I do not doubt that it will tend to bring these fine plants more into notice. I beg, however, to s...
-The Gladiolus; With Remarks On Its Culture
The genus Gladiolus now comprehends many brilliant species and varieties, and is fast increasing in interest with the floral world. The variety of colours, together with the beauty of its varied strip...
-Grand Trial Exhibitions, Open To All England. Northern V. Southern Raised Carnations And Picotees
The exhibition for the Southern division was held at the Royal Nursery, Slough, on July 25th. This exhibition, which was instituted for the purpose of testing the merits of northern and southern raise...
-The Great Northern Show, Held At The Belle Vue Gardens, Near Manchester
On the 29th the original show was held here by adjournment from York. The weather was beautiful, and the flowers in better condition than on the previous day. The first cup was gained by Mr. Hought...
-The Great Northern Tulip-Exhibitions
Owing to the extremely unpropitious weather, there were not so many flowers brought into competition as was expected. The first show took place at the Corn Exchange, Manchester. The flowers, with some...
-Great Show Of Carnations And Picotees
Mr. Turner, desirous of promoting an agreeable intercourse amongst his brother exhibitors, advertised an exhibition of the above beautiful flowers, to be held in his grounds on July the 24th, on which...
-Growing Fuchsias In Large Pots In The Open Air
It should ever be the aim of all cultivators to bring each class of plants to the highest stage of beauty of which they are susceptible. Early last spring, having some old specimens of Fuchsias whi...
-Growing Seedling Gladioli
The raising of these fine plants from seed has hitherto not received that attention it deserves. The late Dean of Manchester did much in this way, and with the best results; but nevertheless much yet ...
-Hail-Storm And Pieces Of Ice
Desirous of making our work a register of any thing out of the common affecting our gardens, plants, etc, we requested the Editor of the Gardeners' Chronicle to oblige us with the loan of the accompan...
-Hamilton's Improved Supporter For Hyacinths, Etc. Etc
We have received specimens of the above, and regret that they were not forwarded to us before; for it is one of the great objects of the Florist and Garden Miscellany to call attention to all contriva...
-Hammersmith Heartsease Society: Eleventh Annual Meeting, Held At The Thatched House, May 2
After the long-continued ungenial weather, we were pleasingly surprised to witness such a display of flowers as was produced on this occasion. Some of the blooms were of extraordinary size; and the nu...
-Hammersmith Pansy Society
THIS Society held its exhibition in the Thatched House, Hammersmith, on the 9th ult. There was a goodly display of this favourite flower, and a spirited competition. Mr. Edwards of Holloway obtained t...
-The Hardihood Of The Fuchsia
The beauty at this season of the year of those Fuchsias that are planted in the open ground, of which I have several, always makes me think when I see a collection of them in a greenhouse that they ar...
-The Hardiness Of Gladioli
Finding that my remarks at the close of last year, p. 295, respecting the hardiness of the Gladioli tribe have elicited some observations from a correspondent who does not unite with me on that point,...
-Herbaceous Peonies
Peonies ! what old-fashioned spring-flowers ! reminding one of the cottage-gardens in our rural districts, where they seem to grow like wild flowers; surely nothing can be written about them but what ...
-Hints On The Cultivation Of Bulbs
The principal danger against which the cultivator of Cape Bulbs has to guard is, excess of wet; and in the case of Gladioli, this is best effected by choosing a piece of sloping ground, rather than by...
-The Hollyhock
I am glad to find that this hitherto much-neglected flower is likely to attain the attention which it so richly merits. The exhibitions of it last season by Messrs. Bircham and Chater convinced me ...
-Horticultural Society
At the last meeting in Regent Street, Messrs. Veitch produced cut branches of Fuchsia spectabilis, stated to have been cut from a plant growing in their conservatory border, and which had been in full...
-Horticultural Society (2)
In our last paper we left the grounds as the judges were entering; but we must return and accompany them, just to give our readers an idea of the manner in which their important duties are conducted. ...
-Horticultural Society (2). Continued
Among them we did not remark much novelty; but there was a variety of the old Epiphyllum (Cactus) speciosum, named Elegans, which is certainly much larger and finer than Speciosum. Turning the corner ...
-Horticultural Society (3)
At a meeting held in Regent Street on the 7th ult., Mr. Fairbairn of Clapham exhibited a beautiful collection of Cape Heaths, for which he received a Banksian medal. Mr. Moore of Chelsea sent Plumbago...
-Horticultural Society Of London
March 20th Dr. Jackson in the chair. The subjects exhibited on this occasion which more immediately concern the florist were an interesting collection of Hyacinths from Messrs. Henderson's Nursery,...
-Horticultural Society's Exhibition
In No. 7 of Vol. I. will be found two woodcuts, conveying a good idea of a portion of the grounds at Chiswick upon an exhibition-day; and we propose, in this and the two following numbers, to give an ...
-Horticultural Society's Exhibition. Continued
But we will go out with the party with which we entered; and in doing so, outside the garden-wall, but within the Society's gates, we come to a building, which was closed at our entrance, but is now f...
-Horticultural Society's Meeting, Regent Street, Feb. 19
A gay assemblage of flowering plants was brought together on this occasion; and among them a noble specimen of Dendrobium specio-sum claims especial notice. It had upwards of thirty-four spikes of flo...
-Horticultural Society, Regent Street
April 2 E. Brande, Esq. in the chair. Messrs. Veitch of Exeter exhibited a beautiful Medinilla. It measured four feet high and as much through, and from the ends of the branches hung down large pan...
-Horticultural Society. August 6
Among subjects of exhibition, that which excited the most interest, in a floricultural point of view, was a collection of Hollyhocks, in spikes and single blooms, from Mr. Chater of Saffron Wal-den. T...
-Horticultural Society. November .5
J. Knowles, Esq., of TrafFord Bank House, near Manchester, sent a new Burlingtonia, from Demerara. It was covered with numerous pendent spikes of beautiful white blossoms. A Banksian medal was awarded...
-Horticultural Society. [July 11th.]
For some time previous the weather had been very warm; and as we entered the grounds upon this the last occasion of the season, we expected to have found them much more parched than was the case, alth...
-How To Have Roses In November
Dec 8th, 1848. On this day I gathered a fine bouquet of fragrant Roses from plants growing in the open air. Such is the entry in my journal of remarkable horticultural events for the year above ment...
-Hoya Bella And Mitraeia Coccinea
In answer to our application, Messrs. Veitch and Son, Nurserymen, Exeter, have obligingly furnished us with the following particulars respecting the subject of our present Illustration, and a notice o...
-Illustrated Work On Camellias
I feel confident that I shall confer a great pleasure on all who cultivate or who admire the Camellia, by making known to them, through the Florst, the illustrated work now in the course of publicatio...
-Illustrated Work On Florists' Flowers
I beg with all seriousness to call the attention of metropolitan Florists to this subject; viz. the immediate establishment of a periodical, which shall give illustrations, or faithful portraits, of t...
-The Improvement Of The Auricula
Much advantage may be derived from assisting to fertilise this beautiful flower; a greater quantity of seed will be obtained, and many plants that would not otherwise produce seed will be rendered fru...
-Improvement Of The Polyanthus
It has always been a source of much astonishment to me, that so few really fine Polyanthuses have been raised, considering the very great quantity of seed annually sown. The thought has struck me, ...
-Japan Lilies
The different varieties of Lilium lancifolium are, in my opinion, some of the most beautiful objects that are within the reach of cultivators of moderate means; and it is a matter of difficulty with m...
-July. Our Illustrations
If there is one point we have given more attention to than another in conducting the Florist and Garden Miscellany, it has been the attempting to ensure fidelity in our illustrations; and we thought w...
-June. Seedling-Raising
In our last we endeavoured to direct the attention of those who might intend to commence raising seedling Florists' flowers, to the means best calculated to effect the object all aim at, viz. th...
-Ladies' Page
My introduction to the fair readers of The Florist takes place at a season which, to the uninitiated, is destitute of floral attractions, but which yet furnishes objects of daily interest to those who...
-The Ladies' Page (2)
February is a month demanding much active labour, but it is rendered easy and pleasant by its immediate results. Nature is impatient to exhibit her treasures, and every gentle shower and warm sunbeam ...
-The Ladies' Page (3)
Spring! spring! beautiful spring! Hitherward cometh, like hope on the wing; Pleasantly looketh on streamlet and flood, Raiseth a chorus of joy in the wood; Toucheth the bud, and it bursts into bloom,...
-The Ladies' Page (4)
Then came faire May, the fayrest mayd on ground, Deckt all with dainties of her season's pryde, And throwing flowres out of her lap around: Upon two brethren's shoulders she did ride, Th...
-The Ladies' Page (5)
No gradual bloom is wanting; - Nor broad carnations, nor gay spotted pinks; Nor, shower'd from every bush, the damask-rose: Infinite numbers, delicacies, smells, With hues on hues expression cannot p...
-The Ladies' Page (6)
Slow move the sultry hours. Oh, for the shield Of darkening boughs, or hollow rocks grotesque! Graiiame. This month may be considered the turning-point of the floral year. Spring is quite past...
-The Ladies' Page (7)
Farewell, sweet Summer, and thy fading flowers! Farewell, sweet Summer, and thy woodland songs! Grahame. Although these lines are more appropriate to the close than to the beginning of August...
-The Ladies' Page (8)
It was Autumn now, though only felt to he so by a certain something in the air, which speaks, to those who understand it, of the fading Summer, even before the flowers themselves have told it to the ...
-The Ladies' Page (9)
The sapless branch Must fly before the knife; the wither'd leaf Must be detach'd, and, where it strews the floor, Swept with a woman's neatness; breeding else Contagion, and disseminating death. ...
-The Ladies' Page (10)
The flush of the landscape is o'er, The brown leaves are shed on the way, The dye of the lone mountain-flower Grows wan and betokens decay. All silent the song of the thrush, Bewilder'd she ...
-The Ladies' Page (11)
When dark December glooms the day, And takes our Autumn joys away; When short and scant the sunbeam throws Upon the weary waste of snows A cold and profitless regard.1' Scott. In the midst of wint...
-The Ladies' Page (12)
In undertaking to instruct in flower-craft, or rather to furnish some useful hints to the lady-readers of the Florist, I labour under considerable disadvantage in following a writer like Mr. Burgess, ...
-The Ladies' Page (13)
Where the modern system of planting flowers in masses of distinct colours is practised, it is presumed that the particular kind intended to occupy each bed was determined upon in autumn, and that due ...
-The Ladies' Page (14)
Here's flowers for you; The marigold, that goes to bed with the sun, And with him rises weeping; daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take The win...
-The Ladies' Page (15)
Come, gentle Spring, ethereal mildness, come, And from the bosom of yon dropping cloud, While music wakes around, veiled in a shower Of shadowing roses, on our plains descend. Thomson. All lov...
-The Ladies' Page (16)
Ye fostering breezes, blow! Ye softening dews, ye tender showers, descend ! And temper all, thou world-reviving sun, Into the perfect year ! * * * * Then spring the living herbs, profusely wild...
-The Ladies' Page (17)
The Earth, till then Desert and hare, unsightly, unadorn'd, Brought forth the tender plants, whose verdure clad Her universal face with pleasant green. Milton. A similar transformation has lat...
-The Ladies' Page (18)
Now, flaming up the heavens, the potent sun Melts into limpid air the high-raised clouds And morning fogs, that hover'd round the hills In parti-colour'd bands. * * * Who can unpitying see the flo...
-The Ladies' Page (19)
The system of filling a whole bed with plants of one sort, which is now so much practised, has had the effect of withdrawing attention, in a great measure, from that very interesting class of flowers ...
-The Ladies' Page (20)
It is not unreasonable to surmise that the elegantly written paper on the Rose given in the Florist of last month has imbued with a desire for further information those among its readers who may not h...
-The Ladies' Page (21)
The western Sun withdraws the shorten'd day, And humid Evening, gliding o'er the sky, In her chill progress, to the ground condensed The vapours throws. Thomson. Those chilly humid evenings, whic...
-The Ladies' Page (22)
Now the leaf Incessant rustles from the mournful grove; and the partially denuded tree.?, from the branches of which the condensed fog drips like a shower of tears, seem, to be weeping over the loss...
-The Late Charles Fox, Esq
Although it may not be unknown to the larger portion of our readers, it is still our painful duty to record in the pages of The Florist, the decease of our lamented friend and fellow-labourer, Charles...
-The Late Charles Fox, Esq. Our Visit To His Birthplace, &C
In our April Number of last year we announced to our readers the decease of our valued friend and coadjutor, of the loss of whom we are continually reminded at every turn. We miss him as a most able a...
-Lawn Trees
There are numerous suburban gardens with lawns too small to be cut up with clumps or beds of shrubs and flowers, yet capable of much ornament, by having a few select trees dotted about them; but few...
-Leschenaultia Formosa
Will any of your readers kindly give me a hint respecting the best way of cultivating this fine plant? Although a great favourite with me, I have as yet been unable to grow it to any thing like the pe...
-Lisianthus Russellianus
This most beautiful plant was introduced into this country long ago from Mexico; but notwithstanding that cultivators have had time enough to make themselves acquainted with its habits, it is only now...
-List Of Carnations And Picotees For Early Flowering And Exhibition
I beg to enclose a list of early-flowering Carnations and Picotees, which are also good ones; yet those who wish to succeed with these flowers at the Botanic, Horticultural, and other early Exhibition...
-List Of Select Camellias
The following descriptive list of Camellias contains most of the finest varieties in cultivation, and may be useful to any amateur wishing to form a collection. I grow, and have bloomed them (with few...
-Lists Of Florists' Flowers, Etc
I have to return my sincere thanks to the numerous correspondents who have favoured me with their opinions as to the most select varieties of florists' flowers, etc. I hope they will be gratified in l...
-Manual Of Flower-Gardening For Ladies
London, D. Bogue. This is too good a shilling's worth to be noticed upon our cover only. It comes from the pen of one of our best English gardeners; and we cordially recommend it not only to our fa...
-March. Seedling Fuchsias
Again we present our readers with an illustration representing some of the productions of our friend, W. H. Story, Esq. We followed out to the letter our published intention of making coloure...
-May. Floriculture
WE believe there is not a lover and cultivator of flowers that would not become a raiser of seedlings, if he once made the attempt; for although year after year he might find his productions surpassed...
-Messrs. Lane's Rose Nursery, Great Berkhampstead
What vivid colours flush yon blooming Rose, Whose fragrance floats upon the balmy gale! A warm sunny morning early in July found us at Euston Station awaiting the time when the train should start...
-Messrs. Pauls' Nursery
Cheshunt is a quiet agricultural village thirteen miles from London on the high road to Hertford and Ware. Half an hour's ride from London by the Eastern Counties Railway-brings us to the Waltham o...
-Mimulus. Figure From A Plant Exhibited At Worton Cottage
It has been truly said, that public taste, as regards certain classes of plants, is very capricious. I well remember the time when almost every flower-garden could boast of its Mimulus bed, and when...
-Miscellanies About Cape Heaths
Well, remarked an amateur friend a few days since, at the close of a visit to a somewhat extensive horticultural establishment, I am delighted with what I have seen. The stoves contained many rema...
-Monstrous Flowers Of Pelargoniums
The following extract from a paper read by Mr. Sowerby at a late conversazione meeting of the Royal Botanic Society in Regent's Park describes an interesting case of montrosity. After pointing out the...
-Mutability Of Colours In The Chrysanthemum
Our attention has been directed to this subject on account of our having received from a correspondent in Norfolk two flowers reported to have been picked from one plant, all of whose stems proceeded ...
-My Fern-Garden
How many are there who, while turning their attention to the cultivation of this interesting class, are yet at a loss to plant them in situations which will develop them in their natural habits of gro...
-My Rose-Journal
June 8th The Ayrshire Roses, which, with the Crimson Boursault, are the earliest of our climbing Roses, are just coming into bloom. They are late; for last year they were gay with flowers even by t...
-My Rose-Journal (2)
July 12th Surely the summer Roses never before bloomed so splendidly! In our old age we shall talk of these Roses as we now do of stage-coaches, as things that have been, and our children will say,...
-My Rose-Journal (3)
August 16th L'Elegante, with the hybrid Bourbon habit of Henry IV., but not so vigorous in its growth, is a new Rose raised by Monsieur Laft'ay, deserving its name; in colour resembling the Duchess...
-Nepenthes Rafflesiana
Tins very interesting species is now in full bloom at the Royal Botanic Garden, Kew, being the second time since its introduction from Singapore; the plant is about sixteen feet high, and has a cylind...
-Nepenthes Rafflesiana (2)
There is not a more interesting object in the vegetable kingdom, or one that attracts more general admiration, than this wonderful plant. It is almost universally known amongst gardeners and lovers of...
-Netting For Greenhouses
Now is the time to make preparation for the coming season; and we again urge our readers to prepare blinds for their greenhouses, and other erections, where flowering plants are to be kept. Messrs. Ha...
-New And First-Rate Pelargoniums
I am glad that you have drawn attention to the system of exhibiting the new and first-rate Pelargoniums; and you have certainly made it very plain that none but new and first-rate varieties should o...
-The New Gardens, Whitby
In noticing Mr. Willison's Rose Nursery in the last Number of the Florist, I inadvertently stated that the Roses were grown on alluvial soil; this is an error (although perhaps not of much consequence...
-New Plants
Under this head we intend to give, from time to time, as opportunity-may offer, some account of such new or recently introduced plants as we consider will prove acquisitions to our readers. Our remark...
-New Plants (2)
Under this head we have this month, with the exception of one or two plants, little very striking to record. The last Number of the Journal of the Horticultural Society makes us acquainted with: Sw...
-New Plants (3)
Primula Altaica Of The Russian Botanists A scapeless, orange-eyed, purple-flowered Primrose, of great beauty. A plant of it in a pot was exhibited at a late meeting of the Horticultural Society, by...
-New Plants (4)
Clerodendron Bethuneanum This fine species of Clerodendron is equal in beauty to any that are at present in cultivation. It is a large-growing plant, with a panicle of crimson-coloured flowers, for...
-New Plants (5)
And others, figured and described in Hookers and Paxton's Botanical Magazines for January. Microsperma Bartonioides An herbaceous rather tender annual, rivalling Bartonia aurea; grows about one ...
-New Plants (6)
Figured in the Botanical Magazine for February. Acanthophippium Javanicum An orchidaceous plant of great beauty, with an inflorescence similar to A. Sylhetense; the pseudo-bulbs are elongated, a...
-New Plants (7)
Figured in the Botanical Magazine for March. Cereus Tweediei A simple-stemmed plant of the Cactus tribe, having a dwarf erect stiff habit. The flowers are produced from the side, and are large, ...
-New Plants (8)
Sepals and petals of a very dark purple-colour, labellum light purple, flower four and a half inches long by three and a half wide. This species belongs to one of the groups of orchids that are great ...
-New Plants (9)
Figured in the Botanical Magazine for May. Mangifera Indica An evergreen stove-tree, principally known for its fruit, which is universally eaten, and esteemed the best in India: jellies, preserv...
-New Plants (10)
Figured in the Botanical Magazine for June. Metrosideros Buxifolia A branching evergreen greenhouse shrub, having much the appearance of a Myrtle. It is a native of New Zealand, where it is desc...
-New Plants (11)
Figured in the Botanical Magazine for July. Echinopsis cristata, var. purpurea. A very showy flowering plant, belonging to the Cactus tribe; it is nearly globular, depressed, about seven inches in ...
-New Plants (12)
Figured in the Botanical Magazine for August. Eugenia Brasiliensis An evergreen stove-shrub, belonging to the family of Myrtles, forming a bush six or eight feet high, with leaves as large as th...
-New Plants (13)
Figured in the Botanical Magazine for September. Bolbophyllum Lobbii A singular stove Orchid of dwarf habit, having excessively large flowers for the size of the plant: they resemble those of a ...
-New Plants (14)
Figured in the Botanical Magazine for October. Spathodea Laevis A robust-growing stove-plant belonging to Bignonias, and attaining the height of twenty feet. On the ends of the branches are prod...
-The New Tulip "Magnificent"
Considering The Florist the best medium to convey information to the floricultural public upon some of our favourite flowers, a desire and anxiety to do justice to the splendid Tulip in question induc...
-Northern And Southern Raised Flowers
From the commencement of the Florist and Garden Miscellany, we have been met with the assurance that productions highly esteemed in one district of the country are despised in the other. Our correspon...
-Northern Tulips
I think I told you that I would give you some account of the Chel-laston (or Swarkstone) Tulips; and 1 will now endeavour to redeem my promise, premising that if there ever was a gordian knot in this ...
-Northern Tulips (Chellaston)
I hope these flowers will soon be better known, as it is likely at one or the other of the great Northern Exhibitions many will be brought forward, and their merits tested with the best of the varieti...
-Notes From South Australia
The following extracts have been made from letters of a private correspondent residing in the Mount Barker district of the above colony. To us these little links connecting our far-away friends with t...
-November. Pelargoniums: New And First-Rate Varieties
The remarks of Orion at pages 253-4 demand the consideration of those who act as judges at our metropolitan exhibitions. It has often surprised us to see old and comparatively worthless flowers awa...
-Observations On The Adjustment Of The Animal And Vegetable Kingdoms By Which The Vital Functions Of Both Are Permanently Maintained
BY ROBERT WARINGTON, F.C.S. This communication will consist of a detail of an experimental investigation which has been carried on for nearly the last twelve months, and which appears to illustrate...
-October. Grand Trial Exhibitions Of Carnations And Picotees, Open To All England
Many of our readers, having read the report of these exhibitions at page 213, and made themselves acquainted with the names of the winners, of the flowers exhibited, and the general results, have dism...
-Ode. Written At The Desire Of E. G
1. A garden claims the lay: Nor would the Muse forget Where dwelt our parents ere they tasted woe; Where beauties still repay. Man's fostering care; and yet, In times to come, where bright...
-Offsets
The best and safest mode of taking offsets from Auriculas is that of carefully breaking them out of the old stem, and filling the wound with a little finely pounded charcoal. If the knife can be dispe...
-Old Godfrey; Or, Market-Gardeners
When I am tired of my easy chair, I sometimes take a stroll to the garden of Old Godfrey, one of the most original characters in our neighbourhood, to watch him at his work, admire the unrivalled exce...
-The Open Tulip-Show, York
On May the 29th this long-anticipated event took place; and certainly, considering the season, a greater number and better flowers were brought together than we expected. It was apparent, however, tha...
-Opinions Given On Flowers From Examination Of Single Pips Or Trusses
On the cover of the last Number the editor said wisely and well, that a very imperfect opinion of the merits of a plant can be formed from single or picked flowers. Every one acquainted with the sub...
-Orchids
In my house, 24 feet by 12, span-roofed, of the meanest construction, and heated by a boiler burning cinders with a little Welsh coal, I had on this date, Nov. 1st, 1849, the following plants in bicom...
-Orchids: Cattleya Spectabilis
Our friends Messrs. Loddiges of Hackney, whose fame is worldwide in connexion with Orchids, have kindly favoured us with the following particulars of this beautiful variety of the species to which it ...
-Our Garden: Birds, Insects, &C; The Daisy, And Its Eradication
Kind Readers, - The thought has sometimes crossed my mind, as it has perhaps the minds of others, how far man is justified in destroying many of the birds, insects, creeping things, and the like, whic...
-Our Great Exhibitions
The exhibitions of the Horticultural Society of London and of the Royal Botanic Society having closed for the season, we are inclined to offer a few remarks for the consideration of fellows and exhibi...
-Our Native Heaths
Permit me to direct the attention of those who have the requisite means and skill, to the wide field open to them of improving our native Heaths by hybridising them with the Cape species, more particu...
-Pansies
Very little attention will suffice this month. Prepare the soil, and keep it dry for repotting those intended for blooming under glass; which operations should be performed about the first of February...
-Pansies (2)
The seed-beds will now require considerable attention, weeding out those of bad shape, and marking any that may promise well. The next four weeks will comprise the height of the Pansy bloom, and we ho...
-Pansy Insects
Some years since I was a very extensive Pansy grower, and for a few seasons they succeeded admirably with me; in fact, no one in this neighbourhood could compete with me, and whenever I exhibited, whi...
-Pansy-Stands; Mode Of Judging, Etc
As we have not had in the pages of the Florist and Garden Miscellany a pattern or description of stands for shewing Pansies, perhaps the above will be found acceptable to some of your readers, and at ...
-A Parting Line For The Present Series
Sir, - As this is the last time I shall have the privilege of addressing you, - and we have the authority of Dr. Johnson for saying, that we never do any thing for the last time without a feeling of r...
-A Peep At The Paris Flower-Market
No lover of flowers who visits the French capital should fail to spend a morning at the Flower-market. Though somewhat different in character from similar exhibitions in our own country, it is certain...
-Pelargoniums
The plants which have not been stopped back since heading down will now require a little attention, to spread out their branches, that air and sun may be freely admitted. The way in which I do this is...
-Pelargoniums (2)
Look over specimens, and where there are any young shoots that can be spared, they can be taken off, and two or three put into a 3-inch pot, placing them round the edge. If plunged into a gentle botto...
-Pelargoniums (3)
It was presumed when this work was started, that our favourite flower would have occupied many pages, and our own productions have found a field of particular favour. Many significant remarks were mad...
-Pelargoniums (4)
If any one compares the Pelargonium flowers that were known in 1827 with those common in 1847, he will find it difficult to believe that they can all have had the same origin, and that twenty years h...
-Pelargonium Echinatum
Among the many plants that have been of late subjected to floricultural improvement, strange to say this has hitherto escaped notice. Is it because this variety of Pelargonium is a perfect gem in its ...
-Pelargoniums For Exhibition
Rapid has been the improvement in form and colouring of this my favourite flower the last few years; but to judge from the varieties exhibited through the past season at the principal London shows, th...
-Pelargoniums From Worton Cottage
A few remarks upon the varieties sent out from this place will perhaps be acceptable; and we should feel obliged if our brother raisers would communicate any particulars of the same kind regarding the...
-The Philosophy Of Florists' Flowers. No. I
When you said, in your Number for November, that you had had a smile excited by seeing the worst Pelargoniums in your collection the most admired, you only spoke the experience of all who have a colle...
-The Philosophy Of Florists' Flowers. No. II
In my last I disposed of the first of the three forms of objection, in which the charge of uselessness is ordinarily brought against the system of fancy flowers. II. The second objection admits the...
-The Philosophy Of Florists' Flowers. No. III
I hope you are a botanist. I know some eminent florists who are so, and more than one really good botanist who duly appreciates floriculture. But as the agriculturist is proverbially a despiser of his...
-The Philosophy Of Florists' Flowers. No. IV
In my former letters I have been occupied in the comparatively easy task of criticising the objections made by others. I now come to the more hazardous one of building up a system myself, and giving t...
-The Philosophy Of Florists' Flowers. No. V
Form, considered absolutely, possesses a double origin of beauty; its two branches being, as in so many instances, in apparent contrast with each other - and these two branches are Unity and Variety. ...
-The Philosophy Of Florists' Flowers. No. V. Continued
It may consist in forms, or numbers, or colours, or in any combinations of these. We have here principally to deal with the first, with some remarks on the second. In the general or primary outline...
-The Philosophy Of Florists' Flowers. No. VI
On Variety I would observe, that by this term I do not mean exactly that quality which gives value to a new seedling plant, by reason of its being different from others already in cultivation; but a q...
-The Philosophy Of Florists' Flowers. No. VII
To conclude the subject of form or shape, we come, lastly, to treat of it as subservient to an ulterior purpose, to set off to greater advantage some other means of beauty. This is a large rather than...
-The Philosophy Of Florists' Flowers. No. VII. Continued
Hence a Pink, often as large as the largest Carnation, will necessarily appear small and confined in comparison. * I have been much encouraged since this letter was prepared, by seeing, in the Gard...
-The Philosophy Of Florists' Flowers. No. VIII
With respect to the case in which more colours than one are associated in the same petal or blossom, the difference of effect is extreme between a tasteful arrangement, or the reverse; and taste in th...
-The Philosophy Of Florists' Flowers. No. VIII. Continued
When combination and contrast unite in the same flower, which is far from rare, the order of excellence is such as to admit of the highest effect colours are capable of giving. The boundaries of sc...
-Picotees
Mrs Barnard, 17; Mrs. Bevan, 16; Isabella, 15; Jenny Lind (Edmonds), 12; Venus, 11; Princess Royal (Willmer), 10; Amy, 9; Enchantress, 9; Regina, 7; Portia, 7; L'elegant, 7; Jessica, 6; Fanny Irby, 6;...
-Picotees And Carnations
The following remarks and suggestions are given in continuation of my letter in the Florist (No. xxvi. p. 46) on the subject of these interesting flowers; and I shall now plainly suggest what I think ...
-Pinks
Pinks do not suffer much from still frost, strong cold winds are far more injurious; any protection that can be given to break this force will be attended with advantage - such as branches of Fern pla...
-Pinks (2)
Put out the young rooted pipings as soon as hardened off; they succeed much better when planted while the fibres are young. Prepare beds to receive them; - the soil should be well pulverised, that the...
-Pinks. Picotees, And Carnations
It appears to me that a few remarks in the pages of the Florist might tend to settle the difference which has for years existed between the Northern and Southern raisers of these popular flowers; whic...
-Planting Standard Roses
By the time I became settled in life, I had succeeded in propagating a large stock of Roses, embracing upwards of one hundred varieties. With these I have decorated my house and lawns, not only to my ...
-Plants For Vases
Last season we were particularly struck with the very beautiful selection and arrangement of plants in the vases placed in front of the Palm-house at Kew. These vases are of iron, thoroughly painted s...
-Platycerium Grande
This remarkably strange but interesting- plant, of which our illustration represents a full-grown specimen in miniature, taken from life, is one of the family of Ferns, belonging to the class Crypto-g...
-Pleroma Elegans
THIS is one of the prettiest greenhouse plants we possess. Its flowers are nearly as large as those of an Ipomoea, rich purple, and they are produced in tolerable profusion. It is a hardy greenhouse s...
-Plumbago Larpentae
This plant is now sufficiently low-priced for every one to obtain; and the more extensively it is introduced into our gardens the better. It is a colour that will prove acceptable; and we shall hope t...
-Points Of Excellence In The Pelargonium
A cold and cough warrant the luxury of an idle evening; and my Florist for 1848, just returned from the binder, makes it an agreeable one. The comparison of Mr. Beck's and Mr. Hoyle's views (pp. 6 and...
-Polyanthuses
Polyanthuses under potculture should be top-dressed in the early part of this month with a compost of equal parts cow manure, loam of medium strength, and leaf-mould. (Decayed wood pile is an excellen...
-Polyanthuses In Pots
Keep the soil well up to the shoulder of the foliage, and in a tolerably moist state. Plants of this kind in borders, if much troubled with insects, should be looked to at every opportunity in fine we...
-The Pot Culture Of The Verbena
As the Verbena merits a place, and most justly, among our popular florists' flowers, perhaps a few hints on its cultivation in pots may be acceptable to those who have not yet adopted that mode of cul...
-Pot, Or Rather Pan Culture Of The Verbena
Verbenas treated in the manner I will now attempt to describe make showy little masses, suitable for the sides of the tables or stands of show- rooms; so that this beautiful flower may be made to mini...
-Pot-Culture Of Japan Lilies
It is a matter of surprise and regret with me that I do riot more frequently meet with these noble autumnal flowers in the collections of amateurs, for they are, in my estimation, the most beautiful o...
-Pot-Culture Of The Petunia
Allow me to say a few words in favour of the Petunia as an object for pot-culture, for with care it may be grown in pots sufficiently bushy to render it one of the handsomest plants in the greenhouse....
-Pot-Roses
The different varieties, as they go out of bloom, should have their flower-stalks removed, and a top-dressing of decayed stable-dung given them, and then be placed in a shady situation. If the weather...
-Power Of The Florist In Bringing Forth The Hidden Beauty Of Flowers
By some it may be considered a sort of presumption for florists to attempt to mend Nature: well, be it so; we hope that, like a fond mother, she will only laugh at the innocent amusements of her child...
-Primula Altaica And Plumbago Larpent.E
I have several plants of the Primula flowering freely in the beds, and a very pretty object it is; but as one or two plants have no blooms at all upon them, the former may be an accidental thing. If, ...
-Primula Sinensis
A prettier object of greenhouse cultivation than this does not exist, nor one more useful and ornamental for the autumn and winter months. It may well be such an universal favourite. Years ago I gave ...
-Properties Of A Good Cineraria
By the time the present Number meets the eye of the public, the floricultural campaign will have begun in right earnest. Amateurs will therefore be able to judge for themselves what properties a good ...
-The Properties Of A Pelargonium
I take a greater interest in the Seedling Pelargonium Fund than is to be inferred from the absence of my name from the subscription-list; and as it is always easier to dispose of other people's money ...
-Pruning Roses
BY MR. M'ARDELL, FOREMAN, CASTLE HILL GARDENS. The interesting article on Roses in your last Number has induced me to offer a few remarks on pruning, which I trust may prove instructive to the youn...
-Purple Flakes
Beauty of Woodhouse (Mansley's). Earl Spencer ( Barrenger's). Lord Byron (Taylor's). Premier (Millwood's). Queen of Purples (Holliday's). Vernon Smith (Holliday's). ...
-Quicklime A Preventive Of Damp In Plant-Frames
As the season has now arrived when plants under protection in pits, frames, or other structures, not artificially dried or ventilated, are injured by damp, the following plan is submitted to remedy th...
-Raising Seedling Roses
I have been for some years an enthusiastic seedling raiser. In my case I find the old proverb Hope deferred maketh the heart sick quite set at nought; for year after year my pleasurable anticipatio...
-Raising Tulips From Seed
The raising of Tulips from seed has been on the increase for these last few years, and it may not be uninteresting to know by what means the best success is to be attained. I have, on many occasions, ...
-Rambles In The West In Search Of British Plants
January may fairly be called the dead month of the year for flowers of every description. If the weather holds tolerably mild, we may hope to collect enough of odds and ends from the garden to make ...
-Rambles In The West In Search Of Wild Flowers. February
Alas ! the weather has not been sufficiently mild to tempt the buds from their hiding-places; there is little else than a few scattered blossoms of the Furze spangling the road-side hedges, which, ind...
-Rambles In The West In Search Of Wild Plants
The country is now assuming a gay appearance, on account of the fresh flowers and new growths which are daily on the increase. The Furze is becoming truly beautiful, and the hedges are thickly spangle...
-Rambling Thoughts By A Rambling Writer
To a person employed in city occupations during the whole day, nothing is more grateful than a return to his garden; and happily the facilities afforded by railway travelling and third-class trains en...
-The Ranunculus
The Ranunculus Asiaticus is generally believed to be indigenous to Turkey and Persia. It has long been cultivated in this country, but the precise time of its introduction is involved in obscurity. Jo...
-Ranunculuses
If the beds are not ready, lose no time in the preparation of them. If the soil of the garden be not a good loam, of somewhat retentive quality, such must be procured. It ought not to be used fresh fr...
-Ranunculuses (2)
Regard must be had to the ripened pericarps; - cut them when brown and on a dry day, to secure from mildew. Take up the roots as they ripen, - not all at once. Beds containing valuable sorts should be...
-Regent's Park And Chiswick Exhibitions
These grand displays of horticultural skill terminated for the season with the Park show on the 3d, and that at Chiswick on the 13th ult. Before we commence to offer any remarks on the exhibitions t...
-Regents Park And Chiswick Exhibitions
The former was held on the 8th of May, the latter on the 18th; and considering that the greater portion of the collections present at the one were exhibited at the other meeting, it seems the better p...
-Remarks On British Ferns
It is a long while ago since I first became familiar with these truly beautiful and highly interesting subjects, and at that time I hardly entertained an idea that ever I should see them forming a par...
-Remarks On British Ferns. No- II
1. Lastr,Ea Filix Mas In this we have a Fern of extremely easy culture, in short we find it growing in almost every soil and situation; nevertheless it prefers shaded hedge-banks and woods where th...
-Remarks On British Ferns. No. III
4. Lastilea Spinosa This Fern usually grows in the vicinity of water, but rarely, if ever, directly in it. The decaying roots of trees and shaded moist ditch-banks are its favourite habitats. It, h...
-Remarks On British Ferns. No. IV
7. Lastraea Thelypteris The present subject is an exception to the other British species of Lastroea, inasmuch as it possesses truly a creeping root, whereas in the other species no one can really ...
-Remarks On British Ferns. No. IX. Cystopteris
In this genus the involucre is fixed by its wide base to the lower side of the clusters of fructification, a circumstance that readily distinguishes it from Aspidium, Lastraea, and Polystichum; and ce...
-Remarks On British Ferns. No. V. Aspidium Aculeatum
In this instance I shall make free with an article of my own in the Gardener's and Farmer s Journal, published in May 1847. Some of the readers of the Florist may not have seen that paper at the time;...
-Remarks On British Ferns. No. VI. Athyrium
A. filix fcemina. For many years this truly elegant British Fern was referred to the genus Aspidium; but as a nearer approach to perfection in generic arrangement, it was thought proper to remove it t...
-Remarks On British Ferns. No. VII. Polypodium
This genus is readily distinguished from any of the preceding genera by the absence of the involucre or iudusium. 1. P. Vulgare It is scarcely necessary to offer any remarks on the cultivation o...
-Remarks On British Ferns. No. VIII. Woodsia
In the earlier stages of development in this genus, the clusters of fructification appear to be furnished with a somewhat scaly involucre, which apparently passes away as the frond approaches maturity...
-Remarks Upon An Article On Ericas, In The Gardeners' Chronicle Of Nov. 25th
An article appeared in the Gardeners' Chronicle of the 25th November, headed, Cultivation of Cape Heaths; and signed, W. P. Leach, S. Rucker's, Esq., Wandsworth, Surrey. This communication of M...
-Remarks Upon An Article On Ericas, In The Gardeners' Chronicle Of Nov. 25th. Continued
Mr. Leach is decidedly in error when he recommends little shade. The best possible situation for Heaths, when they are turned out in the summer after flowering, is on the shady side of a high hedge,...
-Reminiscences
Few plants equal the Amaryllis in the size, diversity, and splendour of its flowers, as well as in its elegant habit. All admire it when they do see it in bloom; but, as usually managed, it is unfortu...
-Reminiscences Of Old Plants. Kalosantbes Coccinea
The rage for horticultural novelties has thrown many old and deserving favourites into the background. However trite the old adage may be, that novelty is not necessarily improvement, we do not seem t...
-Reminiscences Of Old Plants. Kalosanthes Coccinea
The rage for horticultural novelties has thrown many old and deserving favourites into the background. However trite the old adage may be, that novelty is not necessarily improvement, we do not seem t...
-Retrospective Glance At The Dahlia Trade
With a brief review of varieties offered for sale in the years 184.5, 1840', 1847, ami 1848: to which is added a caution for 1849. By An Annual Purchaser. Loud and deep are the lamentations made...
-Reviews
The Midland Florist And Suburban Horticulturist We are glad to find by the volume which is just completed, that this interesting little work is progressing as favourably as its best friends can wis...
-Reviews (2)
A Packet of Seeds saved by an Old Gardener. Chapman and Hall. We have purchased a dozen of this little ninepenny work, with the hope that its distribution may set others thinking as much as it has ...
-Review. Curtis's Beauties Of The Rose (Quarterly Periodical)
We have here a new illustrated work on the Rose, and if for nothing else, certainly most remarkable for the industry of its author. Mr. H. Curtis cultivates Roses for sale, takes portraits of his flow...
-Review. The Letters Of Rusticus On The Natural History Of Godalming
Van Voorst, London. We have risen from a hasty perusal of this interesting work with the full intention of taking it up again, and of more carefully reading its contents in our intervals of leisure...
-Reviews. Rambles And Observations In New South Wales, By J. P. Townsend
Chapman and Hall. 1849. These entertaining details of rambles through a land we visited in our youth have freshly recalled scenes fast fading from our recollection; and though but little will be fo...
-Rhododendrons
Our readers are no doubt all well acquainted with the ordinary form of the Rhododendron as it grows in their gardens; but perhaps some whom we address may never have seen our metropolitan exhibitions ...
-Roses
BY MR. M'ARDELL, FOREMAN, CASTLE HILL GARDENS. Having offered a few remarks at p. 212 on pruning Roses, on the present occasion perhaps a few words on specimen plants may be interesting. Specime...
-Rose Flakes
Ariel (May's). Flora's Garland (Brooks'). Lady Ely (Ely's). Lorenzo (May's) Lovely Ann (Ely's). Princess Royal (Puxley's). Picotees. Red-Edged Ernest (Edmonds'). Gem (Sharp's). Isabella (Wildman...
-Rose Insects
We are indebted to the Editor of the Gardeners' Chronicle for the following article, extracted from that popular journal, and also for the use of the accompanying woodcut. The subject is one of no com...
-Roses In Pots
Those plants which were cut down early will be starting their eyes, and the little maggot will soon be found busily at work. Look sharp after them, not once, but frequently, or they will soon destroy ...
-Royal Botanic Society
This Society held its first meeting this season on the 16th ult. in its garden, Inner Circle, Regent's Park. The day was ushered in by rain; but as it advanced, it cleared up, and the afternoon was fi...
-Royal Botanic Society's Exhibition
The midsummer show of this society was held on the 20th ult. The day preceding was very unpropitious, and led us to apprehend an unfavourable morrow; but the night was fine and tranquil, and the day i...
-Royal Nursery, Slough
This Nursery, long so famous for its floricultural productions when conducted by Messrs. Brown, after languishing in the hands of Cutter and Co., passed into the possession of our friend Mr. Turner in...
-Royal South-London Floricultural Society
April 18 The first show for the season took place at the Horns Tavern, Kennington. The day was the most unfavourable that could be for an exhibition, the wind being sharp and frosty, with occasiona...
-Royal South-London Floricultural Society (2)
The fourth exhibition of the season was held in the Surrey Zoological Gardens on the 25th of July. The day was somewhat unfavourable, and consequently there was a comparatively thin attendance. The ex...
-Royal South-London Floricultural Society (3)
Sept. 12th There was a capital exhibition on this occasion as far as Dahlias are concerned, and this being emphatically the Dahlia show of this society, we shall confine ourselves chiefly to them...
-Royal South-London Floricultural Society (4)
July 23 This Society held its fourth exhibition for the season in the Surrey Zoological Gardens. The afternoon was unfavourable, and there was but a thin attendance. Carnations and Picotees were go...
-Royal South-London Floricultural Society Exhibitions, May 22d And June 19th
Ox both these occasions many excellent specimens of good gardening were produced in the shape of stove and greenhouse plants, as well as in Cape Heaths; and there were Pelargoniums by the usual grower...
-Royal South-London Floricultural. April 17
The first exhibition of the season was held at the Horns Tavern, Kennington. The day was fine, and a large number of well-cultivated plants was produced; but as a Florists' show it was in some respect...
-Sacred Gardens
The Watered Garden (Isa. LVIII. 11, Jer. XXXI. 12, With Their Respective Contexts) The necessity of water to a garden, what florist can doubt? What lively images does this expression, a yv'atered ...
-Saffron Walden, Essex. An Acre Of Hollyhocks
Till within these last few years this flower was used as an ornament in the plantation or shrubbery border only; but it is now becoming an especial favourite with the professional and amateur florist,...
-Salvia Splendens
This brilliant member of a beautiful genus was introduced into this country from Mexico some thirty years ago. It is well known, and frequently met with, but more commonly in a neglected state, than r...
-Scarlet Flakes
Bishop of Gloucester (Brown's). Firebrand (Hardwick's). Hero of Middlesex (Willmer's). King of Scarlets (Ely's). Lydia (Addenbrook's). Queen Victoria (Simpson's). ...
-School-Gardens
In the immediate neighbourhood of Nottingham are an immense number of small gardens, occupied and cultivated by all grades of society; and, with a most laudable and praiseworthy feeling, the friends c...
-Scriptural Uses Of Florists' Objects. The Enclosed Garden
A garden could scarcely be a garden except it were enclosed: the marginal reading of the text is barred, which gives us a meaning beyond simple enclosure. We not only enclose our garden, but have a lo...
-Scripture Illustrations
The Seasons The coming on of spring has lately reminded me of the fact, that only two divisions of the year are noticed in the Bible, which, as our translators render them, are summer and winter. I...
-Scripture Illustrations. The Almond-Tree
The root of the word thus translated in the Scriptures signifies in the Hebrew, to wake. This tree, says Parkhurst, before all others, first waketh and riseth from its winter repose. Pliny noti...
-Scripture Illustrations. The Lily
The word in the Hebrew Scriptures translated Lily, and plainly answering to our flower of that name, is of most interesting origin; and the references to the flower itself may teach us many things. ...
-Scripture Illustrations. The Rose
This flower, so celebrated by the poets of antiquity, is only mentioned twice in the Bible: Solomon's Song ii. 1; Isaiah xxxv. 1. But there is more to be learned in these two passages than some who ha...
-Seedlings
Look these over frequently; pick off fogged leaves; water only when absolutely required; turn the plants round occasionally; break up all variegated-leaved ones, those that throw blind shoots, or have...
-Seedling Florists' Flowers
I am quite an enthusiast for raising seedling florists' flowers, and would strongly urge both nurserymen and amateurs to devote some portion at least of their time and space to this interesting proces...
-Seedling Florists' Flowers (2)
Pinks: Sappho (12 blooms), shewn by Mr. Turner, was very evenly laced, smooth on the edges, good size, and, we should say, a constant variety. Huntsman, by the same grower, very smooth, stout petal, l...
-Seedling Florists' Flowers For Our Illustrations
Desirous of obtaining something from a distant part of the country for the purpose of illustration, we requested J. Edwards, Esq. to ask Mr. Holland if he would send us up the very best Polyanthus and...
-The Seedling Pelargonium Exhibition
Took place, as advertised, in Upton Park on the 15th of June, and drew together a considerable number of plants, nine competitors, and several amateur cultivators from distant parts of the country. ...
-Seedling Pelargonium Exhibition (2)
I congratulate the cultivators of the Pelargonium on the prospect of an annual seedling exhibition, which, under proper arrangements, will be likely not only to improve but to extend the cultivation o...
-Seedling Pelargonium Exhibition At Upton Park
Considerable interest is excited in the above exhibition, to which liberal contributions have been made, although it is only considered as an attempt to arrive at the best mode of having something of ...
-Seedling Petunias
By this time all the seedlings should be in separate pots, and the greater number in flower or shewing bud. Pay attention to the small and weakly plants; encourage their growth, that they may blossom ...
-Seedlings Of Promise
Kendall's Sanspareil, white, with blue tip, was not sufficiently in bloom to judge of its merits: hope to see this flower again, for it is very promising. Henderson's Fairy Queen, white, with puce edg...
-September. Worton-Cottage Meetings
Our two last plates and the present one have been prepared from coloured memorandums taken by Mr. Andrews of flowers exhibited at these Meetings. This was one of the great objects we had in view in th...
-Shanking-Off Of Pansies
I have grown during the last twenty years nearly all the different kinds of Florists' flowers, and with tolerable success; but the Pansy has always been my favourite, and has had the most of my attent...
-The Simultaneous Contrast Of Colours
BY M. CHEVREUL, MEMBER OF THE ACADEMT OF SCIENCES, PARIS. Amongst the pleasures presented to us by the culture of flowering plants, there are few that exceed what we experience from the sight of a ...
-Soils And Their Preparation
Let no time be lost in preparing and housing under cover the composts likely to be required during the winter months, and in getting heaps of raw material together ready for turning in the frosty weat...
-Some Remarks On Wintering Carnations And Picotees
I hear and read of continual lamentations respecting the difficulty of wintering these favourites; but why such should obtain, I am at a loss to guess, for few plants are more easily wintered, as I wi...
-Spring Flowers
At this time of the year our flower-gardens present such a dreary aspect, that the question naturally suggests itself, Can nothing be done to shorten this dark and gloomy season? We are apt to reply i...
-Stamford-Hill Horticultural Society. July 18th
This Society held their third and last show of the season in the grounds of J. Wilson, Esq. It was well attended; and in addition to a very respectable exhibition of fruit, cut flowers, and plants, th...
-The Star Nursery, Slough
Whilst in the neighbourhood, we took the opportunity of paying a hurried visit to this establishment. Mr. Bragg occupies so conspicuous a place as a successful exhibitor of Pansies, Pinks, Picotees, C...
-Stoke-Newington Chrysanthemum Exhibition
The above was held on the 20th November at the Manor Rooms, Stoke Newington; and we have great reason to regret that the clay proved so unfavourable for visitors. The exhibitors and friends of floricu...
-Suggestions On The Management And Hybridising Of The Yellow Picotee
The energetic addresses from the pen of Dr. Horner which appeared in a recent Number of the Midland Florist and of the present work, urging an extended cultivation of the Yellow Picotee, and the raisi...
-Teddington Horticultural Exhibition
Held at the Clarence Arms, Sept. 6. Worth a passing notice, to record how nicely things of this kind can be done in a village surrounded by a good neighbourhood, by obtaining a suitable place, and ...
-Of The Bizarrs
As to the bizarrs, there are two sorts, the old and the new ones. The old kinds are those which have a bottom of a different colour from the stripes; the most common have a white bottom with a yellow ...
-Of The Flakes, Or Striped Auriculas
These flakes, or striped Auriculas, have all their partisans, but they do not absolutely hold the first rank. Nevertheless they are highly valuable when they are glossy and look like velvet, when thei...
-Tiger Flowers
I read Dr. Maclean's papers on the Tigridia with great pleasure; and I hope it will encourage that gentleman and others to communicate information through The Florist, when they learn that I procured ...
-Tiger Flowers (Tigridias)
With the exception of a paper written many years since in the Transactions of the Horticultural Society, and one which lately appeared in the Midland Florist, little or nothing has been done to promot...
-To The Readers Of The Florist
As I considered the closing Number of the first Volume of The Florist a befitting time to review the stewardship of its conductor and editors, so also do I think the commencement of a new one a season...
-To The Superintendent Of The Florist
Sir, - I am glad complaints have reached you on the Pelargonium not occupying a greater space in your pages. Not that I think the complaint well-founded, - for we have about two dozen strictly florist...
-Transplanting Roses
I read with much pleasure the remarks on Roses by my esteemed friend Mr. Rivers, which appear from time to time in the Florist. In the last number, however, he gives me credit for assertions which, I ...
-Trichomanes Speciosum
I am much pleased with Mr. Houlston's illustration of The Irish Fern in your last Number. I am afraid, however, that ere long it will have to be classed as an extinct British species. I was in Irel...
-A Trip To Kew Gardens Via Richmond And The Banks Of The Thames. No. I
Well, here we are at the Waterloo Station of the South-Western Railway; tickets paid for, second class, 1s. 2d. each, and good enough for modest men like you and I. 12: 25 is the starting-time; and, h...
-A Trip To Kew Gardens Via Richmond And The Banks Of The Thames. No. II
Now then let us enter and stroll through the Gardens pleasantly, easily, gently; sit where we like, lie where we like, and do as we like; which, I am sure, cannot be otherwise than the Director, Sir W...
-The Tropaeolum Tricolorum
Than this, few plants possess more real interest; and it is as useful as it is interesting, for it continues to flower nearly the whole season through. It is so easily managed too, that it may be cult...
-Tulips
The continuance of mild weather has caused the green spike of Tulips to appear above ground earlier than usual, consequently no time should be lost in procuring and preparing the means securely to pro...
-Tulips (2)
The bulbs will now be thoroughly ripe, and should be taken up forthwith: see directions last month. Let all the offsets remain attached to the parent bulb until they are well dried. The drawers should...
-Tulip, Rose Magnificent
In these remarks it is not the intention of the writer to question the wisdom of seeing all flowers intended for figuring in your Journal, in preference to depending upon drawings. Indeed, with such f...
-Tulip: Haward's Magnificent
We observe that our contemporary the Midland Florist speaks of this flower as having been seen in a very inferior character to that in which it is figured in our volume for 1848; and this is corrobora...
-Tumps
Remove the top and side-cloths directly the blooms fall. When the foliage turns brown, and the stems will bend without breaking, the bulbs will be fit to take up. Let great care be exercised in not ex...
-Unpruned Drooping Roses
About six or eight years ago I received, among others, some very stout short stocks of the Dog-Rose; they were not more than two feet in height, but stouter than a large broom - handle, the bark thick...
-Vallota Purpurea
This is really a handsome greenhouse bulb, of easy cultivation, and flowering regularly every autumn. I can strongly recommend it to such of your readers as do not already grow it. My plants are just ...
-The Various Modes Of Preparing Ranunculus Beds
Having seen the Ranunculus cultivated in many instances with less success than I could desire, I am anxious to offer through your pages a suggestion to your practical readers, and to solicit their co-...
-Ventilating Contrivance
The accompanying cut represents a method of ventilating rooms, counting-houses, etc. which has been adopted for some length of time, and has given general satisfaction. The ventilator consists of l...
-Ventilating Frame For The Blooming Of Auriculas, Etc
I feel assured that those of your readers who grow Auriculas, and especially who bloom them for exhibition, will receive the highest satisfaction and advantage in the adoption of the cold frame which ...
-Verbenas
Various species of Verbena were cultivated in our gardens before the year 1828; but, if we are not mistaken, it was about that year that the beautiful V. Melindres, the most striking of the then exist...
-Victoria Regia
This queen of aquatics is now flowering beautifully at Syon, the seat of her Grace the Duchess Dowager of Northumberland. We delay giving particulars respecting its successful cultivation, etc. for an...
-Victoria Regia, The Queen Of Aquatics
For the following particulars respecting this noble plant we are indebted to the kindness of a correspondent, who has forwarded them to us just in time for their appearance in our volume for 1849. The...
-Visit To Kew Gardens By Rail Direct
So you're come at last, and, as usual, at the last minute. Have I your ticket? Of course I have. Strange, that you cannot as easily be a few minutes before time, so as to avoid all this drive and hur...
-Water-Lilies
At a late meeting of the Horticultural Society, Mrs. Lawrence of Ealing Park produced a most beautiful bloom of the blue Water-Lily from one of her stoves. It was mentioned that it is possible to obta...
-Water-Plants
I like your flower-garden much; its long, broad, Italian terrace, with geometrical flower-beds on gravel, and bounded by dwarf parapet-walls, ornamented at intervals with vases filled with Scarl...
-Waterproof Covering For Frames, Etc
Your correspondent Alpha deserves credit for his endeavours to substitute a neat for a cumbrous article, in the employment of oiled calico instead of bast matting. I do not think it would resist qui...
-The Weather
There is an old saying, with reference to the well-known uncertainties of our English climate, which I used to think a calumny, and even bordering on the ridiculous, but which I have now found to my c...
-Which Are The Best, The Northern Or Southern Raised Flowers; And First, Carnations And Picotees?
I welcome Mr. Edwards's challenge to try this question by exhibitions, as proposed by him at p. 97; and as an earnest of such welcome, I beg you to hand him my name and two sovereigns; for I am quite ...
-Willison's Rose-Nursery, Whitby
Early one morning in July (and the morning, as Mr. Paul says, is the fittest time for these rambles) I paid a visit to Mr. Willison's Rose-Nursery, which is situated ahout a mile to the eastward of ...
-Window Greenhouses
(To the Superintendent of The Florist). Dear Sir, - I must plead guilty to the charge of never having seen, or indeed heard of, The Florist, till you called my attention to it; but I like the numbe...
-Window Greenhouses. Continued
This stand, painted, cost 155. And as I began collecting gradually, bought but few, and exchanged with friends, I had a very good collection before I had spent 2 upon my hobby. Since then 1 have been...
-Window-Gardening
In my former letter on flowers in windows, I omitted one or two things which may be useful knowledge to some of your readers. In such a situation they are peculiarly liable, especially in dry and hot ...
-Winter Treatment Of The Carnation
I erect a light wooden frame over the place where the plants are to be wintered, fixing it against a wall having a north aspect. This frame is four feet high at back, and two feet high in front. On th...
-Wintering The Carnation
As winter will soon approach us, perhaps the following plan of wintering the Carnation may prove acceptable. My frame stands on legs, and has a false bottom eight inches from the ground, well drilled ...
-A Word Or Two About Annuals
The charge so often laid against this very useful class of flowers, that of being so ephemeral in their duration, requires some degree of qualification. That they frequently are so, cannot be denied; ...
-Zauschneria Californica
In last month's Florist this is described amongst the new plants as being probably hardy. I think there is not the least doubt of it, as two plants of it have stood here all the winter in the open b...









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