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The Chronicles Of A Garden: Its Pets And Its Pleasures | by Miss Henrietta Wilson



Much has been written of late on small farms, and the profits thereof. Reading such works is pleasant and tempting, and sometimes one is inclined to wonder whether any profit could be made out of a shrubbery and garden of two acres. Thus cogitating one day, it came into my head to endeavour to record the pleasures of which these two acres have been the source; and surely in this world of care, and toil, and anxiety, what is a daily source of enjoyment may be counted profitable also...

TitleThe Chronicles Of A Garden: Its Pets And Its Pleasures
AuthorMiss Henrietta Wilson
PublisherRobert Carter & Brothers
Year1864
Copyright1864, Robert Carter & Brothers
AmazonThe Chronicles of a Garden: Its Pets and Its Pleasures

By The Late Miss Henrietta Wilson, Author Of " Little Things," Etc.

With A Brief Memoir By James Hamilton, D.D., F.L.S.

"I love my Garden! dearly love That little spot of ground! There 's not, methinks, (though I may err In partial pride,) a pleasanter In all the country round."

Mrs Southey.

"God Almighty first planted a garden : it is the purest of human pleasures; it is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man."

Loud Bacon.

-Memoir Of Miss Henrietta Wilson
The good and gifted writer of the following pages was the daughter of Andrew Wilson, Esq., Main House. In early life she lost her mother, and for some years found a home with her grandmother in Queen ...
-Memoir Of Miss Henrietta Wilson. Continued
* Contributions to the Medical Mission Sick-Nurse Fund will be gratefully received by Mrs Sym, 37 George Square, Edinburgh. Her heart had long been affected by rheumatism, but it was not till mid-s...
-Introduction
Much has been written of late on small farms, and the profits thereof. Reading such works is pleasant and tempting, and sometimes one is inclined to wonder whether any profit could be made out of a sh...
-The Pleasures Of Work
The sun and sky,. The elements and seasons, as they change, Do find a worthy fellow-labourer there - Man free, man working for himself, with choice Of time, and place, and object. Wordsworth. ...
-The Pleasures Of Work. Continued
* Thorndale; or. Conflict of Opinion. Oh! the rapture of beauty, of sweetness, of sound, That succeeded that soft, gracious rain! With laughter and singing the valleys rung round, And the little...
-Trees, Evergreens And Shrubs
' Oh for a law, originating in the perception of comfort, and self-imposed, which should make the planting of a few trees an operation as certain as the building of a house! Men would live long...
-Trees, Evergreens And Shrubs. Part 2
I know few saunters more enjoyable than one along by a hedgerow in spring; and when, as you pause and linger in delight over the rich clusters of the hawthorn blossom, a breeze passes, and the ground ...
-Trees, Evergreens And Shrubs. Part 3
Were I attempting here a history or description of forest trees, it would be easy to fill pages with the fascinating theme; but I am sure those who love and appreciate well the beauty and variety of i...
-Trees, Evergreens And Shrubs. Part 4
The following pretty but fanciful allusions to the fungi found n woods is from a description of a woodland walk by Madame Gas-par in:- They are a singular race, and full of mystery. There are good...
-Trees, Evergreens And Shrubs. Part 5
There is one peculiar beauty about the variegated holly, the tints of its young and tender leaves; these assume the most delicate shades of white, pink, and green, each differing from the other, and m...
-Trees, Evergreens And Shrubs. Part 6
I fear the forester may be right when he strips the ivy off, lest it should strangle a young tree; but I am not writing for such, and must plead for and counsel a frequent use of this beautiful evergr...
-Trees, Evergreens And Shrubs. Part 7
However much our evergreens are valued, admired, and enjoyed in winter, we begin to look eagerly forward in spring to the budding of our shrubs, and who would not feel the blank the removal of these w...
-Spring
Spring! Summer! Autumn! Of all three, Whose reign is loveliest there? Oh! is not she who paints the ground, When its frost fetters are unbound. The fairest of the fair? I gaze upon her viol...
-Spring. Part 2
One of our triggest little spring plants is the Cheiranthux alpuia, sometimes called the small wallflower. It is very easily propagated, for if a plant of it is torn in pieces, every bit will strike r...
-Spring. Part 3
To return to the heresy with which I started - that some flowers may be occasionally allowed to bloom at the roots of other plants - the snowdrop may be named as one which has a peculiarly pleasing ef...
-Spring. Part 4
Dear spot, which we have watch'd with tender heed, Bringing the chosen plants and blossoms blown Among the distant mountains, flower and weed, Which thou hast taken to thee as thy own, Making all kin...
-Spring. Part 5
The gradual bursting forth of buds and leaves on shrub and tree is a daily source of spring enjoyment; the elder and honeysuckle shew their purple buds early; the lilacs and flowering currants follow ...
-Spring. Part 6
Let me caution the inexperienced, however, against the danger of weakening the young plants when thus forcing them. It is not easy to regulate the due supply of air; and if too rapidly forced at first...
-Spring. Part 7
Taking notes of our experiments as here advised is very necessary, if we really wish to profit by experience; for it is rarely safe to trust one's memory while trying experiments, and inaccurate infor...
-Summer
As now, on some delicious eve, We, in our sweet sequester'd orchard-plot, Sit on the tree crook'd earthward; whose old boughs. That hang above us in an arborous roof, Stirr'd by the faint gale of dep...
-Summer. Part 2
For all that meets the bodily sense I deem Symbolical - one mighty alphabet For infant minds; and we in the low world. Placed with our backs to bright reality, That we may learn with young unwounded ...
-Summer. Part 3
But it is time we turn from these desultory uses and enjoyments of the garden, to some notice of the more practical parts of gardening; although all we can attempt to do, is merely to suggest some few...
-Summer. Part 4
The plants were removed at the end of February from the seed-bed, they were planted in rows nine inches apart each way; the soil was light, but as rich as richness could make it. Two plants of macula...
-Summer. Part 5
Too much attention cannot be paid to tying-up and training while the full growth of summer is on our garden; keeping plants in their places is as necessary as keeping people in theirs, and by means of...
-Autumn
Comes next Brown Autumn in her turn. Oh! not unwelcome cometh she; The parched earth luxuriously Drinks from her dewy urn. And she hath flowers and fragrance too. Peculiarly her own; Ast...
-Autumn. Part 2
The greenhouse plants bedded out in early summer should now be in full flower - scarlet geraniums, heliotropes, verbenas, and lobelias, while the spring - sown annuals, especially China asters, French...
-Autumn. Part 3
* Cottage Gardener, vol. viii., p. 355. A spirit haunts the year's last hours, Dwelling amid these yellowing bowers : To himself he talks. For at eventide, listening earnestly, At his work you ...
-Winter
Not undelightful now to pace The forest's ample rounds; And see the spangled branches shine, And mark the moss of many a hue, That varies the old trees' brown bark, Or o'er the gray stone spreads; An...
-Winter. Part 2
Take as many 3-inch pots as you want plants, drain them with pieces of mortar, and put over that a little of the roughest of your compost; till up nearly level with the top of the pot. and place thre...
-Winter. Part 3
Unless an amateur gardener makes some such personal calendar of work, the things to be done are generally forgotten at the right time; and even where there is occasional help from a gardener, such a c...
-Our Pets
Birds and beasts, And the mute fish that glances in the stream, And harmless reptile coiling in the sun, And joyous insect hovering in the air, The fowl domestic and the household clog, In his capaci...
-Our Pets. Part 2
The first arrival of the birds of passage is always a welcome event to those who like to watch the habits of those feathered favourites ; not merely the swallows, (they are not garden birds,) but the ...
-Our Pets. Part 3
A lark, reared from the nest, was most resolute in thus urging his claims to get out during breakfast. His bath consisted of a saucer of sand, in which he rolled with great satisfaction, after which h...
-Our Pets. Part 4
Jackdaws brought up from the nest are among the most amusing and attractive pets about a garden; they shew much more personal attachment than the magpie, and are much less tricky and mischievous out-o...
-Our Pets. Part 5
It is a question whether much can be learned from the habits of animals in captivity that might lead us to decide upon their native instincts, for these certainly become curiously modified and even al...
-Our Pets. Part 6
This fancy for making pets of reptiles is certainly not very common, and meets with little sympathy; so it is all the pleasanter to find a poet taking the part of these creatures, and drawing a moral ...
-Our Pets. Part 7
It would be easy to cite examples, among all classes, of the great and good, of this love of animals, especially of dogs. Poems have been composed on them, anecdotes collected of them, biographies wri...
-Ranger's Grave
He's dead and gone! He's dead and gone! And the lime-tree branches wave, And the daisy blows, And the green grass grows, Upon his grave. He's dead and gone! He's dead and gone! And he sleeps by the...
-To My Birdie
Here's only you an' me, Birdie! here's only you an' me! An' there you sit, you humdrum fowl, Sae mute and mopish as an owl, Sour companie! Sing me a little sang, Birdie! lilt up a little lay! Wh...
-My Doves
My little doves have left a nest Upon an Indian tree, Whose leaves fantastic take their rest Or motion from the sea; For, ever there, the sea-winds go With sunlit paces to and fro. T...
-To Flush, My Dog
I. Loving friend, the gift of one Who her own true faith has run Through thy lower nature, Be my benediction said With my hand upon thy head, Gentle fellow-creature! II. Like a lady's ...
-On The Grave Of A Faithful Dog
Three trees which stand apart upon A sunny slope of meadow ground, A shadow from the heat at noon, And underneath a grassy mound. A little silent grassy mound! And is this all is left of thee...
-A Book Selection From The Catalogue Of James Nisbet And Co
The Listener By Caroline Fry. A New Edition, with Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth antique. A Morning Beside The Lake Of Galilee, And The Mount Of Olives By the Rev. James Hamilton, D. D. 16mo...
-A Book Selection From The Catalogue Of James Nisbet And Co. Part 2
The matter of Mrs Wightman's publication is most interesting, and we wish every clergyman's wife would carefully peruse it. - Church of England Magazine. English Hearts And English Hands; Or, The...
-A Book Selection From The Catalogue Of James Nisbet And Co. Part 3
Brief Memorials Of The Rev. Alphonse Francois Lacroix Missionary of the London Missionary Society in Calcutta By his Son-in-Law, Rev. Joseph Mullens, Missionary of the same Society. Crown 8vo, 5s. ...
-A Book Selection From The Catalogue Of James Nisbet And Co. Part 4
We are pleased with this book, which may well be placed in the hands of young ladies. - Church of England Magazine. Nine Months In The United States During The Crisis By the Rev. George Fisch...
-A Book Selection From The Catalogue Of James Nisbet And Co. Part 5
Lancashire Homes, And What Ails Them By the Author of Ragged Homes, and How to Mend them. 16mo, 1s. cloth. We heartily hope that this little book will be widely circulated and extensively read....









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