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The Gardener V1 | by William Thomson



Tips and Articles on Gardening. Articles A-H.

TitleThe Gardener V1
AuthorWilliam Thomson
PublisherWilliam Blackwood And Sons
Year1869
Copyright1869, William Blackwood And Sons
AmazonThe New Organic Grower: A Master's Manual of Tools and Techniques for the Home and Market Gardener

A Magazine Of Horticulture And Floriculture

Edited By William Thomson, Dalkeith Gardens, Author Of 'a Practical Treatise On The Culture Of The Grape Vine'

-"Consider The Lilies"
Your correspondent F. W. B., p. 145, indulges in a grim joke on the price of Lily bulbs, possibly deriving his inspiration from the well-known but misleading advertisement which has appeared in the ...
-"Jack Frost" In The 'Gardeners' Chronicle
We have learned that J. Downie's signature was appended to the verses Jack Frost, in the 'Gardeners' Chronicle,' by mistake of one of the officials connected with our contemporary, which led to an...
-My Garden In Winter
As I write, my garden lies locked up in the icy bands of the hard frost, and all the pretty smiling flowers are laid low. A few days since and it was different, for then my eyes were gladdened with th...
-0. Insleayi (Var. Leopardlnum)
This is a very fine and richly coloured form of 0. Insleayi, introduced to our collections by Messrs James Backhouse & Son of York. In habit, it is nearly identical with 0. Insleayi, but its large mas...
-A Beautiful Japanese Tree
The spring we have scarcely yet escaped from is the most difficult that has been encountered by garden vegetation during the memory of man. We have not had very severe frost, it is true, but the long-...
-A Bequest Of Spring
THERE is lying before us as we sit down to write a bunch of flowers plucked from trees growing in the Chiswick Gardens of the Royal Horticultural Society. Each one of them has its pleasant tale of hig...
-A Blessing On An Old Broome
Samuel Broome, for forty years gardener to the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, whose annual Chrysanthemum Show was one of the sights of London, and who, in their culture, gave such valuable t...
-A Chapter On Amateurs For Amateurs
Your true amateur, in things horticultural, is the representative of a class of persons to whom the pages of the 'Gardener' ought to become subjects of deep interest, and full of matter of the most us...
-A Chapter On Over-Attention
Under this head may be enumerated a variety of bad practices, as numerous, perhaps, as those which are classed under the general term Neglect. Among these, the system of watering usually adopted takes...
-A Constant Reader
We never before saw anything like the branch of black Currant tree you sent us, nor can we suggest what may be the cause of it. As it destroys their fruitfulness, we advise you to lift them and plant ...
-A Cottager's Mode Of Cultivating Mignonette
I hope you will permit me to make a few remarks for the benefit of those of my own class that have no garden. To these I say, Make the best use you can of your windows. This is already being done quit...
-A Disease Of The Gooseberry. How To Get Rid Of It, Etc
Aecidium Cancellatum A, a berry upon which it is seen growing in its natural size; b, leaf cut showing the part where the peridia are magnified; c, a full-sized leaf affected as the berry, appearing ...
-A Few Notes About Fruit And Fruit-Trees
Cherry-orchards we generally see planted and grow best where the land is of a deep loamy soil, resting upon what may be termed a good brick earth. In such soils you may see the trees free of canker an...
-A Few Remarks About Hothouses
NEXT in importance to a site for a garden is that of the position of hothouses. The position in which hothouses are placed in relation to the surface of a garden, and to other offices in connection wi...
-A Few Remarks On The Culture Of The Cineraria From Seed By An Amateur
It is now two years past in March last since I became the proud possessor of a small greenhouse 10 feet by 10. For a year previous to that I had a one-light frame, and although I found it a good deal ...
-A Few Showy Herbaceous Plants
Lythrum Salicaria Roseum Superbum (Loosestrife) This is one of the finest hardy herbaceous plants that we have. It is a stately-looking plant - well-established plants of it growing to 4 feet in heig...
-A Few Weeks' Grace For Early-Forced Trees
If it be correct, as stated, that the past season has been the most unfavourable on record for the ripening and development of all kinds of fruit-trees, the suggestion seems to offer itself whether it...
-A Few Words About Cinerarias
Next to Chinese Primroses, Cinerarias are perhaps the most useful winter and spring flowering greenhouse plants in general cultivation. By sowing the seeds at different times, they may be had in bloom...
-A Few Words About Hollyhocks
The Hollyhock is not so generally grown as its decorative qualities entitle it to. When grown amongst shrubs in situations moderately sheltered, few plants produce a finer floral display during the au...
-A Few Words About Orchids
THERE cannot be a doubt as to which family of tropical plants is the most popular at the present time. Orchid-culture has extended by leaps and bounds during the last decade or two, and their star i...
-A Few Words About Orchids. Continued
Nearly all those named, and many more besides, thrive well in potting material composed of equal parts of the fibry part of peat and sphagnum. The temperature required for Dendrobes, Phaius, Calanthes...
-A Few Words About Walls And Wall Trees
It has often appeared to me that the common mode of training fruit-trees against walls might well be modified with great and beneficial advantages. In advancing such a statement, many will be ready to...
-A Few Words On Growing Broccoli With The Object Of Causing It To Stand The Winter
The general way is to plant it about 2 feet apart each way, and then to lift and lay it in autumn. I find it stands far better when planted 4 feet between the rows, and 3 feet between the plants in th...
-A Few Words On The Marechal Niel Rose
Everybody loves the above Rose; and few plants make such a good climber for the roof, or for training against a back wall of a greenhouse. It delights in being allowed to ramble away at will; but for ...
-A Gardener
The dressing your friend has given his Pear-trees should destroy the scale. If it does not, let him, as soon as the leaves drop next autumn, dress them with a mixture of equal parts of train-oil, turp...
-A Gardener's Holiday
The climate of North Wales, as may be judged from its adjoining the Channel, is mild and moist. Ferns and mosses are very abundant; all the smaller species of Asplenium are plentiful, such as Viride, ...
-A General System of Botany, Descriptive and Analytical - In Two Parts
Part I Outline of Organography, Anatomy, and Physiology. Part II Descriptions and Illustrations of the Orders. By Emm Le Maout and J. Decaisne. With 5500 figures, by Sternheil and A. Eiocreux. Tran...
-A Gossip Over Potatoes
Mr Gray has been curiously misled with regard to the Potato Redbog Early. He says, Why named Red I am unable to say, as it is a white. Redbog is the name of the place where it appears to have origin...
-A Grape-Grower
The price you are getting for your Grapes is small, but they have been a drug in the market this season. Cut the mouldy berries out of the bunches as they appear; keep a little fire on the house, and ...
-A Greenhorn
Write to Messrs Lee of Hammersmith, and they may be able to send you a few berries of the Grape. We have it, but not yet ripe. We thought it a nice-looking good-flavoured Grape when we tasted it at Le...
-A Higher Temperature For Late Grapes
The old adage that there is nothing new under the sun, I suppose will hold good in this case also, although I am not aware of ever having seen this point in late Grape-culture mentioned in any of th...
-A Lady
The following are all fine late summer and autumn flowering Clematis: Jackmanii, Prince of Wales, rubella, carulea odorata, lanuginosa, Lady Boville, Alexandra, magnifica, Lady Carolina Nevill, purpur...
-A Lover Of Flowers
It is impossible for us to advise you how to bed out your little garden in the space at our disposal for these notices, and specially as we do not know what plants you have. Procure ' The Handy Book o...
-A Manual of the Coniferae
James Veitch & Sons, Royal Exotic Nursery, King's Road, Chelsea, London. This work is quite worthy of the firm who have produced and published it. Merely to recapitulate the plan of the work will sho...
-A New Plant
Perhaps not really new - certainly not to botanists - but assuredly so to most gardens, is Senecio cruentus of De Candolle, a stately greenhouse composite of Cineraria-like habit, sent to me by Mr Smi...
-A Note On Pelargoniums
The day of the Pelargonium is again coming round. Though it has always obtained a place in gardens, yet full justice has been done to its requirements only in rare instances; but during these last few...
-A Novice
The proper time to bud Vines on the dovetail system is in spring, after the Vines have broken into leaf, and there is no chance of the Vines bleeding. Keep the grafts or young growths from which the b...
-A Plant-House
To any one about to build, and who wants a really good plant-house, I would suggest one of similar size and construction to that shown in the accompanying section, p. 274. What is worth doing at all i...
-A Plant-Pit
Sir, - In the erection of pits, the conservation of heat by the means of mother earth is very often underestimated, if not ignored altogether. I think there is nothing that we can do with more advan...
-A Plea For Evergreen Or Shrub Gardens
Perhaps there is no other department of gardening of which so little has been said in the horticultural press as that which embraces our hardy evergreens and flowering shrubs, nor a department in wh...
-A Plea For Hard-Wooded Greenhouse Plants
Old gardeners, and gardeners in their prime, will remember a time when greenhouse shrubs, or, as they were generally named, hard-wooded plants, were the principal, if not the sole, occupants of the gr...
-A Plea For Hardy Florist's Flowers
The term florist's flowers has a somewhat wide range of meaning. For instance, we have florists who would allow only a few species within the circle to which they would give this name - as the Auricul...
-A Plea For Hardy Herbaceous Plants
IF there is one aspect of gardening more than another that stands out prominently in the present day, it is this - that many of the fine old hardy perennials and biennials, with others not quite hardy...
-A Plea For Large-Flowered And Fancy Pelargoniums
It must be evident to any person that takes an interest in the large-flowering and fancy sections of the Pelargonium, and can remember fifteen or sixteen years ago, that these plants are not so highly...
-A Plea For Large-Flowered And Fancy Pelargoniums. #2
As soon as the cutting-pots are rilled with roots, but before the balls become matted, the plants must be shifted into 4-inch pots. Drain the pots efficiently by placing flat pieces of crocks on the h...
-A Plea For The Mulberry
This venerable plant found its way to this country at a very early date; and somehow, I fear, it is more or less neglected, as we do not see it take that prominent position which I consider it justly ...
-A Plea For The Pentstemon
As a pleasant, easy-to-cultivate, free-flowering, joy-giving, summer-blooming plant, give me the Pentstemon. I have a posy of them before me now, - pretty, glistening, varicoloured flowers, the produc...
-A Reader
Cucumbers - Sion House Improved, Volunteer, Telegraph. Melons, red-fleshed - Scarlet Gem, Malvern Hall; green-fleshed - Bromham Hall, Golden Queen, Cocoa-nut, Onion, Dr Hogg. A Reader #1 Any respect...
-A Remedy For Mildew
A correspondent, in your last issue, complains of his Rose-trees being attacked by mildew. Some few months ago, I was asked by a nurseryman if I could not make him some composition for checking it; an...
-A Selection Of Choice Dracaenas For Table Decoration
Thanks to Mr Bause's skill and energy, and to others following in his wake, we have now an almost illimitable number of this fine genus of plants to choose from for the various purposes of decoration ...
-A Selection Of Plants With Arrangement For Effect
In arranging a plant-house, it is a comparatively easy matter to set down the plants where they happen to fit in nicely; but when a pleasing harmony or contrast is aimed at, the task becomes a much mo...
-A Subscriber
It is very difficult to eradicate white-scale from hard-wooded greenhouse plants such as yours. Try a few of the worst of them by dipping them in water, at a temperature of 100, with the specifie...
-A Subscriber. #2
A Subscriber #9 Dr Lindley, Felicien David, Imperatrice Eugenie, James Watt, Lady Franklin, John Waterer, Lord Byron, Madam Domage, Meyerbeer, Milton, Newton, Prince of Wales, Peine Victoria, Shakesp...
-A Subscriber, Fife
All we can say about your Fuchsias, judging from the points of the shoots you have sent us, is, that they are not healthy. This may proceed from their getting too much water or too little. The soil in...
-A Subscriber, L
We do not think the Trentham Black a suitable Vine for an early vinery, nor the Bowood Muscat. We prefer the Common Muscat of Alexandria to the latter, and Madersfield Court Black to the former. You c...
-A Suggestion
Nowadays, when everything possible is being done to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge by members of any particular craft or profession, I would suggest that concessions should be made in connect...
-A Visit To Frogmore Gardens, Windsor
It yet appears doubtful whether the wars of the adherents of the extension and restriction systems are ended. Probably neither of the combatants are to be convinced against their will, and will ...
-A Visit To Frogmore Gardens, Windsor. Continued
2000 pots of French Beans were in course of forcing in various stages, 600 beans a-day being the demand, all being forced in vineries at work, and mostly on the floors of the houses, the thin copper ...
-A Visit To The Thomery Vineyards
Some 45 miles south of Paris, on the Paris and Marseilles Railway, the train lands the traveller at the secluded little station of Thomery, lying on the skirts of the great forest of Fontainebleau, an...
-A Voice From The Bothy
Gardening, our profession, is moving steadily step by step on its onward course; daily are the productions of the garden becoming, as it were, a necessity rather than as was wont a luxury of life. New...
-A Word About Melons
The last year being a very dull and wet season, the crop of Melons in general was very poor. The want of sunshine tells much against the Melon when in flower. I tried an experiment last year with the ...
-A Word For Young Gardeners
If I am mistaken in supposing that your reference to S. D. means Down South put this and that into the waste-paper basket, as I have no wish to urge my ideas against your better judgment. Otherwis...
-A Word On Balsam-Growing
This is a plant of which we hear little; indeed, we do not remember to have seen a word on its culture for some years (if our memory does not betray us). Whether, like the Fuchsia and some more of its...
-A Workman
If you cannot exclude frost from your frame, you cannot do better than turn your attention to hardy spring bulbs for spring flowers, such as Snowdrops, Crocus, Hyacinths, Tulips, Narcissus, Primroses,...
-A Young Gardener
Lindley's Theory and Practice of Horticulture costs 21s. Longman & Co. publish it, but any bookseller will procure it for you. It is a grand book; study it closely. We believe too strong fumigation w...
-A. A. P
The following climbers will be most likely to suit your purpose, although we doubt the air of your hall will be too dry to grow them well: Tac-sonia van volxemii and T. Exoniensis; Passiflora caerulea...
-A. B. C
We would expect paraffin-oil applied to Peach-trees to do them very serious injury, if it did not kill them. We have known carbolic acid, at the rate of 1 ounce to the gallon of water, clear Peach-tre...
-A. B., Oxon
We received the morsel of the root of one of your Vines you sent us last month, but from it we cannot say what is the matter with your Vines - a patient might as well expect a physician to tell him wh...
-A. H
You cannot think too much in the direction you name. It is folly to think that improvement is not possible. Let us have no stereotyped editions of gardening affairs. A. H #1 Remove the musk and dest...
-A. H. Veale
The effects of charcoal are almost wholly mechanical, and its value consists in keeping retentive soils porous, and in absorbing ammonia from the air and decomposing matter with which it comes in cont...
-A. M
Your letter is too personal, to say the least of it; therefore we must reject it. A. M #1 Bowood and Tynninghame Muscats will do quite well at the warm end of your vinery. Next to the Duke of Buccle...
-A. M'Farlane
Were we constructing a fruit-room, we would build it with a north aspect, put a slate roof on it, and having the joists deep, lathed and plastered inside, and built with either thick stone or hollow b...
-A. S
The cold nights and want of rain combined have been the cause of the running to seed of your Carrots, Turnips, and Beet, and probably you have sown rather early. A. S #1 Grow your Ixias in two parts...
-A. W., Castle N
We have known wooden stakes, such as you refer to, spawn the soil round them with fungi, which would be quite likely to attack the roots of Pear or Apple trees. We have also seen tallies made of whit...
-Aberdeen
Sow your Calceolaria seed about the middle of August in pans, on soil of equal parts well decomposed leaf-mould, river-sand, and light loam - cover very lightly, if at all, water with a fine rose, and...
-About Adiantums
Some people are passionately fond of Ferns, - lovers of all kinds, whether exotic or indigenous, whether of plain appearance or the most beautiful. We doubt if there be many, comparatively, who are no...
-About Potatoes
Many of them of good size, but very coarse, was the critical judgment lately passed upon a large collection of some fifty kinds of Potatoes that were staged at one of the meetings of the Royal Horti...
-About Potatoes. Continued
Thus far we had cleared out of our way two important points of difference, and now turned to the more congenial, but not less interesting, duty of lifting and taking notes of the seedlings and more re...
-About The Chrysanthemum
About the first thing I do when the ' Gardener' arrives is to read the article by M. T., which appears as regularly as the ' Gardener' does itself at the beginning of every month. In the May number, 1...
-About The Chrysanthemum. #2
In reading Teetotaller's article on the Chrysanthemum, I think his opinion as far from right as he thinks M. T.'s. In almost any case I should advocate the plunging of the pots, and I believe the ma...
-About The Management Of Forcing-Houses
Much has been written in the pages of 'The Gardener' these two or three years about the Peach, a good deal of which has been rather conflicting: one recommends a night temperature not exceeding 45...
-About The Pelargonium - Zonals, Tricolors, Etc
At the present day no flowering plant is so generally grown in Great Britain as is the subject of this paper; to give the expression its French meaning, everybody grows it. And it well deserves its po...
-Abutilon Boule De Neige
This is a most valuable free-flowering plant, producing its beautiful white flowers in great profusion the whole year through. It is a most useful plant for florists, etc, who have a demand for white ...
-Acacia Riceana
Allusion being made in your January number to this fine hard-wooded plant by W. S., with your permission I would say a few more words in its favour. It is without exception the most graceful and use...
-Acclimatisation
One hundred skylarks were liberated in one lot, in Foko-mairio, on the 9th of April, and there is every reason to think they will succeed. The pheasant has for years given the sportsmen in Auckland em...
-Acorus Calamus - Sweet-Flag
An elegant, sedge-like plant, very well adapted for introducing to the margins of lakes and streams of some size. It is indigenous to some parts of England, and has been introduced, but is not regarde...
-Acrophyllum Venoeum
A very pretty greenhouse plant, not nearly so generally cultivated as it deserves to be. It is a compact-growing plant, that may easily, by means of pinching alone, be formed into a handsome specimen...
-Adam Davidson
The following are excellent fine-foliaged plants for the ordinary system of bedding: - Centaurea Rigusina, silvery, will stand 10 frost, 1 to 1 foot. ,, gymnocarpa, silvery, ,, 1 to 2 feet, ac...
-Adenandra
In this family there are several very handsome greenhouse shrubs. The two which the writer considers best are A. um-bellata and A. uniflora. The former is the largest-growing species, and the freest-f...
-Adexophora
Adexophora is a genus closely resembling, in all superficial features, Campanula, from which it was separated on account of the glandular cylindrical tube or disc that surrounds the base of the style....
-Adulteration Of Pickles
Sulphuric acid, in the quantity in which it exists in pickles, is probably not very injurious, though it can scarcely be taken habitually without having some prejudicial effect. Even if it is equally ...
-Aerides Crassifolium
This is a free-growing and robust species, of dwarf habit, and has just flowered with F. B. Dodgeson, Esq., Blackburn, an enthusiastic collector of orchidaceous plants. It was first exhibited at the s...
-Agapahstthus Umbellatus
The African Lily, or, as its generic name implies, Love Flower, sent to this country from the Cape of Good Hope about 1690, is one of these fine old-fashioned plants so much prized by gardeners of the...
-Agapanthus Umbellatus
The Agapanthus, or African Lily, is a plant that one very seldom sees in any collection of greenhouse plants, and yet in its own way it is a very useful and decorative plant for entrance-halls, lobbie...
-Ageratum Imperial Blue
Lively lavender, with more of a dash of blue in it than has the real lavender colour, which renders it more lively and effective. Eight inches high. Produces its immense bunches of flowers in the grea...
-Ageratum, Imperial Dwarf
When at Mr William Chater's Nursery, at Saffron Walden, in the early part of January, inspecting his collection of Hollyhocks, I saw the stock of the fine new dwarf blue Ageratum Mr Chater is to distr...
-Allamandas For Autumn And Winter
Seldom are these plants grown for a display of their rich golden flowers during the declining months of autumn and winter. Generally they are to be seen in great profusion through the summer months, w...
-Alpine Plants For Winter Bedding
The person who does not admire the great majority of hardy Alpine plants is not to be envied, for he debars himself from one of the most beautiful and interesting fields of study and observation which...
-Alyssum, Madwort
This is rather a numerous group, composed of a few annual and biennial, and a majority of perennial species. The perennials are half-shrubby plants of humble growth, and evergreen to a greater or less...
-Amaryllis Superba
I may safely remark that every conservatory without a plant of this lacks a most effective feature in winter - superb in summer from its massive flag-like leaves describing a contour of symmetrical ex...
-Amaryllis Vallota Purpurea
Some excellent examples of this fine plant were shown at the meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society on the 7th of September. They were in large pots, and had been in them for five years, and were ...
-Amateur
No. 1. Hypericum montanum. 2. Hypericum pulchrum. 3. Poly-gala vulgaris. 4. We do not recognise. It is most difficult to make anything of such dried-up morsels. Plant your Liliums at once in half loam...
-Amateur Cultivation Of The Hollyhock
It must by no means be assumed, that because comparatively little is now written about the Hollyhock, its area of cultivation has in consequence become considerably reduced. It is still a flower much ...
-Amateur Cultivation of The Hollyhock
And now, by way of supplementing the remarks I have previously made on the cultivation of the Hollyhock, I have to speak of it as a valuable floral agent in the decoration of shrubbery-borders. Let me...
-Amateur Rose-Growing
ONE is really led to ask, What becomes of the tens of thousands of budded and grafted Roses that are annually sent out from our nurseries? Are we to assume that they go on from year to year constituti...
-Amateur, Stockport
A low temperature, and a stagnant over-moist atmosphere when the Grapes are in bloom. The roots being in a cold, heavy, and wet soil, causing all the young roots to rot in winter, and, under such circ...
-Amateurs
Basket of Vegetables, six varieties - 1. Alexander Hosie, Claverhouse; 2. Peter Nicoll, Luthermuir; 3. John Ruddiman, Barrack Street. Two Cauliflowers - 1. Alex. Paton, American Muir; 2. Peter Nicoll...
-American Pomological Society. Address Of President Wilder. - Importance Of A National Society
Most happy am I to meet on this occasion so many who have come up to cooperate with us in our efforts for improvement. Especially would I congratulate you on the reunion with our Southern brethren, wh...
-Among The Chrysanthemums
Few flowers have so rapidly come to the front as the Chrysanthemums, and none more fully deserve their popularity. They are easily grown, and the species (Sinense) comprises a wonderful variety of f...
-Amsonia
This is a genus of hardy herbaceous plants from North America. Without having any very strong claim to be considered beautiful, they have a certain distinction and elegance in their appearance that re...
-An Amateur
The common white Jasmine is one of the easiest plants to manage. From what you say, your plant must be growing in very rich soil, and making too vigorous growth to bloom freely. Try what a little root...
-An Amateur's Experience In Primula Growing
Having a small greenhouse and forcing pit, I try to have a bloom all the year round; and to obtain this my attention was called to the Primula. The first time I tried to grow them from seed I was rewa...
-An Insecticidal Paper
Gardeners have often things of a very vexatious stamp to deal with, not the least of which is to be found in the various insects which infest our plants and trees. Wherever there are plants grown, eve...
-An Old Subscriber
We saw it announced some time ago - in the 'Journal of Horticulture' - that it was to be a new edition. A mere reprint, without bringing its subject up to the present time, is not at all likely, and w...
-Ananassa Sativa Variegata
Is in many people's estimation the prince of decorative plants for a dinner-table; but their being grown, as we generally see them, in large pots, debars them entirely from that place of honour, and t...
-And Fuel Forcing
To the forcing gardener the past two months have been both heart and head aching, heartaching because of the heavy coal bill which, week after week, is running up, and then per contra, the serious r...
-Androsace
This is one of the prettiest of the genera of Primulaceae, and a most interesting group of alpine plants. Several of the species are annual, others are biennial, but the greater number are perennial, ...
-Annuals
There is one feature of present-day flower-gardening which we are not so thankful for as we ought to be, and that is, that there is no necessity for any one to attempt to follow the style of his neigh...
-Anomatheca Cruenta
This is another somewhat neglected plant, though more frequently met with than either of the preceding. I also saw this at Southgate Park, growing in the same pot with the Zephyr-anthes, as well as in...
-Another Chapter For Amateur Horticulturists
What constitutes an amateur horticulturist 1 is a question that seems just now to require a definite answer. Many persons are apt to assume that the possession of a garden and the pretence of having p...
-Another Chapter On The Vine
The culture of the Vine still appears to be a great mystery, and the more the subject is discussed the more mysterious it becomes, at any rate the wider do opinions differ. On the one hand we are told...
-Another Chapter On The Vine. Continued
From the facility with which the border can be dried in autumn, the wood at pruning is harder than that of the other Vines, and a Bar-barossa fruits as freely as the Hambros. It is difficult to under...
-Anthurium Scherzerianum
Sir, - At Salisbury Green, the beautiful seat of William Nelson, Esq., a magnificent specimen of the above may be seen. At present it grows out of a 14-inch pot, and 47 of its spathes are adorned with...
-Aphelandea Auruntiaca
This is one of the most brilliant and effective of winter-flowering plants. It produces its warm orange-scarlet spikes of bloom about the begin-ing of November under ordinary plant-stove treatment. An...
-Aphelexis Humilis. Notes On Greenhouse Shrubs
In one or other of its several varieties this is the best known, and the best worth growing, of this pretty group of greenhouse plants. There are several other species which have been introduced from ...
-Apples, Etc
It is probable there are not many gardens in this country in which there may be varieties of American Apples. It was a matter of considerable interest to ourselves when, about five years ago, a dozen ...
-Apricots
Much of what we have said of Plums and Peaches applies to Apricots. Like Peaches, they are not recommended to those whose gardens are in northern or cold localities. They are rather too tender for any...
-Arabis Albida And Alpina
Arabis Albida And Alpina are considerably larger growers than either of the Aubrietias, but in general style of growth they are similar. They are by no means so neat, but by careful trimming and annua...
-Arabis Purpurea Or Rosea
This is a new and distinct species, of recent introduction, from the mountainous districts of Asia Minor, closely resembling the well-known Arabis albida, and blooming about the same time. Its flowers...
-Arabis, Rock-Cress
This is a rather numerous family, and presents a greater variety of colour in its species than Alyssum; but I do not think a more extensive selection would be proper, for though easily-managed hardy p...
-Aralia Veitchii
We are glad to be able to give an engraving taken from a photograph of this most graceful and distinct of all Aralias yet introduced. It was found by the late Mr John Gould Veitch in New Caledonia. A...
-Arborvitaes
Arborvitaes are sometimes used for this purpose, requiring much the same kind of treatment as Irish Yews. When judiciously managed, these two associate well upon the same wall, and can be made to form...
-Arctostaphylos
The few species of which this interesting group of evergreens is composed were formerly referred to Arbutus, and though by no means strikingly showy either in foliage or flowers, are yet sufficiently ...
-Argemone, Prickly Poppy
This is a genus of few species, the greater number of which are either annual or biennial plants, and furnishing, so far as I know, only one perennial worthy of cultivation. Argemone Grandiflora, Gre...
-Armeria Alpina Grandijlora
This is a beautiful large-flowering variety of A. Alpina, which, from its immense distribution, will soon become a familiar plant. It is of very free growth, resembling the common Thrift, but much lar...
-Aroideae. Notes On Hardy Herbaceous Plants
This natural order is one of singular interest. The majority of the species are herbaceous, but some form considerable stems, both thick and long, of perennial duration, yet of herbaceous texture; and...
-Arrangement Of Vegetables At Royal Caledonian Society's Show
Whilst the memory of the Autumn Show of the Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society is still green, it may not be amiss to note a few thoughts which were given birth to whilst inspecting the Exhibition...
-Artisans' And Cottagers' Rose Shows
I have found those excellent and instructive papers on the Rose from the able pen of S. R. H., which recently appeared in the ' Gardener,' to be sources of great delight and gratification as I perused...
-Arum
Of hardy Arums there are not many species. The spathe is always a conspicuous feature in the inflorescence of the genus, but not always an ornamental one. The spikes of fruit in some species, composed...
-As To Soil And Potting
Like some other plants, Tricolor Pelargoniums will grow in almost any soil; but that best adapted is a combination of two parts of light fibry loam, broken up into small lumps - one part leaf-mould, t...
-Asclepias Tuberosa (Tuberous-Rooted Sioallow-Wort)
This is one of the best of a very interesting and useful genus of hardy herbaceous plants. The swallow-worts are not often seen in flower-borders, yet they are well entitled to a place in them. They a...
-Asparagus
This vegetable requires a light, deep, well-enriched soil to grow it well. In cold or northern districts - more especially if the soil be very heavy - it is apt to rot off in winter, and therefore is ...
-Asparagus (Asparagus Officinalis)
Although there are few vegetables which contain less nutriment than this, it is nevertheless one of the most esteemed products of the kitchen-garden. This is easily accounted for by its being so excee...
-Asparagus Culture
No vegetable cultivated in our gardens is more valued than Asparagus. It may not be found in many small gardens, but it is quite indispensable in every garden of any importance. Its successful culture...
-Asparagus Forcing And Growing
This choicest of vegetables, unlike French-beans, Seakale, or Mushrooms, in order to be forced with creditable success, requires a long period of preparation of the plant beforehand, although the mere...
-Asphalt Walks
Nothing beats good gravel walks. They look better than any other when well kept, and look is not the least important consideration in a garden. They entail an amount of keeping, however, which could...
-Astilbe Japonic A. (Hoteia.)
No gardener who has a demand for decorative plants and cut-flowers throughout the early spring months should be without a good stock of this hardy plant. It is so easily forced, flowers so freely, and...
-Aubrietia
A very interesting and attractive genus, of few species so called, but which are not strikingly distinct in character one from the other. They are all, however, worthy of cultivation, though not toget...
-Auriculas
The flowering season of Auriculas is again past, and before it passes out of mind, I would like to recommend the self section of Stage Auriculas to gardeners as decorative flowering plants of some val...
-Autumn - Sowing Of Californian Annuals
We very rarely see the cause of hardy annuals advocated in our periodicals. Now and again we see a notice of one or two new introductions, with a few passing comments on their merits, but the tone of ...
-Autumn Treatment Of Gladiolus
Everywhere we now hear of the deterioration of this beautiful autumn flower, and of unsuccessful attempts to get it to grow year after year without buying a fresh stock of bulbs. This state of things ...
-Azalea
Possessing many features in common with the Rhododendron, to which they are so closely allied, that, with the single exception of our native species Procumbens, the older botanists classed them in tha...
-Balsam-Culture
The common garden Balsam is now one of the most beautiful of our summer decorative annuals. It is of East Indian origin, consequently tender. Its position should be in the list of subtropicals. It, li...
-Barren Strawberries (J. H. C.)
A friend of mine has a few scores of Strawberry plants which for two seasons have neither borne flowers nor fruit. They had a strong healthy foliage, and produced the ordinary quantity of runners; and...
-Basil
Two varieties of this are grown, common Sweet and Bush Basil. Both are natives of India, where they and other varieties, we read, are in great repute - the leaves and seeds being used in various forms...
-Beans
These are generally sown, for a first crop, as soon in the year as possible, and in quantities as required at intervals of three weeks or a month. Our remarks on soil, when speaking of Peas, apply in ...
-Beaufort
This is a handsome genus of evergreen shrubs from New Holland, so named in honour of Mary, Duchess of Beaufort, a distinguished patron of gardening who lived in the early part of last century. They ar...
-Bedding In The London Parks. From Our. London Correspondent
The display of flowering and foliage plants, or sab-tropicals, is now about at its best; for though the next few weeks may improve some things, others will be going back or losing their freshness, so ...
-Bedding In The London Parks. From Our. London Correspondent. Continued
One of the prettiest little bits of bedding near London is that in front of Mr Chamberlain's cottage, in Kensington Gardens. Here we find bright colours agreeably softened down with a judicious mixtur...
-Bedding Lobelias
It will be some time hence when the bedding Lobelias will be dis-carded from the flower-garden. Their dwarf growth, and their ability to stand severe drought and a hot burning sun, combined with their...
-Bedding Plants In The Western Isles
In common with most garden establishments in these days, a portion of the flower-gardening here is represented in summer and autumn on the bedding system, or grouping half-hardy and tender plants in b...
-Bedding-Plants
Tender bedding-plants, as Verbenas and Ageratums, do better propagated during the present month than those propagated earlier in the year. Accordingly, as many as possible of these and kindred subject...
-Beds Of Succulent And Curious-Looking Plants
It has been a little amusing to notice the frantic attempts that have recently been made to bring into contempt the flower-gardening which has been popular in British gardens for a long time now. So...
-Beds Of Succulent And Curious-Looking Plants. Continued
The bed looked natural and easy, giving variety and uniformity combined in a small space, and consequently the manner of its make-up we recommend for small resources. For larger gardens that can affo...
-Bee-Farming In 1869
In many counties of England the honey harvest has been satisfactory this year. The yield has been greater than for some years previous. Last year, bees were remarkably loath to swarm - comparatively f...
-Bee-Keeping
I am glad to find you have begun a series of hints to beekeepers. I am sure it will be well received. After Mr Abbott's papers are finished, a higher series might be introduced for those who are not q...
-Beet
This much-esteemed esculent is supposed to be a native of the warmer countries of Europe, and to have been introduced into this country by the Romans. According to chemical analyses, Beet contains muc...
-Beginner
In your wet climate keep the bottom of your cold frame 6 inches above ground-level and drain it well. Your hotbed may be sunk a foot and a half, provided you can prevent water from standing in the sit...
-Begonia Chelsoni
This beautiful hybrid Begonia was raised by the Messrs Veitch, and is the result of a cross between the well-known B. Boliviensis and B. Sedeni. It is a free-growing variety of excellent habit. The fl...
-Begonias For Room Decoration
Begonias are most useful for the decoration of sitting-rooms, being highly effective in appearance, and remaining for a long time in good condition. The latter a very important point, as many plants t...
-Berberidaceae. Notes On Hardy Herbaceous Plants
This natural order of plants comprises only a very limited number of herbaceous genera, and none of these may be considered plants of showy character ; for, unlike the majority of the shrubby species,...
-Berry-Bearing Plants
Although somewhat uncertain to which of the foregoing methods to give the preference, I have no doubt as to which is most suitable for Solanum capsicastrum, and Capsicums of sorts. The former, especia...
-Bignonia. Notes On Greenhouse Shrubs
A splendid family of climbers and dwarf trees. It is the representative genus of the order Bignoniaceae, which furnishes so considerable a portion of the gorgeous colouring for which the tropical fore...
-Biota (The Eastern Arborvitae). Notes On Hardy Conifers
The handsome evergreen shrubs which constitute this group, are for the most part indigenous to China, Japan, Tartary, and Northern India. They were originally associated with the Thujas, of which they...
-Boilers And Pipes
While the discussion on heating is going on in your pages, it may not be inopportune to raise a few collateral questions on the subject of boilers and pipes, etc, on which I would be glad to hear the ...
-Books (A Subscriber)
Kemp's ' How to Lay out a Garden,' and 'How Crops Grow,' are likely to suit you, though, like most works of the character, they are rather high in price. The former is published by Bradbury & Evans, L...
-Books Received
The Gardener's Magazine for April, in which we notice that the editor is giving some capital papers on Garden Ivies; or, A study of Hedera, which, in addition to being ably written, are also well il...
-Books, Etc, Received
The Food Journal for March. The Gardener's Magazine for March. Report on the Planting and Laying Out of the Thames Embankment. By Alexander M'Kenzie. Presented to the Parks, etc. Committee of the Met...
-Boronia
These are handsome dwarf evergreen shrubs from New South AVales. They are nearly all compact free-flowering plants, that form most attractive objects for a long period in summer in the greenhouse. The...
-Bossiaea
A genus of dwarf Pea flowering shrubs from New Holland chiefly. They are all greenhouse plants, flowering in early summer mainly, though there are several that flower in autumn. They are free-flowerin...
-Botanical Gardens, Sydney, N.S.W
Those who visit Sydney's infant turrets, and the new-born glories of the southern seas, should not pass by the beauties of these Gardens. If they do not impress one with hoary wisdom and the dim ass...
-Botany For Gardeners. No. III. - Stems
The Stem or Trunk is that portion of the tree which has by some been termed the axis, supplied with pipes, cells, and filters, and through which the sap rises in its progress to the leaves. Part of th...
-Botany For Gardeners. No. IX. - Seeds
The seed is the grand provision for continuing and multiplying vegetable species, and presents a considerable analogy in the vascular classes of the vegetable kingdom to an egg in the oviparous classe...
-Botany For Gardeners. No. V. - Leaf And Flower Buds
Leaf-buds consist of rudimentary leaves surrounding a growing vital point, which lengthens upwards and produces leaf after leaf upon its surface, and appear like a collection of scales arranged symmet...
-Botany For Gardeners. No. VI. - Inflorescence, Etc
Inflorescence is the ramification of that part of the plant intended for reproduction by seed, and the reproductive organs of plants are the flowers. Extremely varied indeed are the forms of ...
-Botany For Gardeners. No. VII. - The Ovule, Etc
Before alluding to the Ovule, it will perhaps be better for me to give a few brief words on the stamens and pistils, essential to all plants for the production of fruit. Stamens are the male organs of...
-Botany For Gardeners. No. VIII. - Fruit
The fruit is, in the strictest sense of the word, the matured pistil; but Lindley says the term is also applied to the pistil and floral envelopes taken together, whenever they are all united in one u...
-Botany For Gardeners. No. X. - Seeds
To watch the growth of various seeds is an extremely interesting study, and one of which I am very fond. I often grow some Peas and Beans on a very damp cloth or wet moss : the latter is best, as it r...
-Bottom-Heat
It might be reasonably supposed - as was formerly argued by Knight, I think - that plants like the Pine or Melon, for instance, should not require a more stimulating root-temperature than would be com...
-Bottom-Heat. Continued
By August the Pines were going to rest with a reduced top-heat, and the temperature of the bed stood at 80; but when the hot weather of September came it rose to 95, and as it was continuing...
-Bouvardias. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
Considering the usefulness of the Bouvardias as autumn- and winter-flowering plants, and especially when cut flowers are much in demand, they are not so generally nor so extensively grown as their mer...
-Brachysema
A small group of greenhouse climbing-shrubs from New Holland, with Pea-flowers, of rather curious shape. So far as I am aware, only two species have any claim to being considered ornamental. They are ...
-Bramcote Tulip Exhibition
On the 21st May the members of the above Society held their annual festival at the pretty rural village of Stapleford, a few miles from Nottingham. The members mustered in strong force, as usual, but ...
-Bramcote Tulip Exhibition. Continued
Eighth - Mr John Clifford, Bramcote Lady Lilford, feathered Rose; Grande Rose Desire, a good flame; Lady Catherine Gordon, a fine flame; seedling feathered Rose; Lord Denman and Due d'Orleans, flamed...
-Bresee's Prolific
This variety originated with Albert Bresee, Esq., in 1861. Mr Bresee was the originator of the Early Rose, the seed producing both that and Bresee's Prolific being from the same seed-ball, and both...
-Bridal Bouquet (Ulster)
The prevailing colour of a bride's bouquet should be white, with just a pale shade of violet or blue, or a light shade of pink sparingly distributed over the surface. A little scarlet can be used in a...
-British Ferns
During the last quarter of a century, Ferns have become very general favourites in the decorations of rockeries, in many odd corners, under trees, and by waterfalls, where they can have a regular mois...
-Broad Beans
Unless there is a demand for these, they are not worthy of a place on a sheltered border. If wanted very early for a particular purpose, they may be sown singly in 4-inch pots, and started in a gentle...
-Brodiaea
This is a very pretty and interesting group of hardy bulbs from California. Though perfectly hardy, they are impatient of wet stagnant soil. A rich, deep, well-drained, sandy loam suits them best, and...
-Bryanthus
The tiny evergreen known to cultivators as B. erectus is a hybrid, obtained many years ago by the late Mr James Cunningham of the Comely Bank Nurseries, Edinburgh, the parents being Menziesia caerulea...
-Bulbs And Bulb-Culture, Vol. II
By D. T. Fish. Bazaar Office, London. Like the first volume of this work on Bulbs by the same busy author, the second one contains historical and descriptive notes, with very full practical instructi...
-Burnham Beeches
By Francis George Heath, author of ' The Fern World,' etc. Sampson Low & Co., London. A very interesting description and history of a piece of most beautiful sylvan scenery in Berkshire, celebrated ...
-Burtonia. Notes On Greenhouse Shrubs
These are rather troublesome little shrubs to grow, but quite pretty enough to induce an ardent plant-grower to try, and they reward him if he succeeds in growing them to perfection - a point he is su...
-C. C. C
There is at least no objection to your first suggestion: we have them hung in the centre, and like them so, because when they fall in at the top they let a stream of air up between the foliage and the...
-C. K., Pruning Vines
Although we feel that the source of information to which you refer is ample, we gladly accede to your request. Prune your Vines immediately they have cast their leaves. As a rule, the spur system of p...
-C. S
The creepers to which you refer, especially the Mandevillea, will bring red-spider on your Vines. Camellias may be grown on the back wall of your greenhouse, and will do well: and they will bloom on t...
-Caladium Argyrites
This is a very useful plant for the dinner-table, and one that gives very little trouble where there is a stove. About the beginning of March I generally look over the bulbs, which are then at rest, t...
-Caladium Culture
Caladiums are a genus of highly ornamental plants of fine growth, easily cultivated, and requiring a strong moist heat to develop their beauties; they should be grown wherever ornamental and beautiful...
-Caladium Metallicum
This plant, better known by the synonym of Alocasia metallica, ranks amongst the most useful of stove fine-foliage plants. When well grown, and red-spider kept away, a good specimen is a telling objec...
-Calanthe. A Few Hints On Their Cultivation
I am often at a loss to account for the little use that is made of some of these free-growing winter-blooming Orchids. Certainly it is not that they require any extra amount of skill to grow them succ...
-Calceolaria Plantaginea - Plantain-Leaved Calceolaria
This is an undoubtedly hardy species. It has now lived over two winters, the one just past and the previous one, without any protection in the garden here; and I am aware of its having been in the gar...
-Calceolaria, Golden Prince Of Orange
We poor gardeners, among the many other frailties and weaknesses of human nature, have been denounced by some of the critics for having been all more or less touched by a yellow, scarlet, and blue man...
-Calceolarias
Could you or any of your numerous correspondents assign the cause of our Calceolarias going off since being planted out?Aurantia multiflora was planted out with balls four inches square, and well wate...
-Calla Palustris - Bog Calla
A beautiful and interesting plant - an excellent subject for planting in shallow pools or bogs, but unfitted for deep water. It extends itself rapidly in quaggy or marshy ground that is always more or...
-Callas (Richardia Aethiopica)
Although I am no great lover of these, they will still be largely grown here, both for conservatory decoration and also for cutting purposes. Few plants give better returns for liberal treatment, seei...
-Callistachys
This is a group of easily-cultivated and handsome shrubs. They are of rather free and vigorous habit, and consequently better adapted for furnishing large greenhouses and conservatories than small one...
-Calochortus
A splendid genus of Tulip-like bulbs, which have for many years been allowed to remain in oblivion. They were first introduced by Douglas between forty'and fifty years ago; but, like many other gems o...
-Camassia [Scilla] Esculenta
The common American names of this plant are, Quamash, Wild Hyacinth, Squill. It is a most beautiful plant, especially when seen in large masses. It is quite as gay as the Hyacinthus nonscriptus, or Bl...
-Camellia Buds Dropping
I have had under my charge for twelve months a number of sickly Camellias about 3 feet high, which drop their buds as they are about to expand. They have never been too dry since I have had them. Wate...
-Campanula Medium Calycanthema
The Canterbury Bell, though a favourite flower, and cultivated of old with more zest than now, has not improved, nor had any very striking feature added to it till within the last few years. The pale-...
-Campanula. Notes On Hardy Herbaceous Plants
This is a very numerous and natural group of plants. A strong family likeness pervades the whole, yet there is much diversity of habit and stature, which renders them useful for many purposes, and fit...
-Can Our Present Waste In Heating Hothouses Wot Be Remedied?
IF the present exceptionally high, price of coal continues, will it affect injuriously the development and progress of the forcing or hothouse department of Horticulture? This is a question which is b...
-Canarina Campanulata
This fine old greenhouse herbaceous perennial, which was introduced as far back as 1696, is now very rarely met with indeed. Last spring I saw a large specimen of it, covered with its numerous orange-...
-Candytufts For Winter Decoration
The value of large numbers of our common flowers is entirely lost sight of. It is not so generally known as it should be that annual Candytufts are invaluable for furnishing a supply of cut flowers du...
-Cannell's Patent Economising Boiler
The long sharp weather of last winter, and the immense consumption of fuel to keep up the necessary temperature to preserve my plants, caused me to ponder much about heating our horticultural building...
-Cape Heaths
A healthy well-grown Heath - no matter of what species or variety, whether in flower or out of flower - is always a pleasing object, and never fails to elicit admiration, even from those who are least...
-Cape Pondweed
Aponogeton distachyon is not uncommon in good gardens as a hardy aquatic plant. We force a dozen or two of its Artichoke-like tubers every winter, and find them a great addition to the winter blossoms...
-Captain R. W. P
The excessive vigour of your Pear-tree fully accounts for its barrenness. Root-pruning and a poorer soil are your remedies; and as the tree is rather old, we advise you to carefully lift one side, pre...
-Carnations
Another grand class of plants for winter and spring work, when there is any quantity of cut-flower required, and for button-holes throughout the year they prove invaluable. They should be struck early...
-Carnations, Picotees, And Pinks
Some months ago, a correspondent, a lover of these sweet plants, whose efforts at their cultivation had not been rewarded with desired success, asked me to write an article on their cultivation in 'Th...
-Carton
This is the seat of the Duke of Leinster, the home of the Fitzgeralds, who have figured so long and so prominently in the history of Ireland. Situated in the county of Kildare, it is only some fifteen...
-Castle-Kennedy Fig
Now that the Castle-Kennedy Fig has been established in many parts of the country, it would be interesting to know what amount of satisfaction it is giving. It received the usual amount of abuse which...
-Catechism Of Agricultural Chemistry
By Professor Johnston. William Blackwood & Sons, Edinburgh and London. This is a new edition of a work which has passed through thirty-six editions, and which has been translated into nearly every Eu...
-Cattleya Labiata At Bothwell Castle
A fine specimen of this magnificent Orchid has recently flowered at Bothwell Castle. It had 22 blooms open on it at once. Three spikes had 4, three had 3 blooms each; and one leaf, where there was no ...
-Cauliflowers
To succeed those planted either at the base of a warm wall or under hand-lights, as the case may be, towards the end of February or early in March, according to circumstances, more of the autumn-sown ...
-Celehy Culture In Pots
In your Magazine for April, Under-Gardener offers to lay down a rule for amateurs to be successful in growing Celery in pots. Would he kindly let me have it, either by letter or in the May numbe...
-Celery
Celery has been a continual plague to me for the last year or two. Big Celery has been wanted, and in growing big sorts I have miserably failed, as the plants would go in for seed-production some mont...
-Celery In Pots
It may be a new method to some growers to adopt this plan, but it is certain that Celery has been grown in pots for many years, probably before Under-Gardener or myself was born - but not for late ...
-Celosias For Early Flowering
It is not often that one sees or hears of Celosias being grown except for the autumn decoration of plant-houses. It is the custom to sow seeds at a certain time; and I suppose we are determined to abi...
-Centaurea
With this plant it is the very reverse. Many gardeners are at much pains to secure plants from cuttings, injuring the old plants in the first place in taking them off, and only succeeding, as a rule, ...
-Centradenia Rosea
As not a few good old plants are being put aside to make room for newer, though, very often, not so valuable ones - when valued according to their beauty and usefulness, and not according to their pri...
-Centropogon Lucianus
This charming plant is not met with in the majority of gardens; and even where it is allowed a place in the stove, it is too often kept for the sake of maintaining a variety. Under such circumstances,...
-Cephalotaxus (The Cluster-Fruited Yew). Notes On Hardy Conifers
Though botanically different from their near allies the Yews, the species vrhich constitute this genus have a general appearance suggestive of that group, and are associated with them in the coniferou...
-Chamaecyparis Sphaeroidea (The Ground Cypress). Notes On Hardy Conifers
This fine evergreen tree, the White Cedar of the Americans, and the only species of the genus of undoubted hardiness in our climate, is perhaps still best known in collections under its original, an...
-Chamaedorea Hartwegii
It is the elegant or the majestic habit of Palms, and the conspicuous character and freshness of their leaves, which distinguish them as decorative plants. Some Palms also possess floral charms, in wh...
-Champion And Magnum Bonum Potatoes
As might have been expected, cottagers and small growers have gone into these varieties extensively, but with various results as regards success - some declaring they have had very heavy crops, whil...
-Change of Soil For Fruit-Trees, Roses, Etc
In the cultivation of permanent plants - more especially of those requiring high cultivation - there is nothing of so much benefit as a change of soil. Tea-Roses - indeed all Roses - which have grown ...
-Charlotte Rothschild Pines
At the meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society on the 17th of August, Mr J. Ward, gardener to Mr T. N. Miller, Esq., Bishop's-Stortford, exhibited four magnificent fruits of the above fine Pine, of...
-Chelidonium, Celandine
This is one of the most free and continuous-flowering genera in the order. It is not of the most showy description, but is always interesting and pretty. It succeeds best in partial shade, and is usef...
-Chemistry In Connection With Horticulture
Botany is the science which gardeners generally identify as the one pre-eminently connected with gardening. In one sense, botany is a gardener's science before all others; but I question if botany c...
-Cherries
Of these, again, there are several on a north-west wall; but those of the Bigarreau type do not ripen properly, and are much too sour for dessert purposes. Morellos succeed admirably on this site, and...
-Chicory
Of all winter salad plants, there are none more useful than this. Lettuce may bolt or fail to heart, and Endive decay before the winter has well set in, but Chicory may be had daily from October to ...
-Choice Hardy Spring Flowers
The taste for hardy spring flowers is developing more rapidly than the taste for any other class of hardy flowers. The reasons for this are obvious. There is no difficulty experienced in keeping the g...
-Choice Hardy Spring Flowers. Continued
Aubrietia Of this there are a good many varieties, differing more or less in the size of the flowers, but all beautiful and very profuse-flowering plants. Purple is the universal colour, in one shade...
-Choice Hardy Spring-Flowers. #2
Resuming my running selection of these beautiful gems of the flora of spring, I must draw attention to one or two which have been omitted in the connection in which they would naturally have occurred ...
-Choice Stove And Greenhouse Flowering Plants
Comprising descriptions of upwards of eleven hundred species and varieties, with instructions for their cultivation, etc. By Benjamin Samuel Williams. Second edition, enlarged, illustrated, and revise...
-Chrysanthemum Indicum Precocite, Etc
This is a dwarf-growing, early-flowering variety of the common winter-flowering Chrysanthemum, with very double, medium - sized, neatly formed flowers, which are borne in great profusion from July til...
-Chrysanthemums
It was with, feelings of surprise I read Mr Hind's article on the Chrysanthemum in the ' Gardener' for March. Seemingly he has entirely misconstrued the purpose for which the article on the same subje...
-Chrysanthemums For The Conservatory
By the time these notes are in print, many conservatories will be beginning to look gay with Chrysanthemums, and in most cases it will have been found that they come so easily into bloom, that their o...
-Cineraria Acanthafolia
The same beautiful silvery whiteness as C. maritima. Fully more compact in growth, the leaves being in shape intermediate between C. maritima and Centaurea Ragusina. Grown with a stem a foot high, thi...
-Cinerarias
Having been a subscriber to the journal since its commencement, and having derived much information from its columns, my object in writing is to remind you of a plant that is largely cultivated amongs...
-Cinerarias (Florist)
As soon as rooted, pot off the first-struck cuttings of the named sorts into single pots. These should flower about Christmas. Continue to put in cuttings if a succession of bloom be required, and pot...
-Circulation Of Water In Pipes
The best way of making this subject clear is probably to resort to facts which have been ascertained by experiment. The sole force which operates to produce motion in the water is the force of gravity...
-Circulation Of Water In Pipes. Continued
Now if we suppose the height of each of these portions to be that set against it in the following table (the height of the slope d being reckoned only as the perpendicular dotted line d'), and if we c...
-Cistus (The Rock Rose). Ornamental Trees And Shrubs
Of the long list of species which compose this genus of beautiful flowering evergreen shrubs, comparatively few have been found sufficiently hardy for open-air cultivation in Britain, and even these r...
-Clematis Jackmanii
When visiting the gardens of Lord Polwarth, Mertoun House, near St Boswell's, about the middle of September, my attention was called to a fine plant of the above, covering the whole gable of a house 2...
-Clematis Jackmanii Perfectly Hardy In The North
In reply to your correspondent Miss Hope, I may say that while travelling in the vicinity of Castle Menzies, about three miles north of Aberfeldy, in Perthshire, in August of 1870, I was struck by see...
-Clerodendron Balfouriana
As a rafter-plant in a cool house this is a most useful and ornamental flowering-plant. It comes into bloom in a cool fernery (where no fire-heat is applied in summer) about the beginning of August; a...
-Clerodendron Fragrans
This lovely plant is not so much grown as it deserves to be for autumn and early winter flowering; its double white sweet-scented flowers are very valuable during the time named, and are useful for a ...
-Clethra
This genus is perhaps best known through its representative arborea, an old-fashioned and popular greenhouse evergreen of great beauty, but unfortunately too tender for our winters out of doors. Ther...
-Clianthus Dampieri
It is a well-known fact that this fine Australian creeper is bad to manage on its own roots, being very impatient of water, and liable to damp off, especially in dull weather. Being anxious to have so...
-Coal
A correspondent of a paper who had taken a drive out to the country districts to see how things were looking, says of the district of Lovel's Flat, - I saw for the first time the immense deposits of ...
-Cocoa-Nut Fibre For Propagating
The art of propagating is frequently rendered a tedious and difficult operation with the amateur, and even the professional horticulturist, in the immediate vicinity of towns, where the scarcity of al...
-Coelogyne Cristata
Whenever any one writes to ask the names of half-a-dozen Orchids to start with, I always include this plant, Dendrobium nobile, Cypri-pedium insigne, Odontoglossum bictonense, Phaius Wallichii, and ...
-Coleus Verschaffeltii
This is a most useful plant for the dinner-table, and has much to recommend it: first, it is very easy to cultivate where a stove or warm frame is at hand; secondly, it may be had at any time of the y...
-Colston Basset Melon
As they say in sporting circles, this is a real good thing. I do not know that I have ever tasted a better Melon. The fruit is of good size and appearance, sometimes large, a good keeper, and the fl...
-Common Shrubs For Covering And Ornamenting The Walls Of Houses
It is often very interesting to observe some of the various modes which modern ideas have adopted in the way of variety, and even usefulness in many instances, to make screens of different shrubs, and...
-Complimentary Dinner
Mr Dunn, of Dalkeith Gardens, was entertained to dinner by the Scottish Horticultural Association in Edinburgh on the 9th March, in compliment to the efficient manner in which he has occupied the posi...
-Comptonia
The singularly graceful deciduous shrub known as C. asplenifolia is the only representative of this genus in cultivation; and though, like its near allies the Myricas, it has little to recommend it as...
-Concerning Some Good Potatoes
At the meeting of the Fruit Committee of the Royal Horticultural Society, held at South Kensington on the 21st September last, a special first-class certificate was awarded to Mr Robert Fenn, the Rect...
-Conifers
Abies Canadensis (the Hemlock Spruce), a very graceful-growing plant, but requires a dry sheltered situation. Abies Donglasii. Biota (or Thuja) orientalis (the Chinese Arborvitae), a close-growing p...
-Constant Reader
Plant your temporary Vines in the border out of their pots. You should fruit them two or three years to enable you to be merciful with the permanent ones, and this you cannot do if you keep them in po...
-Cooking Potatoes
The humble art of cooking this valuable esculent may be by some held in contempt; but I hold to the opinion that it requires more than ordinary care and attention to boil a Potato well. And it is not ...
-Copy Of Letter Sent To Dr E. Gotze
The Gardens, Dalkeith Park, September 2d, 1869. Sir, - I sent my son to your exhibition with the three bunches of Grapes I entered for the Cup offered by the Queen of England, and I have just received...
-Cortusa
Cortusa embraces only one species, the C. Matthioli. It is near akin to Primula, and in general appearance and habit of growth resembles some of the species of that family. It is found, in company wit...
-Cotoneaster (The Cotoneaster). Ornamental Trees And Shrubs
The genus Cotoneaster is composed of a goodly number of hardy evergreen, sub-evergreen, and deciduous low-growing trees and shrubs very diverse in general appearance. They are found distributed over E...
-Cotoneasters
Cotoneasters are, when planted into a shrubbery or in a border, generally very straggling, and far from neat growers; but they are well suited for a wall when well attended to, and kept well fastened ...
-Cotyledon Umbilicus, Syn. Umbilicus Pendulinus - Wall Navehvort
The genus Cotyledon is a small one, comprising plants of no striking ornamental qualities; but they are useful for planting on old walls with a view to covering them, and are easily established in suc...
-Covent Garden Market In The Middle Of April
Dr Hogg deserves our gratitude for his admirable Directory; it makes even the stay-at-home gardener better acquainted with his brethren and the whereabouts of gardens. We never take a long journey wit...
-Covent Garden Market. From Our London Correspondent
Many horticulturists will now be wending their way towards the great metropolis, and those who have not already done so should avail themselves of the first opportunity to inspect the great fruit and ...
-Cowan's Patent Compelsating System Of Heating
ANY system of heating hothouses which will at the present time mitigate or lessen the expenses connected therewith, ought to, and no doubt will, meet with every consideration while coal is so enormous...
-Cowan's System Of Heating Hothouses On The Compensating System
The Editor has previously described the principles of this system in the 'Gardener'(see p. 245), and I now allude to the question after having seen the system at work on the 4th inst., under peculiar ...
-Crassulaceae. Notes On Hardy Herbaceous Plants
The hardy section of this tribe comprises few genera but many species. A good many of them were old familiar plants in gardens; but they have for many years been lost sight of, their quiet unobtrusive...
-Creepers For A Conservatory (G. V.)
Messrs E. G. Henderson & Son, Wellington Road Nursery, St John's Wood, N.W., have been kind enough to send us the following list of spare-growing, free-blossoming creepers as suitable for your purpo...
-Cropping Fruit-Tree Borders
Cast down, torn up, cut asunder, they are not destroyed. In the silence, in the darkness, exposed to freezing cold, benumbed with chilling water, they work bravely on to recover their misfortune, res...
-Cropping Fruit-Tree Borders. Continued
Had we time to attend as systematically to the roots as to the pruning and training of the branches, good crops of fruit - putting accidents of weather, etc, aside - might be calculated upon to a cert...
-Cropping Vine-Borders
TO the editor of the 'gardener.' Sir, - In reply to the practical questions of your correspondent R. M. S. in the last month's number of the ' Gardener,' as to whether I would, under certain circumst...
-Croton Johannis
This is one of the most elegant and distinct of all the recent introductions of this useful class of plants. It was discovered by the late Mr John Gould Veitch in the South Sea Islands. The leaves are...
-Croton Multicolor
Our illustration of this most distinct of the many varieties of Croton is also taken from a photograph, and is a most faithful illustration. We need scarcely say that it is one of those many fine vari...
-Cruciferae. Notes On Hardy Herbaceous Plants
This is a very interesting and extensive order of plants, more remarkable, perhaps, for the great importance and value of the food products it yields to man and beast than for high ornamental qualitie...
-Crystal Palace Rose-Show, June 25
This was a very fine and extensive show, and notwithstanding the drought, the Roses were superb in quality. Of Roses, 72 varieties, distinct, eight most excellent collections were shown, the first pri...
-Crystal Palace, Second Great Show, June 5
At this exhibition there was a large and excellent display of flowering plants, supplemented by an extensive exhibition of table decorations, which constituted a new and attractive feature. The day be...
-Crystal Palace, Sydenham, June 11
The ordinary leading plants of a great show, somewhat the worse for wear in consequence of being knocked about at several exhibitions, came out indifferently here in consequence. The leading features ...
-Cucumber Forcing
Those that have been bearing through the winter require a night temperature of 65 to 70, according as the weather is cold or mild. If in low pits in houses, cover the glass at night in prefe...
-Cucumber Forcing. #2
Keep up a genial growing atmosphere, not allowing the temperature to sink much below 70 at night; give air in the early part of the day, and shut up early with, same heat, and lessen the moisture...
-Cucumber Forcing. #3
Should mildew appear on the foliage of these, as it often does in autumn, dust the affected parts with sulphur, and keep the house warm and airy. Those that are yet in full bearing will now be the bet...
-Cucumber Forcing. #4
Now is a good time to plant out a number of plants in cold pits or frames for bearing up to the end of September. This, however, applies to the south, for in Scotland Cucumbers rarely do much good in ...
-Cucumber Forcing. #5
Mulch the borders of those in full bearing with some horse-droppings and fresh loam in equal proportions. Shut up early in the afternoon with sun-heat, rising to 85 for a time, and syringe the le...
-Cucumber Growing
In the September number of the 'Gardener' you published a few remarks on a mode of growing Cucumbers for market: we very-much regret to find that there was an error as to the sort mentioned as found b...
-Cucumber Sir Garnet Wolseley
Mr James Hamilton of Carlisle has long been celebrated for Cucumber growing, but more particularly for carefully hybridising and raising fine varieties. He is this year growing very extensively a vari...
-Cucumbers
These are much more easily grown than Melons, and any ordinary soil will suit, if it be rich, or made so by the addition of well-decayed manure. Less bottom-heat will do, although a bed the same as ha...
-Cultivation Of Gardenias
Without doubt the Gardenia as an evergreen stove-plant stands very high in popular estimation, and is very highly prized by ladies for the sweet fragrance its flowers possess, as much so as the Rose, ...
-Cultivation Of Roses On Their Own Roots
As the season is come again when plenty of good ripe cuttings are to be had of all sorts of Roses - and generally at the pruning-season a great portion of their heads goes to swell the rubbish-heap in...
-Cultivation Of The Gooseberry In The North Of England
The Gooseberry is generally supposed to be indigenous to the island of Great Britain; but whether this be so or not, there is certainly no country in which it arrives at a greater degree of perfection...
-Cultivation Of The Musk Plant
The Musk (Mimulus moschatus) is such a universal favourite, that one is often surprised pains are not taken to make it much more attractive in form than is usually seen, instead of its being allowed t...
-Cultural Hints
Most people are acquainted with the proper mode of outdoor treatment. In short, their whole requirements are comprised in being planted in good rich peaty soil, well drained, screened from cutting bla...
-Cultural Hints On Allamandas
IN compliance with the request of one of your correspondents, who desires a chapter on Allamandas, I beg to offer the following remarks, in the hope that he may derive some assistance therefrom. The ...
-Cultural Hints On Todea Superba
Most Ferns are beautiful, some are supremely so. Adiantum Farleyense counts an admirer in every one who looks upon its pretty cut leaflets, pendent, in clusters, on hair-like branchlets so fine as to ...
-Cultural Notes On Tricolor And Bronze Pelargoniums
As summer approaches, the demands of our favourites will be considerable, what with training, potting, and other requisites, this being the period when the bulk of their growth is made. Water must be ...
-Culture Of Anthurium Scherzerianum And Allamanda Cathartica
As you ask for a paper on the culture of the above in your last number, I will state my experience with them. They are both stove-plants of easy culture. The Anthurium is of recent introduction, but i...
-Culture Of Hoya Bella
This beautiful species is popularly known as the honey-plant or wax-flower, and well deserves a place in every collection of stove-plants, however small. Its waxy white flowers, with beautiful rose-co...
-Curcuma
This geuus of plants has been sadly neglected although of the easiest culture, and beautifully ornamental. I feel perfectly satisfied they will make fine subjects for the dinner-table - if not for exh...
-Cure For Canker In Apple-Trees
On taking charge of the gardens here in the autumn of 1842, I found many of the Apple-trees in a very bad state from canker. Not knowing very well what to make of them, but, like many a young man on f...
-Currants
Except in pruning, everything we have said about Gooseberries in regard to their cultivation will apply to Currants. However, it may be as well to say that all Currants will thrive on northern or east...
-Currants. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
It may appear to some almost superfluous to enter upon a subject which, as many suppose, is so well understood as the cultivation of Currants. Like the Gooseberry, treated of in our last paper, Curran...
-Currants. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits. Continued
The planting of the Currant is accomplished exactly in the way that has been recommended for the Gooseberry, and the general training and after-management are much the same in ordinary cases. Where, ...
-Cut Flowers
Twenty-four Roses - 1. John Stewart & Sons. Twelve Roses - 1. T. H. Miln, Linlathen; 2. P. M'Tavish, Balhousie Castle, Perth; 3. Joseph Neave, Bal-dragon. Six Roses - 1. P. Nicoll, Luthermuir; 2. Al...
-Cutting Down Young Vines To Get Two Growths In One Season
In 1865 I was anxious to prepare a quantity of extra strong young Vines in large pots, and not being very well off for a place to grow them in, they were put into a Muscat-house with a high temperatur...
-Cyclamen - Sowbread
There is perhaps no more attractive group in the whole range of Alpine plants than that comprised in this genus. They are all neat and dwarf in habit; all have foliage of pretty form; and the flowers,...
-Cyclamen - Sowbread. Continued
When potted, plunge to the rims of the pots in coal-ashes, and give water sufficient to settle the soil about the roots, after which for the winter they will require little attention except that of gi...
-Cyclamens
As before observed, one of the most striking features of the meeting was the extensive display of Cyclamens. Mr H. B. Smith, Ealing Dean Nursery, Ealing, contributed quite 300 plants. Part of the grou...
-Cyperus Alternifolius
When well grown this is a most graceful plant for table decoration, and deserves to be cultivated as such. Plants grown in 5-inch pots, furnished with from twelve to sixteen whorls about 18 inches hig...
-Cypripedium Concolor
This is one of the most distinct and beautiful of the Cypripediums, and one which ought to be in every collection of this interesting genus of orchidaceous plants. Our illustration, which is from a ph...
-Cypripedium Dominianum
In the valuable article on Cypripediums from the pen of one of their best cultivators, reference is made to the beautiful hybrids raised by Mr Dominy at the Messrs Veitch's establishment, and we are i...
-Cypripedium Maulei
This is one of the most welcome of all the kinds known, and in growth and flower is quite distinct from C. insigne, of which it is undoubtedly one of the very best forms. The leaves are straight and s...
-Cypripedium Sedeni
At the meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society at South Kensington, on the 6th inst., Messrs Veitch & Sons exhibited a fine new hybrid Cypripede raised in their establishment at Chelsea. It is the ...
-D. M'C
Your suggestion has, as you will see on second page of Cover, been acted upon. Statice Rattrayana is synonymous with S. profusa: it was raised at Salton Hall, near Haddington, and is the finest and m...
-Dahlia Experiences
Four Years' Subscriber desires us to give a list of Dahlias of 1868 and 1869 which can be recommended for form, constancy, and size. His soil, he states, is a very heavy one, and he is compelled to...
-Dahlias
In order to obtain a fine late bloom of these, the shoots must be kept well thinned out. This does not apply to bedding sorts so much as to the show and fancy varieties, which make splendid decorative...
-Daphne
Though all the Daphnes delight in a peaty soil, and are sometimes associated with American plants with the most charming effect, they are not usually classed with them, seeing that they are found, wit...
-Daphne Indica. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
The Daphnes are among the most deliciously fragrant of our greenhouse plants. They are generally pretty strong growers, and when fairly established succeed best if planted out along with Camellias and...
-Davallia Mooreana
This is one of the most beautiful Ferns that has been introduced into this country. It grows to a large size, and is of the most graceful habit, and may certainly be regarded as the king or queen of a...
-Deacaenas
There are seasons when our collections of new and rare plants receive more than ordinary additions. They at times come and take us by surprise, like the discovery of a gold-field, which, to use a co...
-Dell's Hybrid Melon
From what we learned of this Melon before it was sent out, a very high opinion was formed of it. We have this year grown a span-roofed Melon-house, 80 feet long, full of it, excepting a few lights dev...
-Delphinium Nudicaule - Scarlet Delphinium
There are purple, blue, and white Delphiniums, both species and varieties quite numerous in cultivation, but till the present interesting and striking species was introduced last year by Mr Thompson o...
-Dendrobium Bensoniae
Perhaps it is beyond question that we have not a more easily managed, a more beautiful, nor a more useful Orchid than the old and well-known Dendrobium nobile. It can be had in bloom from early spring...
-Dendrobium Nobile
We propose giving the details of our mode of cultivating this beautiful Orchid, for we have been singularly successful in its cultivation; and as it is very seldom seen in robust health, or producing ...
-Deterioration Of Varieties
We have also another difficulty to encounter - namely, the deterioration of varieties. However we may theorise in regard to this matter, it must be admitted, from the practical point of view, that som...
-Deutzia Gracilis
No doubt this plant and its varied qualities are well known to the professional gardener, but I fear that amateurs know less about it as a forcing shrub. Let that be as it may, few of our hardy plants...
-Dieffenbachia Bausei
This is one of the new plants to be distributed next spring by the Messrs Veitch; it was exhibited and much admired at the great show at Nottingham. It is a hybrid between D. picta and D. Weirii, and ...
-Dielytra (Dicentra) Chrysantha - Golden Dielytra
This, in its own family, is perhaps even more distinct and novel than the preceding in its family. The species we have been hitherto familiar with in cultivation are characterised by extreme grace of ...
-Dielytra Spectabilis
This is a fine free-forcing plant, easily managed, and when grown in good clumps in the open ground, which should be well manured at planting-time, and giving frequent waterings throughout the summer,...
-Difficulties. A Word To Young Gardeners
Every one has difficulties to contend with, no matter what may be their calling or position in society. The monarch who sits on a throne and sways his sceptre over a mighty empire, and the humble peas...
-Difficulties. A Word To Young Gardeners. #2
It was with genuine heartfelt pleasure that I read the remarks made by our Editor in the March number of the ' Gardener' as to the education of young gardeners. I shall anxiously look forward to his p...
-Dinner And Presentation To Mr Thomson, Dalkeith Gardens
Ox the 31st May a complimentary dinner was given to Mr \V. Thomson on the occasion of his leaving Dalkeith Gardens to superintend his extensive vineyards on Tweedside; and a presentation was made to h...
-Dinner And Presentation To Mr Thomson, Dalkeith Gardens. Continued
And hence the alacrity with which the friends who have been associated with him in public labours have united with those related to him only by personal and professional ties in expressing their high ...
-Dinner-Table Plants. Crotons
The great demand for plants on the dinner-table now, makes all who have a large and regular supply to keep up all the year anxious to get possession of anything likely to be of service. Having proved ...
-Dipladenias
This lovely genera of plants ranks amongst the most beautiful of stove-climbers, and deserves to be grown largely on the roof of a plant-stove, where plenty of heat and moisture can be afforded them. ...
-Disbudding Chrysanthemums
A WRITER in the August number of the ' Gardener,' and whose communication I have not been able to notice sooner, professing to quote from a contemporary, says it was asserted early in the year by a cu...
-Diseased Pelargonium - Leaf
Your Pelargonium - leaf was forwarded to that well-known authority M. J. B., who has expressed the opinion that it has the appearance of being a case of common spotting, and one likely to have arise...
-Diseased Pelargonium Leaves
Will you kindly inform me what is the cause of, and how to remedy, a misfortune that happens to my Pelargoniums - Fancies and others? The lower leaves of the plants wither around the edges and become ...
-Diseases
Only two things bearing this designation, that I am aware of, affect these divisions of the Pelargonium; the one spot on the leaves, the other black-rot. Both of these attack the growth, and invar...
-Dodecatheon
'American Cowslip ' - is a small group of pretty well known and much-admired hardy border plants. They are of simple accommodating nature, doing well in most soils and situations, but reach the greate...
-Double Primula Sinensis
Although some of the older varieties of double Chinese Primulas, notably the old white, are common enough, they, with few exceptions, seldom receive that amount of attention and good culture that thei...
-Draccena Dennisonii
This is a great acquisition, being of a dwarfer growth than many of the older sorts. The leaves are from 12 to 15 inches long, about 4 inches wide, dark bronzy colour. When set in silver or gold vases...
-Dracocephalum
Several species of this fine genus are admirable subjects for ornamental borders of hardy flowers. They are profuse-blooming, showy plants, which should be in every good selection of herbaceous plants...
-Drumlanrig Gardeners' Mutual Improvement Association
The last session of this Association was one of the most successful in its history. The attendance was so good, and the discussions so enthusiastically entered into, that the fear of our ever falling ...
-Dundee Horticultural Association
The first meeting of this newly formed association took place on the evening of Friday, December 3d. There was a large attendance. The president, Mr Doig, Rossie Priory Gardens, occupied the chair, an...
-Dundee Horticultural Association. #2
The ordinary monthly meeting of this Association was held in the Imperial Hotel, Dundee, on Friday evening the 7th ult. - the President in the chair. There was a large attendance of the members. Mr Wi...
-Dundee Horticultural Association. #3
The ordinary monthly meeting of this Association was held in the Imperial Hotel, Dundee, on Friday evening, the 4th ult. - the President, Mr D. Day, in the chair. There was a full attendance of the me...
-Dundee Horticultural Association. #4
The ordinary monthly meeting of this Association was held in the Imperial Hotel, Dundee, on Friday evening the 4th ult., the president, Mr I). Doig, in the chair. Owing to the inclemency of the weathe...
-Dundee Horticultural Association. #5
The ordinary monthly meeting of this Association was held in the Imperial Hotel, Dundee, on Friday evening the 1st ult., the president, Mr D. Doig, in the chair. Mr W. S. Watt, landscape-gardener, Bro...
-Dundee Horticultural Association. #6
The ordinary monthly meeting of this Association was held in the Templar Hall, Reform Street, on Friday evening, the 6th ult. - the President, Mr D. Doig, Rossie Priory, in the chair. There was a full...
-Dundee Horticultural Association. #7
A meeting of the members of this Association was held in the Templar Hall, Reform Street, on Friday evening, the 1st ult. - the President, Mr David Doig, Rossie Priory Gardens, in the chair. There was...
-Dundee Horticultural Association. #8
The ordinary monthly meeting of this Association was held in the Templar Hall, Reform Street, on Friday evening, the 5th ult. - the President, Mr Doig, Rossie Priory Gardens, in the chair. Mr James Gr...
-Dundee Horticultural Association. #9
The usual monthly meeting of this Association was held in the Templar Hall, Reform Street, on Friday evening the 7th ult. In the absence of the president, Mr J. D. Ker, Douglasfield, was called upon t...
-Dundonian. Pyrus Mauleii
Apart from the great beauty of its flowers and fruit when cultivated in ordinary circumstances, our experience of this splendid novelty during the past spring warrants us in believing that it will soo...
-Dwarf Poinsettias
There is such a run on dwarf plants of bright colour for table use and other purposes of furnishing in winter, that it is well to remember at the present season how simple it is to accomplish work tha...
-Dwarf Trees
Dwarf Apple-trees are garden toys, and they do not pay. For ourselves, we never would plant them, unless in pots to be grown in an orchard-house. If our ground were so limited that we had no room fo...
-Early And Late Peas
In ordinary soils and situations, little difficulty in general is experienced in securing a plentiful supply of that esteemed vegetable the Pea after midsummer and during early autumn; but unless wher...
-Early And Winter Lettuce
A heavy and well-hearted Lettuce is a good thing, but it is not absolutely necessary that it should be big and heavy to be acceptable as a salad. Besides, Lettuces when forced are rather stubbornly in...
-Early Camellias
With much pleasure and satisfaction many will have read our Editor's leading article in the December issue of ' The Gardener,' headed Camellias for Autumn Flowering. In a measure to corroborate or ...
-Early Green Peas
On Tuesday the 10th, Mr George Green, gardener to the Venerable Archdeacon Fitzgerald, of Charton Mackrell, near Somerton, Somerset, gathered from the rectory garden his first dish of green Peas for t...
-Early Ripening Of Grapes For Late Supplies
This important matter, though a very old story, is being ventilated, and all the light which can be thrown on the subject can scarcely be overdone, especially when backed by the experience of such suc...
-Early Ripening Of Late-Keeping Grapes
No one, I think, can dispute the fact that late Grapes are better flavoured when ripened early in the autumn, or under a higher temperature than they are generally treated to, as has been forcibly arg...
-Early Tulips For Pot-Culture
Before proceeding to give a list of these, I think they deserve a few remarks in a cultural sense, although all those who have forced Hyacinths will be intimately acquainted with the mode of early Tul...
-Early-Flowering Bedding Tulips
I would fain hope many of the readers of the 'Gardener' have a kindly regard for these beautiful and attractive flowers. All the most gorgeous hues of the floral kingdom concentrate here, and aid to m...
-Early-Ripening Varieties Of Fruits, And Hales's Early Peach In Particular
WHERE there is a demand for ripe fruits as early in the year as it is possible to have them, it is of the greatest importance to make such selections of Pines, Grapes, Peaches, Nectarines, Strawberrie...
-East Lothian Stocks
Although it is a good many years since the editor of this magazine brought these famous Stocks prominently before the public in the 'Scottish Gardener,' I do not think they have yet received the atten...
-Economical Kitchen-Gardening
Any one having the operation of an extensive market-garden daily under his eye, where vegetables are grown for profit, and may be exported, and who may be familiar with the routine of kitchen-gardenin...
-Economy Of Fuel In Horticultural Establishments
I observe that a paper has been read before the Scottish Horticultural Association by Mr A. D. Makenzie upon the above subject, which is attracting so much general attention at the present time. Mr M...
-Edinburgh International Show For 1875
Our, readers, we are sure, will have noticed with pleasure that the Caledonian Horticultural Society have determined to hold another great show in 1875. Judging from the very great success which has a...
-Education
Sir, - Much has been written within the last few years on education for gardeners. Without saying one word against it, for it is invaluable, particularly to the class of gardeners who represent the mi...
-Effects Of Last Winter's Frost On Evergreen Shrubs
One of the first questions asked of one another by gardeners when they meet this season is - Are your shrubs much injured by the severe frost of last winter 1 And as a rule the answer is in the affirm...
-English Committee
Rev. M. J. Berkeley, Chairman. Sir Wentworth Drlke, Bt., Sloane St. Mr J. Fleming, Cliveden. Mr J. Gibson, Battersea Park. Mr A. Henderson, Wellington Road. Dr R. Hogg, St George's Road. Mr C. L...
-Epigaea
The species repens, the only representative of this genus in cultivation, is a beautiful little creeping evergreen, never rising above the surface of the ground, producing freely its long tubular whit...
-Epimedium
This family contains three or four distinct and pretty species, some or all of which should be cultivated in every collection of hardy border plants. They are hardy elegant plants adapted to any purpo...
-Epitome of Gardening
By Thomas Moore. With an Introductory Chapter on the Principles of Horticulture, by Maxwell T. Masters. Edinburgh : Adam and Charles Black. This work was originally written as a treatise on horticult...
-Eranthemum Pulchellum
Tins is an old-fashioned winter-flowering stove plant, which is not quite so much grown as its merits entitle it to be. It is exceedingly easy of cultivation. The following directions followed out wil...
-Eriogonum
A genus of pretty hardy flowers, of which a few species are in cultivation. They are related to the Polygonums, but, unlike the majority of that family, are neat-growing, free-blooming plants, well wo...
-Erpetion Reniforme - New Holland Violet
This beautiful little plant is too tender to be trusted out in our climate in most parts of the country during winter; but it is such an essential gem that it should be included in every collection of...
-Erythrina Crista-Galli
The Erythrina Crista-galli, or coral-tree, is one of the really neglected greenhouse plants : we cannot recollect having ever seen it cultivated except at two or three places; and why it should be so ...
-Erythronium Dens-Canis (The Dog's-Tooth Violet)
A very beautiful and free-flowering plant, pretty generally cultivated, and well worthy of being so. The foliage alone is most attractive, with its brown and glaucous-green blotches; but the flowers, ...
-Essays On Window And Cottage Gardening
The prizes offered by Mr W. Egerton Hubbard, jun., through the medium of the Royal Horticultural Society, have been awarded as follows - viz., For an Essay on Cottage Gardening, the prize of 5 to Mr ...
-Eucharis Amazonica
Though much has been written about this beautiful plant, I feel constrained to bring it once more before the notice of your readers. I may not be able, perhaps, to impart anything new concerning it; b...
-Eupatorium Odoratum
One of the most useful winter and spring flowering plants is the above. Coming in as it does when flowers, and especially white flowers, are getting scarce, it is the more useful, and is not cultivate...
-Eupatoriums
Eupatorium riparium is a good early spring-blooming plant. E. glaucophyllum is also most useful, but the best and most generally effective of all the kinds is E. grandiflorum, a robust large-leaved sp...
-Euphorbia Esula
This is a neat hardy herbaceous plant, always pleasant to look upon. It grows in rounded graceful masses, with numerous stems, clothed with narrow linear leaves of brightest green; this green eventual...
-Euphorbia Jacquiniaeflora
The above stove-plant is well-known and highly appreciated on account of it flowering from November on throughout the winter months, when its bright flower-wreaths are especially welcome. I desire jus...
-Evergreen Herbaceous Perennials In The Parterre
There is a very numerous class of hardy perennials with evergreen foliage which may be used in the flower-garden with good effect in summer in conjunction with the usual classes of summer bedding-plan...
-Exhibiting Dahlias (A Young Beginner)
The following remarks will be found to contain, in a condensed form, the rules laid down by Messrs Glenny, Turner, and other prominent exhibitors of the Dahlia: First, then, we recommend young exhibit...
-Exhibition Zonal Pelargoniums
Now that this fine class of plants is getting much attention in many gardening papers of late, I beg to offer a few remarks as to the best varieties to be grown for the above purpose. The immense quan...
-Experiments With Potatoes
[The following experiments with Potatoes were conducted under the direction of Admiral Horby, and are very interesting to Potato-growers. - Ed]. We give below the results of experiments with fourteen...
-Exploration Of The Alpine Flora Of New Zealand
The following extracts from a letter of Dr Lauder Lindsay, were read at a meeting of the Otago Institute, on the 13th May. I am in a position now to give you further information about the movements ...
-Extremes In Grape - Growing
When four months since we called attention to the fact that some of the finest Grapes ever exhibited were produced in districts where the rainfall is very much above the average, and put the questio...
-F. W
Very likely it is as you suppose, that your ground is too damp and cold for Alternantheras. They thrive best in a rather elevated situation, in light rich soil, and under such conditions they do not e...
-Failure Of Peach Crops In Unheated Houses
Several cases of the failure of Peach crops in unheated houses have come under our notice this season. Considering the very sunless summer, and especially autumn, of 1872, in a great many districts su...
-Fancy Pelargoniums
These beautiful free-blooming forms of the Pelargonium, termed for some reason or the other Fancy varieties, are worthy of high admiration, both for the charming softness and delicacy of their tints...
-Fastening Pear Trees to Walls
Perhaps this is as good a place as any to say a word on the best method of securing trees to walls. The old-fashioned way, which is still extensively practised, is to use shreds of strong tweed or oth...
-Feeding Vines And Setting Muscats
I can thoroughly corroborate the remarks in the leading article of your August number, on the feeding of Vines in general and the setting of Muscats. Having annually practised the same manner of mulch...
-Feeding Vines, Etc
MANY years ago the practice of mixing considerable proportions of manure in the form of animal excrement, and in some cases animals themselves, into Vine-borders, was very common, and recommended as t...
-Fern Culture (J. S.)
Mr B. S. Williams's 'Select Ferns and Lycopods' is the best book we have on the culture of Ferns in general, and contains descriptions of all the best sorts, from which you can readily make a selectio...
-Fig Forcing
Where early Figs are grown in pots, now is a good time to start them. They do best when plunged in a bed of warm leaves, giving a bottom-heat of about 80. The temperature of the air should be the...
-Fig Forcing. #2
Encourage trees that are swelling off a crop with waterings of liquid manure, and keep a circulation of air about them as the fruit ripens. Figs should not be gathered till they have cracked their ski...
-Fig Forcing. #3
Where the first crop is ripening keep a circulation of warm air about them, and let them be kept as dry as is consistent with the welldoing and safety of the second crop. Do not gather the fruit until...
-Fig Forcing. #4
Figs in pots started as directed last month will be breaking into growth, and should have the temperature advanced 5; and, as in the case of early Vines, let the forcing be chiefly done by day wi...
-Fig Forcing. #5
The same directions as to ripening and thinning the wood that have been given for Peaches are applicable to Figs from which the second crop has all been gathered. Keep the foliage fresh and healthy as...
-Fig Forcing. #6
Old-established trees with their roots in narrow inside borders, that are bearing heavy crops, will require copious waterings of manure-water to keep the border moist. Syringe the trees every fine aft...
-Fig-Culture. No. IV. And General Management Forcing
There is perhaps no other fruit-bearing plant that submits with greater freedom and success than the Fig to early forcing, and it certainly yields under favourable treatment a very good return in the ...
-Fig-Culture. No. V
Ripening The Fruit Until the first crop begins to show signs of ripening, keep the atmosphere moist, and syringe at shutting-up time on all fine days. But as soon as they begin to ripen discontinue s...
-Figs
Your correspondent, Mr James M'Millan, in his treatise on hardy fruits last month, gives a lengthy description of the cultivation of the Fig; still the few following remarks I have felt desirous of ma...
-Fitz-Roya Patagonica (The Patagonian Fitz-Roya)
This distinct and interesting Conifer is found asociated with the Saxe-Gothoea on high mountains in Patagonia, from whence it was also sent home in 1846. The genus was named by Dr Hooker in compliment...
-Florist And Pomologist Prizes
Two bunches of Grapes, White and Black - 1. Wm. Bryden; 2. George Johnston. For the best collection of White and Black Grapes, with their names, as are not included in the other prizes offered - Geor...
-Florist And Pomologist Prizes. Part 2
Class III. - Open To All Gardeners And Amateurs Eight Stove and Greenhouse Plants in flower - 1. Wm. Thomson, Dalkeith; 2. T. Lees, gardener to Earl of Haddington; 3. John Sutherland, gardener to Mr ...
-Florist And Pomologist Prizes. Part 3
The Dinner The members of the Society dined together in the Douglas Hotel at six o'clock. About 140 gentlemen were present. The Right Hon. the Earl of Dalkeith presided, and Professor Balfour officia...
-Florist Flowers
The following remarks, taken during the blooming season of 1868, may be interesting as well as useful to those who take an interest in the cultivation of florist flowers. Those enumerated in Section I...
-Florist's Flowers
For many florist's flowers, the next two months are particularly trying ones. Verbenas and Petunias, as cases in point, very often die off during this period. Much depends on having good established p...
-Flower Shows In Essex
I have no doubt there are a number of men, readers of the 'Gardener,' who are either natives of Essex, or have at some time of their lives acted as gardeners in that county; if so, they will still fee...
-Flower-Gardening: Cost Of The Two Systems
When J. S., W. advocates any particular theory or system of gardening, we may be sure that he will fall foul of whoever may have the misfortune to disagree with him. Six years ago J. S., W. was ob...
-Flower-Gardening: Cost Of The Two Systems. Continued
It is consequently necessary to have a duplicate collection in frames to make sure of preserving a stock of these disappointing subjects. Of course there is the alternative of not growing these at all...
-Flower-Garden
In this department the chief part of the work is keeping order and sweetness. Whatever style the beds and borders are arranged in, the same attention as to general management is necessary - rolling, s...
-Flower-Garden. #2
Alterations and renovations may now close as soon as possible. Flower-gardens should now assume a dressy appearance. Mowing, rolling, sweeping, clipping, and other operations should have due attention...
-Flower-Garden. #3
The soil which is to receive the summer and autumn flowering plants should (where vacant) be in good healthy condition, having been well turned up to the weather. Any manuring or addition of soil nece...
-Flower-Garden. #4
There will now be abundance of work pegging young growths into their positions. Trim any which are out of bounds, and pick off decaying flowers which have served their purpose. No weeds should find a ...
-Flower Garden. #5
In this department there is little which can be added in a calendar to what has been advised for January, - a general examination of the stock, young and old, to supply plants for the beds next season...
-Flower-Garden At Ealing Park, Middlesex, The Residence Of J. S. Budgett, Esq
There must be many gardeners and others about the country who have lively recollections of and still feel an interest in the place so long and famously associated with the late Mrs Lawrence and her al...
-Flower-Garden Notes
Notwithstanding all that has been said and argued, with the aid of some reason and a good deal of ridicule, against the prevailing style of flower-gardening by means of masses of colour in flowers and...
-Flower-Gardening - The Bedding-Out Or Massing System
It would appear that this system of arranging the various kinds of plants employed in the decoration of the flower-garden will soon be a thing of the past. At least, if the advice of some writers on h...
-Flower-Gardening Notes
Thanks to the fine autumn weather, flowering bedding-plants have late in the season somewhat retrieved the bad repute they got into throughout the summer and early autumn months. At present date (Nove...
-Flower-Gardening Of The Season
FLOWER-GARDENING has been, for the season which may be said to be now gone, gardening without the flowers. The spring gardening was only a partial success, or almost a failure, from the havoc the seve...
-Flowering Plants For Room Decoration
Of late years the demand for flowers has increased considerably, and the rage for fine-foliage plants that existed but a short time ago appears to be gradually on the wane, and year by year the love f...
-Flowering Shrubs
In the southern counties, many such kinds as Double Deutzias, Spiraeas, Dwarf Lilacs, Veronicas, Prunuses, Abuti-lons, etc., are frequently hardened off, cut back, and when breaking afresh are planted...
-Flowering-Plants For December
December - dreary, the fag-end of the year, mid-winter, and a whole catalogue of dismal associations - has yet its cheerful aspects. Christmas, like May, is said to be merry, as we wish all our reader...
-Flowering-Shrubs On Walls
Among the many subjects which have been discussed in your valuable magazine, this is one which I think has not received due attention. I am sure there is no branch of gardening worse understood, or if...
-Forster's White Seedling
This variety has been in cultivation a considerable time, but we think that, as an early white Grape, it is not yet so well known nor so much grown as it deserves to be. Especially is this applicable ...
-Freaks Of Variegation
We appear to be fast approaching a state of things in relation to Horticulture, when we shall not have any description of green-foliaged plant of which there will not also be its variegated counterpa...
-French Bean Forcing
Water those in full bearing with guano and manure-water alternately. Keep the atmosphere moist, and give air when the temperature exceeds 75. The night temperature is sufficiently high at 65...
-Fritillaria
Of this genus there are several forms which are worthy of being included among spring flowers when the collection, is to be composed of all that combine early-flowering qualities with some beauty or e...
-Fruit
Of fruit the display was not extensive, but, with the exception of some of the Pines, it was of great excellence. The Black Hamburg Grapes from Lord Wharn-cliffe's and Lord Bagot's were all that could...
-Fruit. #2
Collection of Fruit, eight varieties - 1. William Brow, Kilmaron Castle; 2. A. Mackie, Camperdown; 3. David Ross, The Gardens, St Martin's Abbey. Four bunches of Grapes, varieties - 1. D. Morrison, I...
-Fruit. #3
The fruit department was quite as well represented as at Manchester, and occupied the central staging of a long tent. Pines were not quite so numerous, Black Grapes were scarcely up to the average, Mu...
-Fruit And Floral Meeting And First Spring Show, March 15
A south-west wind, with continued fine weather for the previous three or four weeks, changed decidedly for the worse on the night of the 14th, with a little change of the wind to the south by east. At...
-Fruit And Floral Meeting, And Show Of Zonal Pelargoniums, August 2
All the different sections of Tricolors and plain-leaved varieties were represeated, mostly by small specimens. Prizes were offered by W. R. Morris, Esq., for 6 Seedling Tricolors. Messrs Downie, Lair...
-Fruit And Floral Meeting, May 3d
Roses in pots were the principal feature at this meeting, besides the collections of miscellaneous subjects. The Roses which were put up for competition in the open classes were magnificent examples o...
-Fruit And Floral Meeting, May 3d. Continued
In the July number of 'The Gardener' there occurs the following passage by Mr Hinds in connection with this topic: I am ready to yield to every grower what I claim for myself - viz., that of knowing ...
-Fruit-Culture. #2
My reply to Mr Hinds on this subject need not be a long one. I am perfectly willing to discuss the matter with him or any one else who is disposed to meet his adversary on fair grounds, and the argume...
-Fruit Culture. #3
As it is generally admitted that there are always two sides to a question, I suppose I may crave space to answer the criticism of your correspondent J. S. W., who has given us a rather lengthy discour...
-Fruit Culture. #3. Continued
All the forced Strawberries at Otterspool were grown as if for exhibition during my time, but whether upon this solitary occasion J. S. W. saw our best effort is not for me to say - only my experience...
-Fruit-Culture In The North
It is the opinion of many who live beyond the Grampians, that nothing but the most hardy of the vegetable kingdom will grow or prosper in this northern clime. But to those who thus think, I will endea...
-Fruiting Vines In Pots
Crops of Grapes from pot-Vines, we need not say, have now more than ever become common. Hence the enormous quantity of Vines prepared for the purpose in all the principal nursery establishments in the...
-Fruiting Young Pine-Apple Plants
It is now becoming a well-established rule that the sooner a Pine-plant can be fruited, the finer will the fruit be in proportion to the size and age of the plant. This has frequently been illustrated...
-Fuchsia, Champion Of The World (Seeker)
This huge double variety, which you saw at the Regent's Park Show on the 2d of June last, will be distributed by Mr Henry Cannell of Woolwich in the coming autumn. He thus describes it: An intense br...
-Fuchsias (L. A. G.)
The following selection will suit you very well, being fine and varied, and plants could be obtained next spring at a reasonable cost: Avalanche, a fine pure white double-corolla'd variety, tube and s...
-Funkia Grandiflora
This is a beautiful plant, possessing every property that can well be desired, and by many competent judges it has been pronounced one of the finest plants that can be grown for the decoration of the ...
-G. C. H
You should get some practical treatise on the Vine and study it, as your questions pretty nearly require such to answer them. So far you have done very well, but to tell you how to treat the Vines fro...
-G. F
The circumstances you describe must be the cause of your Grapes shrivelling so very prematurely. The cold and wet paralyses their whole system, and they are never properly ripened; and Grapes not thor...
-G. W. S. Clericus
The hour at which your vinery fire is made up for the night is quite correct. As to whether it should be made up again to any extent in the morning depends entirely on the state of the weather. To hav...
-Garden Improvements In Scotland. Balcarres
Balcarres, the seat of Sir Coutts Linsday, Bart., is pleasantly situated on a rising eminence about three miles north of the Firth of Forth, on the south-east coast of Fifeshire. Balcarres House, for...
-Garden Memorandums
A day or two's outing in the middle of winter by some may not be considered a great treat, especially when cold winds, frost, and snow prevail; but when one has a purpose in view, difficulties are e...
-Garden Records. No. I. Battersea Park, London, S.W
In a paper read not long since before the Central Horticultural Society by Mr Joseph Newton, the well known landscape gardener, who has just returned from a visit to America, occurs this passage on su...
-Battersea Park, London, S.W. Continued
Near this was a bed of the pink and buff coloured Lantana Fabiola, edged with Robert Fish golden-leaved Pelargo-nium - a good thing, with a dwarf and compact habit. A noble plant, too, is Fer-dinanda ...
-Garden Records. No. II. Battersea Park, London, S.W
Resuming our Records at this point, we note that a tall weeping Ash, with a golden-leaved JapaneseHoneysuckle trained round the stem, afforded an opportunity for the planting of a circle of the doub...
-Battersea Park, London, S.W. #2. Continued
In a serpentine bed, the groundwork formed of winding circles of Ivy, was seen zonal Pelargonium Lucius, one of Bull's fine varieties, and having fine showy crimson flowers and large erect and bold tr...
-Garden Records. No. III. Messrs Salter & Son, Versailles Nursery, Hammersmith, London, W
The annual display of Chrysanthemums made by Messrs Salter & Son has now become an established floral institution of the metropolis, for it is a show of no mean order. Year by year it becomes more ext...
-Garden Records. Messrs Salter & Son, Versailles Nursery, Hammersmith, London, W. Continued
It is very difficult indeed to describe that curious, but deeply-interesting group of Chrysanthemums, the Japanese varieties. There are so many different types of flowers, that though attempts have be...
-Garden Records. No. IV. Messrs Windebank & Kingsbury, Bevois Valley And Mount Nurseries, Southampton
For years past this firm has been famous for the beauty of their strain of Primula Sinensis fimbriata. It is a fact that from Southampton have come forth types of this beautiful spring flowering-plant...
-Garden Records. No. IX. Gunnersby Park, Acton, Middlesex, The Residence Of Baron Lionel De Rothschild, M.P
This place is situated in the south-west side of London, and about midway between Ealing and Kew, though comprehended in the parish of Ealing, and can be readily reached by railway to Ealing, Acton, T...
-Gunnersby Park, Acton, Middlesex, The Residence Of Baron Lionel De Rothschild, M.P. Continued
There are two nice Cucumber-houses, one for summer and one for winter work, and from these fruit can be cut each day in the year. For winter work, a good variety, known as Volunteer, is a great favour...
-Garden Records. No. V. Worton Cottage, Islesworth, London, The Residence Of W. Beck, Esq
Our illustration is drawn from this place - so long associated with the successful cultivation of florists' flowers - for the sake of indicating what Mr Wiggins, the gardener at Worton Cottage, is doi...
-Garden Records. No. VI. Swyncombe Park, Henley-On-Thames, The Residence Of The Rev. C. E. Ruck-Keene
Whatever else of interest may belong to this charming place, situate in one of the most pleasant parts of the fine agricultural county of Oxfordshire, it has come to be regarded as the home of the gl...
-Swyncombe Park, Henley-On-Thames, The Residence Of The Rev. C. E. Ruck-Keene. Continued
This may be prepared just in the same way as a pit for Cucumbers or Melons, with a hollow chamber under it, and two or more pipes running underneath for bottom-heat. Plant out in this bed in good fria...
-Garden Records. No. VII. Mottisfont Abbey, Romsey, Hampshire, The Seat Of Lady Barker Mill
The traveller who journeys by rail from Southampton to Andover, or the pleasure-seeker who makes his annual trip by road to Stockbridge Races, must be equally familiar with the locale, of Mottisfont A...
-Mottisfont Abbey, Romsey, Hampshire, The Seat Of Lady Barker Mill. Continued
Following this is a second house of Vines that were started with heat at the end of January. Here the fruit is still quite green, but will probably be ripe about the end of June. The produce is heavy,...
-Garden Records. No. VIII. Messrs Paul & Son, The Old Nurseries, Cheshunt, Herts
These well-known Nurseries have played a most important part in the progress of horticulture daring the present century. The Rose, the Hollyhock, and many other popular flowers have here found and sti...
-Messrs Paul & Son, The Old Nurseries, Cheshunt, Herts. Continued
Remembering how much the cultivators of the Hollyhock owe to the Cheshunt Nurseries, how much of its glorious past was fostered by the care bestowed on its cultivation and intelligence brought to bear...
-Garden Records. No. X. Mr Francis N. Dancer's Market-Garden, Little Sutton, Turnham Green, Middlesex
A London market-garden is ever an instructive place to visit, and this being one that has always borne a high reputation, we felt certain to be much interested, and were not disappointed. This market-...
-Mr Francis N. Dancer's Market-Garden, Little Sutton, Turnham Green, Middlesex. Continued
Returning again to Plums, it may be stated that the season lasts about two months, the early and late varieties turning in about that time. A capital Plum is Sandell's Late, considered to be of very f...
-Garden Records. No. XI. Mr Charles Turner's, The Royal Nursery, Slough
Almost every florist knows, or has heard of, the Royal Nursery, Slough. For years past - even long before Mr Turner became associated with it, it was a spot towards which florists turned their eyes an...
-Garden Records. No. XII. Messrs Standish & Co., The Royal Nurseries, Ascot, Berkshire
Here, in what must have appeared at the time to be one of the most uninviting spots to be found in the whole county of Berkshire, Mr John Standish set about the formation of a new nursery, when, a few...
-Messrs Standish & Co., The Royal Nurseries, Ascot, Berkshire. Part 2
How well the Golden Yew stands the sun was effectually demonstrated here; and the moral drawn was, that it should on no account be planted in the shade. The plants of the Ascot Golden Irish, a form ra...
-Messrs Standish & Co., The Royal Nurseries, Ascot, Berkshire. Part 3
In the matter of foliage they are as near as possible between the two. Mr Standish has also tried to cross some of the smaller flowering kinds with R. Aucklandii, but to no purpose; and he assigns thi...
-Garden Requisites
Standen's gardener's and amateur's friend, and fowler's insecticide. In the columns of a garden periodical, that, like the 'Gardener,' circulates so extensively among the amateur element of horticult...
-Garden Superintendence
To have everything that may be wanted and of fair general excellence, and everything in general good order, is the true test of a good practical gardener in the average garden establishment; where, as...
-Garden-Walks
For real comfort no garden is complete without good walks; but what constitutes a good walk is not so well understood. Well, then, a good walk should be firm, smooth, dry, and of an agreeable colour. ...
-Gardener
The cracking of Melons is caused by keeping the soil too wet, especially after they are fully swollen. This sunless wet season has also had to do with it, and some varieties are more subject to crack ...
-Gardeners And Amateurs
Twelve distinct Hyacinths - 1. Mr Gordon, Niddrie House; 2. John Cur-rie, Parkside Lodge; 3. Duncan Kerr, Glencorse. Nine distinct Hyacinths - 1. Mr Mattocks, Niddry Mains; 2. Mr Paul, Gilmore Place;...
-Gardeners And Gardening In America
Mr William Robinson, the author of ' The Parks, Promenades, and Gardens of Paris,' is at present making a tour through the United States of America. He has written home some communications of a very i...
-Gardeners' Examinations
Examinations for gardeners have been held for some years by the Royal Horticultural Society of London, who hold two examinations annually, and also by the Society of Arts, who hold but one examination...
-Gardening At Pinkie House
As an Englishman rather enthusiastic in botanical research, I venture to state how very much I am interested, in my yearly visit to Scotland, in what I find in the many gardens that come under my noti...
-Gardening Book Reviews
'An Illustrated Natural History of British Moths,' with life-size figures from nature of each species, and of the more striking varieties. Also full descriptions of both the perfect insect and the cat...
-Gardening Book Reviews. #2
The Parks, Open Spaces, and Thoroughfares of London. By Alexander M'Kenzie, landscape-gardener. London: Waterlow & Sons, London Wall. In a very readable pamphlet of twenty-two pages Mr M'Kenzie disc...
-Gardening Book Reviews. #3
The Amateur Gardener's Calendar, being a Monthly Guide as to what should be avoided, as well as what should be done, in a Garden in each Month. By Mr Loudon. Revised and edited by William Robinson, F....
-Gardening Book Reviews. #4
Alpine Flowers for English Gardens. By William Robinson, F.L.S., author of 'The Parks, Promenades, and Gardens of Paris,' etc. London: John Murray. In a handsome book of some 360 pages, abounding wit...
-Gardening Book Reviews. #5
A Book about Roses: how to Grow and Show them. By S. Reynolds Hole. Second Edition. William Blackwood and Sons, Edinburgh and London. No one will be surprised that this rich, racy, invigorating, plea...
-Gardening Book Reviews. #6
Mushroom Culture, its Extension and Improvement. By William Robinson, F. L. S. Frederick Warne & Co., Covent Garden, London. At last we have a work on the Mushroom that will come to be regarded as a ...
-Gardening Book Reviews. #7
Choice Stove and Greenhouse Ornamental - Leaved Plants, comprising descriptions of upwards of eight hundred species and varieties, accompanied by instructions for their cultivation and mode of managem...
-Gardening In The Open
I was much pleased to see both the Editor and the Squire's Gardener advocating the system of planting fruit-trees generally in plots of ground specially set apart for them, rather than of following ...
-Gardening On The Thames Embankment
Any one interested in city gardening (and it is a matter that is often treated of in the horticultural press) can find much to excite their admiration at the present time in what is being carried out ...
-Gardens Enclosed With Glass
If the experience of the past season will only awaken gardeners and their employers to the gravity of future prospects of what are commonly called hardy-fruit crops, and cause them to inquire into the...
-Garrya Elliptica
About a year ago a correspondence was carried on in the pages of a contemporary regarding the hardiness of this well-known shrub, which was disputed by some of the writers. Looking at its adaptation f...
-Gathering, Carting, And Storing Ice
The provision of a quantity of ice is one of the duties that fall to the lot of the gardener, it being invariably his function to provide a stock sufficient to meet the demands of the family for the y...
-Gaultheria
A genus of pretty dwarf evergreens, all of them interesting, and, we are convinced, not nearly so widely appreciated by horticulturists as they deserve; the handsome shining foliage and elegant flower...
-General Attention
I have already stated that Roses love a rich diet when in a healthy growing state. A little weak guano-water will stimulate a healthy development of foliage, and as the wood makes growth, it can be ex...
-General Remarks Relating To Plants Raised From Cuttings, And Which Are Cultivated For Competition
Of necessity, some difference exists in the general culture of those plants under this heading and that of seedlings. There is no difference regarding the preparation of the ground, and other details ...
-Genetyllis Tulipifera
This plant is not nearly so much grown, or even so well known, as it deserves to be. As an exhibition plant, when well grown and flowered, it has few equals. Though the individual flowers are not very...
-Gentiana Gelida
This is a charming hardy perennial from the plains of Siberia, and will grow freely in any ordinary soil, and form large spreading tufts of rich blue flowers about 12 inches in height, with from four ...
-Gentiana Verna
Few persons are aware of the beauty of this charming plant, although it is a native of this country. It is scarcely ever seen excepting in its mountain home. In its habits of growth it forms dense tuf...
-Gentianaceae. Notes On Hardy Herbaceous Plants
A very handsome order of plants, and mainly herbaceous, though not all hardy. Gentiana is the principal genus, and the type of the order. In it there are some of the most beautiful and brilliant of ha...
-Geraniums
No time is better for putting in Geranium cuttings to strike root than from the first up to the third week of the present month. It is not always convenient to get them in just at this period, but it ...
-Gesnera Culture
If there is any one branch of his business that the gardener ought to pay more attention to than another, I think it should be the decoration of the various structures under his care during the dreary...
-Gesnera Zebrina
I Have at the present time two or three dozen pots of this most beautiful and useful plant in full flower, and never have I before succeeded so well with them. I attribute this success to some alterat...
-Gesneras
The value of the Gesnera as a decorative plant can scarcely be overestimated. Most of them have rich velvety foliage. If grown for their foliage alone, they are very attractive, but during autumn and ...
-Giant Ten-Weeks Stock
This grand strain of Ten-weeks Stock does not appear to be so much appreciated as it deserves to be. When well grown, as every variety of Stock should be to be fully appreciated, this particular kind ...
-Gladiolus
Under the same circumstances, these will require a good watering this month, - in the first place to finish the spikes, which are well advanced during this month, and also to plump up the corms for an...
-Gladiolus-Culture
THE Gladiolus as a florist's flower is of very recent date. Very rapid strides have been made during the last ten or a dozen years in bringing it up to its present standard, but the high prices which ...
-Glasgow And West Of Scotland Horticultural Society
The summer floral fite of the Glasgow and West of Scotland Horticultural Society took place on Tuesday the 2d May, in the City Hall, Glasgow, and was an extremely successful exhibition. The prizes of...
-Glasgow And West Of Scotland Horticultural Society. #2
This, the first show of the season, took place in the City Hall. As a floricultural display it was not equal to many of its predecessors. As regards Hyacinths, there was not that decided quality nor t...
-Glasgow And West Of Scotland Horticultural Society. #3
This prosperous Society held its Spring Show in the Glasgow City Hall on the 29th March. The early morning was characterised by an unusually severe frost for the season, and exhibitors had to take gre...
-Glasgow And West Of Scotland Horticultural Society. #4
This flourishing society held its second show for the season in the Glasgow City Hall, on Wednesday, 7th June. The plants brought forward on this occasion were, taken as a whole, very meritorious exam...
-Glasgow And West of Scotland Horticultural Society
The spring show of this Society took place last week in the City Hall. The weather was propitious, and the exhibition was made up of some very choice materials, Dutch bulbs forming the staple. Never b...
-Glasgow Show Under The Auspices Of The Botanic Society
To Mr Bullen is due the credit of having set the example in Scotland of a more artistic system of displaying the various subjects sent either for exhibition or competition than has hitherto prevailed;...
-Globularia
These are charming little Alpine plants, distinguished, as the name implies, by the inflorescence being gathered together into compact globular heads. Some of the species are not hardy in all parts of...
-Gloriosa Superba
This fine old climber - one of the best and most showy we have - is not so often met with as its merits deserve. It is a tuberous-rooted plant which dies down every autumn. When it has been strongly g...
-Gloxinia Culture
The Gloxinia is now becoming a very popular plant, and most deservedly so; for the beautiful varieties now in cultivation have a grand and very effective appearance when in full flower. Those desirous...
-Gloxinias
Few among the more popular stove-plants are more deserving of cultivation, or will more amply repay any extra care bestowed upon them, than Gloxinias. They can be had in bloom for at least six months ...
-Gold And Bronze Pelargoniums For Exhibition
Since the introduction of the valuable section of variegated zonal Pelargoniums, there has been no addition to the resources of the flower-gardener of such general interest as that group of Pelargoniu...
-Golden Champion
The prospects of this Grape are improving. We have always maintained that such would be the case, and after a longer experience of it than any grower, except the raiser of it, we will try to represent...
-Golden Champion Grape
I have a strong impression that, if this Grape was to receive special treatment, the fatal spot which affects it would to a great extent disappear. It is a Grape that wants time to grow and ripen, and...
-Gooseberries
Decidedly the Gooseberry ranks first. Nowhere in the world does the Gooseberry grow to such perfection as in Great Britain. Not only so, but few fruits are so useful; for it is used for making sauce a...
-Gooseberries And Currants. Fruit-Culture
We have already said that, for small gardens, Gooseberries, Currants, Raspberries, and Strawberries are more valuable than such fruits as Apples. We are not sure but, as time rolls on, and competition...
-Gooseberry And Currant Bush Pruning
My experience of cottage-gardens in this neighbourhood leads me to believe that their owners generally understand the cultivation of these fruit-bushes very well, with the exception that they are too ...
-Gossipy Gleanings From The Greenhouse
I should recommend every one who has a conservatory to keep gay all the year round to patronise Iris reticulata. A dozen of pots are not too much to keep up a supply of it in bloom in winter. It is be...
-Grafting
IN your last number I notice an article, signed X. S., on Grafting, in which the writer makes a statement to the effect that he has seen two or three dozens of Elms grafted on Beech, and that they are...
-Grafting And Management Of Tea Roses
Amongst sweet-scented flowers, nothing is more appreciated or gives greater pleasure and satisfaction than a few Tea Rose buds in the winter and spring. The season is fast coming upon us when plants f...
-Grafting Vines
I, as also, I have no doubt, many of your readers, felt interested in the article describing Dovetail Grafting, in the April number of the 'Gardener.' I confess that to me it was new, but doubtless am...
-Grand Summer Show. Royal Horticultural Society. May 27th, 28th, 29th, And 30th
This annual show, as evinced by the number of exhibitors and attendance of visitors, is fast becoming very popular, and quite worthy of the distinguished patronage usually bestowed upon it. On the pre...
-Grape Forcing
As houses get cleared of the fruit, we would reiterate former directions, and urge the necessity of keeping the foliage healthy and active as long as possible. Red-spider must be prevented by keeping ...
-Grape Forcing. #2
Late Grapes intended to hang through the winter should be quite ripe by the middle of the month, for if ripened later in the season with less sun, they do not keep so well. Assist the process, when ne...
-Grape Forcing. #3
Continue to keep a strict watch on all Grapes that are still hanging, as directed last month. Where it becomes a necessity to introduce plants requiring water into vineries where the fruit still hangs...
-Grape Forcing. #4
In all vineries where the Grapes are not yet colouring, keep up a good supply of moisture in bright weather by frequent sprinklings of the paths and borders. Shut up as soon in the afternoon as the da...
-Grape Forcing. #5
Should the weather be hot and dry, late crops that are still swelling and near the colouring point should have another good watering, in order to keep them in healthy activity. Should a succession of ...
-Grape Forcing. #6
Where the wood of early Vines from which Grapes were all cut in May is thoroughly ripe, let all repairs in the way of painting, reglazing, and any alterations in the heating contemplated, be attended ...
-Grape Forcing. #7
All Grapes intended to hang through the winter should be ripe by the 1st of October; but it is to be feared, started at the usual period, they may be behind time this year. If so, let them be more fre...
-Grape Forcing. #8
Look over ripe Grapes at least twice weekly and remove all berries that are showing signs of decay, and let such bunches as exhibit a tendency to decay or shrivelling be sent to table first. Keep the ...
-Grape Forcing. #9
The fruit will now be all cut from the early houses, and no pains should be spared to keep the foliage healthy and fresh to the last. Red-spider must be prevented by frequent vigorous syringings, and ...
-Grape Thinning
It may appear out of place to call attention to a process which has been in practical operation ever since Grape cultivation was attempted. Grape thinning, though not requiring great muscular exertion...
-Grape-Setting
This subject has of late been discussed to a considerable extent in the various horticultural periodicals. Some of the writers, notably Mr Simpson of Wortley, has been the advocate of a liberal use of...
-Grapes
Has it ever occurred to our readers, that the largest, and in nearly every respect the finest, examples of Grapes that have appeared at our Horticultural shows, have not come from those districts wh...
-Grapes At Chatsworth
A collection of Grapes exhibited at the recent show of the Royal Horticultural Society at Oxford by Mr Speed, gardener to the Duke of Devonshire, which consisted of three remarkably fine, compact, and...
-Grapes At Pitcairlie
Three years ago we gave a brief memorandum, of the Grape-houses at Pitcairlie, and the prodigious crops which had been produced for so many years. Some thought we had, on that occasion, thrown the ha...
-Grapes At The Royal Horticultural Society, October 4
The 'Gardeners' Chronicle,' writing of these, says: - True, indeed, there was no foreign competition on this occasion, but even had there been, the splendid display made by Messrs Lane was such that ...
-Grapes Setting
In your valuable paper for July, your correspondent Subscriber attributes his Grapes not setting to their hanging over water; here there is an instance to the contrary. We have a good many of that ...
-Great Rose-Shows, Crystal Palace, June 19th; And Royal Horticultural Society, June 29th
Two fine shows, the latter the best - plenty of flowers, and these generally good; the season duly regarded. Rose exhibitions are always great successes if the weather be at all favourable; people wil...
-Greenfly On The Gooseberry
I venture, through the pages of 'The Gardener,' to ask its numerous readers if any of them have experienced any difficulty in keeping down this pernicious pest? For the last few years I have been very...
-Greenhouse And Conservatory
Greenhouse plants generally require more care during this month than at any other period, watering only when necessary; and to give enough requires practice how to ascertain this. With many plants the...
-Greenhouse Notes. Azaleas
It is unnecessary on my part to make any preliminary remarks regarding the Azalea in general; but it may not be out of place at the close of the flowering season to send you a few notes, from observat...
-Greenhouse Plants. No. I. - The Azalea
The varieties of this genus in cultivation at the present time are somewhat numerous, and all gardeners are acquainted with a greater or less number of them. The brilliancy and peculiar freshness exhi...
-Greenhouse Plants. No. II. - Correas
These plants are evergreen dwarf shrubs, of compact habit of growth, natives of Australia; and when properly treated, produce from the axils of the leaves, on the current year's shoots, their bright-c...
-Greenhouse Plants. No. III. - Eriostemons
A genus of evergreen dwarf shrubs, natives of Australia, producing their flowers in great profusion in this country during the spring and summer months. All the species in cultivation are of a free an...
-Greenhouse Plants. No. IV. - Chorozemas
Chorozemas are very beautiful, free - flowering, evergreen shrubs, natives of Australia. They are easily cultivated, and produce very freely their bright-coloured, pea-flower-shaped blossoms during th...
-Greenhouse Plants. No. V. - The Pimelea
The plants belonging to this genus are elegant evergreen dwarf shrubs; the majority of them are of a compact habit of growth, forming handsome symmetrical specimens without the aid of stakes or other ...
-Greenhouse Plants. No. VI. - The Boronia
All the species of this genus in cultivation are evergreen shrubs of dwarf growth. Their time of flowering in this country extends from the beginning of March until the end of June. The majority of th...
-Greenhouse Plants. No. VII. - Kalosanthes Coccinea
More than 150 years have passed away since this grand flowering-plant made its appearance in the greenhouses of Great Britain; and notwithstanding the large number of other kinds of beautiful flowerin...
-Greenhouse Plants. No. VIII. - The Acacia
A cheat number of species belonging to this genus are known to botanists. Several are natives of tropical regions; but those found growing in the more temperate parts of Australia are, from a horticul...
-Gros Colman Grape
Should any variety of late Grape in particular necessitate the practical application of Mr Henderson's appreciated remarks on Ripening late Grapes at page 61, it certainly is Gros Colman. When thor...
-Gunnersby Park, Acton, W
As will be seen in our notice of this place, Mr William Forsyth, who has filled the post of gardener to Baron Lionel de Rothschild, at Gunnersby, for the past twenty year3, is about retiring from the ...
-H. A
Sow the Peas you name at once. They should be sown about the middle of May to come in by the 1st of September in ordinary seasons. We are rather at a loss to know how to answer your other question, be...
-Haemanthus Cinnabarinum And H. Kalbreyeri
Haemanthus is a genus of Amaryllidaceae, and these two are very striking plants. They were introduced from the west coast of Africa, and are evergreen bulbous plants, the foliage of which, in general ...
-Hakdy Flowers
I am glad to see these shooting up out of the ground in the beds and borders everywhere. Bulbs are especially robust, as indeed is the rule after a sharp winter with much snow. The new seedling kinds ...
-Handbook Or Hardy Trees, Shrubs, And Herbaceous Plants
Containing descriptions, native countries, etc, of a selection of the best species in cultivation, with cultural details, etc, based on the French work of Messrs Decaisne & Naudin, including the origi...
-Hardy And Half-Hardy Plants For Table And Room Decoration
In general, hardy plants are not very much favoured in rooms. It is, perhaps, natural we should prefer the plants of warmer climates indoors, and those that are hardy out of doors; but we are not alwa...
-Hardy Clematises (Q. J.)
The best, most distinct, and most floriferous of Jackman's lot are Jackmannii and Rubella. Both of these you should have. Lady Bovill, which looks much better on paper than it was shown at Oxford by M...
-Hardy Flower Gardening At Bonnington
To those who cannot discern beauty or merit apart from a high degree of perfection, a visit to such a place as Bonnington will have little interest. The proprietor, Sir Charles Ross, not having resid...
-Hardy Fruits
The importance of cultivating these under a recognised system to give the best results is not at all so general and successful as might be expected. From the amount of information scattered broadcast ...
-Hardy Fruits. #2
Wherever pruning has not been finished - and in many cases it was almost impossible to finish the work, as frost set in so early and was continuous - but for the sake of getting the trees finished, al...
-Hardy Fruits. #3
The ground in which fruit-trees are growing might, with advantage, be tested as to the state of its drainage. This remark may apply more to orchards than gardens: the coating of moss over the bark of ...
-Hardy Fruits. #4
It is seldom that any pruning or planting of fruit-trees is left till April, but in some quarters such may be the case this season. Late planting will require more than ordinary care, and if the weath...
-Hardy Fruits. #5
The present month is generally a period of much anxiety among fruitgrowers, especially to those who make it a business and who in a great measure depend on the crops for their living. In this vast fru...
-Hardy Fruits. #6
With all the favourable reports from the great fruit-growing districts of the promise for fruit crops, and the singular lateness of the season which is likely to keep the flower-buds from opening, s...
-Hardy Fruits. #7
The destruction of insects is perhaps the most important matter requiring the attention of the fruit-cultivator at this year. Black-fly, green-fly, and caterpillars have all been well represented this...
-Hardy Fruits. #8
The time has arrived when all planting of fruit-trees should be brought to a close as speedily as possible. Though this may be done, and in some cases extensively, between November and April, it is an...
-Hardy Fruits. #9
To say much about these will be a recapitulation of the past few months' practice. Many, however, do not think of planting their fruit-trees before this month and onwards, and we have more than once p...
-Hardy Fruits - August
The season has now arrived when special preparation must be made to do what is necessary towards securing fruit for next year. Every tree should be examined, to see that the wood is hard, short jointe...
-Hardy Fruits - December
Fruit-trees ought now to be all planted, mulched over their roots, and safe for the winter, and stakes placed to keep them secure from wind. Former hints as to draining, trenching, and surface-dressin...
-Hardy Fruits - October
Attention to gathering of Apples, Pears, and Nuts is now an important matter. The fruit-room, or wherever storage is, should be dry, free from any impurity, and vermin should be thoroughly eradicated,...
-Hardy Fruits - September
Trees may be expected to form growths very late this season; and where ground is rich and deep, and not very firm, the evil will be increased. The growths should be stopped in a systematic manner, goi...
-Hardy Orchids
A few years ago I received a quantity of plants from Italy, chiefly composed of varieties of Orchis and Ophrys. They - i.e., the Orchi-daceee - were all lifted during the period of growth, many while ...
-Hardy Permanent Edgings
It is surprising how constantly we require to be learning. It seems that while we are ever learning, we are, at the same time, ever forgetting; and while, on the whole, we may be adding to our stock o...
-Hardy Plants In And Out Of Doors
We are in the habit of comparing, rather unfavourably, our hardy plants with our indoor exotics, looking upon the former as coarser than the latter, and less attractive generally; but the comparison i...
-Hardy Winter Gardening
I have been much pleased with your article on Hardy Winter Gardening in 'The Gardener' for December and as I have been for some years creeping on on the same lines, I think some of my experience may...
-Haricot Beans
Unfortunately these are not in request in many establishments. I say unfortunately, for it is a matter of regret they are not, as they give a variety to the list of vegetables daily required, at a tim...
-Harrison's Musk For Beds
This is a charming plant for pot-culture, and the numbers of it sold in pots are immense, but to see it in its most effective dress it must be seen as a bedding-plant. In brilliancy it eclipses the we...
-Heatherslde Rival Cucumber
We have received from Messrs Peter Law-son & Son a new Cucumber with the above name, which appears to be as near perfection as a Cucumber can be. It grows from 18 to 24 inches long, very round and pe...
-Heaths
The soft-wooded varieties of the above rank high as winter and spring blooming plants, and their being almost hardy makes them more valuable. From necessity we had a quantity which stood all last wint...
-Heating And Ventilating
It would be difficult to name two more important or sternly-practical operations connected with Horticulture, than those represented by the couplet with which we have headed these observations. Heat...
-Heating By Hot Water
Although hot water circulating in pipes has been adopted and recognised for many years past as the best system of warming plant-houses, yet there exists at the present time, among hot-water engineers ...
-Heating By Hot Water. #2
In 'The Gardener' of last month we have an interesting paper from Mr Hammond on heating by hot water. All who have to do with deep, and in too many cases imperfectly drained, stokeholes will agree wit...
-Heating By Hot Water. #3
Having for the last few years spent considerable time in experimenting on the circulation of hot water (as an amateur), I was pleased to read Mr Hammond's remarks in the February number of ' The Garde...
-Heating By Hot Water. #3. Continued
We will now look into C. M.'s paper. In reference to my statement that the particles of water are unable to transmit heat to one another, C. M. asks, if this be so, How does it come to pass that wat...
-Heating By Hot Water. #4
THE discussion on the above subject is increasing in force. If it goes on much longer, 'The Gardener' will be in danger of exploding, unless provided with a safety-valve. In the issue for April two of...
-Heating By Hot Water. #5
Your correspondents Mr Inglis and C. M. cannot agree with Mr Hammond's theory of the circulation of hot water in pipes; and, as you remark, it is quite evident that this is a subject that requires to...
-Heating By Hot Water. #6
I Allow me to reply as briefly as I can to Mr Hammond's article in the ' Gardener' for May, where he criticises my letter in the preceding number. In answer to my question, Why water transmitted its...
-Heating By Hot Water. #6. Part 2
II Mr Hammond has failed, I think, to bring anything forward of material value in support of his views on the circulation of hot water. He seems to have been more anxious to point out that there is n...
-Heating By Hot Water. #6. Part 3
IV The interesting discussion now taking place in The Gardener' on heating by hot water will be the means of showing to a great extent whether deep stokeholes are a necessity or not; and I am in a p...
-Heating By Hot Water. #7
In reference to C. M.'s last paper on the above subject, I have to remark in the first place that if it had not been for the two last sentences in it, I would not have taken any notice of the others...
-Heating By Hot Water. #7. Part 2
Expansion, however, is from the centre, and acts with equal force in all directions, therefore all parts of a steam-boiler are made, or ought to be, equally strong. C. M. says the relatively heavie...
-Heating By Hot Water. #7. Part 3
Therefore, whatever the velocity may be in an apparatus at 10 feet of height, this is increased by the difference between 96.6 and 136.2; or, in other words, by increasing the height from 10 to 20 fee...
-Heating By Hot Water. #7. Part 4
To satisfy those of your readers who have taken the trouble to follow this discussion, and whose tastes and habits of thought have not led them to investigate the matter, I may state that in a heating...
-Heating By Hot Water. #7. Part 5
I find that Mr Hood, in his ' Treatise,' p. 12, thus refers to it: Some persons have imagined that if the pipes be inclined so as to allow a gradual fall of the water in its return to the boiler, add...
-Heating By Hot Water. #7. Part 6
R. Inglis predicts that a greater quantity of water would flow if the pipes were to ascend instead of descending on leaving the boiler. One of the houses I alluded to in the May number has equal to ...
-Heating By Hot Water. #8
Allow me to make a few more remarks on this question, and I am done with it, as I think the matter may now be safely left in the hands of Mr Hammond and his opponents. This I shall do as briefly as po...
-Heating By Hot Water. #8. Part 2
The second compartment is cooler still; and to show the difference between the first and third, we may say that during last winter, when the heat in the former was above 40, the frost was in the ...
-Heating By Hot Water. #8. Part 3
A second time Mr Makenzie says he will show that increasing the difference of the temperature between the water as it leaves the boiler and in the returning column acts exactly in the same manner as ...
-Heating By Hot Water. #9
I do not intend to encroach upon your space to discuss further what has been termed the side issues of this question, as they are comparatively unimportant. Mr Hammond differs from me when I say that ...
-Heating By Hot Water. #9. Part 2
Mr Hammond wishes, in his last, to confine the discussion to two points. Respecting the first, he gives some reasons why he says no; but I fail to see an explanation in any of his letters as to how mo...
-Heating By Hot Water. #9. Part 3
Mr Hammond and some others asserted that a continuous or vertical rise is a hindrance to the circulation, and is the cause of repeated failures in the working of hot-water apparatus. I repeat that I c...
-Heating By Hot Water. #10
Notwithstanding the editorial note at the end of the papers on the above subject in the September issue of 'The Gardener,' I ask room for the following remarks. I would not have made this request if M...
-Heating By Hot Water. #10. Continued
The annexed figure will show how to heat a lean-to range of any number of compartments without sinking the boiler more than 1 foot below the floor on which the main body of the piping is laid. A, Boi...
-Heating, Ventilating, And Cabbage Culture
As you inform your readers that you wish to have their opinion of your leader on Heat and Ventilation, I beg leave to advise you to have it put in stereotype, and let it appear monthly so long as yo...
-Herbaceous Bulbs
It will be necessary to explain what we mean by herbaceous bulbs. Of course, all bulbs are herbaceous, none are shrubby or woody: all are more or less annual in their parts; at least, the same actual ...
-Herbaceous Paeonias
In a season like the present, when the general run of bedding-plants are at this date (15th July) no bigger, but in many instances actually smaller, than when they were planted out, certain herbaceous...
-Herbaceous Plants
Summer-flowering subjects, such as Pyrethrums. Lupinus polyphyllus in variety, Delphiniums, early-flowering Phloxes, and others, if cleared of old flower-stems when these are getting over, will in mos...
-Hibiscus Cooperii
This beautiful stove-plant, which ought to be in every collection, is a native of New Caledonia. The leaves are about 3 inches in length and 2 in breadth, ovate, acute at the apex, and finely variegat...
-Hibiscus Moscheutos
This is a Canadian swamp-plant of very showy character. It grows about 3 feet high or more in moist damp loam. The flowers are very large, purplish pink, the petals being blotched with crimson at the ...
-Hibiscus Syriacus (The Syrian Hibiscus). Ornamental Trees And Shrubs
This is one of a large and very varied genus, consisting of evergreen and deciduous trees and shrubs, along with a considerable number of herbaceous plants and annuals. The various species are found d...
-Hints For Amateurs
The long-continued frosty weather may have kept some behind with many of the more important garden operations, which will in a great measure be a barrier to success. When land is tenacious and heavy, ...
-Hints For Amateurs. #2
Some trees on south walls may now require disbudding. This work should be done piecemeal, first taking off those shoots which are growing out from the walls, topping back the stronger ones, and where ...
-Hints For Amateurs. November
Now that winter is fast approaching, much of what is termed the rough work of the garden should be carried forward without delay. It is too often the case with amateur gardeners to be in a miserable...
-Hints For Amateurs. November. Continued
Planting of fruit-trees should be finished as soon as possible. Though we have often planted from October up till April, it was more from necessity than choice. In frosty weather there should be no pl...
-Hints For Amateurs. November. #2
In highly cultivated gardens, November is generally a busy month, as the work for a future season may be said to fairly commence then. There is also much storing to be done, and protecting and clearin...
-Hints For Amateurs. November. #2. Continued
Asparagus is also come-at-able by every one, as it only requires packing closely and tightly in a little good earth in a box: a glass light over it, and manure round it for warmth, will soon start the...
-Hints For Amateurs. November. #3
While weather is suitable for planting, it should be pushed forward without delay. Though trees are planted every month between October and April, there is a proper time, and that is before winter fai...
-Hints For Amateurs. November. #4
Whatever is to be done to improve the fruit-garden should have attention as early as possible. Moss-covered branches are great evils; scraping and washing with lime-water or brine will destroy the pes...
-Hints For Amateurs. April
In gardens where operations are as forward as they should be, every part will now begin to assume a spring-like appearance. Where time will allow, borders which have been turned up roughly may now be ...
-Hints For Amateurs. April. Continued
The last dry season it was exceedingly fine on ordinary soil. All roots, however, do best on deep well-worked soil free from fresh manure. Carrots may be sown for a main crop. A good plot of Carrots i...
-Hints For Amateurs. April. #2
Where fruit-trees have received their annual dressing, and are now properly secured to their places on the walls, etc, and standards (which may have been left unpruned to keep a supply of fruit-buds ...
-Hints For Amateurs. August
At this season, in most gardens, watering (with liquid manure if it can be had) may be done freely among all growing crops, especially Pease, Cabbage, Cauliflower, and Lettuce, which are expected to t...
-Hints For Amateurs. August. #2
Whatever may be the diversity of opinion among cultivators in regard to the summer management of fruit-trees, the practice of divesting them of all useless growths when active growth has ceased is gen...
-Hints For Amateurs. August. #3
In the fruit-garden there will be much annoyance from the depredations of insects and birds. Early Plums and Cherries are among the favourites of winged visitors, and, when they are not promptly cover...
-Hints For Amateurs. August. #4
Where attention has been given to close cropping, every part of the vegetable garden will be well filled up, and the produce in great abundance. While we advocate profusion, we have no sympathy with...
-Hints For Amateurs. December
We may expect soon to receive the usual seed-catalogues, reminding us that we will have to consider our wants for the coming season; and where economy is an object (and it should be in every garden), ...
-Hints For Amateurs. December. Continued
Those in frames require plenty of fresh air, clean, well-stirred surfaces, and no water, except when absolutely necessary. Chicory lifted, trimmed, and placed in heat to blanch like Seakale, will soon...
-Hints For Amateurs. December. #2
If the weather should remain mild, and not too wet, garden operations may be hurried forward as directed last month. We again repeat that the success of vegetable growers mainly results from properly ...
-Hints For Amateurs. December. #3
Where all leaves are off trees, bedding-plants trenched down, refuse of crops cleared away, and the garden comparatively bare, it is easily seen where the strength of the cultivator lies. In summer, ...
-Hints For Amateurs. December. #4
The pruning of all kinds of fruit-trees and bushes requires attention as early as time can be spared. It is not well to prune trees, especially those of vigorous growth, when frost is severe: Peaches ...
-Hints For Amateurs. February
This month, when weather is fine, cropping of ground may in the smallest garden be fairly commenced. Arrangements, if not already made, as to how the garden is to be cropped, should be decided upon, s...
-Hints For Amateurs. February. Continued
Parsnips still in the ground may be lifted soon and allowed to become dry on their surfaces; they may then be placed in a shed thinly, and some dry straw thrown over them. Cabbage may be planted when...
-Hints For Amateurs. February. #2
It may not be out of place at this season to mention a few of the most useful sorts of vegetables for the benefit of the inexperienced, and others who have to make their choice from catalogues for the...
-Hints For Amateurs. February. #3
In the fruit-garden all arrears should be brought forward, and as soon as possible all nailing, pruning, mulching, clearing off moss from bark, dressing the wood with Gishurst compound, etc., to keep ...
-Hints For Amateurs. February. #4
Pruning and tying up trees will be like other operations - much retarded by the continued wet weather. All this work should now be carried on briskly, as every day will bring abundance of work with it...
-Hints For Amateurs. Flower-Garden
Valuable kinds of plants in open ground are not safe from frost at this season, and should be lifted and potted, or protected at night. Propagating should be brought to a close as early as circumstanc...
-Hints For Amateurs. Greenhouse And Conservatory
There should now be a good preparation of soil in dry quarters to be ready for use. During this month much potting may be done, and a store of peat, loam, charcoal, sand, and healthy well-rotted leaf-...
-Hints For Amateurs. Hardy Fruits
It is seldom that experienced fruit - farmers plant orchards at this season; neither do practical gardeners often commit a mistake in this manner, though frequently they are, not from choice, compelle...
-Hints For Amateurs. Hardy Fruits. #2
It will now be generally known what the crops of fruits are to be. Except in the case of those which are not right at their roots, and liable to throw off the greater portion of what have set, one may...
-Hints For Amateurs. Hardy Fruits. #3
There is always plenty of work among these for the enthusiast at this season. Thinning, topping, syringing off insects, and maybe a good soaking of water for young trees especially, will do much to he...
-Hints For Amateurs. Hardy Fruits. #4
A general overhauling of the whole stock may now be made. Many are the systems adopted with pruning and trimming in the autumn, which come to much the same thing in the end. Some enthusiastic friends ...
-Hints For Amateurs. Hardy Fruits. #5
The gathering and storing of fruits is often attended with much anxiety, it being of great moment to have them dry and free from injury when taken under cover. Very late kinds should not be gathered t...
-Hints For Amateurs. Hardy Fruits. #6
Most cultivators prefer this season for the planting of fruit-trees and bushes, and where it could not be performed by the end of October the sooner it is in hand the better. It is well when one can g...
-Hints For Amateurs. January
The experience from the past dry season will be profitable to many of us. It should teach us to be. as far as we can, provided against difficulties to be met in future. We have seen many gardens durin...
-Hints For Amateurs. January. #2
We have repeatedly urged the necessity of thoroughly turning up ground in which seeds are to be sown early; and those who have allowed vacant ground to remain untouched should after this season lose n...
-Hints For Amateurs. January. #2. Continued
Where tree-leaves, manure, etc, are plentiful, a quantity may be thrown up and mixed together: and when the heat is moderate, the whole may be thrown into a bed, building it square, and a little large...
-Hints For Amateurs. January. #3
At this season of the year, perhaps more than at any other, garden operations depend on the state of the weather; and when there is frost and snow, work under cover should be found. There is much can ...
-Hints For Amateurs. January. #3. Part 2
The former has a fine appearance in winter, and is easily trimmed, but it requires poor soil to grow in. Hedges may be cleaned at the roots and trimmed: where repairs are necessary, allow plenty of s...
-Hints For Amateurs. January. #4
Pruning, nailing up shoots to walls and fences, clearing off moss from bark of trees, lifting and replanting bushes, are some of the important operations when weather is mild; but we would neither pla...
-Hints For Amateurs. July
Much of the work in the vegetable garden at present will be, carrying out what could not be attended to last month - such as the planting out of Broccoli, Kale, Brussels Sprouts, Celery, Leeks, and ma...
-Hints For Amateurs. July. Continued
Pears on walls should have the shoots pulled off altogether where the spurs are already too thick. Sun and air are of great importance in preparing the trees for fruiting next year. All growths should...
-Hints For Amateurs. July. #2
Many of the Brassica tribe of plants for winter supply will now be out and growing rapidly, if all has gone well. With us, growth never was more rapid. The hoe and fork will now be required more than ...
-Hints For Amateurs. July. #3
It will be seen now, or before this, that where the best promise for a crop of fruit was observed in early spring it will now be very moderate. Where flower-buds were unusually thick and the trees in ...
-Hints For Amateurs. July. #3. Continued
Layering (we mention the operation in detail as usual for beginners) is cutting the bottom leaves off, leaving those on three or four upper joints. On the bottom of stem, between two joints, draw the ...
-Hints For Amateurs. June
If the weather should be very dry this month, there will be difficulty in dealing with very sandy or strong clay soils, so much will be ready for planting; and if the plants should stand long in the s...
-Hints For Amateurs. June. #2
Stone-fruits will now require much attention. To keep the foliage clean and growths regular, frequent syringings, judicious disbudding, and stopping are necessary. An active hand accustomed to the wor...
-Hints For Amateurs. June. #3
Fruit-trees, where in health, will now be making growth; and where space is to be filled up, steps should now be taken to secure that end. Direct as many shoots as may be required over the empty wall,...
-Hints For Amateurs. June. #4
There will be much to do in the vegetable garden this month in the way of planting out (for winter) the main crops of Kale, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, and Savoys; also succession crops of Lettuce, Ca...
-Hints For Amateurs. June. #4. Continued
Peaches left at the rate of 1 foot apart all over the trees (and much less on weakly ones) will be a good crop: 9 inches apart is enough for Nectarines, and 6 inches for Plums. Though the latter are o...
-Hints For Amateurs. March
There are perhaps more seeds sown during this month and next than all the remainder of the season, and it may be of use for beginners to have a few brief remarks on seed-sowing. When we read the instr...
-Hints For Amateurs. March. Continued
Celery may be sown towards the end of the month: it requires protection and a little warmth; dryness, or a check from cold winds, is liable to cause it to run to seed. A hand-light, or small box with ...
-Hints For Amateurs. March. #2
There should be little work left to be done among fruit-trees this month; but often a press of work elsewhere prevents some from doing what is required at the proper time. We have often planted late i...
-Hints For Amateurs. March. #2. Continued
Hints For Amateurs. March #1 All arrears among- fruit-trees should be brought forward - better to do it late than that it should be neglected. This applies to fruit-tree planting, - better to do it y...
-Hints For Amateurs. May
Where ground is extensive in proportion to the hands employed to carry on the operations, much energy and tact will be required to keep the work forward, which will (for a time) increase daily. Weeds ...
-Hints For Amateurs. May. Continued
Less trouble with Chicory is necessary, as the young tops blanched in winter is all that is wanted; we find this one of our most valuable salads in winter, especially if Lettuces and Endive are scarce...
-Hints For Amateurs. May. #2
The past mild winter, cold biting March, and the warm weather we have experienced in April, have given us a hint not to put too much dependence in what may seem to tempt us to leave tender plants of...
-Hints For Amateurs. May. #2. Part 2
Carrots thinned out 4 inches apart will be enough for drawing young, but 8 to 12 inches in good ground is not too much for the larger-growing kinds. Beet will do well at 8 inches apart. Parsnips we th...
-Hints For Amateurs. May. #2. Part 3
Lawns and walks require close attention to keep them in good order. Mowing frequently, and rolling after showers, will keep this part of the grounds in good condition. A watering with guano-water, at ...
-Hints For Amateurs. May. #3
While there is much pressing work at this season, fruit-trees are often allowed to take their chance. We always consider this a very important time to get trees into even growth, and secure the necess...
-Hints For Amateurs. October
Much time and attention will now be required where gardens are to be kept free from litter, falling and decaying leaves, which offend the eye as well as the sense of smell. All the Brassica tribe of p...
-Hints For Amateurs. October. #2
Fruits, such as Morello and Belle Agathe Cherries, late Plums, Red Currants, and others liable to the attack of insects, etc, will require frequent attention; better to use them for culinary purposes ...
-Hints For Amateurs. October. #2. Continued
After the flower-garden is cleared, Tulips, Hyacinths, Narcissus, and plenty of Crocus, may be planted. The different colours arranged effectually, such aa white edging purple or blue, yellow round pu...
-Hints For Amateurs. October. #3
During the past season we have read and heard much of drought, mildew, and failures among many of the principal garden crops - such as Peas, Cauliflowers, Turnips, Spinach, etc. Where manure is scarce...
-Hints For Amateurs. September
There is much that is pleasant at this season in well-kept gardens. Order, of course, should be stamped on every part of the grounds. Plots should be well filled with vegetables; and every flower-bed ...
-Hints For Amateurs. September. Continued
Cucumbers and Melons will require careful attention, now that nights are becoming colder. Keep up a regular heat by linings or otherwise. Water, when required, should be given in the mornings. Sprinkl...
-Hints For Amateurs. September. #2
When so many crops at this season are likely to be past use, the vegetable garden is liable to become untidy. Peas, Beans, Scarlet Runners, Potatoes, etc, will be turning in for use quickly; and if th...
-Hints For Amateurs. September. #3
It is not uncommon at this season for those who intend planting fruit-trees during the next and following months, to go to the nursery they intend purchasing their trees from, to inspect the stock and...
-Hints For Amateurs. September. #4
Now is an excellent time to prepare for fruit-tree planting. If time will admit, large spaces should be dug out to hold a quantity of fresh earth; chopped turf 4 inches thick is very suitable. If the ...
-Hints For The Winter, Etc
A HARD winter and dear coals: the former of these conditions is possible; the latter, judging from the present aspect of the coal trade, is certain. The combination is of a character that must of nece...
-Hints On Orchids
A friend deeply interested in Orchids tells me that he finds cocoa-nut fibre and charcoal the simplest and best compost for all such Orchids as Cypripediums, Dendrobiums such as D. nobile, D. hetero-c...
-Hints On Potting Plants
Nothing can be more opportune, or more useful to amateur cultivators of plants, than some suggestions in relation to this very important topic. In potting plants that require any cutting or pruning, t...
-Hints On The Culture of The Cineraria From Offsets Or Cuttings
In response to the Editor's solicitation, I venture to detail my treatment of the above; and in doing so, I do not mean to think that I will write anything that will be new to the bulk of your readers...
-Hints On The Formation And Improvement Of Garden Lawns, Croquet-Grounds, Cricket-Grounds, Etc
A good close velvety turf is one of the most ornamental objects dressed ground can boast of, and oftentimes the most difficult to obtain. The following suggestions, based on many years' practical expe...
-Hints On The Heating Of Forcing-Houses
Before the trials of the past winter are forgotten in the warmth and sunshine that may be expected soon, it may not be out of place to make one or two allusions to certain matters in forcing operation...
-Hints for Amateurs. - March
Cultivators who know the value of March dust will not lose any time in forwarding any garden operations still left undone, and be ready to take advantage of the first dry weather suitable for seed-s...
-Hints for Amateurs. - March. Continued
Where ridges have been thrown up to the frost, the width at which the Potatoes are to be planted, it answers well to place a little kindly soil in the ridges - such as leaf-mould, old mushroom - dung,...
-Horizontally Trained Peach-Trees
In Hints for Amateurs last month, M. T. says: Horizontal training answers capitally for every kind of fruit we know. Pears, Plums, Peaches, and Apricots we have trained in this form with the view...
-Horticultural Breakers
I think it was the younger Stephenson who was taught by nature herself the practical axiom, never to contend directly with nature, but to speak her fair and stroke her canny wi' the hair. In construct...
-Horticultural Congress
We are authorised to state that the Horticultural Congress, proposed some time since in our columns, will be held under the auspices of the Royal Horticultural Society, and under the management of a s...
-Horticultural Energy
THERE are not many things impossible to human energy. So spoke the Earl of Derby at the banquet of the Manchester Horticultural Exhibition, in perhaps the most interesting and sensible speech that ev...
-Horticultural Exhibitions
The meetings of the Royal Horticultural Society are practically exhibitions, as they always produce something worth looking at. The December meeting, though held only four days before Christmas, and w...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. #2
As yet, the Royal Horticultural Society is alone in the field; but with the month of March the Royal Botanic Society will commence a series of five exhibitions announced. The meeting of the Royal Hort...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. #3
The ordinary meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society of the 2d of March can only be briefly noticed, though there were many points of interest. One of the prime features was the Camellias in pots, ...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. #4
The Royal Horticultural Society of Ireland held a show of Hyacinths and early spring flowers at the Rotunda, Dublin, on the 24th of March, when the amateur cultivators round Dublin came out in strong ...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. #5
The monthly record of shows commences with that held at South Kensington, by the Royal Horticultural Society on the 20th of April. This one of the series of small but interesting bi-monthly exhibition...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. #6
In this concluding chapter we propose saying a few words upon horticultural exhibitions. We have been connected with these public exhibitions for many years, and we are fully impressed with their uti...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Crystal Palace
In the order of dates, the next great exhibition in the London district took place at the Crystal Palace, Sydenham, on Saturday the 15th of May. There was a falling off in some things - probably the f...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Crystal Palace, Sydenham, May 21
A grand Show was the general comment made on this fine Exhibition, and it was well deserved. The collections of stove and greenhouse plants were very fine, and, as a matter of course, much admired. ...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Dundee Horticultural Society, September 1
This Society held its annual meeting on this date in the Baxter Park, with results most gratifying to all connected or interested in its success. The show was contained in three tents, situated near t...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Botanic Society, June 22
This was another very poor show, altogether unlike the displays that used to be made here a few years ago. So much has the schedule been cut down, that exhibitors scarcely care to bring their plants; ...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Botanic Society, London
The first summer exhibition was held in the Botanic Gardens, Regent Park, May 25th and 26th. The great Whitsuntide exhibition at Manchester opened on the 26th, with greater inducements for exhibitors,...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Botanic Society, Regent's Park, April 27
This was the second of the small spring shows, but so meagre was the tent room provided that a good many of the plants had to be placed in the conservatory, and visitors came upon them quite unexpecte...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Botanic Society, Regent's Park, June 30
This, in all probability, closes the large exhibitions of the Royal Botanic Society. It is stated that they have not been financial successes, and in consequence they are to be abolished. It was in al...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Botanic Society, Regent's Park, June 30. Continued
Mr Parker of Tooting was placed equal second with the above; in his collection were Cypripedium superbius, with four grand flowers; two good spikes of Oncidium divaricatum, and Lajlia Brysiana, with f...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society, December 11
Taking the effects of the season into consideration, the fruit at this show was exceedingly-good, many of the late Grapes showing fine finish, but to the Pine-apples must be awarded the palm for size ...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Horticultural Society - Fruit And Floral Meeting, July 19th
On this occasion a new feature was introduced in the shape of Dephiniums, Pentstemon, Phloxes, Lobelia fulgens, and Herbaceous plants cultivated in pots. There was, however, no competition in any of t...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Horticultural Society's Great Provincial Show, At Oxford, July 19-22
This show took place in the grounds of the Radcliffe Observatory, a place very suitable for it, as it was pleasantly situated, nicely sheltered by trees, and the site far less rough than at Manchester...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Great Provincial Show, At Oxford, July 19-22. Continued
The special prizes offered by Sir A. W. Peyton, Bart., for 6 tricolored Pelargoniums, brought another close competition between Messrs Welch and Stevens the former being placed first. The attempt ...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Horticultural Society's Great Summer Show, South Kensington, June 2d And 3d
This was a grand exhibition. Competent judges were agreed that it brought together the finest list of plants seen for a long time. But how can magnificent plants be seen to advantage in these horrible...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Great Summer Show, South Kensington, June 2d And 3d. Continued
New Roses were shown in good condition by Mr Turner and Messrs Paul & Son. In the former's collection Paul Verdier, Souvenir de Monsieur Boll, Horace Ver-net, and Princess Mary of Cambridge were in fi...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Horticultural Society's, London, First Spring Show
On March 13th the battle of the floral exhibitions opened for the present season. Hyacinths were the prime feature, and they were produced to an extent almost unprecedented in a London show. In additi...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Horticultural Society, November 1
On this occasion prizes were offered for Chrysanthemums, out-of-door Grapes, and Potatoes. The meeting for November is usually fixed for the first Wednesday in the month; and this, even in the most fa...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Horticultural Society, September 20
There were but few prizes offered by the Society, and little or no competition in any of the classes. Begonias, Celosias, Penstemons, Stocks, Zinnias, etc, were the subjects invited. Fruit Committee ...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Horticultural Society, September 7th
Dahlias, Asters, and Verbenas were invited as cut flowers. There were also Liliums and Asters in pots; these, with the numerous flowers and fruit sent to the committees, entirely filled the council-ro...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Horticultural Society, South Kensington, Nov. 2
On this occasion prizes were offered for 6 large flowering Chrysanthemums, the first prize being awarded to Mr Rowe, gardener to Mr Lewis, Rochampton, for Lady Talfourd; Mrs G. Rundle, a lovely white ...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. Royal Horticultural Society, South Kensington, October 5
At the periodical meetings of this Society prizes are offered for a few things, and though the amounts of these are not very large, they generally occasion a smart competition. On this occasion the fu...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. The Royal Horticultural Society Of London
The last meeting for 1870 of the Fruit and Floral Committee of the Royal Horticultural Society was held on Wednesday, December 7. It was a very successful meeting. Not many Orchids and tender plants w...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. The Royal Horticultural Society's Show At Nottingham
For many months past this independent visit of the Royal Horticultural Society to the province of Nottingham had been earnestly and anxiously talked of, written about, and arranged for. The marked suc...
-Horticultural Exhibitions. The Royal Horticultural Society, April 5
Cyclamens and Cinerarias were the principal subjects invited at this meeting: it is too late in the season for the former, and the latter were shown in second-rate order only, so that they were of min...
-Horticulture For Cottagers
HAVE we recently passed a Horticultural Reform Bill, or, if not, what mean this sudden awakening, on the part of certain great ones, to the knowledge that our cottagers are horticulturally ignorant?...
-Hot-Water Circulation
It is not likely that anything new can be added to what is already known on the subject of hot-water circulation - the whole matter has again been made plain by your correspondent, Mr J. Inglis. The h...
-Hoteia (Spiraea) Japonica
Can scarcely be had in large enough quantities where there is great demand for cut flowers, and its foliage is a good substitute for Fern-leaves when they are scarce. It also stands long in the conser...
-Hoteia Japonica
This gracefully pretty plant, so very liable to get injured by late frost in spring in most parts of Scotland and northern England, is a very good subject for room and table decoration. It may be very...
-Hothouse Shelving; Cheap, Phofitable, And Good
It is my intention here to apply the above terms to the system of lining hothouse shelves with zinc, but more particularly forcing-houses, where I think it is essential. It is not my intention to enla...
-Hottonia
So far as is at present known, this pretty and interesting genus of aquatic plants comprises only two species - the one a native of North America, and unknown to cultivators in this country; the other...
-How I Grow My Asters
I AM both a grower and exhibitor of the Aster, and at the end of the season I take up my pen to detail my experiences of the sorts I, during the summer, took in hand for the purpose of growing for exh...
-How I Grow My Cinerarias
In recent numbers of the 'Gardener' a good deal has been written about this most useful spring and winter flowering greenhouse plant, and as I value it highly and grow it by the hundred from seed, I w...
-How I Raise My Pelargoniums From Seed
I think the details of my plan likely to be interesting to any one, who, like myself, is fond of raising Pelargoniums from seed; and those who have not yet attempted to do so may be led to try the exp...
-How Our Broccoli Crop Was Saved
When the critical reader - all gardeners are critical - has scanned these lines, he will probably be disgusted at having such an old-fashioned plan brought to his notice. But this, like some more old-...
-How To Grow Onions For Competition
Sow them in a forcing-pit or hot-frame about the beginning of February. About six weeks thereafter place them in 3-inch pots - one in each pot - filled with rotten turf and leaf-mould - two parts of t...
-How To Grow Pot-Roses
Many elaborate directions for the preparation of Roses for pot-culture are given by various authorities, but they all resolve themselves into two principles - to get strong plants, and to place them p...
-How To Make The Most Of Wall - Borders In Kitchen-Gardens. No. VII. Successional Crops
Although I have previously written at considerable length under the heading of Useful Successional Crops, I may perhaps be allowed to briefly recapitulate my experience, adding any fresh hints that ...
-How To Make The Most Of Wall-Borders In Kitchen - Gardens. No. X. Pearlies And Nectarines
Outdoor crops of these having been unusually good, both in quantity and quality - at all events in the southern and midland counties of England - the demand for young trees will inevitably be extraord...
-How To Make The Most Of Wall-Borders In Kitchen-Gardens. No. II
When commencing these papers, I intended to treat of each border separately, making suggestions in detail both upon the first and suc-cessional crops. This would have been much the simplest; but the c...
-How To Make The Most Of Wall-Borders In Kitchen-Gardens. No. III
Although calendars of garden operations are included in most horticultural periodicals, and some of them, doubtless, are instructive, it is questionable if they do not at times mislead many that are i...
-How To Make The Most Of Wall-Borders In Kitchen-Gardens. No. V. North Borders
The aim of all good gardeners is to extend the duration of crops, whether of fruit or vegetables, over as great a period as possible, various schemes being resorted to as circumstances may suggest. A ...
-How To Make The Most Of Wall-Borders In Kitchen-Gardens. No. VI
In many well-managed gardens, where there is a great demand for forced flowers especially, the wall-borders are made to play an important part in the preparation of the plants for that purpose. Very m...
-How To Make The Most Of Wall-Borders In Kitchen-Gardens. No. VIII
At the commencement of these papers I took occasion to point out how, in many instances, the wall-borders are far too narrow to rightly admit of being cropped with vegetables, as the preparation for t...
-How To Make The Most of Wall - Borders In Kitchen-Gardens. No. I
The most profitable parts of kitchen-gardens generally are, or at all events should be, the borders near the walls - more especially those with a southern or western aspect. All alike can be put to a ...
-How To Obtain Roses On Their Own Roots
I have read in a contemporary an article under the heading of Roses for Hedges. This is a good idea - one I, as an old Rose cultivator, have long believed in and practised. The month of November, in...
-Hursley Park And Gardens, Winchester, The Seat Of Sir William Heathcote, Bart
The visitor from the direction of Southampton will find, at this season of the year, a pleasant walk from the station at Chandler's Ford to the lower lodge entrance to this fine domain; and having gai...
-Hursley Park And Gardens, Winchester, The Seat Of Sir William Heathcote, Bart. Continued
The growth and preservation of the Ailanthus silkworm, as carried out at Hursley Park, under the immediate superintendence of Lady Heathcote, is simply experimental in its character, but its value for...
-Hyacinths Worth Growing
Subjoined is a list of the best Hyacinths exhibited this year at the London shows, and also at the Exhibition of Spring Flowers at the Crystal Palace by Messrs Downie, Laird, & Laing, of Forest Hill: ...
-Hyacinths, Narcissus, And Tulips
I class these altogether, as the in-treatment is much alike. To have them early, the bulbs should be potted as soon as possible in light rich loam, with a little sand and cow-dung which has been lying...
-Hyacinthus
It is unnecessary to mention the varieties of II. orientalis, which are so universally grown in pots and bedded out in the flower-garden; but this paper would be incomplete without a notice of H. amet...
-Hybrid Perpetuals
Taking the numbers in cultivation into consideration, this is the most popular of all classes of Roses; and we are glad to learn that those ugly standards with long stems and tufts of heads are fast g...
-Hybrid Rhododendrons
Every year the true admirers of beautiful plants are becoming more and more enamoured with the splendour displayed in hybrid Rhododendrons. Their utility in the open ground as decorative plants is so ...









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