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The Gardener V2 | by William Thomson



Tips and Articles on Gardening. Articles I-R.

TitleThe Gardener V2
AuthorWilliam Thomson
PublisherWilliam Blackwood And Sons
Year1869
Copyright1869, William Blackwood And Sons
AmazonThe New Organic Grower: A Master's Manual of Tools and Techniques for the Home and Market Gardener

A Magazine Of Horticulture And Floriculture

Edited By William Thomson, Dalkeith Gardens, Author Of 'a Practical Treatise On The Culture Of The Grape Vine'

-Iberis Corifolia
This is one of the dwarfest and most beautiful of the genus. The foliage is of a deep olive-green colour, and if propagated by means of cuttings annually, no more compact plant can be imagined, - the ...
-Imantophyllum Miniatum
This is a grand spring plant, and not so much grown as it ought to be. When grown in 6 and 8 inch pots, they are found most useful for decorative purposes when in bloom. After flowering in early spri...
-Imantophyllum Miniatum. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
The above is a plant that no collection, however small, should be without one or more of; it is one of the most serviceable greenhouse plants we have, either for house, table, or conservatory decorati...
-Improved Pruning And Training Of Fruit-Trees, Or Extension Versus Restriction
By John Simpson, Wortley Hall Gardens. The 'Garden' Office, 37 Southampton Street, London. This is the first volume - so far as we are aware - that has been entirely devoted to the explanation and ad...
-Indoor Gardening
Just now, when the shadows of the on-coming autumn and winter are thrown across the closing days of the rapidly-retreating summer, and indications multiply that The summer is past, And the winds hav...
-Inquirer
You may inarch Vines by placing old wood to old wood, young wood to old wood, or young wood to young wood. In the latter case, the wood should be pretty firm. Place the plants to be united close toget...
-Insects
If any one were to calculate the labour and expense incurred in one year in combating those insect pests and diseases which beset the gardener in every department of the garden, it would be found to b...
-International Horticultural Exhibition
We are sure that it will be gratifying to many of our readers to know that the Glasgow and West of Scotland Horticultural Society intend to hold a great International Show in 1872 similar t those so s...
-Ipomaea Horsfalllae
Where there is a great demand in autumn and winter for cut flowers, either for mixing with other flowers in vases, or for what has now become very fashionable, small hand-bouquets for the dinner-table...
-Iresine Herbstii
I find this charming plant, when used for bedding purposes, subject to many complaints, which, from my own experience, I think are quite undeserved. The Iresine, in some situations, is said to be defi...
-Iresine Herbstii. To The Editor of The 'Gardener.'
Sir, - I have read with interest your observations on the cultivation of Iresine Herbstii, but I fear many may follow out your directions and still make but a sorry display. I have carefully watched t...
-Iresine Lindenii
This is a very decided improvement on I. Herb-stii, being of a brighter colour and much better habit; less lumpy and ungraceful-like, from its being dwarfer, more twiggy in growth, and from the more p...
-Irish Yews
The first time we saw Irish Yews used for this purpose the effect was very much admired, being studded all over with its reddish fruit, thus greatly relieving its somewhat sombre appearance. The Irish...
-Iron-Sand
The report of Messrs Gledhill & Hamerton sets all doubt at rest as to the unlimited abundance of iron-sand at Taranaki. On arriving at the east bank of the Henni river, they proceeded to dig at severa...
-Is The Rose Red?
Poets have occasionally said harsh things of science, - indeed one goes so far as to stigmatise the man of science as one who would untwist the rainbow, and even botanise upon his mother's grave. Stil...
-Ivies
The Ivy can be traced back to very early times, when it is said to have been used at religious ceremonies, and as garlands on festive occasions, and it is still used less or more for similar purpos...
-J. A
In the case of your early vinery, fork into the surface of the border a good dressing of bone-meal, and then apply about 3 inches of farmyard manure. This should be applied at once. About the middle o...
-J. B. W
Gladioli keep better in the ground all winter than any way else that they can be stored, but it must be in a dry loamy soil. It would be a risk if your soil is heavy and wet. We have left thousands of...
-J. C
The reports of weather, etc, you send us are stamped by the post-office officials Contrary to regulations, and we are charged 2d. for them. Thanks all the same. J. C #1 Your proposed system of hea...
-J. D
The pressure on our space will prevent our being able to publish your papers, interesting as they are. J. D #1 As you do not state what plants you can make available for planting your bed, it is m...
-J. D. P
For such a wet climate as yours, Lady Downes is the best late black Grape. From what you say of your climate, we doubt if Muscats would ripen with you, and unless this Grape is well ripened it does no...
-J. F
The questions you put to us involve so many considerations that we cannot give them a reply that would satisfy us, or be safe as a guide for you in the space at our command at this time. Vineries unde...
-J. M
From an examination of the leaves of your Vines we cannot discover symptoms to account for their coming so suddenly to a standstill and ripening their wood so very prematurely as you describe. Evident...
-J. P
The excrescence on the under sides of your vine-leaves is an enlargement of the cellular tissue, and perhaps in your case the low damp position of the border has something to do with the derangement. ...
-J. R
We consider Lomaria Gibbii a Tree-Fern. We have a plant of it with a clear stem of 18 inches. We doubt if Mr F. can get any redress from his Dutch correspondent. The best way is to avoid having any d...
-J. Russel
Your question arrived too late for a reply in February, and we wrote to you at the address you gave, but the letter was returned from dead-letter office. Keep your grafts back in a cool place, and gra...
-J. S., Wilts
We are not able to say what has caused your Grapes to shank. You give no data. The cause of shanking is a deficient supply of nutriment to the Grapes by the roots and foliage. The causes of this defic...
-J. W
Vegetables north and south. This subject is in very able hands, and we think you had better leave it there. If you differ with us, send your lines to the ' Chronicle,' where the controversy began. No ...
-J. W. P. D
Many amateurs, like yourself, have been disappointed most grievously by the pecuniary results of their fruit-growing. To make money by such a pursuit, requires great skill in the management of such ho...
-Jas. W. W
The following Fuchsias will suit you: - Blue Boy, Mrs Marshall, Lustre, Empress, Grand Cross, Roderick Dhu, Brilliantissima, Regalia, Neptune, Warrior, Starlight, and Blauchett. The following Pelargon...
-Jasione. Genus of Canipanulaceae
Jasione, another small genus of Campanulaceae, is distinct in structure and aspect from all other genera of the order. It is not a striking or showy family, and is introduced here chiefly on account o...
-Jeffersonia Diphylla, Twin-Leaved Jeffersonia
This, so far as I am aware, is the only species, and it is perhaps more remarkable as a curiosity than as an ornamental plant. It is not, however, deficient in beauty, the flowers being large, abundan...
-Jottings From New Zealand. Climatic Influences
In our last paper we were necessarily bound within certain limits, as we were anxious to represent a garden rather than the climatic influences of the country. We will now return to the subject, and e...
-Jottings On The Potato
Must I plant large, middle-sized, or small Potatoes 1 is a question often asked by amateurs and the uninitiated; and it is not to be wondered at, considering the diversity of opinion held by practical...
-Jottings On The Tulip. No. I
The Tulip next appeared, all over gay, But wanton, full of pride, and full of play. The world can't show a dye but here has place - Kay, by new mixtures she can change her face. Purple and gold are b...
-Jottings On The Tulip. No. II
Not one of Flora's brilliant race A form more perfect can display; Art could not feign more simple grace, Nor Nature take a line away. - Montgomery. To cultivate a hobby is not generally to make a ...
-Jottings On The Tulip. No. III
Unlike the Auricula, the Carnation, and the Pansy, and several other suchlike gems of beauty which the zealous and enterprising florist has taken into his hands and heart, the Tulip gives a long seaso...
-Juniperus (The Juniper). Notes On Hardy Conifers
The shrubs and trees which form this large and important section of the Coniferse are for the most part natives of the temperate and colder regions of Europe, Asia, Africa, and America, and are with f...
-Juniperus (The Juniper). Notes On Hardy Conifers. Continued
Juniperus Chinensis (The Chinese Juniper) This grand species is found in great abundance in high mountain-valleys in China and Japan, growing to heights of from 20 to 30 feet, and was first sent home...
-Kalmia Latifolia
I have two fine bushy plants of Kalmia latifolia that have never shown bloom since they left the nursery seven years ago. I have grown them in peat along with Rhododendrons, which do well with me. Can...
-Kalosansthes Coccinea
It is somewhat remarkable that, during the long period of time that has elapsed since the introduction of this plant, it should have received comparatively little attention from cultivators. A strong ...
-Kalosanthes
A beautiful genus of succulent plants, forming splendid specimens in a short time, when a little attention can be devoted to them. The flowers, which are produced in large clusters on the points of th...
-Kalosanthes Coccinea
Allow me to add my testimony to that of Mr Hammond's as to the value of the Kalosanthes as a decorative plant. I endorse all he has said in its favour, and agree with him as to the simplicity of its c...
-Kauri Gum Oil
This new oil is beginning to attract the attention of painters in New Zealand. It is a product obtained by the distillation of kauri gum and coal. Its preservative properties are spoken of in the high...
-Keen's Winter-Flowering Carnation, Miss Jolliffe
Having some time ago seen in a contemporary a'glowing report of Miss Jolliffe, winter-flowering Carnation, I was desirous of seeing it. Having been gratified, I am able to indorse the high opinion o...
-Keeping Cucumbers
The Editor gave us such good practical hints as to the cultivation of the Cucumber last year, that I can only add - be guided by him, and you are almost sure to meet with success. I have no doubt the...
-Keeping Grapes In Winter
WE have recently received letters from various localities, stating that Grapes that should have hung in good condition on the Vines for a long time have moulded and dropped from their stalks. In one c...
-Keeping Grapes Through The Winter
We generally learn something monthly in the pages of the 'Gardener' about the cultivation of the Vine; and from the reliable character of the source, the information may be trusted. But although we g...
-Keeping Grapes, And State Of The Vine Roots
The system of filling Vine-borders with healthy fibrous roots (as promulgated by Mr Thomson), instead of encouraging them to cross rapidly through the porous soil, will prove beneficial to growers in ...
-Keeping Of Late-Ripeisted Grapes
Anent this subject I would just state that part of our Lady Downes Grapes, which, as I stated before, were not ripe till the end of October last, are still hanging, April 15, in the fruit-room, having...
-Kidney Beans
Few early vegetables are more appreciated than these, and few are of easier culture. Those who have every facility for growing them in pots in forcing-houses, and later on in pits and frames, are not ...
-Kinds To Sow
It is not enough for the inexperienced to know the proper quantity of seed required to sow a given space, it is of greater importance to know what kinds to sow. The kinds named below have been fully p...
-Kitchen Apples. List Of Varieties Suitable For A Small Garden
We have placed these first because, as before stated, the home-growers can never compete with the Americans with dessert varieties. Moreover, our surest croppers are mostly Kitchen Apples, and if Appl...
-Kitchen-Garden
Where labour is at command, and much extra work not on hand, kitchen-garden operations will be well advanced. Vacant ground will be well ridged up to be exposed to frost, having been trenched or dug. ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #2
The present season will bring its own labour, even although every attention has been given during the last few months to forward all manner of groundwork. The cultivator whose aim is success will for ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #3
The cultivation of vegetables perhaps never was more popular, and encouragement to exhibit fine produce never more liberal, than at present. Among some of the leading prizes offered to tempt cultivato...
-Kitchen-Garden. #4
The necessity of having the soil (in which seeds are to be sown) in good healthy condition has been so frequently referred to, it is unnecessary to say much on the subject now. However we would, by w...
-Kitchen-Garden. #5
The work in this department will be increasing rapidly, so much will now require attention at once. Surface-stirring, planting out crops as soon as the plants are of proper size (or pricking them out ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #6
Before filling up every portion of ground (with the view of having abundance) it may be necessary to look in advance of the present time, so that the necessary space may be left for crops which come a...
-Kitchen-Garden. #7
The advantage of having a good supply of water, which can be given to the kitchen-garden without stint, cannot be overestimated; and the reverse of this (especially where soil is poor, light, and of n...
-Kitchen-Garden. #8
In the vegetable garden, order, cleanliness, and well-filled plots are more general now than at any other time of the year; it is unfortunate when it is otherwise. We hear that rain has been abundant ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #9
During this month the main crops of Cabbages, for early supply next season, will be planted; and this being a very important crop, much care in preparing the ground, and attention when planting, are n...
-Kitchen-Garden. #10
Asparagus will soon be showing a yellow tint, gradually ripening: when ripe it should be cut down. The beds or rows require to be cleared of weeds. Some cover the whole surface with a coating of manur...
-Kitchen-Garden. #11
In this department there will now be abundance of work; and if the weather keeps free from severe frost, every effort to get ground-work forward should be made: manuring, trenching, draining wet cold ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #12
In early positions Peas and Beans may be coming through the ground this month. When this is the case, more soil may be drawn over them, or a quantity of coal-ashes placed along the rows, which keeps s...
-Kitchen-Garden. #13
The past autumn being what is termed open may have been advantageous to those who have not had their proportion of rainfall; but in many districts the continued floods have kept ground-work almost ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #14
The continuous rams have still kept work on land almost at a standstill; and we have to repeat that every dry hour should be taken advantage of. Ground on which Broccoli and other winter crops have gr...
-Kitchen-Garden. #15
Preparation for seed-sowing now requires prompt attention. It' weather should be changeable, the important operation of getting in the crops may have to be done piecemeal, but on no \ account should s...
-Kitchen-Garden. #16
It may be well to examine seedbeds or seed-rows in which seed was sown last month, as much of the ground may be found empty, and the failure may be made good before the season is too far advanced. In ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #17
This has been one of the coldest and dullest springs, on the whole, which we have known for years, and vegetation has made very slow progress generally, except seeds, which I never remember ever seein...
-Kitchen-Garden. #18
The vegetable garden will now be assuming a furnished appearance, and while crops are growing vigorously, weeds will at the same time be making a struggle for their development, and if they are to be ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #19
The removal of crops used up, or nearly so, will now require prompt attention, so that the space may be manured, sown, and planted. An effort should now be made to get every available space well fille...
-Kitchen-Garden. #20
As ground becomes vacant (much of which will be cleared of Potatoes, Peas, Cauliflowers, &c), it should be filled up with crops which will be in use during autumn and winter. Kale, Savoys, Broccoli, e...
-Kitchen-Garden. #21
Preparation should be made as early as possible to get the crops planted which are to come into use during next spring and summer. This applies to Cabbage, Lettuce, Endive, and Cauliflower, on ridges ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #22
There is generally during this month much to do in the way of clearing up in the kitchen-garden. The remains of crops of all kinds should be taken to a position to rot for future dressing, or they c...
-Kitchen-Garden. #23
All operations we recommended to be performed last month may be carried forward without delay. A good start with rough work before the winter sets in will tell favourably throughout the whole season, ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #24
If weather should be wet, and snow lying on the ground, the usual course of digging and trenching may be suspended till the greater portion of the snow is gone, and the surface dry enough to walk on. ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #25
Frosty weather in January, clear and dry, is what is most desired both for the benefit of field and garden, and all who have their vacant soil thrown up in ridges will in most cases have reason to be ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #26
In most cases the stock of garden seeds will have arrived, and along with them the usual garden requisites; and whether the items may be in large or small quantity, it is well to put them in safe quar...
-Kitchen-Garden. #27
We have read more than once that it is a sure sign of a lazy gardener having the direction of a garden which is not in a high state of culture at this season - the ground turned up to frost and air, a...
-Kitchen-Garden. #28
There having been so little time to make adequate preparation for the more important garden crops, we fear in many cases the qualities of garden seeds will be severely taxed, especially where land is ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #29
Crops yill now be advancing, and will require constant attention to get the necessary work done at the proper time. Thinning, hoeing, and weeding will keep the labour-power at high pressure. In other ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #30
Up to the middle of May we hear of great difficulty in raising seedlings in kitchen - gardens. The long continued frosty weather and cold easterly winds are trying in the extreme. While we write there...
-Kitchen-Garden. #31
This month, especially towards the end, is generally considered the warmest of the whole season, consequently the greatest amount of moisture at roots of plants is required, - and when such is rendere...
-Kitchen-Garden. #32
The very important operation of planting the stock of vegetables for winter and spring supplies is generally completed by this time; but where ground is limited in proportion to the demand for garden ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #33
The push of general work will now be well over for the present season, so far as active cropping is concerned; but it is not likely that there will be much time to spare from active labour in the best...
-Kitchen-Garden. #34
Now that one is drawing to the season of sear and yellow leaf, there is nearly an end of sowing and planting for 1879; but the present month is one in which the anxious and industrious cultivator ca...
-Kitchen-Garden. #35
The present time is favourable for noting the kinds of vegetables which have proved satisfactory during the past season. They may be committed to paper systematically, and when the seed-list is formed...
-Kitchen-Garden. #36
A period of fine weather having been experienced (which we trust has been general), will do much to forward crops which were in many cases suffering from continued cold drench-ings. Weeds, too, were i...
-Kitchen-Garden. #37
In January, for the last two seasons, ground was (as is often the case at this time of year) sodden, and, in many cases, frozen and covered with snow; therefore no ground work could be advanced except...
-Kitchen-Garden. #38
Whatever may be left in the way of digging and trenching, preparatory for crops, we need hardly say demands attention without delay. Onion-ground may be about the first to receive its allotted manipul...
-Kitchen-Garden. #39
To have the vegetable garden well cropped, and to be otherwise creditable to cultivators, the work must now be carried forward in earnest : every opportunity should be turned to the best account in br...
-Kitchen-Garden. #40
All soil to receive seeds and plants should now be finely broken, and otherwise ready for seeds. Sow in drills lightly drawn, and cover with fine light soil should the natural soil be heavy and tenaci...
-Kitchen-Garden. #41
One of the driest months of March we ever remember, and up to the 10th of April, has passed. Though very trying for both vegetable and animal life, it certainly was in favour of advancing work, and ar...
-Kitchen-Garden. #42
Our last paper was written when drought was accompanied by cold nor'-easters, and to-night (11th May) we seem much under the same influence, only vegetation is more advanced, and consequently suffer...
-Kitchen-Garden. #43
The weather during the latter part of May being very warm and dry, gave many crops in vegetable gardens an appearance of distress. Slight showers have fallen at the end of the month and refreshed vari...
-Kitchen-Garden. #44
If this month should be warm, gardens, like fields, will reap advantage from such agreeable weather. The great advantage of having all things well forward before the short and colder days come round, ...
-Kitchen-Garden. #45
Where there are means to keep gar-gens in good order, one expects at this season to meet with neatness and cleanliness in every department. All refuse of crops which have served their purpose may be c...
-Kitchen-Garden. #46
The season has now arrived when practical men turn their attention to renovation and improvement of their gardens. It is well to note the weak points, and find out the best remedies to strengthen such...
-Kitchen-Garden. #47
Where forcing of vegetables is a matter of importance, the work in this department will soon become general. We never could see much to boast of by having a mere item of any class of forced produce fo...
-Kitchen-Garden. #47. Continued
This being the last month of the year, it is a very suitable time to take stock of the garden and its produce; note what improvements on the past system of management may have attention; also the va...
-L. (A Subscriber)
Your young Vines appear to have made good progress in the time you name, and if you have no special reasons for cropping them, we would advise you to cut them down within 2 feet of the front lights, a...
-Ladybirds: A New Insecticide
During last summer the public attention was drawn to the large flights of these little insects that appeared in many parts of England, and especially the attention of horticulturists, many of whom, fr...
-Laelia Jonghiana
This is a very beautiful and remarkable plant, introduced by M. de Jongh of Brussels, through a young and energetic collector, M. Libon, who died while collecting in the Brazils. It has been flowered ...
-Lambton Castle Pine-Apple
We have lately - the first week of May - had an opportunity of testing the quality as to flavour of this splendid-looking Pine-apple. The fruit in question started in winter, and stood for a long time...
-Lancastrian
The change you have made in the selection of the Vines is a great improvement on what they were previously. Regarding your list for the early house we think it right to observe, that our experience of...
-Lapageria Rosea
I have now under my care, growing in a cool conservatory, and gradually covering a good portion of the roof, a plant of this fine greenhouse twiner. It came into my hands in 1865, and was then a plant...
-Lapageria Rosea And L. Alba. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
The above are two of the most beautiful and striking flowering greenhouse climbers in cultivation. The sprays of flowers are lovely objects for hanging over the edges of vases filled with cut-flowers;...
-Lapagerias. Alba And Rosea
These magnificent evergreen climbing plants are indispensable in the greenhouse and conservatory; trained up the walls and rafters, they have a grand effect, and cannot be too highly praised. The bea...
-Large Bunches Of Grapes
Though we have not been able hitherto to produce monstrous bunches of Grapes, nor yet what could justly be called very extraordinary bunches as regards size, considering the variety, still we frankly ...
-Large Houses And Strong Soils For Vines
Many years ago we had experience in very small vineries. This experience led us some years ago to advocate large, airy, light vineries in the pages of the 'Scottish Gardener.' Farther experience and o...
-Large Trees On High Walls
Wherever there are walls over 12 feet high, trees grafted on the free stock should be chosen, for they will prove most satisfactory in the end. The best kind of trees to plant in such situations are t...
-Lasiandria Macrantha
Another plant of scarcely less importance, and therefore deserving honourable mention, is Lasiandria macrantha - a noble plant without question. True, its flowers are somewhat evanescent in duration, ...
-Late Grapes Versus Late Houses
Your correspondent, A. Henderson, Thoresby Gardens, has brought the above subject to the front in a very practical manner; and being backed by the leading article in the February number of 'The Garden...
-Lawn From Seed
Now that croquet has become such a fashionable amusement, all who can must have their croquet lawn; and as turf is not always obtainable, by attending to the following directions a very good lawn may ...
-Leschenaultia
The Leschenaultia is a genus of greenhouse plants which are also natives of New Holland, and though unsurpassed either as decorative plants or as specimens for exhibitions, they are very rarely seen i...
-Lessons From The London Parks
These parks have so often been described as to render it unnecessary for me to attempt a description of them. Instead of this I propose to enumerate some of what I considered the most taking arrange...
-Lessons In Drawing, Etc., For Young Gardeners. Conclusion
In Lesson No. XIII. (January 1878, p. 34), a few hints were given about how to find the centres required to draw the various outlines of walks, etc, on plan fig. 37, by means of the compass. In laying...
-Lessons In Drawing, Etc., For Young Gardeners. No. XXIII
At the commencement of these papers I pointed out that in drawing any geometrical figure, or group of figures in a geometrical design, it was first necessary to have two or more lines crossing each ot...
-Lettuces
A salad of some description is at all times essential in most establishments, and if not forthcoming when required, it may prove vexatious to all concerned. Although good salads can be made without Le...
-Libocedrus (The Incense Cedar). Notes On Hardy Conifers
The name of this genus is derived from libanos, incense, and Cedrus the Cedar, in allusion to the strong odour emitted by the wood while burning. The few species of which it is composed have a general...
-Libonia Floribunda
This is one of the most useful and showy of stove spring-flowering plants, which produces its orange-yellow bells in great profusion when carefully cultivated. The plant is simple to propagate and cul...
-Lied Currants, Gooseberries, And Currants
To afford a late supply of these, the north walls and borders will be found of great service. The former, in our case, are in possession of a moderately high north wall, and the buttresses and spaces ...
-Lil1um Longiflorum
This Lily can be purchased very cheap as compared with the price of a great many others, and yet it is not cultivated in private gardens half so much as it ought to be. However beautiful many other Li...
-Lilium - Lily
This is a grand and much-admired genus of bulbous plants. They are beautiful mixed-border subjects, the taller species being fine background plants, and the dwarfer ones in fitting positions are equal...
-Lilium Giganteum
By far the most stately and handsome both as regards habit of growth and foliage, this noble Indian species is by no means deficient of that rich floral beauty so conspicuous in every member of the tr...
-Lilium Giganteum (G. It. D.)
From inquiries made, we believe L. Gigan-teum to be hardy. When visiting the Sunningdale Nursery of Mr Charles Noble, at Bagshot, a few days ago, we saw there lines of this Lily growing between rows o...
-Lily Of The Valley
This is another fine, easily-forcing plant, and a great favourite with all. When in much request for cutting, a good breadth should be grown on a piece of rich ground shaded from the mid-day sun, payi...
-Lily Of The Valley - Convallaria Majalis
I know no more beautiful and fragrant hardy plant for blooming indoors or for cut flowers than this. The handsome leaves of tenderest green, and the chaste sweet flowers arching elegantly on their sta...
-Lily Of The Valley Forcing
The plants that produced flowers about Christmas or the New Year, if aided by light and heat until growth was completed, as previously directed from time to time in the ' Gardener,' will now have plum...
-Limnanthemum Nymphaeoides, Syn. Villarsia Nymphaeoides
An elegant aquatic plant, found in many parts of Britain and Ireland, but supposed to have been introduced, and not native. It forms widely extending immersed stems, rooting freely below and branching...
-Lisianthus Russellianus And L. Princeps. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
These Lisianths are perhaps two of the most gorgeous and showy greenhouse plants in cultivation. Though they used formerly to be considered and treated as stove-plants, yet they thrive quite as well i...
-List Of Orchids In Flower At Fernfield, Bridge Of Allan, November
Masdevallias amabilis, Davisii, ignea, Chimaera Wallisii, Lin-denii, bella, Veitchiana, Veitch-iana superba, melanopus. Odontoglossums grande, constric-tum, Uro-Skinueri (fine var.), nebulosum, can...
-List Of Orchids In Flower At The Kilns, Falkirk, November
Burlingtonia Candida. Calanthe Veitchii. superba. rubro-ocidata. Cattleya guttata. marginata. maxima superba. Pinelli. Coelogyne ocellata maxima. C'ymbidium Lowianum. sinense. Cyprip...
-Liverpool Chrysanthemum And Fruit Show
This exhibition took place in St George's Hall on the 25th and 26th of November last, and was, by impartial and competent judges, considered the most splendid winter display of fruit and flowers ever ...
-Liverpool Chrysanthemum Show
Chrysanthemum Exhibitions are by no means uncommon nowadays, for, in addition to the one now being noticed, a large one is held at Bristol, and then in the London district there is the old Stoke-Newin...
-Liverpool Spring Flower-Show
The annual exhibition of Hyacinths, Tulips, and other flowers, generally identified with the inauguration of spring, took place in St George's Hall, and was visited throughout the afternoon and evenin...
-Lobelia Cardinalis
There are now many varieties of Lobelia all more or less attractive, some for their neat habit of growth, others for their fine telling colours, while in many instances there is a pleasing combination...
-Lobelia Syphilitica
The margins of many a little rivulet - or, as they call it here, branch - are brightened during August and a part of September by the very pretty blue blossoms of the present plant. This Lobelia is ...
-Lobelia. Notes On Hardy Herbaceous Plants
This subject, it may be observed, is barely consistent with the title of these Notes. Only a very limited number of known species of Lobelia may strictly be termed hardy; but it is necessary once for ...
-Lobelias From Cuttings, And Centaureas From Seed
When Lobelias are used for bedding purposes in large quantities, it is the all but universal practice to propagate by seed, the impression being that this is the easiest and most expeditious plan; oth...
-Local Notes On Rare Or Uncommon Wild Plants. No. IV. - Yetholm And The Cheviots
Everybody has heard of Yetholm, it being the capital of that mysterious race the gipsies in Scotland; there they still have a queen and keep up a semblance of royalty, but as a distinct race they ...
-Lomatia Elegantissima
An elegant fern-like plant of free growth; thrives well in an intermediate house. When in too great heat it is apt to run up and get too high for table: when about 1G inches high, and furnished to the...
-London International Exhibition, 1871
The buildings in which the Exhibition of 1871 will be held have been designed by Lieut.-Col. Scott, R.E., and are to be of a permanent character. Those persons familiar with the Horticultural Gardens ...
-London Water-Cresses
Water-Cresses! Fine Water-Cresses! Four bunches a penny! Buy them and try them! Such is the call of many hundreds who perambulate the streets of London nearly the whole year round, with a baket ...
-Low Night Temperature
Your leader in the March number of the ' Gardener ' on low night temperatures raises a question the importance of which it would be difficult to overrate. I had almost said raises the whole theory of ...
-Low Night Temperature In Hothouses
FROM the letters which we have received asking for advice as to lower night temperatures in forcing-houses since J. S. directed attention to the subject in our December issue, we are led to believe th...
-Low Night-Temperature For Vines
In a leading article in the 'Gardener' of August last, and containing much with which I quite agree, occurs the following passage : In our practice we have never been able to corroborate the teaching...
-Low Temperatures For Muscat Grapes
IN last month's 'Gardener' Mr Simpson takes exception to an incidental remark of ours, in the August number, on setting Muscat Grapes. He characterises our remark as exceptional and damaging testimon...
-Luculia Gratissima
This is a magnificent evergreen shrub or tree, found growing in great luxuriance on some of the smaller hills in the Valley of Nepaul, and generally in rather exposed situations, where it produces its...
-Luculia Gratissima And L. Pinceana. Notes On Decorative Greenhouse Plants
Why is it that one so seldom sees these fine plants in cultivation 1 Even in many large places where ample accommodation and suitable positions could easily be found for them, they are rarely met with...
-Luculia Pinceana
This is one of the finest of all choice winter-blooming shrubs, and as it does not require a high winter temperature - indeed does best in a comparatively cool and moist house (40 at night will d...
-Lucy Grieve Pelargonium (Edward Coveny)
Our correspondent writes: The above-named well-known Tricolor Pelargonium has been in my possession ever since it first came out, but it does not do well with me. Perhaps I may use an unsuitable soil...
-Lupinus Californicus
This I believe to be one of the best Lupinus cultivated in the United Kingdom, and one that seems to be little known to practical gardeners and the lovers of flowers generally. Some three years ago I ...
-Lux Venit Ab Alto. May 19, 1881. Notes. "Consider The Lilies"
Thackeray in one of his books made a very nice little sketch of a small boy vigorous in urging his home-made boat across a tiny pool with the breath of his own lungs. Urging the sail of his own work...
-Lycaste Skinnerii
Where really refined flowers are in request, it is found that it pays to grow a good many kinds of Orchids. Masses of Dendrobium nobile, Coelogyne cristata, Lycaste Skinnerii, and a great many more,...
-Lysimachia
This is a useful, showy, and free-flowering group of plants. For a small family there is considerable diversity of habit in the members comprised in it, but there is little variety of colour, yellow i...
-M'Lachlan's New Patent Verge-Cutter
Is it not surprising that so little that is new or improved has been added to garden implements? With the exception of the mowing-machine, and perhaps Park's steel fork, garden implements remain very ...
-Madresfield Court And Golden Champion Grapes
I have these two under the same treatment in newly-prepared borders, Madres-field Court having the best chance, as it is planted in two houses, the one a Muscat house, the other a Lady Downes. All the...
-Madresfield Court Grape
In reply to Mr Cramb, p. 39, for January, I maystate that it was respecting the dry spot on Grapes when undergoing the stoning process, that I advocated less water to be given, which I still hold to b...
-Maggot In Cineraria Leaves
Like your correspondent W. H., I have grown Cineraria in large quantities from seed some years, but never saw the maggot he speaks of until last year, when it bored its way through the inside of almos...
-Making And Planting Rockwork
THE making of rockwork on which to cultivate rock and alpine plants, and also as a feature of taste and variety in the garden, is a labour often undertaken, but one which is very difficult to execute....
-Making Asparagus-Beds
Asparagds-bed-making, like many other garden operations, ought not to be regulated by one uniform rule through the length and breadth of the land. It will be readily admitted that there is a great div...
-Management Of Vine-Borders
While much is being written in some of our contemporaries of the changes and fluctuating habits of the Vine, we have many important facts before us this season. I have reason to believe that the seas...
-Manchester Botanical And Horticultural Society, June 3
Even the great things Manchester has done in time past were eclipsed on this occasion, when Manchester held what was considered to be the finest show that has ever taken place in that city. There were...
-Manchester Exhibition
This grand event, for it is nothing less, begins on the 14th of May, and ends on the 21st. It will, as hitherto, be held in the Botanical and Horticultural Society's Gardens at Old Trafford. For plan...
-Manure For Hops
Land and water are laid under contribution to supply manure to the Hop-garden. To obtain manure from the nearest towns, teams are daily upon the road; the railway brings rags from all parts, clothiers...
-Manure-Water
In nearly every garden this is used. In some it is made the most of - in others it is not used to the extent it should be; and much that might be made into manure-water, or what has actually been conv...
-Manuring And Digging Among Roses
Hybrid Perpetual Roses are cultivated in every garden in these Islands, but in too many cases with but indifferent success. Being universal favourites, and having a very large number of admirers, it i...
-Marigolds
One would fancy that of such old-fashioned common flowers as the French and African Marigolds there would be very little to say. Nor is there much. Only, as the scope of 'The Gardener' is not restrict...
-Market-Gardening In Essex
The following brief remarks on market-gardening will, I trust, prove instructive to some of the readers of ' The Gardener,' more especially those who may not have had an opportunity of personally obse...
-Market-Gardening In Essex. Continued
Nearer London there are large farms given up entirely to growing vegetables, and it is among these that gardeners can gain the most practical information. The quantity of vegetables grown on a compara...
-Martinsia Virginica
It is now early in April, and this plant is at the zenith of its beauty. Often, as I wander along through the woods in which it is found, I wish that some of my friends in Britain - any lover of herba...
-Maud
The weedy appearance of your Lobelia is the effect of the very web summer experienced in so many localities this year. In your climate Nemophila insignis would be far more effective. For blooming in A...
-Meconopsis
This is a very interesting and beautiful genus. The species are few in number, and, with the exception of the first of the two selected, are very rare plants in cultivation. They delight in a rich lig...
-Medium Trees - Management Of The Roots
Although orchard-trees, at least when on a good, deep soil, and in a favourable locality, certainly give the greatest amount of fruit for the least possible trouble, it is not every cottager or villa-...
-Melon Forcing
Sow for early crops in the same way as recommended for Cucumbers, using a heavier loam. If intended for being grown in the old-fashioned way, in pits without trellises, stop the young plants as soon a...
-Melon Forcing. #2
Keep fruit that have got to the ripening stage dry, and well exposed to light and air. The night temperature should range about 70, for Melons ripened in a low temperature and damp atmosphere are...
-Melon Forcing. #3
As late crops come into bloom attend to their impregnation. Those that are swelling off crops in Melon-houses or trellises should have the surface of the border mulched with a little rotten manure. In...
-Melon Forcing. #4
Expose ripening fruits as much as possible to full sun; and should the weather be bright, do not allow the soil to become over-dry and crack as the ripening process goes on. Give all plants swelling o...
-Melon Forcing. #5
Attend to the impregnation of late crops, and do not let the shoots and foliage become crowded. Expose ripening fruits to all the sun possible, and do not let the soil become very dry before they are ...
-Melon-Culture
The Melon is a fruit highly esteemed in its season where a large dessert is required. Although, unlike the Grape, the Pine-Apple, or the Peach, it is not a general favourite, I think the principal rea...
-Melons
Many amateurs shrink from growing Melons because of fancied difficulties and warnings from friends who have failed. But where manure is plentiful enough to afford such a hotbed as was described when t...
-Menyanthes Trifoliata - Buckbean Or Marsh Trefoil
This is a beautiful and fragrant plant, and a common native of Britain, in shallow streams or pools and very wet marshy ground or bogs. The plant forms strong creeping rooting stems in deeper water, o...
-Menziesia
Menziesia furnishes several brilliant and elegant species and varieties. M. polifolia and its varieties, of which there are now eight or nine, are a beautiful and showy group of summer-flowering dwarf...
-Menziesia (Dabcecia)
Resembling their near allies, the Heaths, in their pretty bell-shaped flowers, neat foliage, and dwarf graceful habits of growth, all the species and varieties of this charming genus of tiny evergreen...
-Mesospinidium Vulcanicum
This is a pretty and free-flowering little plant, in habit of growth resembling Odontoglossum roseum, while its flowers at first sight remind one of an Epidendrum. It is a native of Eastern Peru, and ...
-Messrs Carter & Co.'S Nursery, Perry Hill, Sydenham, Kent
This establishment has become a most important adjunct of the extensive business of Messrs James Carter, Dunnett, & Beale, of High Holborn, London. A few years ago, when this enterprising firm branche...
-Messrs Veitch & Sons' New And Rare Plants
[Pressure on our space last month prevented our giving a list of the magnificent collection of new and rare plants exhibited at the International Show in Edinburgh by Messrs Veitch & Sons. We now give...
-Metropolitan Floral Society
The Committee of this Society met in St James's Hall on January 3, in order to form their Schedule for the present year. It was decided to hold another Autumn Show at the Palace, and also to offer pri...
-Metropolitan Society For The Encouragement Of Florists' Flowers. First Exhibition At The Crystal Palace, Sydenham, September 6
This was in every respect an excellent exhibition, perhaps one of the most extensive shows of Dahlias that has taken place during the past twenty years. Some idea of its extent may be gained when it i...
-Metrosideros Floribunda
This plant is a native of New South Wales, and is consequently well suited to the temperature and treatment required for most plants that thrive in and beautify our modern British conservatories. It a...
-Meum Atliamanticum
An umbelliferous plant, with very handsome leaves, on account of which only it is noticed here. The foliage is a most beautiful dark green, and most delicately divided into hairlike parts. It is produ...
-Mignonette-Culture
As I have been very successful in growing this favourite plant, a few remarks as to my mode of culture may not be out of place in the pages of ' The Gardener,' to such of your amateur and lady readers...
-Mignonette-Culture For Autumn, Winter, And Spring
In nearly every garden, large or small, Mignonette is found during the summer; and this is scarcely to be wondered at, as it is as worthy of a place as the majority of sweet-scented flowers. During au...
-Mignonnette For Winter Forcing
As the cultivation of Mignonnette for winter forcing is a work that demands prospective attention, I have chosen the subject as one likely to be both agreeable and interesting to many readers of ' The...
-Mildew On Roses
I should feel obliged if you, or any of the correspondents of the ' Gardener,' can kindly give me any receipt to effect a cure of mildew, either on fruit or Rose trees. I begin to think the best is to...
-Mint
Three species are generally grown, - Common Spearmint, Peppermint, and Pennyroyal. The first named is the variety generally grown in gardens for ordinary purposes. The leaves or tops are used in soups...
-Mirabilis Jalapa (Marvel Of Peru)
This was formerly an immense favourite with flower-loving people, but now could hardly be found in a week's journey in gardens. Yet it is one of the most showy out-of-doors plants that could be named,...
-Monoloena Primuloides
This is a very pretty stove herbaceous plant, belonging to the natural order Melastomaceae, and nearly allied to the pretty Sonerilla margaritacea. It has a somewhat woody root-stock, whence spring th...
-More Scientific Balderdash
M. Regnard has been inquiring into the much-disputed problem, why vegetation does not grow well beneath trees, notwith standing that there is plenty of light, pure air, humidity, and warmth. He has c...
-Mr M'Kenzie
Your questions embrace very wide subjects. The cause of canker is generally considered to be a cold wet subsoil. Reasoning from these premises, thorough drainage and planting on slightly-raised mounds...
-Mr Y
Yours is a matter for private arrangement, not for public discussion. We cannot afford space for such a trifle. Can any of the numerous readers of the ' Gardener' give me the most effectual means of ...
-Munro's Little Heath Melon
Having grown this Melon extensively this season, I can bear testimony to its being a variety with hardy constitution. It sets its fruit very freely under adverse circumstances - such as during dull da...
-Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)
These are lovely and very popular spring flowers. M. moschatum is too late in flowering to be fit to recommend as a spring flower, but any mention of the genus would be incomplete were it left unnotic...
-Muscat Grapes, Kent
See that your Vines, having all their roots inside, do not suffer for want of water. Remove the surface-soil down to the roots, and then cover them with 4 inches of fresh turfy loam, mixing with it ha...
-Mushroom-Culture
Throughout the winter months few garden productions, in the way of eatables which pass through the kitchen, are more acceptable or highly valued than Mushrooms. When outside vegetables are scarce, as ...
-Mushroom-Culture Out-Of-Doors
1. Preparation of the manure: It is of vital importance to let the rank steam out. When you get the manure from the stables, throw it into a round heap, and give a good watering with manure-water. Let...
-Mushroom-Forcing
I do not know -whether it be correct to say that Mushrooms are forced in winter; they rather may be said to be grown, for the necessary conditions to their culture are more easily given in winter than...
-Mushroom-Growing
I beg to lay before the readers of your valuable magazine a short account of a plan by which I have known Mushrooms successfully grown for the last four years. It may be considered as being after the ...
-My Experiences With The Auricula
Strange to state, though I find myself a cultivator of the Auricula, I am wellnigh at a loss how to explain the reasons that induced me to take this flower in hand in the first instance. I had always ...
-My Potato Trials
With the opening of the month of March I commence my planting operations, and thus lay the foundation for the season's trials of this noble esculent. Where the Potato-fancier essays to gather together...
-Myosotis Alpicola
This is a diminutive but very pretty Forget-me-Not. It forms a neat tuft about 3 inches high, with small dark-green hairy leaves and deep-blue flowers, slightly fragrant - the latter quality most noti...
-Myosotis Dissitiflora For Winter Flowering
This is very much appreciated here during the dark dull days of winter, and as it can be had by any one possessing an ordinary greenhouse, it is a pity it is not oftener seen than it is. To get up a s...
-Mysotis Dissitiflora For Forcing
Few who have not seen this elegant little flower, the blue Forget-me-not forced, can have an idea of what a pretty pot-plant it makes for the conservatory, drawing-room, or dinner-table. It is also a ...
-Nails Versus Studs
It may not be inappropriate at the present season, when the subject is being treated of at length in the 'Gardener,' to make a few remarks on the materials in use for training wall-trees. This part of...
-Name Of Flower (J. Kempson)
The bloom of Clematis sent is undoubtedly C. Jackmannii. We are not surprised to find you writing of it in such warm terms of praise. The straggling habit of your plant is no doubt traceable to the fa...
-Name Of Plant (Iago Clark)
What you forwarded was not a plant, as you supposed, but simply the fine fibrous roots of some plant - probably a grass - that had penetrated through one of the joints of the drain-pipes, and being co...
-Narcissus
The Narcissi are essentially flowers of spring. They are all beautiful, and there is a very considerable number of varieties and species in cultivation. In fact, there are perhaps too many varieties: ...
-National Tulip Show
The following notes on some of the flowers exhibited at this exhibition have been furnished to us by Mr Thomas Haynes of Derby, a successful cultivator and exhibitor. After the awards were made, some ...
-Neglected Decorative Plants Worth Growing
In our eagerness to obtain new and rare plants, we are often apt to overlook older ones of infinitely more real and practical utility to the gardener for greenhouse, stove, or conservatory decoration....
-Nepenthes Hookerii
We presume that botanists have some reason for assuming that this magnificent, and we may say distinct, pitcher plant is merely a variety of 1ST. Rafflesiana. They are, nevertheless, as distinct as m...
-Nepenthes Sedeni
This beautiful Pitcher-plant is the result of a cross between an unnamed species with deeply - coloured pitchers and the well-known Nepenthes distillatoria. Our figure of this is also taken from a pho...
-Nerine Fothergillii
At the same time Mr Pilcher produced some fine examples of this showy autumn-flowering plant. Some were in 24-pots, others in 12-sized pots. The Nerine requires a winter treatment similar to the Vallo...
-New And Select Florist Flowers. Phloxes
The excellence of these as garden ornaments induces me to notice a short list, which I consider well worthy the notice of those who have a spare corner that wants brightening up. I do not say too much...
-New Fruits
The Fruit Committee of the Royal Horticultural Society have just awarded Mr J. R. Pearson, Chilwell Nurseries, Nottingham, first-class certificates for the following new Grapes: Chilwell White, a very...
-New Or Rare Orchids
There are now no less than seven hybrid Orchids in bloom in the Orchid-houses at the Royal Exotic Nursery, Chelsea, and they alone are a sight every lover of Orchids would travel miles to see. Every o...
-New Pansies. - Fancies
This section of the Pansy is fast rising in public favour, indeed threatening to supersede the much-esteemed Show division. The Fancy, though less refined to the eye of a connoisseur than the Sh...
-New Plants Of The Past Month
It is always pleasant to note that just at the dullest season of the year, when of out-of-door flowers it may be truly said, Through all the long dark winter time They mourn within their dreary cells...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #2
At this season of the year, Orchids mainly represent the new plants that come under notice. At the meeting of the Floral Committee on the 15th of December, Messrs Veitch & Sons received first-class ce...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #3
In relation to the production of new plants, the first two months of the year may be regarded as a period of quiet and comparative rest - like a truce coming between two battles; it is at once a respi...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #4
Orchids are again in the van of new plants, not only in regard to numbers, but also in relation to excellence. Cypripedium Harrissonianum, awarded a first-class certificate, is a true hybrid, raised b...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #5
There must be a demand still for named Cinerarias (though named varieties are by no means so popular as they were a few years ago), or else it would not repay the trouble of raisers to name their seed...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #6
At the meeting of the Floral Committee on the 20th of April, a very-handsome and striking lot of Amaryllis, of the Hippeastrum group, were staged by Mr Baxter, gardener to C. Keizer, Esq. of Broxbourn...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #7
During the months of May, June, and July, when the great shows are held in addition to the bi-monthly meetings of the Floral Committee, the rush of new plants is so great that it is difficult to prese...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #8
Since Echeveria metallica came to be generally known, together with, those very useful dwarf-growing forms, E. secunda and E. secunda glauca, several more have been obtained, either by introduction or...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #9
What the month of July furnished in the way of new plants would be found at Manchester on the occasion of the great exhibition of the Royal Horticultural Society. The great majority of these were not ...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #10
The meetings of the Committees at South Kensington on the ] 7th of August was the occasion of bringing together not only new plants but some new fruits as well. A great curiosity was exhibited in th...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #11
The approach of autumn is beginning to thin the number of new plants that put in their claim for recognition at the hands of the Floral Committee, though it is by no means an invariable rule, that whe...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #12
So finely developed was a grand specimen of the glorious Vanda ccerulea, sent from Lord Londesborough's, Grimston Park, Tad-caster, by Mr Downing, to the meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society, on...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #13
This is the season for new Chrysanthemums, and Messrs Salter & Son of Hammersmith have a fine lot of new flowers, which will be noticed very shortly. It may be recorded here that one of their new Japa...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #14
But a scanty record completes the list up to the close of 1869. Cold inclement weather, with nipping winds and attendant frost and impending snow, is scarcely favourable to the production of new plant...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #15
Of these, Orchids naturally enough form the largest proportion at this season of the year. Foremost must be placed the magnificent example of Oncidium splendidum, exhibited by Lord Londesborough. The ...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #16
Singular to state, no Orchid has received the distinction of a certificate since the last record of new plants. In the way of Palms, Messrs Veitch & Sons received first-class certificates for the foll...
-New Plants Of The Past Month. #17
Among Palms - and we are constantly receiving some beautiful things in this way - the following have received first-class certificates: Oncos-permum Van Houtteii, Pritchardia pacifica, and Raphis humi...
-New Plants Of The Past Two Months
With the accumulating spring shows, these are now appearing somewhat numerously. As is usual at this season of the year, Orchids form a large proportion of the new introductions, which will be seen fr...
-New Plants Of The Past Two Months. #2
With the passing away of the great shows, comes to some extent a diminution of the number of new plants periodically produced. Still, some good things have put in appearance, and of these, first-class...
-New Potatoes
We are indebted to Messrs Hooper and Co., Covent Garden, London, for the opportunity of giving illustrations of two new Potatoes of American origin, recently imported to this country, the advent of w...
-New Spotted Foxgloves
One of the best additions made to our hardy herbaceous border-flowers during the past few years is the fine spotted varieties of Digitalis purpurea, sent out three years ago by Messrs Ivery & Son, Dor...
-New Turfing Plant
The dwarf-growing Pyrethrum Tchihatchewii is likely to become invaluable for covering dry banks, spaces under trees, and other bare places where grass refuses to grow. It is also valuable for small fo...
-New Varieties Of Coleus. To The Editor Of The 'Gardener.'
Sir, - The Coleus, raised this summer at Chiswick by Mr Bause, were this day sold by Mr Stephens, and the following is the result, as far as the biddings and names could be ascertained in the saleroom...
-New Varieties Of Fruit
In the article on New Varieties of Fruit by Mr Shortt, in the December number of the 'Gardener,' there are more mistakes than those mentioned by J. G. B. The Royal Ascot Grape is not truthfully de...
-New Zealand
Oamaru, Otago, New Zealand, July 5, 1869. Sir, - It is my intention in sending you these papers not to confine myself entirely to subjects under cultivation in the gardens here, but also to give a br...
-New Zealand Forests
The mystic law of association seems to crowd around the word forest - the idea of all that is voracious in the brute, cunning in the reptile, or treacherous in the savage. Were we transferred to the j...
-New Zealand Spinach
Where the cooks can be prevailed upon to use it, this is found to be a most profitable vegetable. It is most easily cultivated, and about a dozen plants will in time afford heavy pickings daily. The s...
-Nicotiana Wigandioides
I have just seen some flowering specimens of this fine Tobacco, and can recommend it as a good conservatory plant. The plants had been taken from the open ground in the autumn, and placed in large pot...
-No. IV. - Leaves
Leaves, when perfect and fully developed in flowering plants, consist of two parts : the lamina (limb), or disk - and the petiole, or foot-stalk; the latter in many cases being articulated or jointed ...
-North Of The Trent. Making Borders For Wall-Trees On Bad Subsoils
Ox an entire renovation of the garden being made here, and when starting to take out the foundation for the wall, we had to go to the depth of 6 feet before a solid foundation could be got. After 20 i...
-Notable Places. Glamis Castle, Forfarshire
The seat of the Right Honourable the Earl of Strathmore is situated a little more than one mile from the Glamis Station on the Caledonian Railway, between Perth and Aberdeen. A few minutes' walk bring...
-Notable Places. Glamis Castle, Forfarshire. Continued
I found the flower-garden bedded out with the usual bedding-plants, all in fine flower; but there were two beds that struck me as being rather out of the usual, which I think worth mentioning. These w...
-Notable Places. The Glen
This beautiful estate was purchased by Charles Tennant, Esq., the present proprietor, about twenty years ago; and since then various improvements have been going on on a very extensive scale in every ...
-Notes
If I were asked to name the most useful of all the Orchids now in cultivation, I think I should say Calanthe Veitchii. I should hesitate a little, of course, for Dendrobium nobile is not to be lightly...
-Notes. #2
AQUATIC plants are now becoming more generally appreciated, and this is especially true of the small-growing kinds. Salvinia natans, Azolla (pinnata) Caroliniana, Trianaea bogotensis, Pistia stratiote...
-Notes. #3
All gardeners know something of grafting, but what I desire to know is, Whether is it best to graft a strong-growing scion upon a weak-growing stock, or vice versa 1 There is a tendency among some Ros...
-Notes. #4
One of the loveliest of all Orchids now in bloom is the deep rosy-flowered Vanda teres - a beautiful thing truly, but with a reputation of being shy in producing its flower-spikes. A Continental autho...
-Notes. #5
THE greatest earthquake of our time is beginning to be felt amongst us, and the wisest can only conjecture where and how it will all end. I am writing this in a quiet English village, and without a th...
-Notes. #5. Continued
When I was in Singapore I found Vanda teres was brought down from Burmah in trading vessels and sold to the residents as a popular hardy flower for their gardens. I need scarcely say that Singapore po...
-Notes. #6
A good Dendrobium just now in flower is D. formosum giganteum, with its great ivory-white flowers almost lily-like in size and purity, the only bit of colour being a broad blotch of orange-yellow on t...
-Notes. #7
SPEAKING for a moment of Andre's new scarlet Anthurium, alluded to in my Notes of the November number of the 'Gardener,' I forgot to say that it was at Mr Bull's nursery where I saw this plant so fi...
-Notes. #7. Continued
All growers of the Queen of Autumn, otherwise known as the Chrysanthemum, will now reap the results of their labour for the past eight or ten months. Of white kinds, Mrs G. Rundle and Elaine are no...
-Notes By A Cottager Addressed To Cottagers
Being a great enthusiast in the cultivation of flowers in my own small way, I hope you will allow me to occupy a portion of the columns of the 'Gardener,' as I feel it to be a duty due to my brother h...
-Notes From New Zealand
[The following has been received from a correspondent, and we publish it to give an idea of the state of horticulture in New Zealand. - Ed]. On Monday, 23d December, the summer exhibition of fruit, f...
-Notes From New Zealand. #2
[Being frequently asked about the best colonies to which gardeners should emigrate, we publish the following:] The Rev. A. J. Campbell (late of Melrose) gives the following, in the ' Geelong News,' a...
-Notes From The Old Country
After leaving Edinburgh, we called at Dalkeith, the noble seat of the Duke of Buccleuch. It was here that M'Intosh, author of the 'Book of the Garden' and other works, was once gardener. The same posi...
-Notes From The Papers
The Rev. George Henslow has succeeded in convincing the scientific mind by an elaborate series of experiments that plants do absorb moisture by their leaves and it is now acknowledged that the belief ...
-Notes From The Papers. #2
The 'Garden,' speaking of the culture of that most beautiful and deservedly popular flower the Bouvardia, in the London market gardens, says:- Messrs Low & Co., of Clapton, are the largest cultivato...
-Notes From The Papers. #2. Continued
In the same paper the genial 'Wiltshire Rector,' in his annual homily, has an interesting and true story to tell of gardeners who have actually as a colony gone on, fathers succeeded by sons, from a.d...
-Notes From The Papers. #3
The French, we all know, are adepts at rearing and managing trees; but if we are to believe an able writer on French Forestry at the Paris Exhibition, in the 'Journal of Forestry,' the Frenchman doe...
-Notes From The Papers. #3. Part 2
More men may be seen out in the grounds busily nipping off the points of young plants which are growing on in cold pits for the next year's blooming; and so the production of young Heaths goes on from...
-Notes From The Papers. #3. Part 3
That leading article in the 'Gardeners' Chronicle' (whose misfortune it is to have to discuss practical questions in their scientific aspect), on M. Alberto Levy's investigations regarding the influen...
-Notes From The Papers. #4
English nurserymen and seedsmen pride themselves on the bewildering length of their lists of plants, seeds, and novelties; but one American firm at least, the Messrs Ellnanger & Barry of Rochester, N....
-Notes From The Papers. #4. Continued
Last January 1 pruned the tree again, but tacked up more of the right hand (being black) than I did on the left, for which reason I had this year a great many more of the black than I had of the white...
-Notes From The Papers. #5
Is not the character of the 'Gardeners' Chronicle' in the matter of copy above suspicion? It neither steals from others nor permits its own to be stolen, if it can put in a claim; and it would be ab...
-Notes From The Papers. #6
About this period last year we referred to the comments made frequently by the press on the unfavourable character of the season. It was then thought tilings could hardly be worse; but if 1877 was unu...
-Notes From The Papers. #7
We wish the members of the British Association could be subjected to a cross-examination - some of them at least. No doubt Dr Allman, Professor Huxley, and others are honest inquirers, but they are o...
-Notes From The Papers. #7. Part 2
It is difficult to conceive of an organless and structureless substance possessing life; and it is on this particular and important point that biologists have not satisfied thinkers: it is not yet s...
-Notes From The Papers. #7. Part 3
The copious reports of the fruit crops in the 'Garden' tell, says that paper, of sad disasters to Apricot trees, owing to the remarkable season which we have experienced. Branch-dying has been unus...
-Notes From The Papers. #8
Writing in one of the magazines lately, Mr Anthony Trollope says the most difficult thing that a man has to do is to think. There are many, he tells us, who can never bring themselves really to think ...
-Notes From The Papers. #8. Continued
This has been a most unfortunate year, so far, for the weather prophets. It was widely predicted that we were to be nearly frizzled up by scorching heat some time in June or July, whereas we were, on ...
-Notes From The Papers. #9
Your highly respectable contemporary, the Irish 'Gardeners' Record,' we would recommend to the attentive perusal of the horticultural press generally - it is worth watching. It is difficult to feel an...
-Notes From The Papers. #10
The Apple trade of America with this country is, says the Loudon ' Telegraph,' still in its infancy, and yet it is enormous. We are told that Washington Market, in New York, and the adjoining streets...
-Notes From The Papers. #10. Continued
It is not by any means an easy task following Mr Stevens in the train of reasoning by which he evolves a Potato fungus from a Potato beetle, and associates it with Huxley and Tyndall, and the bacteri...
-Notes From The Papers. #11
Plagiarism by known and unknown contributors to the horticultural press has increased to an almost discreditable extent of late. Different gardeners writing on the same subjects, on which they enterta...
-Notes From The Papers. #12
Another burster from John Wills, F.R.H.S., etc. We can never read those periodical demonstrations of Mr Wills without thinking of his bread-and-butter Vine-borders, which he made when at Huntroyde...
-Notes From The Papers. #13
Hotwater-men, as gardeners term Horticultural Engineers, do not always know most about heating; and as to boilers, one has only to contemplate some of their misshapen and thoroughly stupid inventi...
-Notes From The Papers. #14
We have been lately reading a new work on Horticultural Buildings by F. A. Fawkes, of the firm of Dennis & Co., Horticultural Engineeers, etc, and published at the 'Journal of Horticulture' office. It...
-Notes From The Papers. #14. Continued
A correspondent writes to us saying, The exigencies of space and labour compel me occasionally to do things in the cheapest and easiest way; and as we require to grow many Carnations and Picotees, I ...
-Notes From The Papers. #15
The Marquis of Huntly's experiments in Turnip-storing on his Scotch estates, as recorded in the horticultural papers, are suggestive to gardeners as well as farmers in regard to the winter storage of ...
-Notes From The Papers. #15. Continued
There is no disposition in any portion of such soils to run together, or to become sour; every facility is afforded the roots to permeate the borders, while the finely divided state of the various ing...
-Notes From The Papers. #16
Every critic of Darwin's book on Worms, from the 'Athenaeum' downwards, has instanced the horticultural writer as one whose inability to sum up the effects of a continually concurrent cause has reta...
-Notes Of New And Beautiful Plants Seen Recently In Messrs Veitch's Nursery, King's Road, Chelsea
Croton Yeitchii, being sent out now. C. Hookerii, to come out in two years. C. Maxima, to come out this year. C. Hillii, bronze and red, to come out this year. C. tricolor, pretty. C. Wysemania has a ...
-Notes Of The Month
The last month of the year - when leaden skies and dull short days prevail - is invariably that particular season when things horticultural are at their lowest ebb, in so far as they attain publicity....
-Notes Of The Month. #2
The New Year has opened strangely, characterised by singular variations of weather - heavy rains, then hard stern frost, immediately succeeded by a close foggy atmosphere and warm dull days; and then ...
-Notes Of The Month. #3
At the Anniversary Meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society held on the 8th ult., an announcement was made in the Annual Report of the Council that filled many of the friends of the Society present ...
-Notes Of The Month. #4
The long-impending snowfall visited London on the morning of February 13th - a fitting close to the somewhat long and severe winter, which has left its mark on vegetation, having destroyed much - prob...
-Notes Of The Month. #5
At the nurseries of Messrs Downie, Laird, and Laing, Stanstead Park, Forest Hill, can be seen some remarkable illustrations of the influence of the graft on the stock in certain cases of grafted plant...
-Notes Of The Month. #6
Among the last acts of service done to floriculture by the late Mr Samuel Broome, of Chrysanthemum renown - perhaps the last act - was that of entering a protest against the severely formal manner in ...
-Notes Of The Month. #7
Manchester has once more held its great Whitsun Show, and in doing so has demonstrated that in Cottonopolis there is no such thing as a decline in horticultural exhibitions to mourn over; and so no do...
-Notes Of The Month. #8
The reputed trial of Lawn-Mowers which took place at Leeds, on the occasion of the Horticultural and Floral Show on the 3d of June last, appears to have been of a character to call for a protest from ...
-Notes Of The Month. #9
The Horticultural Congress held at Oxford in connection with the provincial show of the Royal Horticultural Society appears to have been very successful. Some good and interesting papers were read, an...
-Notes Of The Month. #10
One of the most notable incidents of the month is the fact of the Royal Horticultural Society having decided to go to the provinces alone in 1871. An influential meeting has been held at Nottingham - ...
-Notes Of The Month. #10. Continued
The drought of the past three seasons appears to be awakening in the breasts of scientific men a fear that it may come to denote a decline of the rainfall in England, and consequently to the expressio...
-Notes Of The Month. #11
That towards the close of a long and useful life in the service of horticulture, Mr Thomas Rivers of Sawbridgeworth should be selected to receive some token of the high esteem and regard in which he i...
-Notes On "American" Or Peat-Soil Shrubs. Andromeda
In this fine genus we have a rare combination of some of those qualities which are most valued in outdoor flowering shrubs. The uniformly neat habit of growth, elegant foliage, and the singularly grac...
-Notes On "American" Or Peat-Soil Shrubs. Erica
Compared with the many hundreds of species and varieties of this brilliant genus, for which we are indebted to the Cape of Good Hope, and which all require greenhouse culture in this country, the Euro...
-Notes On "American" Or Peat-Soil Shrubs. Kalmia
Of this genus of American shrubs it is unnecessary to say more, by way of commendation, than that it contains among the few species of which it is composed some of the most handsome Evergreens in cult...
-Notes On "American" Or Peat-Soil Shrubs. Ledum
Though less showy in foliage, and to some extent lacking in that brilliancy of colour which characterises many of the other American shrubs, the Ledums are nevertheless a most useful and interesting f...
-Notes On "American" Or Peat-Soil Shrubs. Polygala
Of this somewhat extensive and popular genus, the only ligneous species hardy enough for open-air culture in Britain is chamoebuxus, a pretty dwarf evergreen, found wild in several countries of contin...
-Notes On "American" Or Peat-Soil Shrubs. Vaccinium
In this extensive genus, popularly called Whortleberries, we have a great number of species well adapted for cultivation in this country, most of them sufficiently interesting and distinct in their ha...
-Notes On A Few Succulent Plants Suitable For Bedding
According to the author of 'Lothair,' a garden should not look like mosaic work, but mosaic work should look like a garden - a proposition which I leave your readers to make what they like of; but the...
-Notes On Autumn And Winter Flowering Plants
I purpose giving a few notes on plants that bloom between the time when frost generally puts an end to flowers outdoors, and when plants that bloom in summer and early autumn have done their work, and...
-Notes On Autumn And Winter Flowering Plants. Amaryllis
Here we have a fine tribe of bulbs, which can be had in flower at any time when they have been previously prepared for it. Now is a good time to examine them. Any that have got the pots well filled wi...
-Notes On Autumn And Winter Flowering Plants. Ardisia Crenulata
This is another fine scarlet-berried plant for winter decoration. It is not particular to situation, only give it heat and moisture in its growing stages. After the berries are scarlet, it will stand ...
-Notes On Autumn And Winter Flowering Plants. Double And Zonale Pelargoniums
These are a very useful class of plants in the autumn, and by pinching back a few of them rather late, and giving them a gentle heat, they can be had nearly all the winter. To have fine plants, a few ...
-Notes On Autumn And Winter Flowering Plants. Epiphyllums
We find Epiphyllums very useful, there being so many varieties, several of which flower much earlier than others. When grown on stems about 18 inches high in 6-inch pots, nothing looks handsomer when ...
-Notes On Autumn And Winter Flowering Plants. Eucharis Amazonica
The Eucharis amazonica is one of those plants which amply repay all the attention bestowed upon them. When in bloom, who does not admire their snow-white flowers, contrasting so well with the fine gla...
-Notes On Autumn And Winter Flowering Plants. Mignonette
To have Mignonette in flower all through the winter adds greatly to the charms of the cut-flower basket; and when in handsome plants, intermixed among other things in the conservatory, sending out the...
-Notes On Autumn And Winter Flowering Plants. Solanum Capsicastrum
This is a common but very useful plant for autumn decoration. Its dark-green foliage, and shining red fruit or berries, render it a very effective plant, When properly treated it grows rapidly, making...
-Notes On Autumn And Winter Flowering Plants. The Chrysanthemum
This is another fine autumn flower, and well repays all the labour bestowed upon it. Where there is a great demand for them in long succession, it is advisable to put in a batch of cuttings in Novembe...
-Notes On Broccoli
Last autumn, when our Broccoli were looking their best, I decided to send a few notes to the 'Gardener' on the subject when the time came round again for their culture; and now that it is here, I am a...
-Notes On Coleus
The cultivation of Coleus is comparatively easy, and so well understood by the majority of gardeners, that cultural details are almost unnecessary. Notwithstanding the ease with which they are propaga...
-Notes On Cypripediums
The Cypripedium is, in some respects, the most interesting genus in the whole family of Orchids. Not the least interesting amongst their many fine features is their beautifully-marked foliage of every...
-Notes On Gardens In Fife
St Brycedale (though apparently under a dozen acres within the boundary-wall) has the appearance, from the centre of the grounds, of being a place of considerable extent, and the old trees show that i...
-Notes On Gardens In Fife. Continued
Entering through a door in a high brick wall, the flower-garden is before us: it is somewhat extensive, but smaller now to what it formerly was; and we think the reduction a great improvement, giving ...
-Notes On Gardens In South Of Fife
There is seldom anything which appears in the gardening periodicals in the way of notes or memorandums but is read by all classes of horticulturists, and we often wish that we could have opportunities...
-Notes On Gardens In The South Of Fife
Arriving at Dysart House, we entered the kitchen-garden, which is near the highroad, and soon found Mr Pirie, the intelligent gardener. Proceeding towards the centre of the garden, we made our first v...
-Notes On Hard-Wooded Greenhouse Plants. Acacia
It would be easy to make an extended list of beautiful and useful species of Acacia for general decorative purposes without exhausting the list of those which are or have been in cultivation. It is a ...
-Notes On Hardy "American" Or Peat-Soil Shrubs. No. I
Though the term American plants has long ceased to be a correct one in its indiscriminate application to the great family of hardy ericaceous shrubs cultivated in this country, seeing that America c...
-Notes On Hardy Fruits
While on a business tour in different parts of Scotland, especially the Border counties north and south of the Tweed, it occurred to me to take note of such varieties of the different species of hardy...
-Notes On Herbaceous Plants
When ribbon borders and massing became the rage, we all remember how quickly the old herbaceous and mixed borders were effaced from the garden. In establishments where such borders had once existed, c...
-Notes On Lilies
The varied beauty of form and colour in the many species comprised in the genus Lily, and the sweet fragrance which some of them possess, combine to make one wonder why they are not more generally see...
-Notes On Potato Chop Of 1873
Last year I sent to ' The Gardener' a few notes on the varieties of Potatoes we had then under trial. It having been a very unfavourable season for Potatoes, as well as for most other crops, I decided...
-Notes On Propagation
Propagation, as applied to the vegetable world, may be defined as the art of multiplying the many and various plants cultivated in our gardens, either for their use or beauty. It is a subject well wor...
-Notes On Rhododendrons
Rhododendrons, the pride of European gardens, as they are of their native wilds - so wrote the great Loudon nearly fifty years ago, when very few species or varieties were either known or cultivated...
-Notes On Rhododendrons. No. II
Notwithstanding their superlative claims upon all who have an interest in horticultural pursuits, and their admitted value as decorative plants, whether as arranged in masses in the flower-garden or s...
-Notes On Rhododendrons. No. III
With a situation sheltered, yet fully exposed to the sun, a competent supply of suitable soil, a good amount of moisture, without wetness, and an occasional watering when exceptionally dry weather occ...
-Notes On Rhododendrons. No. IV
The immense array of distinct species and varieties of Rhododendrons now in cultivation renders the selection of a moderate number, particularly to those who are unacquainted with them, a task of no l...
-Notes On Rhododendrons. No. V. Greenhouse And Conservative Sort
Among the many novelties which, during the last quarter of a century, have been introduced into British gardens, none have attracted greater attention, or obtained a higher place in popular favour, th...
-Notes On Some Flowers And Grasses Suitable For Drying
Possibly some of the readers of the 'Gardener' who do not possess a stove or other heated structure in which to grow flowers all the year round, find it at times very difficult to obtain them for the ...
-Notes On Some Of The Recently-Introduced Grapes
We purpose under this heading giving the impressions formed of new or recently-introduced seedling Grapes, - these impressions or opinions being the result of our own more direct experience, and of ob...
-Notes On The Culture Of The Hollyhock
This stately autumn flower has within these last few years been gradually disappearing from gardens. Some six or seven years ago the plants of southern growers were affected with a disease which in a ...
-Notes On The Culture Of The Pansy
Poets Lave immortalised the Pansy. But the Pansy of the poet and the Pansy of the florist differ somewhat. The Pansy freaked with jet is the poet's flower. The subject of these notes is of roundest ...
-Notes On The Hollyhock
At the commencement of this year Mr Brotherston gave us an article on the culture of the Hollyhock, and as his experience of this grand old flower was unfortunately the same as that of too many of its...
-Notes On The Newer Peas
These are a few new or at least reputed new varieties which I have seen growing this season that are well worthy of being recommended. In describing these I will so arrange them as that the order of t...
-Notes On The Selection Of Varieties
In- order to be successful in the ordinary routine of a garden, or in the culture of either fruits, flowers, or vegetables, there are certain natural laws relating to light, heat, air, soils, and mois...
-Notes On The Strawberry Crop Of 1879
The Strawberry is such a universal favourite among all classes of the community, that anything bearing upon its culture will always receive a certain amount of attention. The present season has proved...
-Notes On The Vine
In some cases Vines are cultivated in winter, in many instances in spring, but it is in summer when the great majority, especially of small growers, prefer to cultivate them; and no doubt they are rig...
-Notes On Todeas
Todea superba is one of the most beautiful of all Ferns, and worth a place in the most select collection. A well-grown plant will be from 2 to 3 feet in diameter; and when this result is attained, and...
-Notes On Watering Gardens
Some one, of high standing in the gardening profession, has said that a great number of the gardeners of the present day require the erroneous ideas pumped out of them before they can be really usef...
-Notes On Winter-Flowering Plants
The present month will be gladly welcomed by all who grow plants extensively for the production of flowers during winter, especially where house and pit room are somewhat limited. In northern district...
-Notes To Correspondents
An Amateur would feel much obliged to the Editor of the 'Gardener' for a few hints about the proper cultivation of Tuberoses. They were put, according to directions, in bottom-heat in the spring, th...
-Noticcs To Correspondents
All business communications and all Advertisements should be addressed to the Publishers, and communications for insertion in the 'Gardener' to David Thomson, Drumlanrig Gardens, Thornhill, Dumfriessh...
-Notices La Correspondents
All business communications and all Advertisements should be addressed to the Publishers, and communications for insertion in the 'Gardener' to David Thomson, Drumlanrig Gardens, Thornhill, Dumfriessh...
-Notices To Correspondents
In reply to one who signs himself Respect for the Under-Gardener, I may mention that the gardener did not board me. Can any one in their right senses suppose that he would do so for two or even th...
-Notices To Corrospondents
All business communications and all Advertisements should be addressed to the Publishers, and communications for insertion in the 'Gardener ' to David Thomson, Drumlanrig Gardens, Thornhill, Dumfriess...
-Novice
Black Hamburg, Maddresfield Court, Golden Champion grafted on Muscat stock, Lady Downes, Bowood Muscat, and, for fine flavour, Duchess of Buccleuch. Keep Bowood Muscat at the warm end of the house, Go...
-Nuphar, Yellow Water-Lily
In foliage. and mode of growth this group does not differ essentially from the Nymphaeas, but in the structure of the flowers there is an easily-recognised distinction. In Nuphar, the parts of the flo...
-Nurserymen
Eighteen distinct Hyacinths - 1. Downie, Laird, & Laing; 2. Thomas Methven & Sons. Six Rhododendrons, varieties, in pots or tubs - T. Methven & Sons. Six Camellia Blooms, varieties - Messrs Dickson ...
-Nuts. The Walnut
This nut is grown pretty extensively all through Britain, but it is only in the best parts of the kingdom that the fruit ever gets thoroughly ripened. The tree succeeds very well in almost any part of...
-Nymphaea, White Water-Lily
The petals, being numerous, and inserted on the side of the seed-vessel in a freer manner, give the flowers a more graceful appearance than those of Nuphar have. Few objects are more graceful and inte...
-Nymphaeaceae
The members of this order are all aquatic or marsh plants. It is an order of the grandest interest and beauty. All the world has rung with the praise and fame of the regal Victoria, the noblest of Wat...
-O
We use the paraffin for Peach-trees at the rate of a wine-glassful to a gallon of water. In applying it, one person is employed lifting a syringeful out of the pot or pail and discharging it vigorousl...
-Obituary
On the 25th June, in his eighty-fifth year, to the grief of his son and daughter, died Mr William Hunter, late gardener to Sir Edward Blount, Bart., of Mawley Hall, near Bewdley. The early history of ...
-Obituary Notice
We regret to have to announce the death of Robert Miln, Esq., at his seat near Arbroath, on the 13th inst., at the age of 84. Mr Miln was a liberal patron of horticulture, and had a passionate love fo...
-Obituary Notices
It is our painful duty this month to record the death of Mr Jas. Veitch, senior partner of the firm of James Veitch & Son3, Royal Exotic Nursery, King's Road, Chelsea. This sad event took place sudden...
-Odontoglossum Vexillarium
This is perhaps the most superb plant in the genus to which it belongs, which is saying a great deal; but when seen staged side by side with 0. Alexandras, 0. Pesca-torei, and the other acknowledged b...
-Old-Fashioned Gardening
Time was when kings and conquerors did not disdain the homely occupation of farming and gardening; when philosophy, in the persons of Plato and Epicurus, took up the gentle craft, and made their parad...
-Old-Fashioned Plants
Habrothamnus. It seems to us that amid the plethora of new plants, fruits, and vegetables, and the existing rage for novelty at any price, horticulturists are in danger of forgetting or ignoring old f...
-On Colour In The Tree Scenery Of Our Gardens, Parks, And Landscapes
(Read before the Horticultural Congress at Oxford, July 21, 1870). Last year I had the privilege of reading a paper at the Manchester Congress of this Society On the Improvement of Races, which sub...
-On Colour In The Tree Scenery Of Our Gardens, Parks, And Landscapes. Part 2
I think that any cultivated observer who may dwell ever so briefly on the tree scenery of Great Britain, will admit that the contrasts of colour, weak and little varied as they generally are, present ...
-On Colour In The Tree Scenery Of Our Gardens, Parks, And Landscapes. Part 3
The splendour of the American forests in autumn is a theme on which many travellers have loved to dwell, and leaves from these forests may be seen in that admirable institution the South Kensington Mu...
-On Cucumber-Growing
In a quiet country village about 16 miles from London may be seen a small garden devoted to Cucumber-growing for market. Having frequently visited this place, we are always forcibly struck with the si...
-On Grafting
What is the theory of grafting, at least in so far as the nature and affinity of the stock and scion in relation to each other are concerned? We know there are some families of trees, including a goo...
-On Hellebores
Considerable interest - more, perhaps, than their intrinsic beauty warrants - attaches to Christmas Roses. This is, no doubt, owing largely to the fact that some of them, especially the Christmas Rose...
-On Judging Fruits. A Paper Read At The Horticultural Congress At Oxford, On July 21, 1870
Dr Hogg, after a few preliminary observations, said: Though the judging of fruit has on various occasions occupied the attention of those interested in the subject, and has from time to time been disc...
-On Knowledge, Attained And Attainable
Or all the belles in the country-side, the Blue Bells of the wood carry the bell for grandeur and effect during what we fondly call the merry month of May. No dwarf plant, neither native nor foreign...
-On Late Autumn-Flowering Herbaceous Plants
The value of late-flowering hardy flowers is yearly becoming better appreciated. This year, characterised as it has been by its disastrous weather, resulting in a greater dearth of both fruit and flow...
-On Peach-Tree Training
Old writers (I use the term with all respect), and some young ones, borrowing from them, generally advise, in beginning with a young Peach-tree, to train up several shoots, to pick out the sublaterals...
-On Pruning Small-Bush Apple And Pear Trees
A CORRESPONDENT has by means of some queries placed this matter before us, and we have thought it of sufficient importance to lift it out of the ordinary space allotted to answers to correspondents, a...
-On The Art Of Gardening
By Mrs Francis Forster. W. Satchel & Co., London. This is evidently the work of a lady who has a warm attachment to what some people call old-fashioned flowers, and what amounts to a dislike to the n...
-On The Construction Of Frames
Kindly allow me a few lines in reply to your correspondents, A.M.A. and Adam Kenton, with respect to the building of their frames, the former with gas-tar, the latter with gas-lime. For my own part, I...
-On The Management Of Bees
The substance of the following and succeeding communications was delivered in the form of a paper entitled 'Half an Hour on Bees,' and was read at one of the Hanwell (Middlesex) penny-readings by a H...
-On The Management Of Bees. #2
When the bees crowd the mouth of the hive in comparative idleness, it is for the bee-keeper to determine whether he will secure honey or swarms. If honey is desired, supers or caps should be placed on...
-On The Management Of Bees. #3
When the first swarm issues forth, the original mother-queen goes with it, and during the next day the combs commenced by the bees in the new hive would be sufficiently advanced to enable her to grati...
-On The Management Of Bees. #3. Continued
For the present (the month of December), if stocks of bees are sufficiently numerous to keep up the temperature inside the hives, and are in dry winter-quarters, sheltered from rain, wind, and snow, w...
-On The Propagation Of The Lebanon Cedar
Sir, - Pray permit me to direct the attention of all those who are interested in arboriculture to the splendid crop of cones which these trees are now bearing. All Cedars do not bear fruitful ones, bu...
-On The Protection Of Fruit-Trees From Late Frost
A very large number of gardeners deem protection of some sort necessary; a few declare against protective measures in any degree, and not very fairly comparing small things with great, class them in t...
-On The Road
It was with a feeling of relief that we left the cares of superintendence, somewhat aggravated by an ungenial season, behind us, to spend our holidays among our old haunts and friends north of the Twe...
-On The Road. Continued
In a paper of this kind it is impossible to particularise details of such an extensive place as this. I would just observe that the same taste and skill that made Archerfield famous in every departmen...
-On The Road. #2
Back again from Glasgow to Dumfriesshire. We were anxious to visit Eccles, the seat of------Maitland, Esq., where we had heard something extraordinary in the way of Grape-growing was to be seen; nor ...
-On The Summer Management of Forcing-Houses
The management of forcing-houses in winter and spring has been treated of so often and so well by several correspondents of ' The Gardener,' that it would be difficult to write much that is new upon t...
-On Theoretical Instruction
Premising that a certain amount of education is necessary before any trade can be learned, it does not follow that a sound theoretical education is either necessary or of primary importance to a young...
-On Wiring Garden-Walls
In the November number of the 'Gardener' there are some judicious remarks on wiring garden-walls. I recur to it again simply with a view of dispelling several absurd ideas entertained by some parties ...
-On" Window Plants And Their Culture
So extended has now become the cultivation of window plants, either as grown within the glass in pots, or without the window in boxes, that attempts in this direction can be seen on every hand by any ...
-One Of The Advocates Of The Hardy Brigade
[As the question of staking was first raised by us, we must point out that our correspondent misrepresents our object in doing so. We did not raise the question of expense connected with much necessar...
-Onions
For the earliest supply, sow from the 1st to the 20th of August, according to locality, on moderately rich, firm soil. Some people sow in beds, but we prefer to sow them in a sheltered spot in rows on...
-Orchard-House
In this structure the success or non-success of the season may depend on one item of management - viz., watering, - that is, if the trees are restricted at the roots by pots or otherwise. Where there ...
-Orchard-House Forcing
The inmates of this structure will have been kept dry at the root throughout the late severe weather, and their pots protected at the same time from severe frost by being plunged or covered with some ...
-Orchard-House Fruit-Culture
I shall feel obliged if some of your correspondents who are able and willing should give their experience on the culture of Peaches, Pears, Apples, etc, in pots under glass. Several gentlemen have mad...
-Orchard-Houses
The disappointments of past years enhance the value of glass protection for hardy fruits; and the value of walls, unprotected by glass, is lessened to a great extent. Our experience is that walls are ...
-Orchards
In the south of England orchards are on the increase, showing they do not seem to fear the importation of foreign fruits, as some would endeavour to make us believe. Of course it requires years of wai...
-Orchids In Bloom
The following Orchids are in bloom in Mr Smith's Collection, at Brentham Park, Stirling, March 14 : - Ada aurantiaca. Angraecum citratum. sesquipedale. Arpophyllum giganteum. Barkeria Lindleyana....
-Orchids. Indian Crocus
MR WILLIAMS, in his admirable work on Orchid-culture, goes so far as to say that these lovely mountain Orchids are somewhat neglected by gardeners and Orchid cultivators generally. They are so beautif...
-Ornamental Trees And Shrubs
Acer (Maple) Colchicum rubrum. The foliage of this ornamental plant assumes a deep reddish tinge in the autumn. Acer negundo variegata (the variegated Norway Maple), a most beautiful plant, the foliag...
-Our Crop Of Peas During The Past Season
This crop with us during the past season has been a very abundant one. From the locality in which our garden is principally situated, we are rather later than usual in first commencing to gather; but ...
-Our New Arrangements For 1870
THE Proprietors beg to intimate to their readers that they have made new arrangements in regard to the editing of the 'Gardener,' which they trust will prove acceptable to their Subscribers, extend th...
-Ouvirandra Fenestralis, The Lattice Plant Of Madagascar
Amongst the many stove-plants cultivated for the beauty, elegance, or curious appearance of their foliage, there are many much more stately, but scarcely one more interesting, than the singular little...
-P. B. F
We would plant the centres of your circles with Sensation Chrysanthemum, then a ring of two rows of Crimson King Verbena, and next the grass a band of Cerastium tomentosum, or Alyssum maritimum varieg...
-P. R
We decline advising you. A man who thoroughly deserves advancement is, in 99 cases out of 100, sure to get on. See that the fault does not lie at your own door. Always remember that slovenliness, drow...
-Paeonies (G. M.)
Paeonies grow best in a light sandy loam, and need but little attention - digging round and manuring in the winter, and some care in tying them up neatly in the spring, being all they require. They so...
-Pancratium Illyricum
This is a choice hardy border-bulb, rarely met with in collections of hardy flowers. It has a large black-skinned bulb, emitting many strong fleshy fibres. The leaves are about 18 inches long and 2 1/...
-Pandanus Veitchii
One of the best table-plants of recent introduction, surpassing all the other Pandanuses. The leaves are serrated, light-green colour, with lines of pure white, and curving gracefully. Although our pl...
-Pansies
The summer of 1870 must have tried the patience of many a Pansy-grower, for such hot dry weather is terribly against this flower, and drives colour, marking, and form, into all kinds of fantastic shap...
-Pansy Box (Old Subscriber)
A Pansy Box to hold twelve blooms should be 13 inches long x 9 inches wide, and the case for holding the stand, with a cover to fit after the blooms are placed, should measure over all 4 inches at ...
-Papaver Orientate
This Poppy is near akin to the Papaver bracteatum, but differs from it in an important respect as regards its adaptation to ornamental purposes. It has the the showy orange-scarlet flowers of bracteat...
-Papaver, Poppy
This group is a large one, consisting mainly of annual and biennial and a few perennial species. A small selection of species only is needed to embrace the best and most distinct. The taller-growing s...
-Papaveraceae. Notes On Hardy Herbaceous Plants
This order does not include many plants of much ornamental value. It is much more famous for its medicinal qualities than for floricul-tural importance, yet it includes not a few plants remarkable for...
-Paraffin-Oil. A Cure For Mealy-Bug
I was a little surprised to find such a noted plant-grower as Mr Hammond recommending in the 'Gardener' for November the utter destruction of plants of Hoya carnosa infested with mealy-bug; and also, ...
-Parastranthus
Formerly the few species that are included in this genus were considered Lobelias; and, as implied in the new generic name, an inversion of the parts of the flower is the base on which the new family ...
-Paris Flower-Show
This exhibition, which opened on the 18th May and extended over a week, was held in the Palais de l'lndustrie, and as the French system of showing is so very different to what is seen in this country,...
-Parsley
This herb is equally as indispensable as the foregoing vegetable. From various causes, during the spring months, it is frequently very scarce, and where this is anticipated, seed should at once be sow...
-Part Of A Season's Experience In The Flower- Garden
During last winter a new herbaceous garden was made here, and I may say no pains were spared to lay a solid and lasting foundation, both in labour and material, in order to insure success. The subsoil...
-Passiflora Quadrangularis
This plant is not surpassed by the Vine for fruitfulness under ordinarily favourable conditions; and it is a mistake to suppose that it will not set its fruit without being impregnated with pollen fro...
-Passiflora Quadrangularis. #2
In reply to Mr Donaldson, I beg to say, that when we bought our plant from Fisher, Holmes, & Co., of Handsworth Nurseries, Sheffield, Mr Fisher informed us that it was the true variety, as sent out ...
-Patent Compounds
A neighbouring gardener recently called my attention to the state of the plants in his greenhouse, which, on looking at them, I found to be in a most deplorable condition, presenting a sight that migh...
-Paullinia Thalictrifolia
This fine plant at a distance and first sight would be taken for a variety of Maiden-hair Fern, being of slender growth, producing leaves freely which resemble the Maiden-hair Fern very much. The old ...
-Peach Crop Of 1869
Sir, - The interesting remarks on this subject by your correspondent, Wm. Chisholm, in last month's 'Gardener,' will be interesting to all fruit-growers, but more especially to those who have had this...
-Peach Culture Under Glass
Ventilation The Peach dislikes a close, stagnant atmosphere, and should be as freely ventilated as circumstances will admit of all through the process of forcing. If the house is kept too close and m...
-Peach Culture Under Glass. Disbudding Or Summer Pruning
What is known by the term disbudding the Peach, consists in the removal of all the buds while in a small state that are not required to grow into shoots, to furnish wood bearing fruit for the followin...
-Peach Culture Under Glass. Disbudding Or Summer Pruning. Continued
Root-Pruning I am averse to root-pruning the Peach and Nectarine, or any stone fruits, according to the fashion recommended by some, and have never found it necessary to cut away many of their roots ...
-Peach Culture Under Glass. Propagation And Selection Of Trees
The propagation of Peaches and Nectarines being a process almost entirely confined to nursery-gardens, it is not my intention to enter very elaborately into the details connected with it, for very few...
-Peach Culture Under Glass. Pruning And Training
Many ways of training and pruning the Peach and Nectarine have been practised and recommended. French horticulturists especially have been very successful in training them in several ways characterise...
-Peach Forcing
Should the weather be cold and dull, be cautious in the application of fire-heat, unless it be in the case of trees in full bloom, to keep up a circulation of dry air: go over the blooms at mid-day wi...
-Peach Forcing. #2
Where the early crop is all gathered, give the trees a thorough washing with clean water through the engine, and continue to syringe or engine them two or three times a-week, to keep the foliage fresh...
-Peach Forcing. #3
Force cautiously if the weather be dull and cold. When the trees are in bloom keep the temperature at 50, and give more or less air daily to create a circulation of dry air about the trees. Take ...
-Peach Forcing. #4
Fruit that are ripening should have an abundant supply of air night and day. If any are shaded by the leaves, push the latter aside so that light can reach the fruit, or it will not colour properly. I...
-Peach Forcing. #5
Where early Peaches are set and have cast their blossoms, the night temperature may be advanced to 50, and to 55 by the end of the month, with 5 to 10 more by day. Syringe the tree...
-Peach Forcing. #6
Where Peaches are ripening look over the trees, and if any of the fruits are shaded by the leaves push the latter aside so that sun and air can play freely about each fruit to flavour and colour it pr...
-Peach Forcing. #7
Apply fire-heat to all strong-growing trees till the wood is well ripened. Look over trees from which fruit has been recently gathered, and remove all superfluous shoots, so as to let light and air pl...
-Peach Forcing. #8
With a proper selection of varieties and cautious forcing, few fruits can be forced early with more constant success than Peaches. For years in succession we have gathered Peaches from the same trees ...
-Peach Forcing. #9
Give the earliest trees a good washing with the engine as soon as the fruit are all gathered, and continue to do this frequently to keep them clean and healthy. If there be any spider about them, put ...
-Peach-Trees On The Extension Or Spur System
Some years ago I tried the spur system in cultivating the Peach, not thinking that I would get better fruit from the spurs than from the long-rod system, but thinking that I might reduce the labour to...
-Peach-Trees On The Extension System
It is worth while to discuss whether it is better to encourage strong vigorous growth on young Peach-trees under glass and early cropping, or little or no crops at all and hard pruning, in order to la...
-Peach-tree Insects
Red-Spider I have never found much difficulty in preventing red-spider from gaining much of a footing on Peaches. Cleanliness in connection with the wood-work, glass, and everything else, the dressin...
-Peaches (Under-Gardener)
They were both raised from seed by Mr Thomas Rivers, of Sawbridgeworth, and are thus described by him: - Lord Palmerston - Very large, the largest of Peaches; skin creamy white, with a pink cheek; fl...
-Peaches And Nectarines
We do not recommend amateurs in northern localities to plant Peach-trees in their gardens, for they very seldom prove satisfactory unless they are under glass. It would be somewhat out of place, in ad...
-Peaches And Nectarines Forcing
Crops that have passed the stoning stage may be forced on more freely, and the night temperature raised to 60 and 65, according to state of the weather. As in the case of Vines, make the mos...
-Peaches Dropping Prematurely
Gardeners as a rule are very greedy - at least they get this name - and for my part I think I am no exception, although, in common with the most of my brother-gardeners, my greed puts nothing extra in...
-Pears
These, I think, we may safely assert are the most generally popular kind of fruits for wall-culture, as not only do they succeed where others fail, but if a judicious selection of varieties is planted...
-Pears On Quince Stocks In Scotland
Some of your correspondents have expressed doubts as to the welldoing of Pears on Quince Stocks in your country. It is quite possible that in some soils and on some sites they do not succeed thoroughl...
-Peas
Of what country the common Pea is a native is not exactly known, so far as I am aware of, nor is the exact time of its introduction into Britain recorded by any one that I know of. More than likely it...
-Peas. Part 2
The method sometimes adopted of waiting till far on in February, and then sowing in stove-heat to make up for lost time, is not to be recommended. The way that is attended with the most substantial re...
-Peas. Part 3
Where Pea-sticks are not easily got, as in the case of villa gardens, I would recommend the adoption of a plan I once saw practised by an amateur, which is, to drive in stakes along the sides of the r...
-Peas And Their Culture
Of all the different kinds of vegetables grown none are greater and more general favourites than Peas. The chief object which every one aims at in their culture is to have them as early as possible, a...
-Pelargonium
Pelargonium Vesuvius Brilliant scarlet; flowers produced in largish trusses in wonderful profusion. Habit compact and dwarf; lively green leaves slightly zoned. We regard this, from our experience of...
-Pentstemon Heterophyllus
Beautiful and numerous as are the species and varieties of this favourite genus, the present species lately introduced to cultivation is scarcely equalled in point of colour by any of the older and be...
-Petunias As Bedding Plants
The drought has served most unmistakably to bring out the value of Petunias as bedding plants. Repeatedly have I seen them furnishing masses of effective colours without that intensity of hue so pecul...
-Phoenocoma Prolifera
The above plant is closely allied to the Aphlexis, and in many respects requires the same kind of treatment; it also bears everlasting flowers, which last a long time in perfection. It makes a very ha...
-Phylloxera Vastatrix
We are very sorry to learn that this most formidable of all the enemies of the Grape Vine has made its appearance in England. We were the first to call attention to it in this country as being prevale...
-Phylloxera Vastatrix. #2
Mr Dunn, Dalkeith Gardens, who for three years fought a most determined and successful battle at Powerscourt, in Ireland, with this Vine-destroyer, has kindly furnished us with some particulars regard...
-Phylloxera Vastatrix. A Caution To Importers Of Plants From France
A short time since a correspondent sent us specimens of Vine-leaves taken from Vines which had been planted last January, and from which the foliage was dropping off yellow and prematurely, and the Vi...
-Phyteuma. Genus of Canipanulaceae
Phyteuma is one of the most distinct, though not the most showy, of Campanulaceae. It is nearly allied to Campanula, but always easily distinguished from it by the curved cylindrical form of the corol...
-Picturesque Beds
Although it is our desire by all means to avoid heaping ridicule on the tastes of any, or to join in the hue and cry against even the most feeble attempts at any style of flower-gardening, we are, a...
-Pinching - When And How To Do It
Perhaps the subject upon which I am about to treat would have been better discussed at an earlier date; but its importance to juniors in the horticultural profession, as well as to others who look for...
-Pine Forcing
Where ripe Pines are required in May and June, no time must be lost in getting the required number started into fruit. For this purpose, select those Queens that have completed their growth early in a...
-Pine Forcing. #2
Continue to apply the directions of last month to those that are starting, and that have shown their fruit distinctly. The most important point in their management this month is to keep the soil about...
-Pine Forcing. #3
Those that started into fruit in the early part of winter will this month ripen and be found very useful when other fruits are generally scarce. As soon as they show signs of colouring, give no more w...
-Pine Forcing. #4
Early-started fruit will now be swelling rapidly towards mature size; and when it is an object to get them ripe as soon as possible, they may now be pushed on with a high temperature, but let it be pr...
-Pine Forcing. #5
Succession stock will now have well taken with their shift, and make rapid progress, and will require careful management to prevent them from making a soft watery growth on the one hand, and on the ot...
-Pine Forcing. #6
That portion of the stock which are intended for early summer supply next year, should, by the end of this month, have their pots well filled with roots, and be of a stocky well-matured growth; for if...
-Pine Forcing. #7
Suckers potted in August and early part of September will now grow freely, and will require to be well aired to prevent their drawing, especially if they are plunged rather thickly than otherwise. Aft...
-Pine Forcing. #8
Early autumn potted suckers that are well rooted, and wintering in dry light pits or houses, with bottom-heat supplied by hot-water pipes, will require to be carefully examined at intervals, and water...
-Pine Forcing. #9
The earliest-potted suckers of last year should now be examined, and if they are becoming pot-bound take the earliest opportunity of shifting them. If dry, they should be watered five or six days befo...
-Pine Forcing. #10
If the suckers most in need of shifting have not been shifted in the course of last month, no time should now be lost in attending to them. Do not force these into rapid growth until it can be done wi...
-Pine Forcing. #11
If the succession plants that have been shifted in the end of February, and in March, and that have been plunged in beds of fermenting material, such as leaves and tan, are dry at the root, let them h...
-Pine Forcing. #12
Succession plants that were shifted into their fruiting-pots in March will now be growing rapidly. Great care is now necessary in watering and regulating the ventilation of these, so as to produce a g...
-Pine Forcing. #13
Plants that were shifted to their fruiting-pots in March and April will now be growing rapidly, and filling their pots with roots. Much of the success in connection with this portion of the stock depe...
-Pine Forcing. #14
Queens intended to supply ripe fruit next May ought to have their pots well filled with roots and their growth well matured by the end of the month. Avoid an over-abundant supply of water and air-mois...
-Pine Forcing. #15
Autumn and winter fruiting plants swelling off their fruit in various stages will require to be supplied with water often enough and in sufficient quantity to keep the soil steadily moist but not over...
-Pine Forcing. #16
If young stock, such as August and September potted suckers, are at all crowded, let them be taken out of the pit and replunged at wider distances, now that the autumn fruit will be mostly cut, and mo...
-Pine Forcing. #17
In order to have ripe Pines in May and June, a number of the earliest Queens that have been kept comparatively dry and cool for the last ten weeks or more, and that are likely to show fruit without ma...
-Pine Forcing. #18
Considering the excessive cold of the last three months, it is more than probable that the majority of early-fruiting Queens that are usually past the flowering stage by the end of last month are only...
-Pine Forcing. #19
Succession plants that were shifted into their fruiting-pots in March and early in April will now have commenced to grow freely, and require to be carefully managed to prevent their making a soft, att...
-Pine Forcing. #20
If the weather should be such as is generally looked for in July, tire-heat even in the coldest localities will not be much required; and in the warmer parts of the country it will be almost entirely ...
-Pine Forcing. #21
About the middle or end of this month is a good time to pot a second batch of suckers from plants that have recently ripened fruit. For Queens 6-inch pots, and for strong suckers of strong-growing sor...
-Pine Forcing. #22
It frequently occurs that a few Pines start into fruit in October and November. These may either be such as failed to start along with others in July and August, or of the most forward of those intend...
-Pine Forcing. #23
It has been our practice for many years to keep our whole stock of Pine plants as thoroughly at rest as possible from the middle of November till after the first week of February. There may be excepti...
-Pine Forcing. #24
When a really aristocratic dessert has to be made up, a Pineapple is indispensable, and the season is at hand when it is more difficult to have a variety of fresh fruits fit for the table than any oth...
-Pine Forcing. #25
Presuming that the necessary number of early Queens have started in due time after they were subjected to increased temperature at the roots and in the atmosphere, the most of them should be nearly do...
-Pine Forcing. #26
Plants that were shifted four or five weeks since into their fruiting-pots, will, if treated as directed last month, have began to lay hold of the fresh soil, and to show signs of growing freely. Care...
-Pine Forcing. #27
Young plants that were shifted into their fruiting-pots three months ago will now have good hold of the fresh soil, and should be growing freely. With the stronger sunshine of midsummer and the full v...
-Pine Forcing. #28
The very bright and really warm weather experienced during the latter half of May and the early part of June, caused Pines in all stages to make rapid progress, and they have well made up for the litt...
-Pine Forcing. #29
Attention must this month be more particularly directed towards laying a good foundation for a supply of strong young plants for next season. Suckers yielded by early Queens, and that were potted some...
-Pine Forcing. #30
As a rule it is not desirable to keep Pine plants that are expected to make a vigorous growth next season in an active growing condition after the beginning of this month. Early autumn - potted sucker...
-Pine-Apple Growing Without Bottom-Heat
History repeats itself, not less in scientific Pine-apple growing than in any other branch of culture. Your correspondent from Elvaston Castle astonishes me by not mentioning the performances of the l...
-Pine-Growing At Wycombe Abbey
A few days ago we found ourselves journeying along the Great Western Rail way through Buckinghamshire to have a look at Wy combe, to pay a promised visit to Mr Miles, and to see his Pine-growing, for ...
-Plant-Houses
At this season plenty of flowers are to be had; the Chrysanthemums being at their best, also Salvias of sorts; Lobelia cardinalis, which has been grown in pots for decorative purposes under glass, Hab...
-Plant-Structures
At this season watering must have increased attention; it may be done in the after-part of the day. The roots of all pot-plants should now be in healthy soil, with proper drainage; no stimulants, or t...
-Plant-Structures. #2
As plants come into bloom outside, and gardens become gay, all plants inside should be of a showy or interesting character, not merely for a glare of flowers, but handsome and graceful in form, striki...
-Plant-Structures. #3
Summer and autumn flowering-plants will now be abundant, and great care must be exercised, so that show-houses of any pretension may not form a part of the bedding system. To have a mass of plants c...
-Plant-Structures. #4
The work in this department is much as was recommended for last month. A general preparation for harvesting the stock through the winter should now have attention. The washing of all glass houses, lig...
-Plant-Structures. #5
Plants to be wintered under glass should all be safe from frost, neatly arranged in their winter quarters, clean and orderly. However hardy any plants in pots are (which have to stand the tear and wea...
-Planting Fruit-Trees
Out of the window I can see an Apple orchard, every tree in which is like a good-sized Chestnut-tree; they bear fruit in cart-loads. At the time when those trees were planted, planting was considered ...
-Planting Out Forced Strawberries For A Main Crop
For the last nine years we have planted out our forced Strawberry plants in a systematic way, for a main crop of fruit, and have never in one instance failed in securing a most abundant crop. I am awa...
-Planting Oxalis
Sir, - In answer to your correspondent, L. M. N. P., I beg to say that I think a bed 80 feet long would not, under ordinary circumstances, be too long for edging with the Oxalis, but it would depend a...
-Planting Shrubs
The planting of forest trees and shrubs, where such work has to be done, will be continued to a late date this spring; for while we write, the frost and snow have only just gone, and it will require s...
-Plants As Sanitary Agents
THIS important point has just been put prominently forward in a thoughtful paper read by Mr William Ingram, gardener to the Duke of Rutland, Belvoir Castle, before the Leicester Museum, in which, with...
-Plants In Pots
Six Fine - Foliaged or Variegated Plants - 1. James Cocker, jun., Aberdeen; 2. John Stewart & Sons. Four Scarlet Geraniums and their varieties - 1. John Taylor, Foxmount; 2. G. Philip, Castle Huntly...
-Plants Suitable For Table Decoration
Plants and flowers have become intimately associated with our everyday lives. We have recourse to them in seasons of social enjoyment and in the hours of sorrow. They have long been plucked for the ba...
-Plants Suitable For Table Decoration. Crotons, Coleus, And Caladium Argyrites
Those who have never seen a dinner-table adorned with the foregoing plants can scarcely form a right idea of their exceeding loveliness, while those who have seen them will look upon them as old frien...
-Plants Suitable For Winter Decoration At Messrs Veitch's
Business called me to London in the first week of the new year, and I thought I would try and glean some information that would be useful to the readers of the 'Gardener': with this object in view, I ...
-Plants Suitable for Table Decoration. Aechmea Fulgens
Among the many varieties of plants suitable for dinner-table decoration, the Dracaena, as a fine-foliage plant, is worthy to stand first; and out of a great number of flowering-plants which I have tri...
-Plants for January
Peas A small sowing of Peas may be made some time during this month in favourable localities, should the weather be open and the soil in good condition, otherwise there is no gain in being early and ...
-Pleasure-Grounds
This island of ours is being studded with gardens and dressed grounds, especially in the neighbourhood of our large towns and centres of commerce, with a rapidity which was never dreamt of thirty ye...
-Pleiones
Having been a reader of the ' Gardener' since its commencement, I naturally take a little interest in reading and supporting it - by recommending it amongst the gardening community. I was pleased to s...
-Plumbago Capensis Culture
Most plants, to grow them well, require cultural management peculiar to themselves or to their own wants. Plumbago Capensis does not form an exception to this rule. It is seldom met with amongst colle...
-Plumbago Rosea Coccinea
Amongst useful stove-flowering plants this Plumbago should be extensively grown for decorative purposes. There are objections urged against it as useless for cutting, for which purpose it is not suita...
-Plums
Seeing how well these succeed as standards, especially in the more southern counties, it is scarcely advisable to generally devote much wall-space to them. Where, however, space is plentiful, or where...
-Plums And Cherries. Fruit-Culture
Being very much alike in their nature and requirements, we have placed the Plum and the Cherry under one heading. Much of what we have said on the root and top cultivation of Apples and Pears applies ...
-Plums From The Plum-House At Chatsworth
About the middle of July Mr Speed kindly forwarded us fifteen varieties of Plums from the Plum-house at Chatsworth, his object being to show which varieties are best suited for forcing. The fruits wer...
-Podocarpus (The Long-Stalked Yew)
In this group we have a large number of grand evergreen shrubs and trees, some of them very lofty - natives of Asia, Africa, and America, many of them producing excellent and durable timber. Though bo...
-Poinsettia Pulcherrima
We have many varied and rich floral colours of singular beauty and attraction to please the eye, elevate the taste, and otherwise charm the fast-declining days of the year - the cultivator having by p...
-Polyanthus
I send you the method by which I grow my Polyanthuses in beds. I take the soil out of the bed 18 inches deep, and I put a thick layer of old horse-dung at the bottom. Then I mix the soil from the bed ...
-Polyanthuses (R. T.)
Polyanthuses may be parted at the end of this month: it would perhaps have been better had they been parted in May. When divided, be sure to plant them deep enough, so that the new fibres, which will ...
-Poot-Cuttings
Cuttings of the root often give better results than other means of propagation. Three plants just occur to me that may readily be increased by cuttings off their thick fleshy roots. Their names are Se...
-Pot-Culture As Specimens
Commencing with rooted cuttings early in spring, they should be potted into pots 3 inches in diameter, then plunged in bottom-heat of 65, with a few degrees higher atmospheric temperature, avoidi...
-Potato Planting
The value of a good crop of sound floury Potatoes cannot be over-estimated, and yet how few, comparatively, use the means to secure it! Planting the same kinds which our forefathers have grown from ti...
-Potatoes
These are often planted before the ground is fit for their reception. More depends upon the proper preparation of the seedtubers, especially with the kidney varieties, than early planting; homegrown s...
-Potatoes - The Effect Of A Change Of Seed On The Production Of Crops
Rear-Admiral Hornby, of Knowsley Cottage, Prescot, Lancashire, has forwarded to us a table, giving the results of a trial of various sorts of Potatoes, in which the comparative productiveness of seed ...
-Potatoes: How To Grow And Show Them
By James Pink. Crosby Lock wood & Co., London. Mr Pink has in this handy volume gone very fully into the practical routine of the preparation of the soil, and all other matters relating to the high-c...
-Pots For Strawberries
While your correspondent, Mr Hinds, is writing on Strawberries in 'The Gardener,' I should feel obliged if he would explain to me and others the incomprehensible statement of his in his calendarial w...
-Potting Material For Orchids
A variety of opinions have recently been advanced regarding what is the best potting material for Orchids in general. Mr Bruce Finlay, of the Manchester Botanic Gardens, has recently recommended, from...
-Premier Runner Bean
I cannot but think that this new and distinct variety will prove to be a valuable acquisition to our list of Runner Beans. Whilst thoroughly differing in its character from the old Scarlet Runner, it ...
-Preparation Of The Ground For Roses (Rosarian)
The following directions are given by Mr Keynes, and they will no doubt prove of service to you: - When they are to be placed out singly on lawns, a hole should be made 2 feet deep, and large enough ...
-Preparing For The Flower-Garden
No time should now be lost in making final arrangements as to the mode of planting the beds for the ensuing season. There is much forethought called for, even in the smallest system of flower-beds - p...
-Presentation
The old pupils of Mr M'Kie, gardener to the Dowager-Duches3 of Athol, Dun-keld, availed themselves of the occurrence of the International Exhibition in Edinburgh on the 8th of last month to present hi...
-Presentation To Mr William Hinds
On the 17th of February 1879 a number of the principal gardeners in the neighbourhood of Liverpool and a few friends assembled at the Public Rooms, Aigburth, for the purpose of making a presentation t...
-Presentation To Mr William Sutherland
On the 20th December 1878 about forty gentlemen (including the leading gardeners about Liverpool, and other friends of our valued contributor Mr Sutherland) assembled at the Public Rooms, Aigburth, fo...
-Primula
This is a very beautiful and interesting group of hardy border and rock plants, which in bygone years was much admired and extensively cultivated in this country, but latterly it has been entirely neg...
-Primula Auricula
Primula Auricula is the parent of the well-known varieties of stage and border Auriculas. In its native habitats on the German, Swiss, and Italian Alps, it is rather a variable plant, but not to such ...
-Primula Elatior Magnified
This is one of the most beautiful of the elatior-tribe of Primroses. It has the compact tufted habit of all the breed. The flowers are large, about the same size, and fringed in the way of a good type...
-Primula Vulgaris
The Primrose is distinguished from the Cowslip by the flower-stalks having the appearance of springing directly from the root, and bearing each only one flower: there is, however, a common footstalk s...
-Primula. Notes On Hardy Herbaceous Plants
Primula Denticulate Primula Denticulate is a species of considerable interest and beauty. It is rather vigorous in habit, with large oblong lanceolate toothed leaves, hairy on both sides, but densely...
-Prizes For Groups Of Greenhouse And Stove Plants
Your correspondent, A. Leslie Melville, writing on the above subject in last number, says he staged from forty to fifty plants on a space 6 feet by 6. Surely there must have been a mistake in figures ...
-Progress Of Pomology
I have on a former occasion alluded to the wonderful progress of pomology in our day, and I deem it proper, although at the risk of repeating previous statements, to erect, as it were, some landmarks ...
-Progress Of Pomology. Continued
Mark the amazing increase of the small fruits. Take, for instance, the Strawberry. Within the memory of many of this assembly, we were dependent almost wholly upon the wild species of the field, or th...
-Propagating Clematis Bicolor (Amateur)
This is easily propagated by grafting one-year-old wood on to the roots of Clematis flammula (the sweet-scented kind). The plants should be potted as soon as grafted, and the pots plunged in a gentle ...
-Propagating Lobelia And Centaurea Raguslna
In the September number of the ' Gardener,' my attention was drawn to an article by J. S. on the propagation of Lobelias and Centaureas. I quite agree with J. S. so far as regards the propagation of L...
-Propagating Vines From Eyes
As it has become one of the questions of the day whether Vines propagated and grown in the usual way in pots or on turves are best for planting the same season, or which of the two systems gives the q...
-Propagation Of Aralia Sieboldi (William Hood)
Mr John Gibson, of Battersea Park, kindly writes in reply to your inquiry: In reference to the propagation of Aralia Sieboldi, I am sorry I have no definite experience as to the best mode of increasi...
-Propagation Of Centaurea Ragusina (Candidissima) (C. L. S.)
The best way to obtain a supply of this plant is to take plants from the flower-garden in the autumn, and pinch or cut their heads in at the same time. They should be potted in some light sandy soil, ...
-Propagation Of Lapageria Rosea, Etc, At Chatsworth
The system of propagating this splendid climber by Mr Cully brings to mind a very successful mode of treating this plant as adopted by Mr Speed at Chatsworth. When there (on a visit for a few days) in...
-Propagation of Echeveria Metallica By Cuttings
This striking plant is so useful in flower-gardening for various purposes, that there are few places now where more or less of it is not seen. Strictly speaking, it belongs to the class of fine or cha...
-Properties Of Fruit, Etc. - Fruit-Judging
There seems at the present time nothing less understood by a great number of practical gardeners than the properties of fruits. Seldom do we visit a show, but we find the opinions of exhibitors and ot...
-Prosperity Of Otago
Otago is at present enjoying a full tide of prosperity, as is evident from the following statements of his honour the superintendent, at the opening of the Provincial Council, in which he says: I am...
-Protecting The Blossoms Of Fruit-Trees
During the severe frost last winter, I found considerable difficulty to fix upon some plan that would effectually serve for the above purpose. I had previously seen the efficacy of various kinds of co...
-Protection For Wall Fruit-Trees
Fig. 1 represents a 12-foot wall, the canvas drawn a little way up. a a a a are 3/8-inch wrought-iron rods, which are hooked into an eye in an iron bar projecting from the wall at the top, and fixed a...
-Prumnopytis Elegans (The Graceful Prumnopytis)
As far as we know the only representative of the genus in cultivation, this superb little plant is a recent introduction from Valdivia, in South America, discovered by Mr Pearce, growing as a broad bu...
-Pruning
It is an old and often-repeated saying, in reference to any disputed point, that the truth lies between two extremes - not always midway, we presume. One of the privileges enjoyed by her Majesty's sub...
-Pruning Early Vines For A Crop
The time is fast approaching when everything connected with our early vinery must be put in readiness for another season's forcing. The usual routine is generally gone through with no doubt a measure ...
-Pruning Roses
Probably no more common subject could be selected to write on than this, but for all that, the pruning of Roses is far from being generally understood or rightly performed in numerous instances. I bel...
-Pteris Serrulata
Those who have to keep up a supply of plants for house decoration, will find this Pteris a most useful plant. It is noways particular as to soil, so long as it is sufficiently open, though a compost o...
-Pteris Umbeosa
Considering the great demand for ornamental plants for all sorts of decorative purposes, it is matter for surprise that this most useful and ornamental Australian Fern is not cultivated to a greater e...
-Pyrus Japonica
Pyrus Japonica is a far more coarse-growing plant than either of the above, and seldom can be made to show such a neat appearance; but when once well established, it sometimes has an interesting appea...
-Quick Way Of Fruiting Bananas. (Musa Cavendishii)
Last April I had two very fine suckers of Bananas in 10-inch pots, and being unwilling to throw them away, yet not knowing very well what to do with them, being scarce of room, I resolved to act upon ...
-Quince Jam
The following is an excellent method of making Quince jam, and a very simple one: - Take 12 lb. of Quinces, pared and cored; cut them into small pieces; put 12 lb. of white sugar into a preserving-pan...
-Quince Stock
I was pleased to see Mr M'Millan's supplementary paper on this subject, and I am gratified to learn that he is experimenting practically with the Quince: he has my best wishes for his success, and non...
-R,. D
Cucumbers to bear from August till the end of November will do best on trellises. Melons to the end of September can be grown very well on the surface of the bed, though we prefer them on trellises al...
-R. E. S., Laurencekirk
The following are 24 Gladiolus, all for exhibition varieties:- Grace Darling, Marshal Bazaine, Lycoris, Octavie, Ossian, Rosa Bonheur, Sir J. Paxton, Dr Hogg, Duchess of Edinburgh, Le Vesuve, Scopas, ...
-R. G
The Golden Champion is the most robust and vigorous Vine we know, whether grafted on another stock or on its own roots. We have it on Muscats, Hamburgs, White Tokay, Raisin de Calabrica, and on its ow...
-R. H
Such plants as dwarf Palms, Dracaenas, Tree-Ferns, Ficus elastica, Aralias, and Crotons will suit you for winter decoration. For summer, any of the fine-foliaged plants, such as Caladium Coleus, Ferns...
-R. P. Brotherston
The probability is, that the seed you have procured of the Lassianthus Russelliana is too old. It, however, may yet vegetate. Cover the top of the pot with a sheet of glass, and keep it in a moist sto...
-R. T
We have simply recommended what we practise, and would like to know why a young gardener should be called upon to labour extra time on worse terms than any mechanic. We have great sympathy with young ...
-R. V., Shorley Bridge
Pansies can be safely planted up to April, but if too late in planting, they are apt to go off when hot weather sets in. The following twenty-four show varieties will answer your purpose well, viz.: -...
-R., Aberdeen
The object in placing a little dry moss over the crocks at the bottom of pots is to keep the soil out of them, and by that means secure more perfect drainage. Thanks for the seeds. We do not know them...
-Rainfall In 1880
Inches. At Lowther Castle, Westmoreland ..... 32.54 At Thoresby Park, Nottinghamshire ..... 34.02 At Drumlanrig, Dumfriesshire ...... 33.15 T...
-Raising Vines From Eyes On Turves
I should not have alluded to this subject had your correspondent, Mr Hinds, not mentioned names in describing the system of raising Vines from eyes on turves, which he has adopted and found so success...
-Random Notes On Flower-Gardening
Two of the driest and warmest seasons on record, followed by one of the wettest, most sunless, and cold in the annals of meteorology, must be regarded as extremes of the most trying order to the syste...
-Ranunculus Parnassitefolius
This is a rather rare species from the south of Europe, very pretty and interesting, hardly ornamental enough to find favour with those who derive their gratification from floral display merely, but o...
-Ranunculuses
I herewith send for your notice a plant of double Ranunculus in flower. We have a good-sized bed of them here (5 feet by 24) at the west end of a south border in our kitchen-garden, and to see them at...
-Rapid Growth Of Young Forest-Trees
There is a young wood which forms the north boundary of the flower-garden here planted about eight years ago with various varieties of trees, the growth of some of which have been so rapid, that it ma...
-Raspberries. The Cultivation Of Hardy Fruits
Like most of the other varieties of small fruits, the Raspberry is a general favourite, and is found in most gardens from the least to the greatest. It is of easy cultivation, yet, nevertheless, to pr...
-Ravages Of Vermin
Under the initials of K. Y. a correspondent writes: I am suffering in a great degree - i.e., my Peas - from a vigorous attack of Curculio linearis and C. macularius; and I shall be glad if you will...
-Reciprocal Action
This phrase has a rather learned and respectable sound when used by a writer on the subject of roots or branches, and is supposed to express much or little meaning just according to circumstances; but...
-Recommending New Fruits
It is in no spirit of carping criticism that these remarks are penned; nor are they specially brought to mind by the discussion of the properties of Madresfield Court Muscat Grape in your columns the ...
-Remarks On Fruit-Culture
Notwithstanding the books that have been written, and the gardening periodicals that have been filled weekly with information upon fruit-forcing and fruit-growing generally, there still seems to be a ...
-Remarks On The Chrysanthemum
I have to thank Teetotaller for his criticism of my Hints on the Chrysanthemum in May 1870. At first sight I feared that I had committed some great blunder, deserving the censure of the numerous c...
-Remarks On The Cultivation Of The Mushroom
I mean to allude particularly to the soil I use in the construction of the beds. In autumn I select soil from the places where Mushrooms grow most abundantly, remove it about 6 inches deep, and replac...
-Remarks Suggested By A Horticultural Tour
THE last few decades of the present century have been strikingly characterised by perseverance, energy, and material progress. The commerce of nations, and of Britain in particular, has been developed...
-Report Of The Weather - 1871
On March 14th we had 8 of frost; on the 15th, 12; and on the 16th, 7. Our thermometer is self-registering, and hangs 5 feet from the ground, against a north wall. The garden lies high, ...
-Report Of The Weather. 1870. Lambton Castle Gardens, Durham
January Rainfall, 1.93. Barometer Mean, 29.84. Thermometer Mean, 34.8. Highest, 45 on the 5th, 8th, 9th, 16th, and 18th. Lowest, 15 on the 27th. February Rainfall, 1.93. B. Mean, 29.96. T...
-Report Of The Weather. 1872
Meldon Gardens, Morpeth, Northumberland. Month. Mean Temperatures. Rainfall-Inches. No. of days on which rain fell. Greatest fall in 24 hours. Minimum. Maximum...
-Report Of Weather - 1871
On March 15th the temperature fell 23 below freezing; on March 28th, 10 of frost; on 29th, 12; on April 11th, 8; and this morning May 17th, we had 11 of frost; the result bein...
-Report On Double-Flowered Pelargoniums
A collection, consisting of forty varieties of these novel and useful plants, was grown at Chiswick during the past year. They were also, with one or two exceptions indicated below, presented to the g...
-Reports Of The Weather
The summer of 1871 will long be remembered for its unusually low temperature. The thermometer at Drumlanrig Gardens indicated 1 below freezing on June 26, and some of the more tender things, suc...
-Reports Of The Weather. 1870. Highclere Castle Gardens, Hants. 600 Feet Above Sea-Level
Thermometer. Barometer. Depth of Rain. Prevailing Winds. Lowest. Highest. Lowest. Highest. Jan., 26th 20 17th 55 ...
-Resting And Watering Plants
Plants generally will be safely located in their winter quarters, many of them, we fear, in a backward state, and by no means so well prepared to withstand the winter as in many previous years. The wo...
-Retinospora (The Japan Cypress). Notes On Hardy Conifers
The beautiful shrubs and trees comprised in this genus are indigenous to Japan, where also, with their numerous varieties, they are extensively planted for ornamenting gardens and pleasure-grounds. I...
-Review. A Book about Roses: how to Grow and Show them
By S. Reynolds Hole. William Blackwood & Sons, Edinburgh and London. This is a well-got-up volume of 277 pages, and though the greater part of the substance of it appeared in our columns from time to...
-Review. Handbook of Hardy Herbaceous and Alpine Flowers
By William Sutherland, Gardener to the Earl of Minto; formerly Manager of the Herbaceous Department at Kew. William Blackwood & Sons, Edinburgh and London. If any proof were required that Mr Sutherla...
-Review. Hardy Flowers: Descriptions of Upwards of Thirteen Hundred of the Most Ornamental Species, and Directions for their Arrangement and Culture, etc
By William Robinson, F.L.S. London, Warne & Co. Another volume from the busy pen of Mr Robinson ! and one of the best he has yet written. If hardy border-plants do not soon become as popular as their...
-Review. Home-Made Wines: How To Make And Keep Them
With Observations on Gathering and Preparing the Fruit, Fining, Bottling, and Storing. By G. Vine. London: Groombridge & Sons. In a neat, compact, readable little book of forty-eight pages, the autho...
-Review. Practical Treatise on the Cultivation of the Grape Vine
By William Thomson, Tweed Vineyard, Galashiels. Seventh Edition, Enlarged. Blackwood & Sons. The very successful career of this 'Treatise' has brought it to its seventh edition in less than nine years...
-Review. The Amateur's Greenhouse and Conservatory
A Handy Guide to the Construction and Management of Plant-Houses, the Selection, Cultivation, and Improvement of Ornamental Greenhouse and Conservatory Plants. By Shirley Hibberd. Groombridge & Sons, ...
-Review. The Art of Botanical Drawing
By F. W. Burbridge. London, Windsor & Newton, 3S Rathbone Place. Mr Burbridge is well known to the readers of most of the gardening periodicals of the day as a very accurate and scientific botanical...
-Review. The Art of Grafting and Budding
By Charles Baltet. William Robinson, 37 Southampton Street, London. A volume of over 200 pages devoted to grafting and budding by a Frenchman of great experience in the art. It is a translation of M. ...
-Review. The Garden Oracle, and Horticultural Year-Book for 1869
The Garden Oracle, and Horticultural Year-Book for 1869. Edited by Shirley Hibberd, F.R.H.S. Groombridge & Sons, Paternoster Row, London. Is replete with well-assorted information, bearing on a great...
-Review. The Gardener's Year-Book and Almanac for 1873
By Robert Hogg, LL.D., 171 Fleet Street, London. This Annual is more instructive than ever. In addition to a full descriptive list of notable new fruits and flowers of 1872, there is the most complete...
-Review. The Gardener's Year-Book, Almanach, and Directory for 1869
The Gardener's Year-Book, Almanach, and Directory for 1869. By Robert Hogg, LL.D., F.L.S., etc. Journal of Horticulture Office, 171 Fleet Street, London. This work becomes every year more useful and ...
-Review. The Parks, Promenades, and Gardens of Paris. By W. Robinson, F.L.S
This is a handsomely got up volume of 644 pages, containing 400 illustrations, all bearing upon the subjects of which it treats - showing the various methods of training fruit-trees in vogue in France...
-Review. The Six of Spades
A Book about the Garden and the Gardener. By the Rev. S. Reynolds Hole. William Blackwood & Sons. There are few authors who are at the same time highly amusing and instructive writers. We need scarce...
-Review. The Subtropical Garden: or, Beauty of Form in the Flower-Garden
By William Robinson. John Murray, Albermarle Street, London. Another volume of some 250 pages from the busy pen of Mr Robinson. He has long waged a furious war against the popular system of bedding-pl...
-Rhododendeon Aucklandii
A delightful surprise awaited me on calling to see this noble plant in flower in the secluded little glass-garden of Mr M'Kelvie, Osborne Terrace, Edinburgh. I had not seen Rhododendron Aucklandii bef...
-Rhododendron Floribunda
When writing about Rhododendrons last year, I think I noticed Rhododendron floribunda. This variety forces as freely as other early sorts; and what an acquisition it is to those that have bouquets in ...
-Rhododendrons
Of all our common shrubs I often wonder that the commoner varieties of the Rhododendrons are not far more extensively used. Many of the common shrubs are well adapted for giving shelter, while, as to ...
-Rhodora
This genus, of which Canadensis is the only known species, is found abundantly in a wild state over a large portion of Canada and the United States, growing in bogs and the margins of lakes; and thoug...
-Rhubarb
To the northern parts of Asia we are indebted for this very useful vegetable. It was introduced into Britain in 1778 by Dr Fothergill, and a good many years elapsed before it was generally cultivated ...
-Richardia Aethiopica
Although this plant is not new, still it is one that can never be altogether uncared for. To those who have to provide a great many plants for winter and spring decoration, it is especially valuable. ...
-Ripening Late Grapes
WE commend Mr Henderson's forcible and seasonable remarks on the ripening of late Grapes in our present issue to the particular attention of those of our readers who are in-terested in the matter. It ...
-Romford Horticultural Society's Show
It so happened that we were at the Essex Agricultural Society's show, held at Romford in June last, and also visited the Romford Horticultural Society's Show, held in the same park and at the same tim...
-Rosarian. Notes Of The Month
At last, after much patient waiting, there has come a break in the weather, and the long-continued drought that almost without intermission had lasted from March till the middle of October, has come t...
-Rose Notes For Amateurs
It is often said, no flower is a greater favourite with all classes than the Rose. We have only to look about our own doors for proof of the correctness of this, as we fail to find a garden where flow...
-Rose-Garden
Try and find out all Roses which are killed outright, and replace them before there is a scarcity of plants to be purchased - as I fear there will be. The reports of Roses and shrubs which are killed ...
-Rosemary
An aromatic, hardy Evergreen shrub. It is found abundantly in those countries bordering on the Mediterranean growing on hills, and in dry rocky places. As an herb, it is cultivated only for medicinal ...
-Roses And Mildew
In very dry seasons mildew among Roses is often prevalent, while in wet cold seasons they often suffer from the same scourge. This need not be wondered at, as any plant which suffers at the root from ...
-Roses For Exhibition
Abel Gand. Achille Gonod. Adam, T. Adolphe Brongniart. Alfred Colomb. Alice Dureau. Alpaide de Rotalier. Antoine Ducher. Archimede, T. Baronne Adolphe de Rothschild. Baron Gonella, B. Beauty of Walt...
-Roses For Exhibition. Continued
I know, in fine, that the importation of this stock has been a very gracious boon to those who love the Rose; but I am equally sure that nine-tenths of the most perfect Roses which have been grown and...
-Roses In Pots And Under Glass
In many gardens the stock of these is ever increasing, and the knowledge of this must be gratifying to all ardent Rose-growers - as of all Roses, I think there are none so valuable as those gathered u...
-Roses On Their Own Roots
The interest in Roses never seems to flag, except it be in new ones. The new Roses of late have been very much like new novels, attractive only in their names. Enthusiasts - and they are not few - wil...
-Roses To Be Seen To Best Advantage
A south border well trenched and manured is probably the best position for Roses, and if it has a good slope to the front so much the better. Plant vigorous kinds, beginning at the back with crimsons ...
-Roses Under Glass
Rose-culture under glass is a practice which has been, if anything, rather neglected in gardens; and yet, perhaps, the gardener who has to supply cut-flowers for the house could not grow any one plant...
-Rotation Of Crops In The Kitchen-Garden
A regular rotation in the kitchen-garden of crops of vegetables of distinctly different botanical character, is usually enjoined by all writers who casually touch on the subject, as being profitable a...
-Round London
A friend who went up to London with me to do the show at Kilburn, declared, after a day's wading amongst the acres of mud, that the mud of itself was worth going four hundred miles to see. For mysel...
-Round London. #2
The next garden visited was altogether different from the general ruck. Old fashioned flowers occupied borders and beds, and even encroached indoors, for two houses have been built entirely for the cu...
-Royal Botanic Society's Show, June 14th And 15th
On this occasion the grand specimen plants of Mr Baines, gardener to H. L. Micholls, Esq. of South-gate, were worthy of special notice, both in the stove and greenhouse flowering and foliage plants; h...
-Royal Botanic Society, July 6
If anything, this show was of a lower degree of quality than its predecessor. The plants were of a somewhat mediocre character; the table decorations helped to redeem the character of the show to some...
-Royal Botanic Society, March 22d And 23d
The chief attraction of this Show was the collections of Hyacinths. Messrs Veitch, of Chelsea, and Mr W. Paul, of Waltham Cross, each had excellent groups of new varieties, and the best of the old sor...
-Royal Botanic Society, May 19
There is no show held in London or near it that can compete with this for general effect, and those are to be envied who are privileged to look upon it for the first time. There is always a beautiful ...
-Royal Botanic Society, Regent's Park, May 25
This, the first of the great shows held at the Regent's Park, followed only four days later, and some of the plants seen at the Crystal Palace also put in appearance here. A new arrangement of the sch...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society
This Society is to hold a grand international fruit and flower show in Edinburgh on the 8th and 9th of next September, when 500 will be offered in prizes; and there is reason to expect that, as a dis...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #2
The annual spring exhibition of the above Society took place in the Music Hall, George Street, Edinburgh, on the 31st March. The morning of the day was frosty, and though a number of plants suffered i...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #3
Great International Fruit and Elower Show at Edinburgh, September 8 and 9. It must be confessed that, in every sense of the word, that was one of the grandest exhibitions of Grapes ever held; notwith...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #3. Part 2
This came from Mr James Dickson, gardener to John Jardine, Esq., Arkelton. The Messrs Lane had a wonderfully large bunch of Muscat of Alexandria. Muscat Hamburg was well shown by Mr David Morrison, Mr...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #3. Part 3
As might have been expected, there was a great lot of Melons, the best in the green-fleshed class being Beusie's Incomparable and Dr Hogg; and in the scarlet-fleshed class the perennial and ever-victo...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #3. Part 4
He was the only exhibitor, and was awarded the first prize. Zonal Pelargoniums were generally large, and somevvhat coarsely grown. The best lot of four kinds shown by Mr J. Kennedy, gardener to D. Mu...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #3. Part 5
The cut blooms of Dahlias bore unmistakable evidence of having been roughly treated by the frosb and drought; nevertheless, Messrs Downie, Laird, & Laing contributed, and took first prize with a good ...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #4
This Society held its autumn exhibition in the Music Hall, George Street, Edinburgh, on the 7th of last month. As a whole, it was scarcely up to the average of the autumn exhibitions of the Society. A...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #5
The autumn exhibition of this Society was held in the Music Hall, George Street, Edinburgh, on the 13th of last month. As an exhibition of fruit and flowers it was one of the best ordinary-autumn show...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #6
The summer exhibition of the above Society was held in the Waverley Market on 9th July, and seldom, indeed, has any of the shows of the Society been held under more unfavourable circumstances as regar...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #6. Continued
The judges were Messrs Anderson, Oxenford; Priest, Newbattle; Cowe, Morningside; Gray, Eglinton Castle; Garrett, Whittinghame; Lindsay, Botanic Gardens; Currie, Edinburgh; M'Farlane, Edinburgh; Gorri...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #7
The autumn exhibition of this Society was held in the Waverley Market on 10th September. Excepting the great International Shows, this was generally admitted to be the most extensive show of plants an...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #7. Part 2
For the best eight dishes of fruit,Pines excluded, Mr M'Indoe came first with Madresfield Court, Forster's Seedling, Black Hamburg, and Golden Champion Grapes; Violet Hative and Alexander Peaches; a ...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #7. Part 3
One bunch Gros Colman Grapes. - 1, A. Gould; 2, G. M'Lure, gr. to J. Milne,. Esq., Trinity Grove. One bunch Golden Champion Grapes. - 1, W. Kay, gr. to Sir Jas. L. Foulis, Millburn Tower; 2, D. Kemp,...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #8
The spring exhibition of this Society on the 6th and 7th of last month, notwithstanding the severe weather of the eight days preceding it, and the intense frost on the morning of the first day's show,...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society. #8. Continued
Special awards were bestowed on some Vanda blooms from Mr M'Intyre, The Glen; and on a basket of flowers from Mr M'Millan, Broadmeadows. It was hardly possible to believe that the combination of blue ...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society And The Forthcoming Show Of Roses
Every lover of the queen of flowers must hail with satisfaction the result arrived at by the Committee of the Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society to give that prominence to the Rose which its merit...
-Royal Caledonian Horticultural Society's Spring Show
After a winter so exceptionally severe, there was every reason to fear that the spring show of this Society would show its effects in a limited entry of exhibition produce. Visitors to the show would ...
-Royal Horticultural Society
The following prizes are offered for competition at the next meeting of the Fruit and Floral Committee of the Royal Horticultural Society, on Tuesday, April 6 th, viz.: - 1. White-spined Cucumber, 1 ...
-Royal Horticultural Society. #2
A severe hail-storm with thunder and lightning on Monday, a wet day Tuesday, with the appearance of more on the 18th, led me to fear there would be but a poor show. I was agreeably disappointed; there...
-Royal Horticultural Society - Fruit And Floral Meeting, June 21st
The subjects invited on this occasion consisted entirely of Zonal Pelargoniums, Fuchsias, and Palms. Class 1 and 2 was for Zonal Pelargoniums. Mr J. Catlin, gardener to Mrs Ler-mitte, sen., East End,...
-Royal Horticultural Society Pelargonium Show, August 3
Whether it was that the classes of Variegated Pelargoniums are less regarded than they were, or owing to the drought having affected the coloration of the leaves; or whether because the prizes offered...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Great Provincial Show At Manchester, July 19th
On another page will be found some general remarks relative to this exhibition. Here it will suffice to indicate some of the leading prizes, and the subjects staged in competition for them. As usual, ...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Great Provincial Show At Manchester. Part 2
Orchids were not numerous, but a few good specimens were shown, such as Miltonia spectabilis, with eighteen finely-expanded and beautifully-marked flowers; aerides odoratum, with twelve very fine spik...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Great Provincial Show At Manchester. Part 3
In the classes for amateur growers there was no competition. The first of the special prizes offered by Mr Broome for twelve Carnations and Picotees, was also taken by Mr Turner, who had of the former...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Great Provincial Show At Manchester. Part 4
The first of the special prizes given by Edward Joynson, Esq., for eighteen cut Roses (amateurs), was also taken by the Rev. S. R. Hole, who had fine blooms of Victor Verdier, Marechal Vaillant, Triom...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Great Provincial Show At Manchester. Part 5
Class 19 For 6 Variegated Zonal (Tricolor) Pelargoniums, distinct (amateurs) (Prizes offered by Messrs G. & W. Yates and William Southern, Esq.) - 1. Mr M. Torkington, Wilmslow, 5, 5s.; 2. Mr Smith,...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Great Provincial Show At Manchester. Part 6
General Prize-List. Flowers And Plants Class 48 6 Stove or Greenhouse Plants, Heaths included, distinct (open) - 1. Mrs E. Cole & Sons, 5; 2. Mr J. Bolton, 3; 3. Mr W. E. Dixon, 2. Class 49 6 S...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Great Provincial Show At Manchester. Part 7
Class 100 6 Cut Roses, distinct (amateurs) -!. Rev. S. R. Hole, 15s.; 2. Mr T. Draycott, 10s.; 3. J. E. Mapplebeck, Esq., 5s.; 4. Mr J. Walker, 2s. 6d. Class 101 12 Cut Roses, new kinds, distinct...
-Royal Horticultural Society's November Exhibition
(From our London Correspondent). The meeting of the 12th and 13th inst. was one of the most interesting held for some time past. Chrysanthemums, fruit, and Potatoes were largely represented, and exci...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Rose-Show, June 29
Here, the Roses were neither so numerous nor so fine as at the Crystal Palace: some hot days intervening, told their tale in a marked manner. Of Roses, the best 72 came from Messrs Paul & Son, compris...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Second Spring Show
This exhibition was held on the 17th of April, but was a very small affair; and, though held in the Conservatory, fully one-half of the plants were contributed in the form of miscellaneous collections...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Third Spring Show, May 8
Roses were the main feature here, some capital plants being produced, small in size, bushy, and generally having an abundance of bloom. With nine kinds, Mr William Paul was first; Mr C. Turner, secon...
-Royal Horticultural Society's Third Spring Show, May 8. Continued
In the conservatory or show-house, the choicer plants of tropical and sub-tropical regions were displayed; and here the plant-grower par excellence found, undoubtedly, much to delight him. The tent ad...
-Royal Horticultural Society, April 6
This was a charming spring show, perhaps one of the prettiest and most interesting seen for years, those things commanding the greatest amount of interest being found, as is often the case, in the mis...
-Royal Horticultural Society, Aug. 17
This meeting proved extremely interesting for the excellent display of cut Gladioli, Phloxes, and Hollyhocks brought together. The former were very finely shown, and their superb beauty was much admir...
-Royal Horticultural Society, Dahlia And Verbena Show, Sept. 7
The large exhibition held at the Crystal Palace on this day helped to thin this one somewhat, though the prizes being rather small, there was but little inducement to show. In the class for 12 Dahlia...
-Royal Horticultural Society, June 7th
This is the Society's largest exhibition of the season held at South Kensington. The weather has been very severe, which caused a falling-off in some of the classes, exhibitors not wishing to expose s...
-Royal Horticultural Society, June 8
This was a very fine exhibition, perhaps the finest London show yet held, as the quality of many of the things staged was very good indeed: stove and greenhouse and fine-foliaged plants, together with...
-Royal Horticultural Society, May 17
On this occasion an improvement was evident in the general effect of the exhibition, from the show being held in a large tent, and the plants staged on turf banks instead of in the conservatory. Pelar...
-Royal Horticultural Society, May 18
Ericas were a leading feature of the show, and they made a very nice display, being also somewhat plentifully produced. The leading varieties were Lindleyana, Ventricosa coccinea minor, Eximea superba...
-Royal Horticultural Society, May 4
This show had as its leading feature Roses and Auriculas. Of the former, the best nine in pots were furnished by Messrs Paul & Son, having Anna Alexieff, Vicomte Vigier, Camille Bernardin, and Marecha...
-Royal Horticultural Society. 17th December. Fruit Committee
Henry Webb, Esq., Vice-President, in the chair. Mr Dancer, Little Sutton, sent Reinette de Caux and Dutch Mignonne Apples, and the Committee were of opinion that the two varieties are essentially iden...
-Royal Horticultural Society. August 9th
Gladioli from Langport and Petunias from Swanley were the two special features of the meeting, though new plants were well represented by the Chelsea firms. The Council-room did not present a crowded ...
-Royal Horticultural Society. February 8th
Primulas, Orchids, and Grapes constituted the chief features at this meeting, the first-named occupying a large space, and forming an attractive group. There was a large attendance of the members of t...
-Royal Horticultural Society. June 14th
New plants, Pyrethrum blooms, with several miscellaneous groups of Orchids and other plants, constituted the chief features of this meeting, and visitors found sufficient to interest them both in the ...
-Royal Horticultural Society. March 8th
The advancing season was well shown at Kensington on Tuesday, for the exhibits had so far increased in numbers that, besides several small groups in the Council-room, an unusually fine display of Cycl...
-Royal Horticultural Society. March 8th. Continued
In the conservatory, as noted above, the display was unusually bright, the stage along one side of the entire path being entirely occupied with large and beautiful groups of plants. The most noticeabl...
-Royal Horticultural Society. May 10th
Exhibits on Tuesday last were not very numerous, though both the Council-room and the conservatory contained some groups of interest and several promising new plants. Fruit Committee Harry Veitch, E...
-Royal National Tulip-Show
The special character of this exhibition requires we should give its details rather more space than we usually allot to horticultural shows. It was held at Cambridge, on the pleasant grounds of King's...
-Rust On Grapes
In his Treatise on the Grape Vine, Mr W. Thomson gives it as his opinion that rust on Grapes is caused by sulphur coming in contact with the fruit at a very early stage of its development. Rust has be...









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