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The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V18 | by Thomas Meehan



In the North, with the great body of vegetation still shrouded in snow and the usual habiliments of winter, little can be done in this department; but in the Southern States gardening operations will be about commencing actively. Pruning should be completed as soon as possible. Some judgment is required in pruning flowering shrubs, roses, etc., although it is usual to act as if it were one of the most common-place operations. One of the most clumsy of the hands is commonly set with a shears, and he "goes through" the whole place, clipping off everything indiscriminately. Distinction should be made between those flowering shrubs that make a vigorous growth, and those which grow weakly; and between those which flower on the old wood of last year, and those which flower on the new growth of next season, as the effect of pruning is to force a strong and vigorous growth...

TitleThe Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V18
AuthorThomas Meehan
PublisherCharles H. Marot
Year1876
Copyright1876, Charles H. Marot
AmazonFour-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long

Devoted To Horticulture, Arboriculture And Rural Affairs.

Edited By Thomas Meehan, Formerly Head Gardener to Caleb Cope, Esq., at Springbrook, and at the Bart-ram Botanic Garden near Philadelphia; Graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, (London,) England,. Member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Author of "American Hand-Book of Ornamental Trees." etc.

-Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground - Seasonable Hints
In the North, with the great body of vegetation still shrouded in snow and the usual habiliments of winter, little can be done in this department; but in the Southern States gardening operations will ...
-Communications - A Plea For Planting Pyrus Coronaria
I was much pleased with Mr. Stauffer's remarks, in the March number of last year, on our native Pyrus coronaria, the American or Garland Crab Apple. He, Mr. S., is an excellent writer, - good, sound l...
-Waterproof Packing Paper
Dissolve 1.82 lbs. white soap in 1 quart water. In another quart water dissolve 1.82 ozs. troy of gum arabic and 5.5 ozs. glue. Mix the two solutions, warm them, and soak the paper in the liquid, and ...
-Beecroft's Wheel Hoe
Man is a pretty smart sort of a creature, and has managed in various ways to evade the primeval curse with tolerable success. The old-fashioned hoe we have, however, regarded as just about the same as...
-An Automatic Gate
We have never seen a gate of this character that did not in time get out of order to an extent that caused an early abandonment. The idea of a self-opener is too good in a, gate to be wholly given up,...
-The Tulip Tree In England
A correspondent of Gardener's Chronicle says: There is in Lord Llanerton's grounds, Woolbeding, near Midhurst, Sussex,-' a very fine Tulip tree, which was acknowledged by the late Sir Wm. Hooker to b...
-Wintering Echeverias
Echeverias which have served for borders, beds, or floral inscriptions during summer, if potted to pass the winter, are liable to rot or spindle up. A method of preserving them, which occupies practic...
-Arundo Conspicua
Vietch says it is very similar in habit to the well-known Pampas. Grass (Gynerium argenteum), but blooming about two months earlier than that variety, and lasting much longer in beauty. ...
-Physianthus Albens
The Garden says: -Those of your readers who are in want of a quick-growing summer climber, for covering a wall or trellis, should procure this interesting Asclepiad. A small plant of it, little more ...
-Corylopsis Spicata
We have before given some account of this beautiful Japan shrub, one which will probably prove hardy in our country. The Gardener's Magazine has recently given a wood cut of it, and with the following...
-New Hardy Trees
From various sources we make up the following, that will probably all prove hardy in our climate: Maalcia Amouriensis We had a specimen of this from the collection of Alfred Cope. The flower...
-Green House And House Gardening - Seasonable Hints. #1
Many of our readers have only a few window plants. These are often kept too warm, too wet, have too little sunlight, and have too many insects. In towns, in addition to all these, they have often too ...
-Communications - Aesthetics In Conservatories No. 2
The London Crystal-Palace, of 1851, designed by the then only Mr., afterwards Sir Joseph Pax-ton, the gardener to the Duke of Devonshire, was a clever structure, meeting the requirements imposed by th...
-Galea Aethiopica
Our lady readers will value the following little hint from a correspondent of the Gardener's Magazine: - With a comparatively small number of plants, I have been cutting blossoms nearly every week for...
-Button-Hole Roses
Mr. Radclyffe must have written in fun when he recommends Madame C. Joigneaux and Charles Lefebvre as button-hole Roses; but he might as well have gone the whole hog and recommended a full-expanded...
-Treatment Of Oranges
'The small Otaheite Orange, so useful for winter flowering, should, when out of bloom, have its growth pushed on in a little warmth. This plant is subject to scale, and before any young growth is made...
-Verbenas From Seed
Those who are limited or room in their greenhouses, and still like to make as good a show of bedding plants as possible during the summer months, will find it by far the best plan to raise their stock...
-Silver-Leaved Plants
A. L. S., writes, Will you give me, please, a list of such silver-leaved. [Artemisia, stellaris; Centaurea requsina, often called C. Candida; C. gymnocarpa, and Cineraria maritima, are gener...
-Saxifraga Huetii
Most of the Saxifrages in cultivation are perennials, - the best known, perhaps, being the S. sarmentosa, one of the most useful of plants in hanging-basket culture. The present species in as annual, ...
-Disease In Palms
E. H., New Bedford, Mass., writes: - I enclose to you two samples of Palm-leaves affected with a disease which seems to be spreading over the entire plant; my gardener is at a loss to know how to dea...
-Seasonable Hints. #1
In getting ready for spring; vegetables do not fear to pile on the manure. It is the rank rich growth which gives the agreeable tenderness to them, and without an abundance of manure this cannot be do...
-Communications - Free And Cling-Stone Peaches
In the September number of the Monthly you compared several of the new early Peaches with mine (the Downing), which was quite favorable to the latter, but closed by calling it a clingstone. Please def...
-Black Walnut
Almost every man and boy thinks he knows all about gathering and cracking and eating Walnuts - but may be not. Our native Black Walnut (Juglans nigra) is hardly ever treated right, and is when rightly...
-Grape Growing At Galveston, Texas
Many kinds of American Grape vines are grown in the gardens in and around Galveston, and although some sorts of them do well, the more experienced gardeners (I apply this term to those people interest...
-Comet Peach
I send you by to-day's mail a plate taken from the same kind of peaches sent you, only the ones sent to Dewey were larger than the ones sent you. I also sent some to Chas. Downing, who says it is a ne...
-Eldred Cling Peach
A year ago last June, Mr. D. R. Eldred, a farmer and enthusiastic fruit grower of this (Washington) county, Texas, brought a basketful of these peaches to Mr. Watson for his opinion regarding them. It...
-Strawberry Fertilizer
A Lancaster correspondent of the Farmer says: An experiment made last year by myself may not come amiss at this time with those who grow Strawberries. I procured half a hogshead, filled it with rain ...
-Profitable Bee-Keeping
One of the most profitable speculations in Bee-keeping that we ever knew, was by a young lady in Illinois, until recently, Miss Ella Dunlap. But two Cali-fornian girls seem to have gone ahead of her A...
-Dreer's Lima Bean
Mr. Geo. Paist, of Rees-ville, Chester Co., Pa., reports that he finds this variety a remarkably prolific bearer, and in his opinion it is much superior in every respect to the common Lima bean. ...
-Remedy For The Celery Fly
One of the worst enemies to the celery is a small fly, which deposits its eggs in the leaves, and the young eat their way under the skin, and in this way materially affect the growth of the plant, The...
-Dwarf Apples
On my Pommier de Paradis stock, Apples may be planted eighteen inches apart each way, and when they begin to touch each other may have each alternate tree removed, leaving the plantation at three feet...
-Phylloxera On The Roots Of Grape
G. A. F., Waltham, Mass., says: - I send in this package a few Iona Grape roots and wish you would be kind enough to inform me if the knots on the roots are caused by the Phylloxera. Please answer th...
-Weld Celery
M. L. says: - In Baltimore recently, and dining with a friend, I was struck with the excellency of some duck, and was told that it was through the bird having been fed on Celery. Is it generally know...
-Grapes For A Cold Grapery
B., Lebanon, Pa., asks: What are the best grapes for a cold grapery? [The best of all kinds for a cold grapery is the Black Hamburg. Perhaps for an amateur who takes pleasure in their growth, so...
-The Highland Hardy Raspberry
A correspondent from Ulster Co., N. Y., sends us the following. We may say that we know nothing of the variety personally: This variety, though surpassed, perhaps, in some respects by others more ...
-The New Early Peaches
T. T. A., Comorn P. O., King George Co., Va., asks: Please inform me how the early Beatrice, Louise, and Rivers peaches have succeeded this year, and would you advise the planting of them with us? ...
-Apples For South-Eastern New Jersey
A correspondent from S. E. New Jersey asks: Can you give in the Gardener's Monthly a list of late-keeping apples of good quality and production? I have the Winesap, but would like several other varie...
-Red-Fleshed Apple
A Henry Co., Ills., correspondent says: I have received from Michigan an apple which I think is worthy of notice. The skin is yellow, with a slight blush, medium size, juicy, good flavor. The remarka...
-Winter Grafting Of The Plum
A New Jersey correspondent writes: I have a few hundred plum stocks which I wish to graft, and could I not saddle graft them successfully during any pleasant weather this winter? Should I tie and cem...
-Plum Growing
O. M., Ottumwa, Iowa, writes: I am interested in plum growing, but am at a loss to know how to proceed, or what plan to adopt, and appeal to you for advice. This subject has not been tried much in th...
-A Seedless Persimmon
B. says: I send a small box of seedless persimmons. My reason for sending is, I never heard of another tree of the kind north of Texas, and the seedless feature is, in my opinion, a valuable one. Th...
-A Piece Of History
As will be known to most of our readers before their eyes meet this, the Horticulturist has now become a part of the Gardener's Monthly. Personally we regret the fact. We have never felt any rivalry i...
-Communications - Abies Macrocarpa - A New Coniferous Tree
In the fall of 1874, Mr. F. M. Ring, of San Gorgonia Pass, California, sent to the Department of Agriculture some cones and twigs of a coniferous tree, of which he desired to know the name. The striki...
-Do Plants Need Water?
Thomas Mechan, editor of the Gardener's Monthly, answers this question by saying that if any one thinks plants need water, lie can try by stopping up the hole in the bottom of a flower pot, in whic...
-Disease In The Larch
It is known that the plantations of Larch in Scotland suffer much from disease, and the planting has received a check in consequence. At a recent meeting of the Scottish Arboricultural Society, Mr. Go...
-Immediate Effects Of Cross Fertilization On Fruits
Everyone knows that whenever Indian corn is fertilized by strange pollen there is an immediate result on the grain of corn, but it has been contended that this is not a fruit, as pomologists understan...
-Fungus Cracking The Pear
At the meeting of the American Pomological Society at Chicago, the editor of this magazine was called on somewhat unexpectedly to deliver an address on fungi and fruit diseases. Without notes or memor...
-Toughened Glass
We have already noticed this invention. When it becomes cheap it will be one of the best insurances we can have against hail storms for our glass-houses. The Boston Journal of Chemistry, referring to ...
-Rapidity Of Growth In Timber Trees
At one time it was supposed that it took almost a long life time for a tree to grow to any considerable size. Of late years people come to understand differently. At a recent meeting of the Scottish A...
-Depth Of Roots
J. B. says: You remark hat the roots of trees which run deep are not or food, but for moisture. Is it a recognized;ruth in vegetable physiology that some roots can only take up moisture, while others...
-Aponogeton Distachyon
Please let me know, through the Gardener's Monthly, the botanical family and native place of the water plant called by the gardeners Aponegeton distachyon. A [native of Cape of Good Hope, and, l...
-The Potato Disease
M. says: Dear Sir: -Since my return from Europe, where I spent the summer, 1 have been looking over some of the back numbers of the Gardener's Chronicle, and find that the potato rot continues to exc...
-Female Weeping Willow
M., Newcastle, Del. says: I have heard that the willow in this country has but one sex. Is this correct, and how is it? [This probably refers to the common weeping willow, which, up to quite rec...
-Emblematic Description Of The Passion Flower
Mrs. R. T. W. asks: Can you inform me where I may find the Emblematic description of the 'Passion Flower,'and greatly oblige. [ An apology is due to this lady for overlooking the question last mo...
-The Charter Oak
We have the following let-ter from Dr. G. W. Russell, of Hartford: I sent you last year some of the leaves of the Charter Oak, which you thought to be those of the Quercus discolor or Swamp White Oak...
-Rocky Mountain Silver Spruce
H., Quincy, Ill., asks: Will you be kind enough to give us the botanical name of the 'Rocky Mountain Silver Spruce?' We are often asked to give it, and cannot do so. We enclose a paragraph clipped f...
-Poisoning By Rhus
I notice, in Gardener's Monthly for December, a communication in regard to the poison of rhus. I have suffered many times from the poison of Rhus toxicodendron (L.) and Rhus venenata, (D. C.) In New E...
-Gardeners At Galveston
Gardeners, with the view of getting employment at their trade, should not come to Galveston or, indeed, to Texas, unless pre-engaged, as no one employs professional men of their class - a negro or com...
-Law Of Purchasing Plants
A trial has taken place in England in which an employer refused to pay Mr. B. G. Williams for plants purchased by the gardener. Some of these plants were expensive, one of them being $150. It was show...
-The Baobob Tree. Adansonia Digitata
Before the discovery of the mammoth Sequoias of California, the baobob tree of India used to be the greatest wonder among large trees. We have read of it taking thirteen men spreading arms and touchin...
-Dr. C. C. Parry
This well-known botanical explorer, has been spending the summer in Central Utah, and will winter in Southern California. Few men have added so much to the knowledge of American plants as he has. H...
-Personal
The Country Gentleman, one of whose editors recently made a visit to Mr. Meehan's nursery, at Germantown, has a kind reference to the fact that in the seventeen years of Mr. Meehan's editorship of the...
-Billieu's Comet Peach
Since D. 0. Munson's article was printed in first form of present No-(see page 14) we have the following from him by way of correction: I still find there is a mistake in the name of the Comet pea...
-Agave Virginica
We are in receipt of the following striking circular from Tennessee: New Flower - Agave virginica. This plant was discovered a few years ago in one of the beautiful valleys of East Tennessee, ...
-Binding The Advertisements
A correspondent of the publisher's, from Saratoga Springs, New York, sends his year's numbers to be bound, directing the advertisements to be inserted; for, says he, in years to come it will remind...
-Thanks
The publisher hands the editor a batch of letters from many who are renewing their subscriptions, telling him of their satisfaction with the magazine, and their intention to send ou a few more subscri...
-Alfred Cope
Horticulture suffers a great loss in the decease of this gentleman, which occurred on the 4th of December. He was in his 70th year, fifty of which he had been more or less of an invalid. He was partic...
-Death Of Dr. Hull
This excellent gentleman died at his residence, near Alton, Illinois, during the last week of November last, of inflammation of the bowels, in his 50th year. Mrs. Hull, heartbroken by the blow, died f...
-R. Buist's Catalogue
With a remarkably full list of plants, Mr. Buist makes the announcement that this will be the last he will issue. The next will be that covering the sale by auction, in June, 1876, when the whole of t...
-Botanical Bulletin
Mr. John M. Coulter, a well-known botanist, has commenced the publication of a small monthly serial under this name. It is only $1 a year, and single numbers 10 cents. Address Dr. John M. Coulter, Han...
-The American Agriculturist
This well-known agricultural monthly is now entering its thirty-fifth year, and with all the evidences of its old time prosperity. Prof. Thurber, the chief editor, is so well known for his many intell...
-The Scientific Monthly
This is a new magazine, devoted to the natural sciences, and published and edited by E. N. Fitch, of Toledo, Ohio. Price, $3 a year. It is a healthy sign that there is room for intelligent magazines o...
-The Annual Register
We have just received an advance copy of the Annual Register of Rural Affairs for 1876, published at Albany, N. Y., by Luther Tucker & Son, and mailed to any address for the nominal sum of 30 cents. I...
-Gladiolus. The Pronunciation
A correspondent writes: - Vick accents the first syllable; Webster, the second; and those not favored with the perusal of either, the third. Among those who wish to be governed by authority, the ques...
-Hidden Advertisements
A. P. P., Peoria, Ills. writes: Send me some samples. Gardening here is carried on extensively for market purposes. We have have been so often fooled in agricultural papers that we have sworn to only...
-The Centennial Exhibition
Horticulturists will be anxious to learn what is going on in this department of our coming Centennial. We suppose there will be special exhibitions of various classes of fruits and flowers during the ...
-Academy Of Natural Sciences Of Philadelphia
The natural sciences are in so many ways the handmaids of horticulture, that we are all particularly interested in their prosperity. The Philadelphia institution has the finest collections, taken as a...
-From The Proceedings We Take As Follows: -The Apple Hair Worm
It will be remembered by our readers that last year we called attention to a long slender hair worm found in an apple at York, Pa., and which was supposed by some to be the common Hair worm, Gordius A...
-New York Horticultural Society
After numerous failures, some of the leading horticulturists of New York have organized a Horticultural Society. We are glad to see it. Baltimore, which had also often failed, has now succeeded at las...
-"Inter Meetings Of The State Horticultural Societies
Notices often come to hand of forthcoming meetings, but too late to insert in our columns. We would gladly aid these bodies by publishing their dates and programmes, if they would give us a chance to ...
-The American Pomological Society
We hope our readers will not forget that the American Pomological Society will hold an ad-interim meeting in Philadelphia next September. Exhibitions will be held continuously, of course, all the year...
-Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Society
The Seventeenth Annual Meeting of ' The Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Society will be held in Lenape Hall, Doylestown, Pa., commencing on Wednesday, Jan. 19th, 1876, at two o'clock p. M. Essays ...
-Number 206. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground - Seasonable Hints
The problem of perfect roads is yet unsolved. As every place, large or small, has to have pathways of some kind, it is a topic that interests every reader of our magazine. As we cannot have perfection...
-Communications - Touching The Hardihood Of Conifers
Your comments, friend Meehan, in the December number of the Gardener's Monthly, are just to the point, in so far as my own experience, in practice and observation, proves. It has been my study at all ...
-Celastrus Scandens
This native climber, better known, perhaps, by its popular name, Stafftree, presents a grand appearance long after king frost has robbed our fields of their summer beauty. It blossoms early in June, a...
-Trees In Cities
As you are well aware, much has been said and written about shade trees, both for and against them. I believe it is well understood that even the most handsome and rare trees would be out of place ...
-An Election For Roses
The Journal of Horticulture gives the result of an election for roses. Twenty-four of the most distinguished rose growers of England gave in a list of 25, naming their first choice first, and the othe...
-Achillea Umbellata For White Edgings
So far as we know the plant referred to in the following has not been introduced into our country, but is worth bringing in. The A. iomentosa is somewhat hoary, and makes a very good edging. This one ...
-Mammoth Rose Tree
Mr. O. D. Dryden, near Gilroy, informs us that he has a rose tree, twelve years old, of the Cloth of Gold variety, the stock of which is seventeen inches in circumference. It branches one and a half f...
-Magnolia Campbellii
The Magnolia Camp-bellii was discovered by Dr. Griffith in Bhotan; it is a large forest tree abounding on the outer range of Sikkim, at elevations of 8,000 to 10,000 feet, appearing on the road above...
-Gymnothrix Latifolia A Good Centre Plant For Flower Beds
Those who want a good plant for the centre of a bed should use this Grass, not so handsome in its flowers as the Pampas Grass, but much handsomer in its foliage and manner of growth. Here it grows ove...
-Tamarix Plumosa
Of this plant, M. Carriere writes as follows in the Revue Horticole: Nothing can be finer or more graceful than this species, which is still so rare, in spite of the readiness with which it can be pr...
-Rare Evergreens In Maryland
W. G. A. says: A friend brought me from Maryland, near Gun-' Powder river (or creek), these evergreens which grow beautifully at that place. I was not able to name them. The Spruce is very abundant, ...
-Disease In Evergreens
B. T. B., Carlinville, Ill., says: My evergreens are. dying ' piecemeal,' that is, they die in spots; a little branch here, and another there; sometimes on one side of the tree, and then again on th...
-Chiococca Racemosa
M. C. & Co., Atlanta, Ga., say; A lady of Cedar Keys, Fla., sends us the enclosed branch and fruit of a vine that is indigenous to that part of Florida, and says it blooms three times before fruiting...
-Raising Thorn Seed
J. C. T., Farber, Mo., writes: I have tried to get information of the American Agriculturist how to manage thorn seeds like this I enclose. I cannot find out why I have failed two different times to...
-Seasonable Hints. #2
Window plants are as much appreciated at this season as at any time of the year. There are few things more beautiful than the old classes of roses - the Borbon and China. We have seen some beauties in...
-Communications - Growing The Poinsetta
The Poinsetta is a little difficult to grow satisfactorily in pots, being somewhat irksome to maintain the proper degree of moisture, which seems requisite to its well being. How we have obtained the ...
-Bouvardia Humboldtii Corymbiflora
Having for a long time grown and flowered the Bouvardias grandiflora and jasminoides, of which species the Humboldtii is a member, and knowing their faulty character as bloomers, though prizing them f...
-Tar In Greenhouses
You will be doing many a poor fellow a great kindness if you will again warn, and keep warning, against the common and fatal mistake of painting hot-water pipes in greenhouses with gas tar. I have ...
-Notes On A Summers Tour
The country seat of Matthew Baird, Esq., situated at Darby, Delaware County, Pa., under the skilful management of Mr. James McAdams, the gardener, is one of the neatest kept places in the vicinity of ...
-Hot-Water Heating
Having had considerable experience with heating greenhouses with hot water, I wish to give a few suggestions. I have learned that water pipes should be so arranged as to facilitate the rapid motion...
-Violet Victoria Regina
We have from Mr. Chitty a bunch of flowers of this excellent violet. It is strong stemmed, large and sweet. Geranium, Happy Thought, also from Mr. Chitty. The deep edge of green around the central ...
-Olea Fragrans
It will be seen by the following from the Journal of Horticulture, that this very sweet and popular plant can be grafted on the privet: Olea fragrans is flowering in the Economic house, at Kew, an...
-Diseased Geranium Leaves
F. R. & Son, Denver, Colorado.- The leaves sent are not affected by red spider, but by mildew. Syringe them well with warm soap-suds, and then sprinkle them with sulphur. Sometimes this trouble comes ...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening - Seasonable Hints. #1
In managing the vegetable garden the highest excellence should be aimed at. This is the chief source of pleasure in a garden. If one can take no pleasure in his garden, - if the watching of the beauti...
-Communications - The Icing Water-Melon
Having grown the above melon the past summer, and thinking it a good variety for family use, I endeavor to speak a word in its favor. We grew the past season the mountain sweet, ice cream, and the ici...
-Management Of The Bark Of Fruit Trees
I notice your tilts at those who do not believe in opening the bark. I have seen in an orchard of the best fruit, splendid trees, split in the bark of the trunk and larger limbs. In a place, fence bet...
-Don't Use The Hatchet Or Saw
Of all the blunders that the common farmer, and some others, make with trees, none is so common, or so hurtful, and which he is so long finding out, and of which he might know so certainly, as the pra...
-That Little Turk
How got our curculio this heathenish name? Comes it of that wreck and waste marking alike the bivouac of this Little and the Grand Turk? Most likely it was hinted by that Moslem signet, the little cre...
-Grapes - Training And Mildew
In the summer of 1874, a large portion of the leaves on some of my grape vines (out-doors), were badly mildewed and dropped off. The mildew followed cold, damp nights. My vines are mostly trained on t...
-Trained Gooseberries
The Florist and Pomol-ogist tells us of the great skill of Mr. Henderson, the gardener at Moresby Park, in England, in raising fruits. Among other things, he has ft wall twelve feet high, the northern...
-The European Sparrow And The Fruit Buds
We have given our opinion in these pages, that the sparrow does not injure fruit buds. This was the result of our own observations in connection with such evidence as we could gather from other source...
-The Three Earliest Peaches
The experience of this season confirms the opinion I had previously formed on the respective merits of Mr. Rivers' three earliest seedlings. As the matter concerns growers for the market, as well as a...
-Marshall Pear
See cut.- By P. H. Foster, Babylon, L. I.- The Marshall pear, is not a new candidate for public favor, being an old fruit of superior quality, that has not been pushed into notice as its merits deser...
-Plum Culture
0. W., Ottumwa, Iowa, asks: Will you please tell us something relating to the best curculio proof plums to grow? [The American varieties of the Chickasaw and common red plums are less liable to i...
-Variation In Apples
H., Oberlin, 0., writes: By a recent reference in the Gardener's Monthly, I see you refer to the Rhode Island Greening producing sweet apples in California and sour in the Atlantic States. Is the aut...
-Grape Borders
B. M. D., Spring Garden, Pa., writes: Wanting to make a vinery for foreign grapes under glass, I went to considerable trouble to dig out a border three feet deep in the clay, and fill in with good e...
-The Blush Pippin Apple
A correspondent speaks of an excellent apple grown in Western New York under this name. What is it? ...
-Natural History And Science - Communications - "Do Plants Need Water?"
I wish also to dissent from the opinion of the editor, and say that they do. Air plants are no more fair examples than fresh water Alga? would be; but let us take common agricultural and garden plants...
-Tobacco As Manure
H. L. can best see the value of Tobacco waste by comparing its nitrogen and ash constituents with other plants, as meadow-bay, and wheat-straw and grain, as given by Prof. Wolff, of Ho-henheim: ...
-Resting Spores Of The Potato Fungus
In accordance with your request, I send you the following: There are three diseases, apparently, afflicting the potato. First, the potatoes may be gathered apparently sound, but after being housed ...
-Pinus Aristata
Many American botanists believe that this is the same as one collected by Jeffrey, in California, and named by Mr. Murray P. Balfouriana, and if so, the name of P. aristata will have to be dropped, in...
-Utilizing The Rain
Where land is of a hard, rocky character, the rains are liable to run rapidly to the streams, very little penetrating beneath the surface. In such soils forests are of immense service by checking the ...
-Rofia Fibers
In many of our seed stores Rofia is introduced in competition with Linden bark for tying plants. It is not quite so low in price, but is sometimes thought to go further. It is simply the split leaves ...
-Pronunciation Of De Candolle
A. J. S.: The accent is on the second syllable, - not De Candolle, but De Comdolle. The letters or abbreviations after plants' names are for the names of the botanists who gave the name to the plant. ...
-New Colorado And California Plants
Dr. Asa Gray contributes to the January number of the Proceedings of the American Academy, notes on various American plants, many new. Some will be of interest to florists when they once get into the ...
-Fertilization Of Campanula
As our readers know, many flowers cannot fertilize themselves, but depend on insects to help them. In this way the pollen is often brought from other flowers than the ones fertilized, and this constit...
-Variability Of Conifers
Our English friends give specific names to numbers of forms from our country that we regard scarcely as varieties, not seeming to be aware how variable this class of plants is, and yet facts before th...
-Australian Grape Fungus
Mr. Berkeley tells us in the London Gardener's Chronicle about a fungus on the grapes of Australia that may interest our people to know about. He says: In the Gardener's Chronicle, June 8, 1872, p...
-Species Of American Plums
So many of our readers fail to distinguish the species of American plums that the following, prepared for Mr. Curley's recent work on Nebraska, by Prof. Aughem, will help them. There are three t...
-Drosera Roots And Water
At p. 24 we endeavored to show that deep roots take in only water, because there is nothing more that they can take, and referred to a similar experience Mr. Darwin's in regard to Drosera. The follow-...
-Cross Fertilization Of Fruits
Justice to Mr. Garfield impels me to say that I had nothing to do with the very interesting experiments made by him upon cross fertilization of fruits, noticed on page 23 of the January number of the...
-Plants' Names
M.- All generic (the first) names are spelled with a capital letter. No specific names (the second) begin with capitals unless they are proper nouns or their genitives. Thus we write Abies alba, the w...
-Fungi
A knowledge of these minute plants is of great use to the gardener. The following was not sent to us for publication, but we give it in the hope it may help the study. Dear Sir: - I beg to call you...
-A Wedding In Iowa
The Editor of the Gardener's Monthly was made happy by the receipt of an invitation card to attend the marriage ceremony between Miss Jennie Wright and Mr. Alex. E. Patton, of Ennis & Patton, of Ly...
-Where Plants Can Be Purchased
We often have inquiries as to where the plants noticed in our columns are to be obtained. This is a matter that wholly concerns our advertising columns, and out of place in this department. As a gener...
-Low Price Of American Nursery Stock
The celebrated nurseries of Luccombe, Pince & Co., of Exeter, England, have recently been sold at public sale. The apple trees are regarded as having been sold low, - at an average price of 75...
-Responsibility Of Seedsmen
At a meeting of the Seed Trade, held at the Astor House, in the City of New York, on the 6th day of January inst., at which were represented the principal houses of New York, Boston, Philadelphia and ...
-Flowers In Cemeteries
A cemetery is most certainly the right place for a profusion of flowers. Of all out-door monumental decoration these are by far the most beautiful and appropriate. Those who have money to spend upon t...
-Annual Report Of The Pennsylvania Fruit Grower's Society For 1875
This excellent report is beautifully illustrated with plates of various Pennsylvania fruits, and has numerous essays, and reports from many of the leading horticulturists of the State, besides brief n...
-Mr. David Webster
This gentleman, well known in connection with landscape gardening, and a contributor to our pages, is at present on a tour through California. We notice, by the California papers, that his lectures on...
-Text Book Of Scientific Agriculture
By E. M. Pendleton. M. D. Professor of Agriculture and Horticulture in the University of Georgia. 2nd Edition. Published by A. S. Barnes & Co., New York. This is one of the most useful works of thi...
-Centennial Historical Calendar
Philadelphia, published by T. W. Price & Co., for 1876. This little almanac will be of immense service to any one visiting the Centennial. There is a map of Fairmount Park with references to the le...
-The American Naturalist
The Peabody Institute, of Salem, Mass., has made over this publication to 0. H. Houghton & Co., of Boston, by whom it will be published as heretofore. Price, $4 per annum. As announced in our last,...
-The Rural Journal
This is a new candidate for public favor, published by H. Young, and edited by Prof. S. B. Heiges, of York, Pa. The editor is well known to the farmers and Fruit Growers' of Pennsylvania, as one of th...
-Communications - Kansas State Horticultural Society
The ninth annual meeting of this Society was held at Manhattan, Kansas, on the 14th, loth and 16th of December past. The most of the regular and reliable members of the Society were present, except Dr...
-The Southern States' Agricultural And Industrial Exposition
It is sometimes said of Southern people that they lack energy and push. The managers of this society are not open to this charge. There never was an enterprise better advertised. This is to be held ...
-Number 207. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground - Seasonable Hints
One would suppose that with all that has been said in our pages in regard to deep planting, we should not see much of it done; but it is very common, and we have to note the evils continually in our t...
-Communications - Forest Hill Cemetery, Utica, N. Y
A correspondent sends us the following from the pen of a citizen of Utica, - and we have from Mr. Roderick Campbell the favor of photographs of the buildings. The idea is excellent, and promises to be...
-Rhode Island Bent Grass
In a note to the editor, which strayed into print, in the Gardener's Monthly for October, 1875, I spoke of Rhode Island Bent Grass, pure and simple, as the best Lawn Grass, in the estimation of many p...
-The English Sparrow
The English sparrow' abundant about our trees, do not eat the buds - but it may be that they find enough of other preferable food. Mr. William Tillery, one of the most prominent and respected of Engla...
-A Hedge Of Geraniums
The Gardener's Chronicle says, that on the Scilly Isles, which receive the full force of the warm gulf stream as it dashes against the coast of England, there is rarely frost, and it speaks of a garde...
-The Umbrella Pine (Sciadopitys Verticil-Lata)
It does not appear to be generally known that this fine Japanese Conifer, so distinct in habit and yet so beautiful, is hardy in sheltered positions on well-drained soils, as far north as Edinburgh. ...
-Xanthoceras Sorbifolia
We have from time to time had notices of this new tree. A recent number of the Garden gives a colored illustration, and shows it to be more beautiful than one would suppose from the description. The f...
-Pentstemon Palmeri, Gray
This handsome Utah species is of robust habit, attaining, in good soil a height of from 3 to 5 feet. The lower leaves are petioled, varying in form from ovate-lanceo late to spathulate, coarsely and ...
-Brodiae Volubilis, Baker (Stropholirion Cali-Fornicum, Torrey)
This Californian species is remarkable for its twining habit, the flower-scape often reaching the height of 7 or 8 feet or even more. The flowers are produced in terminal umbels of from fifteen to thi...
-Raising Clematises
X. Y., Rochester, New York: Clematises are generally raised from seeds; but they mostly take one year to grow. The hybrid kinds are grafted on roots of the Clematis flammula, or perhaps other kinds. T...
-Tar Walks
Very good walks are made by mixing gas tar with gravel. It softens somewhat in summer, but is an admirable winter path. They fail sometimes - and a correspondent of the Country Gentleman suggests that...
-Green House And House Gardening - Seasonable Hints. #2
Visiting the greenhouse of a lady at Doylestown recently, who keeps no gardener, but does all her own work, it was interesting to note that the pots were not only full of earth, but it was mounded up ...
-Communications - A Few Facts About Callas
Excepting the Rose, I know of but few plants having more admirers, or of which so much has been said or written, as the well-known Calla .AEthiopica-or, more correctly, Richardia AEthi-opica. Of all p...
-Myrsiphyllum Asparagoides
This beautiful plant, commonly known as Smilax, is from the Cape of Good Hope; the word Myrsiphyllum means myrtle-leaved. It is now used in the cities for decorating, and as greens for bouquets, to su...
-Richardia Alba Maculata - ; By W. Pullen, Penn Yan, Yates Co., N. Y
Can you give me some information in regard to the above-named plant? Having seen in Peter Henderson's Catalogue that it was deciduous, and required the same treatment as the Dahlia, I procured a tuber...
-Winter-Blooming Fuchsias
The Fuchsia is an excellent plant for window culture, but, unfortunately, does not bloom well in the winter season, when window flowers are the most desirable. Some, however, have a decidedly winter-b...
-A Fine Pot Pose
The Gardener's Record says: The Gardener's Chronicle, of Saturday last, gives an illustration of one of the splendid roses in pots, exhibited by Messrs. Paul & Son, at Manchester, at the Great Whitsu...
-Euchaius Amazonica
This is essentially a lady's flower, both for hair and dress, combining purity of color with delicate fragrance. Some can scarcely command a bloom of this plant at all, others flower their plants twic...
-Violet Victoria Begina
Recently we re ceived some fresh flowers of this beautiful new violet from Mr. Henry Chitty of the Bellevue Nursery, and now have the pleasure of giving our readers an illustration of the same. ...
-Alocasia Odorata
The common Caladium esculentum is well known. Some years ago we noted a fine plant in the garden of Mr. Mitchell, of Milwaukee, as stated in our columns at the time. Since then we have noted it of imm...
-Rubus Rosaefolius
S. D., Oxford, Pa.- The above is the plant referred to in the following: I send you by mail a box with a flower of a seedling that came of itself in one of our pots. It is new to me, although it may b...
-Disease In Violets
J. McB., Boston, Mass.; says: Would you be so kind as to let me know through the columns of your valuable periodical what has caused the failure of a bed of Neapolitan violets, which I had planted l...
-Propagating Begonias
T. H., Bridgeport, 0.- The dwarf kinds are raised from leaves, or portions of the leaves, from any portion of which buds will push. Many people divide the nerves and ribs of the leaves, and then peg d...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening - Seasonable Hints. #2
There is nothing so worries the editor of a Magazine like this, as questions as to what varieties of fruit it is best to plant; for every locality has a favorite list of its own. The editor of this Ma...
-Communications - June Peach Budding
My chief reason for writing this note is that myself and others may be enabled to successfully perform what is commonly termed June budding of the peach. I will first say what I have done. Last year, ...
-Self Opening Gates
I observe your remark about self-opening gates, or rather gates opened by the wheels of the carriage passing over them. I have had in use one made by Messrs. Cottom, of this city, for three years, and...
-The Lady Grape
In our advertising pages Mr. Geo. W. Campbell, of Delaware, Ohio, has a beautiful lithograph of his Lady Grape. We can say from our own experience that it is a free, healthy grower, and the fruit, whi...
-The Southern Red Raspberry
A year or more ago Mr. Stearns furnished us a note in regard to this variety, which attracted some attention. A correspondent from St. Mary's, Indiana, furnishes us with the following note in relation...
-Borecole
While on a trip through the State of Mississippi recently, we had occasion to note how extensively this was grown and appreciated under its old fashioned name of Coleworts, pronounced down here col...
-Grape, Golden Queen
The Gardener's Chronicle, referring to grapes for cold vineries, says this continues to be one of the highest excellence. ...
-Preserving Figs
While along the Gulf coast recently the writer noticed that the fig, though in a climate exempt from frost, seemed determined to keep to its deciduous proclivities, and was in a perfectly leafless sta...
-The Walbridge And Edgar Red Streak Apple
A correspondent of the Prairie Farmer, says these have been proved identical, the last being the prior and therefore the proper name. He gives the following history of it: The Edgar Red Streak wa...
-The Lettuce Mould
This terrible disease of the English salad grower has not been hitherto very destructive in America, but Prof. Burrill, excellent authority, reports it as being very destructive in the vicinity of Cha...
-The Wild Goose Plum
It is very hard to get at what is meant by the true Wild Goose Plum. We had some sent to us for our opinion last summer, some from Delaware, and some from Lebanon, in Pennsylvania, as the true and ...
-The Profit Of Filbert Nuts
A correspondent of the Garden says: If, in America, an enterprising man were to get the grant of 1,000 acres, and at once clear and plant it with Cob Filberts, he would find it one of the most rem...
-Fertility Resisting Frost
We have repeatedly called attention to the fact that a half starved tree, or one dried out in summer, is the first to die in a severe winter. An abundance of rich nutritious food is favorable to hardi...
-Early Cabbages And Tomatoes
A practical gardener of many years experience, hailing from Janesville, Wisconsin, is issuing a circular in which we are told that the tomato, except in few instances, does not ripen in that latitud...
-Late Apples
There ought to be a good field for the exporter, with our late keeping apples, to England. The London Garden says that early in January their two best keepers, Ribston Pippin and Cox's Orange Pippin, ...
-The Mandarin Orange
This is one of the luxuries of New Orleans. It is a much superior fruit to the ordinary orange, but, decaying easier, is not suited to transportation, hence we do not get it in our markets. Those who ...
-Brockworth Park And Bonned' Ezee Pears
The new English pear, Brockworth Park, is said to be the same as the French Bonne d'Ezee. Clapp's Favorite Pear is regarded by a distinguished French pomologist, as one of the best three August pea...
-American Potatoes In England
It has been long known to us that English varieties of potatoes soon degenerate when planted here. It now appears that it is exactly so with our varieties in England. They produce wonderful crops the ...
-American Apples
In a notice of a collection of apples from Ellwanger & Barry the editor of the Garden observes that the flavor of American apples is far superior to that of English apples, even the Ribston pippins fr...
-The Best English Peas
Kinds that prove best for the English climate, are not necessarily the best here. Still it is good as a matter of information to know what are regarded as the best in the old world. A correspondent of...
-Protecting Trees From Rabbits And Mice
This is a very simple matter. A piece of paper tied around the stem near the ground, and tarred, is sufficient. Pine tar should be employed, gas tar often contains creosote in sufficient quantity to p...
-Profits Of Forced Peaches
We believe all attempts to make any very great profits from early peaches have failed in the vicinity of Philadelphia. We do not know why it has been abandoned. It would seem that it ought to pay. We ...
-The Wilder Peach
Mr. H. M. Engle, of Marietta, Pa., has got out colored lithographs of this, which we favorably noticed last year. Mr. E. is very sensitive about having his name connected with any unworthy thing, and ...
-Mushroom Culture
A Subscriber, has started a small bed of mushrooms, as described in Henderson's Gardening for Profit, but says he don't know how to cut, pack and sell them, which Henderson omits to mention, and ...
-Black's Early Peach
H. E.Van Deman says: Who knows to a certainty about this peach? Where did it originate? What is its season of ripening? What of its productiveness and quality? Any one who can answer these questions ...
-Water At The Roots Of Grape Vines
M.N.C., Chicago, 111. You are right. It will not hurt the roots of your vines to be near water. The celebrated vine at Hampton Court is said to be so superior because some of the roots get to a cesspo...
-Fruit Culture
A Cincinnati correspondent says: I am a great admirer of the Gardener's Monthly, but think you give too much space to small fruit growers and others whose grounds are rather farms than gardens. In a...
-Highland Hardy Raspberry
J. A. N. St. Josephs, Michigan, says: Who sells the 'Highland Hardy Raspberry?' If what your Ulster Co. correspondent says of it in January number is correct, the purchasers Would be many. Please ask...
-Oyster Shell Lime
W. Ml, Plainville, Conn., says: My garden is a light sandy soil, and this spring I think of using on it oyster shell lime. Am I right in doing so, and what will be the result? I also intend to apply ...
-Forestry - Communications - Rapidity Of Growth Of Timber Trees
Your note of the Abies Douglasi suggests to me that, perhaps, it would be admissible in your journal to state that twelve to sixteen years in this country has grown the Cottonwood to a height of over ...
-The Forests Of Michigan
Within my recollection a large part of Southern Michigan, which is now in the form of arable land, has been cleared of timber. Our grandfathers, at great labor and expense, cut down, rolled into heaps...
-Forestry In Iowa
Mr. Suel Foster tella the Country Gentleman: Forest timber, windbreaks and ornamental trees, was a subject of much interest in our meeting. No man in oui State has done so much in this line as Hon. ...
-Californian Chestnut
At a recent meeting of the Californian Academy of Natural Sciences, Dr. Kellogg said he had just returned from under the shadow of the finest evergreens ever grown. He hoped the secretary would record...
-English Oak Timber
We have before us a statement of an English planter that he has two acres of oak timber planted in 1845 now with trees fifty feet high. This is not two feet a year. We have seen English Oak do better ...
-Gum Trees
At a discussion in New York, a gentleman observed that one of the family of Australian gum trees, the sweet gum, was already prolific in the South. The Sweet Gum is the Liquidambar styraciflua, almost...
-Virtues Of The Eucalyptus
It seems to be now conceded that the chief value of the Euca-Ipytus resides in its rapid growing and numerous roots, which absorb so much moisture as really to dry up ground but moderately marshy, and...
-Value Of Australian Gum Wood
The Rural Press, of San Francisco, thus speaks of Eucalyptus wood: It will be of much interest to our gum tree growers to know some of the uses and qualities of the wood in the region where it has...
-Catalpa Timber
We believe people are not generally aware of the great value of the Catalpa for enduring timber. We find the following in an exchange: This familiar tree, says Landreth's Rural Register, indigenou...
-The Range Of American Forests
Prof. Brewer, in discussing the distribution of American woodlands, says, that though Maine is the great source of Pine and Spruce lumber, the hardwood species predominate in that State. The wooded ar...
-Slow Tree Growth
At a recent meeting of the St. Louis Academy of Science, Dr. Engelmann exhibited a section of the trunk of Juniperus califomica var., which was not quite four inches in diameter and yet showed an unmi...
-Work On Forestry
B. M.- One of the most beautiful and complete works on forestry that we know of in our language, is an English work by a Scotch'gentleman: Forestry, by James Brown. If you read French Cours Element...
-Natural History And Science - Communications. Potato Rot
BY M.-------You asked me in last month's paper, why no frosts, etc. had these destructive effects previous to 1846, which I might honestly answer by asking you another question. Is it a fact that p...
-Spontaneous Combustion
The matter of the origin and prevention of fires, is a question of particular interest to horticulturists. The following, which we find in the Journal of Chemistry, is to the point: This seems a quee...
-Picea Parsonsiana
The history of this variety, as recently given by Mr. Parsons in our pages, has stirred up some of our English friends, and several letters have appeared. Though Mr. Parsons himself tells us that it i...
-Botanic Garden Of Harvard University
Very few know how widely useful this celebrated garden has become. In the hope that our readers may aid or profit by it to a still further extent, we give the notice of Prof. Sargent's recent report o...
-Improvements
The preparatory work, having in view the proper re-arrangement of the hardy plants in the Garden, has been continued during the year. The permanent labelling of all plants, as soon as determined, has ...
-Exchanges
The total interchange of plants and seeds with other Botanic and Horticultural establishments has more than doubled; while the number of plants and packets of seeds distributed from the Garden is more...
-Botanic Gardens
Some of our larger cities are now turning their attention to the forming of botanic gardens, for the amusement and instruction of the people. There is no reason why these gardens may not be artistic a...
-Plants For Name
Mrs. Norton, Iowa.- The numbers have been mislaid. The purplish grass was Agrostis scabra, the very small bit some Sporobolus, the pretty little Iris like flower Sisy-rinchium Bermudianum, and the oth...
-Mixing Of Potatoes By Pollen
H. says: I send you a potato of a pink tint, which I am positive grew on a plant of the Peach Blow variety. Not far from where these grew were some Early Rose. Does not this prove that the pollen of...
-The Tomato Disease
The American Garden-eners' Monthly, in quoting our account of the tomato disease around London, says: ' So far as we know there has been nothing of this character seen in the United States. Occasiona...
-The Cut Flower Trade Of Baltimore
The American Farmer says: The cut-flower business during the holidays and since seems to have been satisfactory, notwithstanding the cry of hard times. Mr. Pentland's handsome store at the corner of...
-Private Gardens About Baltimore
We learn from the American Farmer that Mr. W. W. Spence, at Bolton, his beautiful place, which is a charming bit of country almost entirely surrounded by city walls, has recently put up probably the m...
-Flowers In New York
The New York Times says that the money expended in New York for flowers exceeds $2,000,000 annually, and $3,000,-000 more for plants, etc.; but we suspect that this is only a guess, and not the result...
-Not A New Candidate
In Mr. Foster's note on the Marshall pear, he said it was a new candidate. From the context we supposed the word not was accidentally omitted, and so we inserted it. Mr. Foster desires us to say he ...
-Blue Roses, Strawberries On Trees, Etc
One man in New York has invested $700 in the speculation, and thousands of dollars are being taken by a set of swindlers. These men have flourished for generations back. A correspon-dent says we shoul...
-Trees For Nothing
A western nurseryman advertises That he has growing on his premises spontaneous seedlings. Large amounts of seedlings of different sizes, and some ten or a dozen different varieties, which he will gi...
-The Waban Greenhouses Of E. A. Wood & Co
A Boston paper gives the following information about this establishment: These greenhouses are conveniently situated to Boston on the Boston & Albany Railroad, within a few minutes' walk of Natick, ...
-Mr. Darwin
This distinguished gentleman has brought out a new edition of his climbing plants, and has in the press a new work on cross fertilization by insect agency. We doubt very much whether any one man has b...
-Edwin Satterthwait
The Bucks County Intelligencer gives an account of one of its neghbors well known to our readers, from which we extract the following: One of the most energetic and successful of the farmers and truc...
-Communications - Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Society
The annual meeting of this society was held this year, and for the first time at Doylestown. Mr. Edwin Satterthwaite, the well-known fruitgrower, and president elect, presided, his past experience ...
-Germantown Horticultural Society - Begonias
Thomas Meehan Esq., Dear Sir.- In your notice of the fall exhibition of The Germantown Agricultural Society, published in the Gardener's Monthly, there was an error in the name of the exhibitor of the...
-Kansas Horticultural Society
E. G. says: Many questions relating to the culture of forests, orchards and gardens in Kansas are yet unsettled. We have learned that forest and fruit trees suited to the southern part of Kansas, are...
-Organization Of The Nursery Business
At a meeting of Nurserymen, Florists and Seedsmen, at Crystal Lake, 111., Jan. 25th, it was decided to hold a Centennial meeting of all engaged in the trade, in the city of Chicago, on the 2d Wednesda...
-Alton Horticultural Society
Apples for Profit.- At a late meeting Mr. Pearson said that his most profitable apple was Smith's Cider; and next to this is the Benoni. No other sorts approach these. Dr. Long had made more money out...
-Western New York Horticultural Society
The annual meeting held in January at Rochester, but very full reports have been given in the Rural New Yorker, Country Gentleman, Rural Home, and other agricultural weeklies, so that details in a Mon...
-Numbebr 208. Flower Garden and Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
April in the South is Spring, and the early-flowers have long since been in bloom; but April in the North scarcely finds the Violet in flower. What should we do if we were to write a Calendar of Oper...
-Communications - Postscript To Article On R. I. Bent Grass
Since the article in last number was written I have obtained specimens of Rhode Island Bent grass from Charles H. Potter, which were cut sufficiently young to retain and show the characteristic inflor...
-Remontant Pinks. Carnation
The culture of the Carnation is believed by certain horticultural writers to have been for upwards of 2000 years We know nothing of what was practiced at that time, and horticultural Science as well a...
-Time To Prune Shrubs, And Other Hints
All know me as an old fogy soon to pass away to, I hope, a land where trouble or doubt has no abiding place - but while here among my fellow men I cannot rest, without now and then pencilling down my ...
-Jasminum Nudiflorum
This is one of the best hardy plants to put under the windows on the walls of houses. It is a trailer and needs a trellis or wires to keep it up. It grows in a dense mass, and the flowers open on the ...
-The Live Oak - Quercus Virens
In our recent trip to the far South, we know of nothing that so impressed us with its rare beauty as the Live Oak, and we feel a grateful remembrance of Col. Hardee of New Orleans, for a drive to wher...
-Garden Edgings
Those who do not like box, or are in climates too cold for it, should by all means use the Globe Arbor Vitae. It can be laid just as box is laid, and bears trimming just the same as box if not better....
-Schizostylis Coccinea
A few years ago we saw this beautiful plant in flower in a garden near Philadelphia, but have missed it lately. We suppose it is yet in some of our gardens. We are reminded of it by the following sket...
-Komveya Coulteri
A new and peculiar flower, belonging to the Poppy family, which we did not meet in California, but of which we often heard. The plant was represented to us as two feet or more in height, with white, f...
-Brodiaea Californica
Of all the pretty flowers that abound in California, we know of nothing prettier than the twining Hyacinth. The flowers are a very fine pink, or deep rose. It grows in the mountains and twines over ev...
-Spiraea Palmata
In a description of this plant given in the Botanical Magazine, No. 285, Dr. Hooker says: By far the handsomest species of the genus hitherto imported, and certainly one of the most beautiful hardy ...
-Crataegus Pyracantha Hedges
A Kentucky correspondent writes: I take the liberty of writing you regarding Crataegus Pyracantha, which is now exciting a good deal of attention in these parts, though very little is 'known of its m...
-Seasonable Hints. #3
In this part of the world window plants are nol given their summer airing until May, but every opportunity is taken to let them have all the open air possible, by opening windows and sashes wherever p...
-Communications - Orange And Lemon Trees And Geraniums
A lady, writing from Maryland, says that last spring a year ago I proposed in the Monthly to tell something about raising Orange and Lemon trees, and wishes I would redeem my promise. She says she and...
-Coal Tar
A few years ago I had some experience with the use of coal tar in two forcing pits, which may be interesting to some of your readers. The wooden frame-work of the beds having become decayed, it was...
-Heating With Hot Water
I have had thirty years' practical experience in heating plant houses with flues, steam and hot water, and do not hesitate to say that hot water is by far the best for plant growth. The best boilers a...
-Floral Decorations At Tunbridge Wells
The floral decorations at the exhibition of the Tunbridge Wells Horticultural Society, held on the 2nd inst., exhibited a marked improvement upon those of last season, both as regards number of entrie...
-List Of Annuals Suitable For Bouquets
People often want to know what to sow to get flowers for cutting all summer long. The following list is recommended by Messrs. Thorburn: Abronia umbellata. Ageratum Mexicanum album. Alyssum maritin...
-Begonia Froebeli
This new species was first exhibited in this country by its introducers, Messrs. Froebel & Co., of Zurich, on August 4th, 1875 (see The Garden, Vol. VIII., p. 121), when it received a first-class cert...
-Variegated Lantana
Mr. Harkett writes: I send you to-day a plant of my new Lantana, which I think you will find a valuable plant for bedding, especially where exposed to the sun, where few variegated plants can succ...
-Seasonable Hints. #4
The Apple is our standard fruit, and may always be relied on with reasonable care. The first care is good food. Some talk about too rich soil. We never saw the soil too rich for the apple. Where any t...
-South Of Philadelphia
The More Tender Kinds Of Garden Vegetables May Now Be Sown - Beans Corn, Cucumbers, Squashes, Etcthat it is not prudent to plant in this latitude before the first of May; and tomato, egg-plants, etc.,...
-Communications - A Visit To Covent Garden Market
Being long anxious to visit this world-renowned place for a display of vegetables, I accordingly paid it a visit one Saturday morning, in January last. With the produce which the market gardens around...
-A New Culture For Asparagus
The horticultural observations and experience you so wisely invite, have worth just in proportion as they come tested and sifted from mere notions and whims. What others tell us they have tried or see...
-June Budding Peach Trees
H. C. S., Green Tree. Pa., says: - Gardeners, be so kind as to inform me through the columns of the Gardener's Monthly, whether peach trees, budded in June, are budded from wood of the previous year'...
-The Lady Apple
There are two varieties of Lady Apple, viz.: Pomme d'Api rose and Pomme d'Api noir. The black one is really black, if we may term a blackberry black, and has a very peculiar appearance on the dish in ...
-Two Sets Of Roots To A Grape Vine
The Gardener's Chronicle speaks of the great success of a grape grower in obtaining fine fruit, who bent the top of the cane down so that it could root in the ground. There were thus two sets of roots...
-Forced Fruits And Vegetables
It is said the taste for varieties is increasing, and prices rather on the advance for them in England. The early Olive Radish is the most popular early kind now in England, having completely displ...
-The Profits Of Orange Growing
There has been some discussion as to the relative profits of fruit growing north, and orange growing in the far south - the advantage being thought to be with the southern oranges. We are inclined to ...
-The Big Rambo Apple
In regard to the note of our Ohio correspondent, we find the following in the Galena Press: J. H. Creighton, of Pataskala, Ohio, gives the supposed origin of the Big Rambo Apple which, with many alia...
-Large English Pears
A correspondent of the London Journal of Horticulture, thus braves American pear growers as to the size of their fruit: We have from time to time read in the newspapers surprising accounts of the eno...
-Thwack Easpberry
A Louisiana,Mo.,correspondent says: This berry so far is only locally known, for I have purposely held it back till I could propagate a good supply of plants, and thoroughly test in ordinary field cu...
-The Sterling Strawberry
Mr. Bateham sends us a private letter, evidently not intended for publication, but in which he says he is annoyed by parties writing to him about it, and he desires us to say to all without any furthe...
-Human Hair As A Fertilizer
A New York correspondent says: Do me the kindness to inform me what you would think of the application of human hair as a special manure to pear and plum trees in orchards. It occurred to me to-day ...
-Gas Lime
D. D. & Sons, Allegheny City. Will you please inform us if lime, after being used in the gas works, is better than fresh lime for land for cabbage? [Gas lime is no better than other lime, but i...
-Hardy Market Raspberry
A subscriber, J. S. near Crosswicks, N. J., about to commence the cultivation of raspberries for market, asks, What is the best kind for the purpose, and whether the best kind for market is hardy...
-The Cork Tree
In reference to the article by Mr. J.JaySmithin another column, we give the following piece of information from the Semi-Tropical, a newsy magazine from Florida. The cork tree, (quercus suber,) is...
-The Peccan
This kind of hickory, Carya olivaeformis, is considered by a correspondent of Prairie Farmer to promise well as a timber tree. It grows faster than other hickories, but is rather slow we think in comp...
-Osage Orange Timber
When in Texas a few years ago, the writer saw large quantities of Osage orange sawed into joists for buildings, and was told that it was one of the best possible for indoor uses, but not of so much wh...
-Hard Names
There would be some force in the objections made against hard botanical names, if those who prefer common ones would properly identify the plants they mean. The Scientific American gives us the follow...
-The English Maple
This, the Acer campes-tre, or cork-barked maple, though affording good wood for cabinet making, does not grow to a very large size. Sometimes it seems to attain considerable dimensions, as appears by ...
-Russian Timber
The Gardeners' Chronicle Bays: 'As evidence of the traffic in Pine Timber, (whether simply sawn or dressed) between foreign ports and this country, we may mention that an official return shows the tow...
-Larch Timber
A. B. C, Ottawa, III - The timber of the American Larch is of little value, it is the European which is so popular. Even this varies considerably in the quality of the timber. In some localities it is...
-Rate Of Growth In The Oak
M.- You are mistaken. There are some trees that grow faster than oaks truly, but most oaks grow faster than you think. Faster than some maples. We have no doubt that under most circumstances many oaks...
-Communications - The Root-Cap
The idea held by the earlier botanists, that the tips of all roots consisted of spongy masses' of tissue, by means of which plants were enabled to soak up their food from the soil, has, with the aid o...
-The Phylloxera
We find the following in the LondorL Journal of Horticulture: Owing to the disastrous effects of the Phylloxera in the French vineyards, the desirability of importing stocks from America was urged o...
-Sunken Forests
Near all bodies of water, especially near old lakes, or the mouths of rivers, are forests under the surface, which show how ages ago trees grew where now nothing of the sort is found, or where other f...
-Diervilla
A Flushing correspondent asks: May I trouble you to tell me where the name of Diervilla was given to Weigela, and when? [Diervilla was never given to Weigela. It is just the other way. The original ...
-Horticulture In New Orleans
Last fall the writer chanced to get to New Orleans, and the temptations to visit that section again when the spring should start vegetation into new life was so great that he took another run in Febru...
-"Subscriber" On Mushrooms
We have from Mr. Henderson the article on Mushrooms desired, and hope to be able to give it in our next. Proceedings of the Western New York Horticultural Society, January, 1876 - from R. C. Reynol...
-Bad Advice And Worse Consequences
As the the Editor sat in his well-worn chair, the Publisher, with a look of horror, threw him the following card, and demanded an explanation: My subscription to the Gardener's Monthly expired wit...
-Reclaiming Damages
It will be remembered that recently a vegetable grower of New Jersey obtained damages in court from a New York seedsman for having sold him late turnip seed, when he supposed he was buying an early ki...
-The Garden
We have a notice from the Garden that it will in future discontinue its exchanges with American publications - the Gardener's Monthly among the number. It seems to us that most, if not all, of the suc...
-Me. Robert Demcker
This gentleman, well known by his former connection with Central Park, and one of the most intelligent gardeners in America, has just concluded a series of admirable articles in the Pen and Plow on ...
-Hoopes Bros. & Thomas, West Chester, Pa
Catalogue of Alpine and perennial plants. The number of horticultural catalogues that pour in on a horticultural magazine is so great that we found it took up several pages of our limited space to not...
-Gould Nursery Co., Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, Annual Catalogue Of Greenhouse Plants
The publisher desires to return thanks to this company for a kindly notice of the Gardener's Monthly on its title page. It says, and we believe truly, each number during the year furnishes some new ...
-The Evergreen
This is a valuable monthly serial, devoted solely to the growing interests of tree culture, and published by Mr. Geo. Pinney, of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, for the low figure of 60 cts. per year. ...
-Horticultural Societies - Communications - Potomac Fruit Growers - February Meeting - Gala Day
As at this meeting the officers elect were to be installed, arrangements were made, at the last meeting, for a social re-union to-day, and a good time generally. On entering the rooms, your reporte...
-Minnesota State Horticultural Society
Proceedings for 1876, from Charles Y. Lacy, Secretary. We have always had an idea that for genuine gardening Minnesota was destined to become in time the best State of the Union, and delight in wat...
-Meeting Of American Nurserymen
At a Meeting of the Nurserymen, Florists and Seedsmen, at Crystal Lake, 111., January 26th, it was decided to hold a Centennial Meeting of all engaged in the trade, in the city of Chicago, on the seco...
-Object Of Meeting
1st. Relaxation from business. 2d. The cultivation of personal acquaintance with others engaged in the trade. 3d. Exhibition of any new Fruits, Flowers, Plants, or any Manufactured articles, suc...
-Horticultural Department Of The Centennial
At the last meeting of the Advisory Committee on Horticulture, there were present: John J. Smith, Chairman, W. L. Shaffer, Thomas Meehan, J. G. Mitchell, Robert Buist, S. B. Parsons, Secretary. It ...
-Admission To The Centennial
It has been decided to charge fifty cents for admission to the Centennial, and each person must be provided with an exact fifty cent note, so as to save time in making change, or counting of fractiona...
-Hotel Rates At The Centennial
To avoid all misunderstanding as to the probability of increase in the rates during the Centennial, the Continental, the leading hotel, charging $5 per day for its best rooms, as other leading hote...
-England And The Centennial
A London paper tells us: In the lists of exhibitions announced for 1876, the International gathering at Philadelphia is necessarily the most important. It should prove the most powerful and brillian...
-Fruits At The Centennial
A space five hundred and twenty-five feet long, and one hundred feet wide, will be devoted to a continuous exhibition of fruit, so that any one at any time may send anything they have. The opening day...
-Volume XVIII. May, 1876. Number 209. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground - Seasonable Hints
Most of our readers know that evergreens can be transplanted with considerable success at any season of the year if certain precautions be taken. But perhaps the best time is just as the buds are abou...
-Communications - Disease In Violet Roots
In the March number, J. McB., of Boston, Mass., inquires about a disease affecting his Violets. I have been quite familiar with this disease for four or five years past, and believe it exists to ...
-Evergreens
I have been much interested in looking over our friend Hoopes' selection of ornamental trees, etc. Although I regard his selection as a very good one, and his opinion and experience as of the first im...
-Rhododendron Arboreum
The scarlet Rhododendron arboreum, was first introduced into British'gardens in 1820, from Nepal. The late James Cunningham, nurseryman in Edinburgh, found it in a London nursery, bought it for a high...
-Names Of Varieties
Our readers may remember that when our friends Maxwell and Barry introduced two varieties of Arbor vitae, and named one George Peabody, and the other Tom Thumb, and we supported them in the excellent ...
-Weeping Hemlock Spruce
The Garden says: Mr. Samuel B. Parsons writes to us from Flushing, Long Island, praising the beauty of the Weeping Hemlock (Abies canadensis var. pen-dula.) The ordinary form of the Hemlock is a very...
-Lilium Parkmani
This magnificent Lily, raised by Mr. Francis Parkman, between L. aura-tuni and L. speciosum, and to which we have referred in our pages, is the subject of a beautiful colored plate in the London Flori...
-The Purple-Leaved Maple
This, known in catalogues as Acer polymorphum atropurpu-reum, is one of the loveliest ornamental maples imaginable. The winy purple tint is peculiar among all the purple-leaved plants, - and it has th...
-Pancratium Rotatum
This native bulb is quite as handsome as many of the imported Lilies and other grand plants from abroad. Our enterprising friend who has taken in hand to push the Agave Virginica, might do a similar g...
-Insect Injury To The Elm
The elm, and especially the English elm, is skeletonized every year by an insect which it has been taken for granted is the larva of a Scolytus, which is reported to be destructive to the elm in Fra...
-Failure Of Camellias In Florida
A Jacksonville correspondent calls attention to her Camellias in the open ground, the buds of which never fully expand but dry up while opening. While in New Orleans, recently, we saw the same in Came...
-Failure Of Paeonias
A Rochester correspondent says: Do you know why it is that in the South, California, and South-west, Paeonias so generally fail to bloom - the buds blasting? We have constant complaint. Is it the he...
-New Double Deutzia
A correspondent sends us for name, a specimen, which proves to be the new double white Deutzia crenata, - which we did not know before had reached our shores, though announced in Belgium. This will be...
-Yellow Violet
A Bloomington, I11., correspondent says: Is there a yellow Violet? Would you regard one as a choice plant, or worthy of propagation? [There are yellow Violets in abundance among the botanical sp...
-Green House And House Gardening - Seasonable Hints. #3
About this time of the year people will prepare hanging-baskets, for suspending from trees and half-shaded places in piazzas, so as to get them to grow well and be established against next winter, whe...
-Communications - Heating Small Greenhouses
I think there must be a great many readers of your paper that heat their houses with furnace heat that would be pleased to know how to heat a small greenhouse by the same fire. I know that I should...
-Peerless Rose
Or, as most catalogues have it, Bourbon Rose Peerless. I also notice it under the head of Ever Blooming Rose. I do not wish to say anything against the rose, having purchased a half dozen plants the f...
-Plant-Selling At Amherst College
We find the following in the Detroit Farmer: We recently visited the Durfee Plant House at Amherst, established by a fund given the Agricultural College by Dr. Nathan Durfee, of Fall River. We found ...
-The Plant House At The Agricultural College
The plant house at the Agricultural College at Lansing is a success, an honor to the institution and to the State. But it is just in its infancy and should be extended. We strongly recommend that this...
-Royal Bouquets
Mr. Wills, of the Royal Exotic Nursery, Onslow Crescent, had the honor of receiving the commands of H. R. H, the Duke of Edinburgh, for the Floral decoration of the Royal Albert Hall and the Royal Box...
-Flower Pots
We learn from the Hamburger Gartenzeitang that the fabrication of Flowerpots from a mixture of cow-dung and earth is now extensively practiced in North Germany. As many as 16,000 were used last year i...
-Forced Deutzia Gracilis
The Gardeners' Chronicle says: Deutzia gracilis that has been forced through the winter and has done flowering will now be pushing growth. The best way of treating this plant, and by which it may be ...
-Fuchsias
Fuchsias appear to be grown more extensively than in any previous year, for several houses are filled with plants of various sizes, ranging from the smallest to be sent out from rooted cuttings to tho...
-Standard Pyracanthas
The old evergreen thorn, Crataegus pyracantha, which is usually grown as a wall-tree, and is certainly one of the finest wall-trees of its class, makes an equally effective standard or free-branching ...
-A Hint To Table Decorators
A splendid subject for table decoration, hitherto (so far as I know) unused, may be found in every garden, but its season of perfection is nearly past. It has stared me in the face for years and years...
-Poinsettia
Passing by these old friends, not without a word of hearty welcome be it well understood, we come to another plant which has been of late years an almost indispensable adjunct of Christmas decorations...
-Work On Greenhouse Culture
W. M. G., Niles, Mich., writes: Will you have the kindness to inform me which is the best authority and most extensive work on greenhouse culture, and where obtained, and the price. I have Henderson'...
-Scale On Oleanders
J. P. S., Wintersett, Iowa.- Please inform me through the columns of the Gardener's Monthly (of which I am a subscriber) what is the best means of destroying scales on Oleanders; also, can alcohol be...
-Niphetos Tea Rose For Cutting
Dallas Bros., Bridgeport, Conn., with a very beautiful rosebud, say: We noticed in the Gardener's Monthly a paragraph headed Roses for Winter Buds. We send you two buds of the first-named (and perhap...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening - Seasonable Hints. #3
Fruit culture, for profit has had to contend with over-abundant crops the past year or two, and the trees in such cases are weakened. Now, this may be remedied by thinning out fruit in infancy. This p...
-Communications - Mushrooms
In reply to Subscriber, in the March number, who complains that in my work, Gardening for Profit, I omit to say how to cut, pack, and sell the product of his mushroom bed that my instruction...
-Bilyeu's Comet Peach
In December number of Gardener's Monthly, p. 368, your correspondent, D. O. Munson, Esq., of Fall's Church, Va., says, I send you by express some peaches which have been sent to the Washington market...
-Training Gooseberries
In your editorial notes for February, I notice an extract from Florist and Pomologist in regard to training gooseberries on north side of a wall, and would say that the writer of this has spent many h...
-Peach Growing
The Ohio peach growers have a bad time with their peach orchards. In 1869 and 1874 they were ruined by abundance. In 70, 73, and 75 they were ruined by scarcity. So far as abundance is concerned, it o...
-Mexican Ever-Bearing Strawberry
A correspondent says: You seem to have a suspicion of the merits of our seedling fruit, and yet you spoke well of the Mexican ever-bearing strawberry, though it did no good on our grounds. We never ...
-Peach Raising In Mississippi
Col. W. B. Hillyard has the following account of Gov. Brown's grounds in a recent number of the Indiana Farmer: Some of the land on Gov. Brown's farm brought over a bale and a half of cotton to th...
-New Apples
As a general rule, we favor no new addition to the two thousand list of apples, unless they are in some respects superior to old ones. But Mr. Chas. Downing, in a recent report to the Fruit Grower's S...
-Pyle's Red Winter
A promising new winter apple, from Wm. C. Burk, Glen Mills, Pa., who states that it was a chance seedling on the farm of B. Pyle, Thornbury township, Pa. Tree vigorous, spreading, an early and abundan...
-Piedmont Pippin
Origin on the farm of Jas. Woods, Rockford township, Virginia, and is supposed to be a seedling of the Albemarle, or Yellow Newtown Pippin, and by some regarded as equal to its parent, and in some res...
-Mellinger
This originated on the premises now owned by Dr. Mellinger, Manor township, Pa.; and although not a new apple, is but little known out of its locality, where it is esteemed as one of the most valuable...
-Smith's Seedling
A new Mississippi apple, raised by Hiram Smith, Woodville, Miss., from whom we received specimens, and who informs us that it is one of the best grown in that latitude, and is popular where known, rip...
-Picket
This was received from W. M. Samuels, of Clinton, Ky., and originated with Wm. Picket, Arlington, Ky., where it is esteemed a valuable acquisition, keeping as late as the Winesap. Tree a strong and up...
-Mcintosh Red
Originated with John Mcintosh, Dundela, Ontario, some seventy years since, but is not widely known; the tree is said to be very hardy, long-lived, vigorous, with a spreading head, - a good annual bear...
-Classification Of The Apple
If a person is already acquainted with the flower and seed vessels of a cabbage or turnip, and come across a wall-flower or a stockgilly for the first time, he sees at once a similarity of general app...
-Briggs' Bed May Peach
This is becoming the popular early Peach in California, and is found superior to Early Beatrice. The Wealthy Apple Tree - is a native of Minnesota; raised by Peter M. Gideon, from seed obtained at ...
-Sterling Strawberry
Mr. Elliott says: Your April number has just come to hand, as usual full of practical, as well as scientific matter. I note that I have been quoted as having written a flattering notice of the Sterli...
-The Pear Slug
Waverly, Baltimore Co., Md.- My Pear trees were attacked last June by a slug about a quarter of an inch long, he has a broad flat head, body tapering to a point at the tail. They left my trees in ...
-Fruit Prospects In Kentucky
A. N., Breck-enridge Co., Ky., under date of March 21st, tells us: Our early-blooming cherries, peaches and plums were in full bloom two weeks ago, but we have had winter for about one week; freezin...
-Forestry - Communications - The Cork Oak In West Virginia
I see by the Gardener's Monthly you desire information about the cork oak. I think about 1808 I obtained a can of cork oak acorns through the Patent Office, with the understanding that they came from ...
-Timber Of Delaware
It is very much to be regretted that in the efforts of the various States to display their resources at the Centennial so many of them have lacked the ability to discover those in their midst of whom ...
-Tree-Planting In Massachusetts
To encourage arboriculture within the State, the Trustees of the Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agriculture have voted to offer prizes to the amount of $3,000 for plantations of different trees o...
-Sub-Hardy Eucalyptus
An Eucalyptus, supposed to be E. viminalis, has been found in a garden at East Lothian, in Scotland, that has been out for thirty years, though somewhat injured in severe winters. This is hardier than...
-Dogwood Charcoal
A correspondent suggests that the writer in the Scientific American must mean a Buckthorn (Rhamnus frangula), not a Dogwood, and further suggests that this Buckthorn would be well worth planting exten...
-Origin Of Sericulture
Whence came this silk-worm? What is its country and that of the mulberry - for the tree and the animal seem to have always travelled side by side? Every thing seems to indicate that China - Northern C...
-An Argument For Tree-Planting
Mr. Northrop, Secretary for the Connecticut State Board of Education, makes the following patriotic argument for tree-planting: Tree-planting is fitted to give a lesson of forethought to the juveni...
-Rapid Growth Of Timber Trees In Massachusetts
Mr. J. W. Manning says in Boston Cultivator: I will here record my own experience: In 1858, 3-feet trees of Norway spruce and Scotch larch were planted. In 9 years the spruce reached 15 feet in hei...
-Natural History And Science - Communications - Trees Of Southern Florida
During the months of October and November last, Dr. A. W. Chapman of Apalachicola, Fla., made a journey along the western coast of Florida, examining the Keys and running up several rivers into the in...
-Motion Of Tendrils
Ever since Mr. Darwin's little work, the motion of tendrils has become an interesting study. In Scientific Farmer for March, Prof. Penhallow gives some account of observations made on a squash. The te...
-Ozone
This element is considered a purifier of the atmosphere. Where there is a deficiency there is disease. .A Dr. Mantogazza of Pavia, finds that odoriferous flowers throw off ozone largely on exposure to...
-Growth Of Plants As Affected By Latitude
A Prof. Hoffman states that from numerous observations in Central Europe, he may conclude that as an average, one degree of latitude is equal to 3 3/4| days in the development of plants, especially in...
-Cause And Effect
How difficult it is to trace the relations between cause and effect is frequently illustrated by everyday occurences. A chemical factory started in England in the vicinity of a market garden where lee...
-Pronunciation Of Botanical Names
We have had several inquiries lately about this matter. Unless one is very well versed in the ancient languages, it is best not to look for any rules, but go at once to authorities. In regard to our...
-Bocky Mountain Silver Spruce
Mr. Siler, Osmer, near Ranch P. O. Utah Territory, writes: In the Gardener's Monthly and Horticulturist for January, current year, on page 25, I find a question in regard to the Silver Spruce of the...
-Fertilization Of Clover
A. T. L., Whitehall, Mich., writes: A Swede in my employ is quite an expert pianist, reads music readily at sight, even if it is quite difficult, etc. After a twelve months practice at odd tunes I ' ...
-Our Early Botanists
Letter of Dr. Muhlenberg. (Copy of original in Library of Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia). Lancaster, Oct. 29, 1814. Dear Sir: - Your letter of the 20th of October arrived safe and ga...
-Henry Muhlenberg
I enclose a specimen of P. cerasifera (Willd.) from Gundacker's formerly Matlack's Garden. To Zaccheus Collins, Esq., Philadelphia. [The letters of those identified with the early history of bot...
-"Rincaton," Indiana
We have before said in these pages that there is no place of the above name in Indiana. Those who address James Ford, Princeton, Ind., any other way, throw away both time, paper, printing, and stam...
-Common Names Of Plants
If one is really convinced that language was given to man for the purpose of concealing his thoughts, he would no doubt commence to exercise that faculty on giving common names to plants. For insta...
-Box In Washington's Garden
The box edgings in the garden of Washington at Mount Vernon are still in a healthy condition, though over one hundred years old. They are well kept and cared for. The estate was named Mount Vernon by ...
-Explorations In Japan
The Flora of Japan is so remarkably well adapted to the Atlantic portion of the United States, that we feel a particular interest in a paper kindly communicated to us by Mr. Louis Bohmer, an excellent...
-Postal Laws On Seeds And Plants
We warned our friends that unless they exerted themselves much more than we expected they would, the express companies would hold all the advantage they had gained, and the rates would not be lowered....
-Artificial Heat In Horticulture
We may form some idea of the rapid progress in horticultural buildings from the fact that one hundred and fifty years ago, even dwellings in England had not begun to be artificially heated. ...
-The First English Nursery
The earliest nursery worthy of the name of which we have any record seems to have been that of London & Wise, founded in 1684. ...
-Mr. Charles Darwin
This distinguished naturalist was born with the coming in of the century, and has recently passed his 76th birthday. ...
-Miscellaneous Publications
We have received Helmick's Counterfeit Note Detector, Dreer's Garden Calendar, Long Bros.' Illustrations, Home Florist, Briggs Bros.' Tomato Race and Catalogue, Bull's New Plants, Annual Report of t...
-First Book Of Zoology
By Prof. Ed. G. Morse. We have only a notice from Messrs. Appleton that they are publishing a book as above - we have not seen it, - but can say from what we know of Prof. Morse's knowledge of the sub...
-The Shepherd's Manual
A practical treatise on sheep, by Henry Stewart, New York, Orange Judd &. Co. This little manual takes into consideration everything connected with sheep management, and must be a useful helper to the...
-The American Lawn
By Thos. McClunie, Landscape Gardener, Hartford, Conn. This is an excellent essay, by one who is a master of his art. It can probably be obtained from the author. ...
-Forest Culture In Minnesota
Published by The State Forestry Association. Nothing shows more the growing attention given to forestry than the increase in the number of essays and papers like unto this, which is an address by Leon...
-An Egg Farm
By H. H. Stoddard, published by Orange Judd & Co., New York. From J. B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia. This small paper covered work, tells what it is by its comprehensive title. The management of fo...
-Manual Of Small Fruits
Mr. E. P. Roe tells us in a letter that he has issued a small work under the above title, and that he has read the advanced sheets to Charles Downing. All such works are valuable, as fruit culture ...
-The Boston Cultivator
In a recent issue we find the following: The Gardener's Monthly and Horticulturist, an excellent journal, in giving the condensation of an article of ours, credits it thus indefinitely - 'A Boston...
-Farmer's Home Journal
Mr. W. Duncan, well known in past times as a contributor to the Garden, Gardener's Chronicle, and Gardener's Monthly, - and who, for some time past, has been editing the Farmer's Home Journal of Louis...
-Beveu De L'Horticulture Belge
This new Belgian venture, which we have before noticed, appears to have been quite successful. The first number of the second volume, now before us, starts with a beautiful colored plate of some new C...
-Communications - South-Eastern Kansas Horticultural Society
Although this society was organized one year ago it has not yet been reported to the readers of the Monthly. We are not asleep in this corner of the vineyard, but in our weakness and ignorance are ...
-Northern Iowa Horticultural Society
We had a very pleasant, and I trust profitable, meeting of the Northern Illinois Horticultural Society, at Crystal Lake, I11., the last week in January. Although the place of meeting did not suit many...
-Stated Displays
At the Centennial the following Stated Displays, under their respective dates, will be held during the International Exhibition. Applications for entry may be now made, on forms which will be supplied...
-Dr. Warder
Among the pleasantest incidents of the Centennial, we anticipate the universal meeting of friends. Among the first to come in on Centennial business we had the pleasure of meeting Dr. Warder, of Ohio,...
-Thos. Meehan
Dear Sir: I take the liberty of troubling you a moment (as hundreds are doubtless doing at this time), with reference to space for exhibition at the Centennial. A letter from Prof. W. C. Kerr, Geologi...
-Maryland Horticultural Society
Orchids - At the March monthly meeting, Captain Snow exhibited twenty species of orchids in flower. ...
-Attractions At Horticultural Societies
We are apt to complain that so many of our horticultural societies have to introduce music and various other outside attractions in order to make horticultural exhibitions popular enough to pay expens...
-Royal Horticultural Society Of London
Mr. Thos. Andrew Knight suggested it. It was founded - its first meeting - March 7th, 1804. April 2, 1805, Mr. Knight read the first paper, followed by one May 7th, by Sir Joseph Banks, on the introdu...
-Volume XVIII. June, 1876. Number 210. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground - Seasonable Hints
A lady says, The first thing I always read in the Gardener's Monthly is the 'seasonable hints.' The rest of the Magazine seems just the thing for those who are already advanced, and who must keep pac...
-Communications - The Glories Of Gardening; Or, "The Goodliness Of Trees."
' Twas when the world was in its prime, When the fresh stars had just begun Their race of glory, and young Time Told his first birthdays by the sun; And The Book informs us that soon after cr...
-Dahlia Maximilliana
Respecting Dahlia Maximilliana, noticed amongst New Plants in the Monthly for March, Mr. Haeltel, foreman to John Rock, Esq., Nurseryman, etc, San Jose, Cal., writes me as follows:Last summer Mr. ...
-Beautiful Shrubs Of S. Utah
Shephardia rotundifolia, Parry, presents to the beholder, on first sight, so bright and silvery an appearance, that it is with persons of taste the universal exclamation - oh, how beautiful, how much ...
-Hardiness Of Aralia Papyrifera
I wrote you about this time last year asking if Aralia Papyrifera was hardy. You replied that it was doubtful and I took mine up. Sometime in September, of this year, I found a fine young plant growin...
-Who Shall Lay Out Our Ornamental Grounds?
From time to time, during the last one or two years, allusions have been made in the horticultural magazines to the employment of civil engineers in the laying out of our public parka and other orname...
-The Pomegranate
The Home Journal of New Orleans, tells us: The pomegranate is one of the most profitable fruits grown. The trees bear fruit in three years from the cuttings, and will grow on the most ordinary soils ...
-Chimonanthus Fragrans
This old-fashioned shrub is not near as common in gardens as it deserves to be. The buds are formed in the fall and grow larger with every warm winter's day. If these branches are cut off and placed i...
-Festuca Viridis For Edgings
This pretty herbaceous grass is recommended for edgings, and I can fully endorse all that is said in its favor for that purpose, as I have employed it in that way, and find it most valuable. It is ve...
-The Original Golden Yew
The original plant of the Golden Yew is in the Royal Botanic Gardens, at Glasnevin, and a remarkably good specimen it is. It is known to have existed there from about the beginning of the present cent...
-A Good Tea Rose For Market Purposes
I was told the other day says a correspondent of the Garden, that from one dark apricot-colored Tea Rose Madame Falcot,. worked on a standard briar stock, out of doors, roses had been cut every yea...
-Peraphyllum Ramosissimum
Mr. Siler says: While writing upon the vegetation of Southern Utah it will probably be interesting to you for me to notice a few other plants that are either new or but little known. Peraphyllum...
-Proliferous Hyacinth
Mr. Dreer hands us the following from a correspondent: - I have sent you by express one or two clusters of flowers from the hyacinth I named to you. The clusters grow something as shown in sketch. I...
-Lime Floors
E. S. M., Amherst, Virginia, asks: Can you give me the modus operandi for making the lime floor for cellars mentioned in the February number of the Gardener's Monthly. By so doing you will greatly ob...
-Communications - Culture Of Combretum
Having been successful in flowering some of this genus, a few remarks may be of interest to some who grow it. C. grandiflorum, which J. B. asks about, is one I never had anything to do with, and which...
-The Australian Or Parlor Ivy
Under the names of Parlor Ivy, Australian Ivy, and German Ivy, Senecio scandens is now very well known to our readers. A new species, Senecio macroglos-sum, has been recently introduced, and the Garde...
-Pinks For Summer Flowering
The whole family of Dianthus, and its neighbors Armeria and Silene, which includes Indian Pinks, carnations, Ragged Robins, and so forth, are among the best of border plants in our climate for earl...
-Carbolic Acid For House Plants
Several of my nice geraniums began to look sickly, and upon examination I found little worms at the roots. I applied a solution of weak carbolic acid quite freely to the earth, and found it restored t...
-Ivy As A Decorative Plant
Gardeners are beginning to appreciate more fully than they used to do the value of Ivy for a variety of purposes. Connoisseurs, too, have begun to collect, study and classify the many varieties. Mr. S...
-How To Dye Mosses, Grasses, Flowers, Etc
It may interest some of our readers to know how the Germans dye grasses, etc, in a great variety of unnatural colors; but we have our hopes that few people will follow them in the use of blue moss and...
-To Dye Moss
Green: Boil 1/2 lb. of alum in 4 quarts of water, and dissolve 1/2 lb. of finely triturated mineral blue in it, and a dark green dye is the result. Or a very beautiful green dye may be made with indig...
-To Bleach And Dye Everlasting Flowers
Bleaching: Put a number of flowers, which have previously been placed in a warm chamber to cause them to open, in a vessel containing a solution of chloride of lime, 1/2 oz. of soda, and 2 quarts of w...
-Dyeing
Carmine: 1/4 loth (about 2 drachms) of Munich lac, 1/4 pint (about 1/2 drachm) ultramarine blue, dissolved in 12 loth (about 6 ounces) of warm water.- Rose: 1/4 quint of extract of safflower, dissolve...
-To Preserve Asters
Place a vessel containing muriatic acid and sulphur in a suitable air-tight box, and hang the Asters in it. ...
-To Bronze Or Gild Grasses, Ice
Take a solution of equal parts of oil of turpentine and copal lac, and immerse the grasses, such as Anthoxan-thum, Briza, etc, and, before they are quite dry, strew them over with gold, silver, or cop...
-To Bye Asters, Etc
Take a pint of water and add an eighteenth part of sulphuric acid, and dip the newly cut flowers into it singly, afterwards hanging them up to dry in an airy, shady place, when they will assume a beau...
-Propagating Roses
A. Pose says: Please inform me what mode of treatment would be best to adopt with spring primings of roses, in order to make themstrike. They are tied in bunches, labelled, and buried in damp sand...
-New Hybrid Gloxinias
Mr. Alex. Newett, gardener to H. P. McKean, Esq., of this city, has flowered some of Messrs. Veitch's new hybrid Gloxinias, and they prove to be very handsome things indeed. On the continent of Europe...
-The Lilac-Flowered Fuchsia
Referring to Fuchsia syringseflora, Mr. Porcher, President of the Orleans Horticultural Society, writes as follows to the Revue Horticole: When grown in small pots, the effect of Fuchsia syringseflo...
-Bryophyllum Calycinum
A correspondent from Plainville, Conn., says: I send with this a plant by mail for you to examine and name if you can. It is commonly called air plant. The leaves taken off and hung up in a room wi...
-Grafting Double Camellias
J. S., Baltimore, Md., writes: In article 'Grafting,' Appleton's Encyclopaedia, reads: The fine double camellias will not grow from cuttings, but are propagated by grafting upon the single kinds whi...
-Summer Treatment Of Camellias
H. L., of Oak Park, Ills., writes: Will not some one write an article on this subject, and oblige me and probably a great many others? [Camellias in this part of the world are generally taken o...
-Greenhouse Furnaces
W. H. L., (post-office indistinct) writes: Will you please give explicit direction for building furnace and flue to heat small or large greenhouses, in Gardener's Monthly and Horticulturist? or if su...
-Communicationss - Wild Goose Plum
We notice thee says in the March number of the Monthly, that we say the Wild Goose Plum is perfectly round and fully two inches in diameter. The true Wild Goose Plum, we have found a handsome, rathe...
-A Few Apples That Do Well In New Jersey
Early Flat Top. Medium size; color, pale yellow. This is a local apple as far as I know, not finding it among our list of named varieties in bearing. Tree low-headed, needs considerable thinning and r...
-Grafting The Feathery Weeping Cherry
This weeper - Cerasus pumila pendula- many nursery catalogues name as always scarce and difficult to work. If I do not mistake the tree which answers to this name, the only trouble is in the meth...
-The Apple Borer
I have been a careful reader of your Monthly a long time, and I think with profit. I entertain the highest regard for your judgment and plain practical suggestions you generally make on all subjects y...
-Huckleberries
I will try to write a few lines on the subject of huckleberries. I think there is no doubt but it can be domesticated and raised so as to pay in a majority of gardens, especially when the fruit cannot...
-Asparagus Culture
Your correspondent, Gen. W. H. Noble, in the April number, wishes to hear more on what he calls the new culture for asparagus. It is not new to me - my father planted a bed about thirty years ago, ...
-Pear Trees - Frozen-Sap-Blight
Late, rapid growth of the pear tree, when the vitality of the leaf is not sufficient to effect a perfect assimilation of the sap, produces immature wood, which is very apt to be injured, if not killed...
-Grape Culture - The Wild Goose Plum
Your remarks on grape pruning we like very much. We cultivate the scuppernong grape with more profit than any other (for home use), and that you may let rip; needs no pruning whatever after you get ...
-Natural Peach Stones
A correspondent from South-eastern Tennessee confirms our remark in regard to the rareness of true natural stones in market,-and says that though three-fourths of the peach trees of that section are...
-American Apples In England
We are very much indebted to Mr. Robinson, for the following correction. There is a mistake in the Monthly as regards what I said of the fine collection of American apples sent us by Messrs Ellwa...
-Small Fruits
A. B. C. The article did not appear, because, while there were here and there an item that might interest some people, - on the whole it was a bare-faced advertisement. We might have selected the news...
-Forestry - Communications - The Forest Trees Of Celaware
A brief item in the Wilmington Commercial shows, that at least one member of the CentenI nial Commission of this State is alive to the advantage of having one of the most important resources of Delawa...
-List Of Trees
Swamp Magnolia, Tulip Tree, Tulip Poplar, Linden, Bass Wood, Sugar Maple, Silver Maple, Red Maple, Box Elder, Negundo, Magnolia glauca. Liriodendron tulipifera. Tilia Americana. Acer saccharinum...
-Substitutes For Wood
What shall we do when the forests are no more, and the coal all used up ? This is a question which those who look many centuries ahead, are continually asking themselves. Some reply, Providence will t...
-The Profits Of Tree Planting
In a notice of Prof. C. S. Sargent's paper on timber culture recently we said that we thought that the profits of timber culture could in many cases be made much greater than he had presented them. On...
-Ratio Of Tree Growth In Iowa
The Western Farm Journal furnishes the following figures: Mr. H. H. McAfee, of the Iowa Agricultural College, and also now Secretary of the American forestry association, gives the following as re...
-New California Plants
In the February part of the proceedings of the American Academy, Mr. Sereno Watson gives us three articles; one on the Flora of Guadalupe - a small island of the coast of Lower California; another, a ...
-Nomenclature
It has always been a mystery what rule our English friends had for their choice of names. Mr. Barron, whose name is closely associated with evergreens, says that in that old-fashioned country we have...
-Bees And Flowers
The relation between bees and flowers is one of increasing interest. A London paper says: An interesting experiment is being made in the shipment of two nests of humble bees, which have just left ...
-Freezing Of The Sap Of Plants
Our readers know that we have furnished innumerable evidences that the juices of plants do not freeze, and the plants so frozen continue to live. And how strangely some of our friends quite distinguis...
-Fertilization Of Lilies
Those who are interested in the fertilization of flowers would do well to watch how Lilies behave in nature, as well as to experiment with them under culture. Mr. Park-man found the pollen of some kin...
-Effect Of Weight On Tendrils
A remarkably interesting paper has recently been contributed to the Gardener's Chronicle by Mr. D. T. Fish, showing how weight influences the pro- duction of fruit in the grape-vine. We leave out. wh...
-Annual Rootlets
At a recent meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences, of Philadelphia, Mr. Thomas Meehan called attention to the many varying hypotheses in regard to the eccentricity of the annual layers of wood in...
-American Pomological Society
Transactions for 1875. Chicago meeting. Edited by the Secretary, W. C. Flagg, Moro, Ills. There have been no issues of the transactions of this Society that were not a credit to the Society and to ...
-Indiana Horticultural Society
Transactions for 1875. From W. H. Pagan, Secretary. We do not know that we have ever been more pleased with any annual address than that of President Gilbert, as reported here. In speaking of the...
-Col. Wilder
It must be gratifying to this distinguished gentleman to receive in his old days so many testimonials of regard for his services to his fellow-men - services which have already extended far beyond an ...
-John T. Norris
This distinguished individual, whose dealings with nurserymen render him an object of their tender solicitude, has recently received the following notice from the daily papers; A man named John T....
-Burnett Landreth
This gentleman, to whom the Agricultural Department of the Centennial Exhibition owes so much of its great success, has been appointed by the Scottish Arboricul-tural Society its leading representativ...
-Age Of Mr. Charles Darwin
In a note recently, it was stated that this gentleman was born on the 12th of April, 1800. This is on the authority of Shirley Hibberd's Almanack for 1876. A correspondent points out that Lippin-cott'...
-Second Appendix To Downing's Fruits
This has just been published by, we suppose, Wiley & Co., and, like the others, is from the pen of Charles Downing. It brings pomologica.1 knowledge down to date. Orchid Culture. By E. S. Rand, Jr....
-The Mill Stone
A monthly journal of practical science. Richmond, Ind. No. 6. Above the average of family papers, as the Western magazines generally are. We are pleased to note that a good friend of the Gardener's ...
-The Rural New Yorker
Mr. Moore, so long and so agreeably known in connection with the Rural Neiv Yorker, has had to retire by reason of failing health. The paper comes into the hands of many of the former associate editor...
-Opening Of The Centennial Exhibition
The Horticultural Department is hardly yet in a condition to do justice to the exhibitors, and a critical notice must be deferred till the future. In the meantime the following sketch intended for the...
-Volume XVIII. July, 1876. Number 211. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground - Seasonable Hints
New sown lawns are liable to be crowded with weeds. There seems no better remedy than to hand-weed, filling the holes made with earth in those cases where the roots are large. In some cases this hand-...
-Communications - Rose - Duchess Of Edinburgh
I send a flower - though it is a little past its best - of the new tea rose, Duchess of Edinburgh. If you have not already seen it, I thought it might interest you. I am disappointed in the color, as ...
-Arboretum Americanum. List of One Hundred and Seventy-five Specimens
Ornamental Deciduous Trees, in the Grounds of Messrs. Hovey & Co., Boston. Long ago, in the Magazine of Horticulture, I urged upon all lovers of trees the importance of employing a greater variety ...
-Note On The Gardens Of Germany
The taste for rare trees is not as wide-spread here as in other parts of the world. I have found considerable difficulty in getting together all I wanted. In fruit trees I had no trouble whatever; ...
-How Marechal Niel Rose Grows
Mr. Harrison, of Darlington, mentions m the Gardeners' Magazine, that a plant of the Marechal Niel Rose in his nursery has attained the immense growth of 500 yards, and is now (Feb. 22) making nearly...
-Gun-Barrel Budding
This kind of budding is now much practiced by rosarians. In all rose gardens where the amateur buds his own rosea there will be found many strong suckers rising from the roots of dead briars. On accou...
-Importance Of Forests
At the nineteenth annual meeting of the Scottish Arboricultural Society, held recently, the President, in his inaugural address, alluded to the beneficial effects of the maintenance of a due proportio...
-Andromeda Arborea
We seldom see in pleasure grounds the Andromeda arborea (sometimes called Lyonia arborea), and yet it is one of the prettiest of deciduous trees of moderate growth, and when in blossom it forms an obj...
-New Double White Clematis
In Lucie Le-moine we have a new double-flowering white Clematis which is destined to take high rank among these beautiful garden flowers. It is a Continental variety, as yet but little known, for, as ...
-Fritillaria Pudica
A beautiful yellow-flowering bulb of Utah and California; is finding its way into general culture. Unlike so many of these far western things it seems to be adapted to eastern culture. The flower much...
-Diseased Branches On Oaks And Maples
J. H. McH., Pikesville, Md., writes: I forward some branches cut from diseased trees, and shall he glad to have your advice as to the proper remedial treatment of the trees. The knots on the Engl...
-Double White Deutzia Cbenata
Mr. David Saunders, Whitneyville, New Haven, Ct., furnishes the following additional note: I notice in the May Monthly that you mention the Double White Deutzia crenata as a novelty. Six years ago...
-Green House And House Hardening - Seasonable Hints
If we take a look through most greenhouses, we see with regret that the cultivation of plants with the view to make fine specimens of skill has not kept pace with general gardening progress. The deman...
-Communications - Poinsettia Culture
On page 40, February number, is a good article on the culture of the above plant. I have long practised a method differing somewhat from the one referred to, and described by me in last year's Country...
-Orchid Culture
The increase in the culture of this class of plants throughout Europe and America within the last few years is really astonishing, and the great perfection which is attained in the cultivation of such...
-The Aquatic Bouquet
A novel and most charming floral arrangement will be found in the Aquatic Bouquet; and whether for the drawing-room bracket, the stand of the sick-room, or as an epergne for some elegant dining or ...
-Odontoglossum Cirrhosum
New orchideous plants continue to be introduced, - adding to the variety and interest of collections, but seldom surprising by rare beauty. The subject of this paragraph, as well as Odontoglossum Alex...
-Kalmias For Winter Blooming
The following hint from the Gardener's Chronicle may be of value to our winter bloomers: One of the best hardy plants for forcing is Kalmia latifolia. Plants should be selected well filled with bu...
-Money Value Of Orchids
To show the value of orchids we give the following from the Gardener's Chronicle, advertised as unprecedently low prices: - Pleione humilis, good flowering bulbs, 3s. 6d. each; if a dozen are taken...
-"Coelogyne Corymbosa
This is probably the first time this handsome species has ever been seen in England in a living state. 10s. 6d. each, 4 guineas per dozen. Dendrobium marmoratum, 7s. 6d. each, 3 per dozen. De...
-Cheilanthes Fragrans
A pretty dwarf Cys-topteris-like Fern, forming dense tufts in vertical fissures of rocks fully exposed to the sun. Fronds bright green, two or three times divided, with deep brown bristly-scaled stalk...
-Phormium Colensoi Variegatum
This beautiful plant has narrowish, erect, pointed, dark-green leaves, scarcely an inch in width, elegantly banded at the margin with one or sometimes two narrow stripes of creamy white. It has the sa...
-Corynostylis Hybanthus Albiflora
The genus Corynostylis belongs to the family of the Violets, and consists of semi-scandeut shrubs, with alternate leaves and long-stalked flowers, the lower petal of which is produced behind into a lo...
-Nymphaea Coerulea
Ignoramus, Sing Sing, N. Y., writes: Will you please be so kind as to let me know in the next number of the 'Gardener's Monthly' about the aquatic plant, Nymphaea coerulea, how soon will it bloom ...
-Communications - How To Destroy The Pear Slug
In your May number, in reply to the inquiries of a correspondent on this subject, you recommend the use of powdered quick lime (not slacked lime) sifted over the trees by means of a suitable sieve fas...
-Progress Of Plum Culture - A Thousand Acres Planted Within Three Years
It will no doubt be a matter of interest, if not of surprise, to most readers of the Monthly, to learn of the amount of Plum-tree planting that has been done in Ohio within the past few years. If ther...
-Fighting The Codling Moth
That hay bands wrapped around the stems of apple trees afford an enticement to the codling moth to stay and be killed when in its larval condition is well known. Whether the plan will stand the test...
-Snyder Raspberry
An Illinois friend tells us that this variety proves very hardy and well adapted to that region. The fruit is not so large as some well-known kinds, but it is of first-class quality and yields in imme...
-The Wealthy Apple
Among the interesting fruits in the Iowa collection was the Wealthy apple, a seedling of Minnesota, from seed brought from Maine by Peter E. Gideon of Bangor. It stands the severe climate of Minnesota...
-The Art Of Making Wine
A system prevails, more or less, in all wine-producing countries, but especially in Spain, of what is known as Plastering the Wines. In some notes on the chemistry of tartaric and citric acid, in ...
-Versailles Currant
In the London Gardener's Chronicle Mr. Barron makes this a synonym of the cherry currant. In this country there are two distinct kinds. La Versaillaise has a long bunch; the cherry is a comparatively ...
-Plum Culture In Ohio
Mr. Bateham says that plum culture is considerably on the increase in Ohio. Small growers cannot care for a few trees, but in large orchards it pays to keep a man with shaking machines to knock down t...
-Chickory Salads
In our country we know chickory simply as a root used in the adulteration of ground coffee. In Europe they use both the roots and leaves as ingredients in salads, and the demand for them has induced a...
-The Plum And Cherry Knot
The cause of the plum knot - a fungus working from the outside of the bark inwardly - has been so clearly developed by Professor W. G. Farlow that there is no longer any excuse for knots in a good orc...
-Fire Blight In The Pear
An Elyria, (Ohio) correspondent says that the fire blight has been so destructive there that pear growers are much discouraged. Since it has been demonstrated that this disease is the work of a fun...
-Pear Disease
A Frankford (we believe Pa.) correspondent says: Enclosed I send you a piece of bark from a twig on a Bartlett pear. Will you in the Gardener's Monthly please to explain the nature of the disease if ...
-Pear Trees And Underdraining
There is nothing in the following to show where it comes from. It appears to be from some place in Ohio. Correspondents should be careful to note their localities, as it is half the interest of inquir...
-Vanilla Culture
Some friends went from Philadelphia a year or so ago to engage in Vanilla culture at Greytown Nicaragua, and now send us a sample of their fruits in the shape of some Beans six inches long. They under...
-Peach Yellows
Col. Wilkins, of Maryland, is sure that an aphis causes the yellows in the peach. The peculiar process by which this cause was traced to this effect, we have not had described to us. Polygonum amph...
-Natural Hlstory And Science - Communications - General Observations On The Flora Of Hokkaido
Horticulturist to the Kaitakuska, Yedo, Japan. [Continued from page 183.] The forest trees principally consist of large Elms, which have much the appearance of the Ulmus campestris, so very common ...
-Root Hairs
That the largest portion of the liquid used by the growing plant makes its entrance through the roots, from the soil, is a well-established fact; but those parts which are the most active in the absor...
-"Peach And Apricot Hybrids
H. M. Engle says he has cross-fertilized the peach with the apricot pollen, and had produced several new varieties, two of which are acquisitions, being highly colored, and of excellent quality. T...
-Callirhoe Involucrata
The following from a Marysville, Kansas, correspondent refers to this beautiful plant: It has been very hard times in Kansas the last two years, but crops look well. I send a flower and leaf of a pla...
-Seeds From Male Plants Of Aucubas
They are having the same bother over the male Aucubas in England that we used to have over our barren strawberries till we learned better. A strawberry that usually has its stamens abortive, and thu...
-Insects, Both Night And Day Flyers
As there has been some curiosity to know in the supposed necessity many flowers have for cross-fertilization by insect agency how it is done in early spring, before winged insects are common, the writ...
-Grass From Geneseo, III
If you please, the name of this grass? Twelve or fifteen inches high; spreads rapidly from seed; stools wide. None of us saw it until three years ago. [Alopecurus aristulatus, the water foxtail gr...
-Laws For Nurserymen
A nurseryman of Germantown, Philadelphia, took pear and other trees, and having marked them found them in a garden owned by a notorious character who had already been several times in prison. The evid...
-Advisory Committee Of The Bureau Of Horticulture Of The Centennial
A member asks us to say, and it seems but justice to do so, that the committee was never called together but once, and that the results of the exhibition, creditable or otherwise, in the Horticultur...
-Linnaea Borealis
A lady writes: I inquired in vain at the Centennial Exhibition in the Egyptian Department for the Papyrus, and in the Swedish School Room for the Linnaea borealis. Now I suppose both plants are there...
-About Hybrids
A correspondent calls our attention to the following from Sachs' Text book: Mr. Sachs says: According as the union takes place between (1) different varieties of one species - between (2) differen...
-Hoopes' Book Of Evergreens
A Mississippi correspondent writes: I do not see Cerasus lauro-cerasus among the evergreens in Hoopes' book. It is a grand thing for these parts. Mr. Hoopes confines himself to the resinous plants -...
-The Grape Phylloxera
Those grape growers about Kelley's Island, who were for so long a time sure Mr. Riley must be mistaken about the ravages of the Phylloxera, seem to have reconsidered the matter more favorably. One gen...
-Sale Of The Rosedale Nurseries
We have only a line or so at command as we go to press, to say that the sale of Mr. Buist's plants is now going on. We note among the buyers friends from Milwaukee, Cleveland, New York and other place...
-Test Of A Good Gardener
Mr. J. Paget, gardener to J. Donald Cameron, Esq., of Harris-burg, Pa., sends us a brace of cucumbers that reminds us of the good old times of England's gardeners, when skill was measured by what a ga...
-Geological Survey Of Texas
Texas is wise in prosecuting her geological survey. It furnishes just-the kind of knowledge people want who are disposed to emigrate, - and Texas, beyond many States, has room for thousands. This is t...
-Report Of The American Pomological Society
The following kind notice from the Gardener's Chronicle shows the high appreciation of the Society's work in intelligent European cities: We have received, through the kindness of Colonel Wilder, ...
-Mr. Rand's Book On Orchids
The following letter from Mr. Rand is addressed to Mr. Mee-han personally, but as it relates to matter which appeared in the Gardener's Monthly, we presume it was intended for the Editor, and so give ...
-D. D. T. Moore
Our old friend of the Rural New Yorker cannot be idle since he gave up his paper, and here before us is a circular of his advertising agency. It always struck us that a knowledge of agriculturists and...
-Mr. W. T. Harding
We are gratified to learn from some friends at Upper Sandusky, Ohio, that our excellent contributor, as skilled in practical work as he is intelligent behind his pen, has been spending the spring and ...
-Flora At The Centennial - May
The great floral feature at the Centennial for May was Mr. Waterer's Rhododendrons. A house was built for these by the Centennial authorities, like a huge curvilinear conservatory, only covered with c...
-International Exhibition - Pomological Report
We have the pleasure of giving to our readers the following, the first report on anything exhibited at the great Exhibition, so far as we are aware. Philadelphia, May 25, 1876. Hon. A. T. Goshor...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society
No Horticultural Society in America at all nearly equals that of Massachusetts in wealth or in the amount awarded in premiums. For 1876 the prizes will amount to $6,800, of which $3,200 are for plants...
-Volume XVIII. August, 1876. Number 212. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground - Seasonable Hints
In the last generation the effort of the wealthy citizen was to have a home in the country, with business in town. If very well off he had a town house and a country seat - the one for his summer enjo...
-Communications - Landscape Gardening
The remarks of B. S. Olmstead I read with pleasure, for we want no more of jobbing gardeners, who work physically, and claim to be landscapists; nor do we want engineers, who perhaps are capable of ru...
-Destruction Of The Rose Slug
Under the head of Seasonable Hints, in June number, speaking of rose slugs, you say: The best thing of all is to set a boy to crush them by finger and thumb. Hand picking for rose slugs is now ...
-A Happy Home
I have had one hour of real pleasure with old Mr. White, of Ellis Park. Fresh as a lark, and full of enthusiasm, he was turning out his greenhouses into the park, and his own lawns. It is such a pleas...
-Lilies
How often is the question asked, Why is it my lilies do not bloom, but produce a cluster of small setts round the old bulb? To which I would reply, that you must first learn what is the cause, and t...
-Curves
I think it was Hogarth who first designated the curving line as the line of beauty. Whoever it was, he enunciated a far reaching truth. Ruskin gives utterance to very much the same thought when he ...
-Lawn From Seed
The Germantown Telegraph has a well merited compliment to the lawn grass around the government buildings at the Centennial Exposition, made under the direction of Mr. William Saunders, from seed sown ...
-Hemlock In Limestone Soils
From circumstances that had come before us, we were led to believe that the hemlock did not do well in some parts of England and elsewhere, because of limestone land. The Country Gentleman notes insta...
-Lilium Auratum
You speak of this lily in your last number, and remark that with the exception of L. Parkmani, nothing has been done in the improvement of this superb lily. Did you ever read the Magazine of Hert'cult...
-New Tea Rose, Duchess Of Edinburgh
It is to the Messrs. Veitch that we are indebted for this valuable acquisition. I believe it is now sufficiently well tested in this country to establish its merits, and that it will be found to suppl...
-Seasonable Hints. #5
August and September are often taken as the time to repair plant houses and build new ones. A few hints in connection may not be out of the way. Summer heat shrinks wood, and very often loosens glass,...
-Communications - Greenhouse Furnaces
Your directions to W. H. L. on this subject, in June number, are scarcely explicit enough to enable a person without experience to build a good furnace and flue, and having had something to do with fl...
-Mr. Sargent's Azalea Show
Towards the end of May Prof. C. S. Sargent, Esq., of Brookline, Mass., exhibited his famous Aza-eas, and they were grand. The plants, some arge and others of various sizes, were well grown and densely...
-Mr. Hunnewell's Rhododendron Show
Now, June 10th, is the season of Mr. Hunne-well's Rhododendron Show at Wellesley, Mass., and such a display Waterer, Veitch or Lane might be proud of - yes, Waterer went to see them, was surprised at ...
-Forcing Roses
Although much has been written on this subject, still as there are so many failures made yearly, in what is really an easy matter, I venture to offer a few suggestions. Many growers prefer a three-qua...
-History Of The Double Lobelia
I selected a plant in a London greenhouse, and carried to this country in my hand, as it were. In fact, we had the Double Lobelia in our nursery as early as June, 1873, and was getting a nice stock of...
-Wall-Flowers And Gilliflowers
These old-fashioned flowers do remarkably well under culture for greenhouse adornment in early spring, and may be sown now for that purpose. There have been great improvements made in form, color and ...
-Royal Patronage Of Cut Flowers
The Gardener's Chronicle says: The floral decoration at the Guildhall on the occasion of the reception of the Prince of Wales was entrusted to Mr. B. S. Williams, of Holloway, who also supplied the ...
-To Prevent Hyacinths Having Short Stems
Get some stout brown paper and cut it into squares of a suitable size, and then roll them up into funnels similar in form to the pointed bags in which grocers put moist sugar. They should be from six ...
-Flowering Of The Hoya Carnosa
Mrs. C. C. P., Aledo, Mercer Co., I11., asks, Can you tell me how to flower the wax plant (Hoya)? I can make it grow like a bad weed, but cannot, as yet, make it bloom. Or must it have a certain age ...
-Killing The Mealy Bug
A correspondent sends the enclosed and asks our opinion. ' For exterminating mealy bug, writes a correspondent in the Rural New-Yorker, I have never found anything so good as alcohol; or eve...
-New Double Zonale Pelargonium Wonderful
Mr. Geo. Smith, of Hornsey, London, who raised this variety, says it is remarkable for the persistency with which it retains its petals, the unusually large size of its trusses, as well as the great s...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening - Seasonable Hints. #4
Many kinds of fruit trees that have arrived at a a bearing age, may perhaps be growing very vigorously and producing very little or no fruit. Those who have read our remarks in past numbers, will unde...
-Communications. Onion And Seed Growing In California
No country in the world produces finer onions than are grown around the Bay of San Francisco. The rich alluvial soil and the peculiarity of the seasons and climate in this part of California seem to b...
-Roe's Seedling Gooseberry
We have before us some specimens of Mr. Roe's Seedling Gooseberry, and a marked copy of circular stating that it is as large as the best English varieties, and has never mildewed for fifteen years. ...
-Linseed Oil For Pear Blight
We have noted the remarkably beneficial effect on pear and apple trees by washing with linseed oil, but we find a place for the following from the Rural Home: Two or three years ago, a paragraph w...
-The Peach Bird
We regret to state that these birds have made their appearance in our county. One of our fruit growers informs us that he first discovered them on his place last Sabbath; he described them as being la...
-The Early Peaches
The desire of the public to know about the early peaches, now closely rivaling each other for superiority, is intense. It is very difficult to settle contending claims, and among so many friends it is...
-Colorado Cabbage
The Saguache Chronicle gives some interesting facts regarding Mr. Stoll-steiner's farming operations in the upper valley of the Rio Grande in Southwestern Colorado. Last year he raised Marblehead mamm...
-Briggs' Red May Peach. From John Rock, San Jose, Cal., June 22d
Round, very white skin with red cheek, 7 to 8 inches in circumference, rather tart in flavor, probably from the distance requiring them to be gathered before quite ripe, but very juicy and refreshing;...
-The Hamner Peach
Mrs. M. E. H., Galveston, Texas, gives the following account of this variety: Hoping that I have something new in the way of a very fine late peach, I thought I would give you its history thus far, ...
-Cumberland Triumph Strawberry
We gave a figure of this new variety, last year, showing its large size, and from a personal examination of the beds, were enabled to judge of its productiveness. Colman's Rural World (Mo.) states th...
-Durand's Great American Strawberry
Those exhibited at the Centennial attracted much attention. They are similar in size to Jucnnda, as Knox used to raise them, and are equal in quality to that capital variety. There is a greater tenden...
-Smith's President Lincoln Strawberry
Exhibited at the Centennial, is among the best seedling strawberries of the season. The fruit averaged as large as any exhibited at the great Centennial show. Very firm solid berries; of a brilliant d...
-Prouty's Strawberry
A Western seedling, has been tested by Mr. Bassett, of Hammonton, on whose grounds the writer saw them in June last. It bears out here all its Western friends have said of it. ...
-Southern Red Thornless Raspberry
We have from Mr. W. Bassett, Hammonton, N. J., some boxes of this variety, which proves to be an excellent traveler, and as superior a keeper. It appears to belong to the same class as the Philadelphi...
-The Barnhardt Cherry
R. D. Barnhardt, post-marked West Newton, Pa., sends us a seedling cherry. He does not say it is his own, but that it originated with some fruitgrower of this locality. As it is a valuable cherry un...
-Seedling Strawberry
J. R. S., Catawissa, writes: I take the liberty of sending you to-day per Reading Express (expressage prepaid) one small box of a seedling strawberry of my own raising for examination. With me they a...
-Richland Plum
G. & S. B., Norwalk, Ohio, say: Can you tell us anything about the Richland plum? [It is a small copper-colored plum - indeed often confused with the Copper plum - much planted by the Germans of...
-Cornelian Cherry
An Indiana correspondent, evidently supposing this to be a cherry, inquires what stock it is budded on. It is not a true cherry, but a dog wood - Cornus mas - also called male Cornel, but why, we ne...
-White Alpine Strawberry
J. H. C, Columbus, O., says; I once had a white Alpine strawberry, twenty years ago, that bore a long time after the strawberry season and bore abundantly. I see no account of such a berry. Who can t...
-Leechee Nuts
Miss G. writes, My neice, Mrs. Wm. C. Heacock, U. S. N., when in San Francisco, about three years ago, was presented by a Chinaman with some nuts containing, as near as I can make out, an edible pulp...
-Disease In Cabbage Plants
A Felton, Kent Co., Del. correspondent, says: I send by mail to-day in a small box, packed in moss, two cabbage leaves of Jersey Wakefield variety. They are spring grown, in a gentle hot-bed; the bed...
-Pear Or Apple: Which?
The strangest thing in my pomological experience of twenty-five years has come under my observation recently. Some years ago, for want of a more convenient stock, a Sops of Wine apple tree was graf...
-Palms Of Southern California
In your note upon my last contribution in June Gardener's Monthly, I see that you have misunderstood me in regard to the South California palms. Brahea is a genus of Central Mexico, of a single...
-The Elm Slug
It is well known that throughout a large part of the United States the elms are skeletonized by a small slug, which renders the trees very unsightly after midsummer. We could find no account of this i...
-Literature, Travels & Personal Notes - Communications - "Laws For Nurserymen."
In the July number of the Monthly an article headed as above has special interest for me, as I had some time ago a similar experience. In May of 1875, we had a large bed of Tuberoses flowering in on...
-M. Louis Van Houtte
This distinguished horticulturist died on the 9th of May last. Next to the late Prof. Lindley, we regard Mr. Van Houtte as having exercised more influence on the elevation of horticulture than any man...
-Horticultural Judges At The Centennial
It is not to be wondered at that in an affair of such tremendous magnitude as the Centennial, things should not all go right. It is indeed amusing to hear of this or that one body, or even individual,...
-"Palms" On Palm Sunday
The English papers are trying to find out why their people use willows for palms on Palm Sunday, and fancy they find Scripture for it: Ye shall take you on the first day the boughs of goodly trees,...
-Belgium Honors Horticulturists
The Journal of Horticulture says: In no country in Europe are the representatives of horticulture held in such honor as they are in Belgium. It is not on some solitary occasion only that they have exp...
-Forsythia Splendens
Prof. S. B. Buckley desires us to say that the name as above given in his Texas geological report is a misprint for Fouquiera splendens, as we supposed. ...
-Proceedings Of The New Jersey Horticultural Society, 1876
Prof. Thurber is President, and a large list of well-known horticultural names make up the officers. This is the report of the first annual meeting, and much good work appears to have been done. The P...
-Botany Of California
By W. H. Brewer, Sereno Watson, and Asa Gray.- We briefly noted the appearance of this in our last. The work is now before us, and we take occasion to say that only for the liberality of a few gentlem...
-Fruit Growers' Association Of Ontario
Proceedings for 1875, from D. W. Beadle, Secretary, St. Catharine's, Canada. This volume has colored plates of Mr. Arnold's hybrid raspberries, and has many essays and discussions of great interest...
-Insects Of The State Of Missouri
Eighth Annual Report of Prof. C. V. Riley, State Entomologist. Unfortunately the Insects of the State of Missouri are the insects of most of the Union, and yet it is fortunate that this is unfor...
-Williams' Pacific Tourist And Guide Across The Continent
A notice of this appeared in our last - the work itself is now before us. The writer of this, having been over some of the ground described, can testify to the interest attached to the places noted, a...
-Protection From Tree Thieves
A Philadelphia correspondent says: The tree thief (referred to in the July number of the Gardener's Monthly), should have been held for Malicious Trespass. The law reads as follows : 'Malicious T...
-Horticulture At The Centennial. #1
Before proceeding with our notes we may say that it does not seem to be well understood that the plan of awards at this great exhibition is essentially different from any that has gone before, and in ...
-Volume XVIII. September, 1876. Number 213. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground - Seasonable Hints
With September we think of the bulbs which flower in spring. We have an idea that as soon as the bulbs from beyond the Rocky Mountains come into culture and under improvement, we shall have races that...
-Communications - Centennial Rhododendrons
The Editorial Notes of the Gardener's Monthly are always interesting, because the Editor is also a connoisseur. His admiration of the colors in Mr. Waterer's tent was very natural and just, for they w...
-Mr. Hovey's Arboretum Americanum
I am a great lover of trees, and was interested in reading the list of what specimens Mr. Hovey has. One hundred and seventy-two species and varieties on one's grounds must be a source of great pleasu...
-The Rhododendron And American Yew
It is said Rhododendrons should not be overhung by trees, as the roots of trees would be injurious. It is also recommended to use charcoal liberally. Growing in their native places, they do not get ch...
-Rhododendrons
It is gratifying to learn from your last number that the grand display of Rhododendrons brought out by Mr. Anthony Waterer has been so satisfactory, and attracted, as it ought, so much attention at th...
-Hardy Rhododendrons
I would remark with regard to your list of probably hardy kinds of Rhododendrons, that out of eleven there mentioned, commencing with album grandiflorum and ending with Minnie, not half are hardy. In ...
-Hardy Herbaceous Plants For July
May and June are the hey-day of hardy herbaceous plants, but underneath I mention those only that are in bloom now, July 10th, in the gardens here, and which have been wintered without any protection ...
-Public Adornments Of Cities
Americans often wish that their public servants were intelligent, and would attend to parks, squares, and other public places as they do in Europe. But it appears they are no better off than we, a...
-The Rhododendron
Mr. Waterer with his Centennial Rhododendrons has stirred up the folks with a vengeance. Four Rhododendron articles in one number! The subject is well worthy of the space. Ignorant Rhododendron cultur...
-Protection Of Tea Roses In Winter
L. F., Belleville, Ills., asks: Having heretofore failed to find the proper method to keep my Tea Roses during winter, I propose the coming season to fasten the branches to a stake and surround them ...
-Seasonable Hints. #6
Those who have greenhouses, pits or frames, will now see to having any necessary repairs attended to. White-washing annually is serviceable, destroying innumerable eggs of insects, in the war against ...
-Communications - Remedy For Verbena Rust
Some three months since I asked through the pages of the Monthly if there was a remedy for the fungus known as Verbena rust. No one having offered a remedy I now give one. Pulverized charcoal applied ...
-Pittosporum Tobira
A plant of Pittosporum tobira, four and a half feet high, and three feet in diameter of its spread branches, was planted in the open garden of James C. Smith, Esq., 2104 Walnut street, Philadelphia, i...
-Culture Of Primula Sinensis
This very desirable winter-blooming plant may be propagated from seeds, which should be sown in a pan on a light sandy compost about the beginning of August for early spring bloom, or sooner, say May,...
-Bouquets Of The Philadelphia Belles
The correspondents of the different papers, writing from the Centennial Exhibition, ought to find enough of facts to write about without serving up fiction as truth. We have seen in leading English pa...
-Violets For Winter Blooming
We have at present, says a correspondent of the Garden a row of Czar Violet, in patches about 400 feet long, at the bottom of a south wall. These flower freely and long in Spring and early Summer. T...
-Cut Flowers
The Gardener's Chronicle says: 'We read in the London papers of whole congregations carrying large bouquets of flowers to church on some particular occasion, and in the country parishes in Scotland sp...
-Chrysanthemums After Flowering
Many amateurs who have grown chrysanthemums for conservatory decoration are in doubt as to what should be done with them now that they are out of flower; and a word or two on the subject will be of se...
-Soft-Wooded Greenhouse Plants
Veronica Andersoni and salicifolia are amongst the most useful autumn flowering plants for conservatory decoration, when grown in pots and properly prepared. To keep them dwarf and bushy, as also to i...
-Pink Marechal Niel Rose
A pink Mare-chal Niel rose appears to have been secured by our excellent coadjutor Mr. Thomas Trussler, of Edmonton, and should it prove to bear the test of criticism it will add to the series of illu...
-The New Double Flowering Ivy-Leaved Pelargonium
This plant originated as a chance seedling in the garden of Herr Oscar Liebmann, of Dresden, and is a valuable addition to this class of plants; it has the trailing habit of growth, and the semi-succu...
-Croton Undulatus
This is one of the most beautiful varieties ever introduced. It is of the usual free Croton growth, the edges of the leaves being beautifully undulated and wavy, and the variegation consisting of nume...
-Anthurium Crystallinum
This fine species is in the style of the well-known A magnificum, having large, ovately heart-shaped leaves of deep emerald-green ground, with beautiful silvery veins radiating from the base to the ex...
-Hybrid Ferns
W. B., Delaware, Ohio, writes: I send you this day a box, by mail, containing three fern fronds. Nos. 1 and 2 are seedling crosses of Pteris semdata and P. elegans, they somewhat resemble the Pteris ...
-Sun-Ray Fuchsia
J. P. S, says: Sun-ray Fuchsia was raised by Mr. G. Smith about the year 1870. It was introduced into this country also under the name of Sunset. fruit and Vegetable gardening. ...
-Seasonable Hints. #7
Trees that have long stems exposed to hot suns, or drying winds, become what gardeners call hide-bound. That is, the old bark becomes indurated - cannot expand, and the tree suffers much in conseque...
-Communications - The Standard Currants And Gooseberries
It is now about twelve years since this method of growing the Currants and Gooseberries has become general in Europe; since then it has rapidly assumed large dimensions, so that now they are quite an ...
-Linseed Oil For Scale
This morn Prof. Wheat asked me if I had seen the Gardener's Monthly for July, stating that Mr. Meehan pays to you a very high tribute. I read it, and said, I would rather have it than the praise of ...
-Classification Of Fruits
In the last number of the Gardener's Monthly you allude to the need of a classification of apples,number of fruits as plants are arranged. Now, are you sure the thing is possible? In these days whe...
-Nectarine Produced From A Peach
A valued correspondent sends us an account of a nectarine produced from a peach tree on the grounds of Mr. E. Wilkins, of Maryland. It is thought to be a case of reversion. But the first nectarine t...
-The Amsden Peach
Mr. J. Wampler, Carthage, Mo., says: As the unprecedented freeze of loth March last destroyed the peach crop here, when they were just coming out in bloom (mercury fell almost to zero), we hope to he...
-The Alexander Peach
We have seen some letters addressed to Messrs. Jabez Capps & Sons in regard to this peach, from California, which compare it very favorably with Briggs' Red May, and show it to be far superior to Earl...
-Manure & Strawberry Insects
Dr. Phillips, Oxford, Miss., writes: - I do not know whether I communicated to you, or whom, that Dr. J. J. Wheat, professor of Greek in our University, requested me to examine with him what should ...
-A Strawberry Grower At Boulder, Colorado
Mr. William Newland has one of the most valuable tracts of land in the suburb of this city, one-half mile to the north. Its chief attraction now is its l 3/4-acre strawberry patch. They were now just ...
-Hame's Apple
Messrs. Cole & Co., Atlanta, Ga., write: We send you by express to-day a few Hame's Seedling Apples - a seedling that originated in Western Georgia in about 33' 30 N. latitude. It ripens with Red A...
-Maryland Early Peach
W. L. M., Frederick City, Md., writes, July 11th: I send you today by express, specimens of a new peach, which originated in this county, and which may prove a valuable acquisition to the pomologica...
-Natural History And Science. - Prairie Flowers
Every one has heard of the beauty of our Western prairies when decked in their floral robes of summer. And every one has tried, at some time, to form, in the imagination, a picture of a landscape, swe...
-Horticulturist To The Kaitakuska, Yedo, Japan
On my arrival at Hakodate, in the end of May, I at once proceeded to investigate the neighboring districts. The weather, however, proved so unfavorable that I was for some time unable to collect speci...
-Ring Forming Fungus
C. B. Grubb, Esq., residing on Lime street, in the city of Lancaster, inclosing an entire block, between Lime and Shippen streets, called my attention on the 23d of June, 1876, to a remarkable feature...
-Trietelia Laxa
That there are found in California many gems of the first water in the floral line, is no new information to the thousands of readers of the Gardener's Monthly, therefore I will proceed, with-out'comm...
-Culture
The Trietelkt laxa improves wonderfully by cultivation. The bulb should be planted in the fall of the year, about October; it should be planted in good, rich soil, which should be in good condition, f...
-Secretary Of The Connecticut State Board Of Agriculture, West Cornwall, Conn
I notice in the Gardener's Monthly the subject of eccentricity in wood growth. I have had two remarkable illustrations on my grounds. A choke cherry sprang from seed in front of my piazza, close to...
-Seeding Of The Trailing Arbutus
The Bos ton Cultivator says: What we would like to learn from our readers in the sections of New England where it abounds, is, does it fruit Who will send specimens to Prof. Asa Gray of Harvard Unive...
-Mite Parasites Of The Colorado Potato Beetle
Prof. Riley exhibited a specimen of Doryphora 10-lineata, that was so completely cov ered with a mite parasite belonging to the Gam asidse, and apparently the Gamasus coleopteratorurr, that the point ...
-The Bermuda Grass
This grass, which wag brought to our attention by Col. Hillyard, of Mississippi, as one of the most valuable of all introductions for that State, is also attracting much attention in Australia, as we ...
-Populus Canescens, Ait
E. P., Delaware County, Pa.- I enclose leaves of a species of Popidus which is planted in Philadelphia a good deal, to ask if thee would name it for me through the columns, of the Gardener's Monthly...
-Western Tannin Plant
N. N., Louisville, Ky., says: Can you give us any information of the so-called Wester 1 Tannin Plant, and whether the same is in practical use in this country? [The plant is Polygonum amphibium, a...
-Communications - Notes Upon The Grounds Of Smith &. Powell, Syracuse, N. Y
Recently, in the absence of other occupation, I visited the nursery grounds of the Messrs. Smith & Powell, at Syracuse, N. Y. They have in real estate about 1,240 acres, of which say 540 are used as n...
-Observations In Northern Texas
Owing to the call of business, I have been spending the greater part of the past two months (May and June, 1876) in the northern counties of Texas. It is possible that a short sketch of the horticultu...
-The Postal Laws As Affecting Horticulture
Many of our friends were hurt that we should say the Express companies would hold their own. They now see that it is so. It was never the intention to double the rates on printed matter. It makes no d...
-Flower Thieves
A thief in Jersey City did not read the papers. He did not steal the flowers direct from the plants, but he stole them from a messenger who was taking them to a customer. He is to stay two years in ja...
-Physalis Edulis
Of this the Gardener's Chronicle says: Physalis edulis is receiving the attention it deserves from some French horticulturists, and M. de St. Quentin, writing in the Bulletin de la Societe d'Accli...
-The Lemon Verbena
Very few of our readers, we suppose, ever fancied there were medicinal virtues in the Lemon Verbena, but this is what the London Gardener's Chronicle says: The Lemon plant, or sweet-scented Verbe...
-Visitors To Kew Gardens
On August 2nd, 1875, 61,133 persons visited Kew gardens. It was the highest number for any day in the year. Gardening must be popular to attract such crowds in England. ...
-Landscape Gardening
Mr. F. R. Elliott is engaged on a hand-book, similar in character to his recent hand-book for fruit growers. ...
-Exchanges Of Seeds And Plants
Amateurs often have seeds and plants of their own raising that they would like to exchange with others similarly situated. Organizations for this purpose materially assist the idea. A valued correspon...
-Colored Plates
Mr. John Saul sends us a colored plate of the Duchess of Edinburgh Rose, of which we recently gave a wood-cut in our pages, and Mr. A. Rolker & Sons, of New York, one of Rose, Duchesse de Vallambrosa....
-The Florist And Pomologist
Edited by Mr. Moore, and published at the office of the London Journal of Horticulture, has a beautiful colored plate of our Hale's Early Peach; a variety first brought to notice in our columns, and w...
-Corrections In The Article On Curves
Mr. Olmsted writes: In the article entitled 'Curves,' in the August number of the Gardener's Monthly, some errors have crept in which, if corrected, would make my meaning more evident. Page 228, 1st ...
-Communications - Massachusetts Horticultural Society
The exhibitions held on each Saturday in January have been very interesting, as all the impromptu exhibitions are, owing partly to the discussions which take place at the same time The subject of the ...
-Horticulture At The Centennial. #2
Notwithstanding the terrific heat of July, this first week in August finds the floral department of the Centennial Bureau of Horticulture a blaze of glory, and receiving applause from all quarters. Ou...
-New York Horticultural Association
Officers of the Association, for 1876: President, John Henderson, Flushing, Long Island. Vice-Presidents, George Such, South Amboy, N. J.; James M. Patterson, Newark, N. J.; William C. Wilson, Astoria...
-The Nurserymen And Tree Growers
The regular semi-annual meeting of the Nurserymen's and Tree Planters' Association of Chicago and vicinity was held July 11th in the office of the Western Farm Journal, at Chicago. The President, Mr. ...
-Judges Of Special Pomological Products
W. L. Schaffer A. W. Harrison, Josiah Hoopes, Thomas Meehan. ...
-Pomology At The Centennial
An exhibition of Fruits will be held in the Pomological Annex to the Agricultural Building, September 11th to 16th inclusive. Tables and dishes will be furnished by the Centennial Commission free o...
-Volume XVIII. October, 1876. Number 214. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. - Seasonable Hints
The great exhibition of flower gardening at the Centennial Grounds must have taught our people- how beautifully they can adorn their grounds at a trifling expense, and, as thousands on thousands are v...
-Communications - Landscape Gardeners
Mr. Editor: - In the June number of the Monthly I found an article headed Who shall lay out our Ornamental Grounds, wherein queries are put and suppositions made, many of which I submit has very lit...
-Kills And Cures In The Garden
After each new pest and ail, follow lots of sure cures therefor. But much of their value is lost by not.telling plainly the method of their use, and their exact make-up. These are just the things want...
-Hardy Herbaceous Plants For August
The following comprises the cream of the hardy herbaceous plants in bloom here at the Botanic Gardens on August 19th, botanical plants being strictly omitted. Some of our best reckoned-to-be hardy p...
-Public Parks
These are just now receiving particular attention in every populous town. In a recent visit to Buffalo, we were especially delighted with their public grounds. Mr. F. Law Olmstead is the designer, and...
-Patents For New Plants And Fruits
We see this subject, which has been so impartially discussed in our pages, is still the theme of writers in the agricultural press. There is a deal said about regarding the brain work of the introduc...
-Silver-Thorn And Pyracantha Hedges
The Country Gentleman speaks of the Silver-thorn or Pyracantha as if they were one and the same thing. Silver-thorn is the Elaeagnus parvifollus, and has no relationship whatever to the Pyracantha. As...
-Flowering Of The Taulownia In England
If our summer heats do not permit some of the gardening enjoyments of England, it vouchsafes us others which are denied to them. It favors the maturity of some trees for which the cool summers of Engl...
-American Foliage In Europe
When in Edinburgh, a week or two ago, I noticed several trees, in the Botanic Gardens there, remarkable for their handsomely-colored leaves. A Pavia flava and one or two others were bright orange in c...
-Liatris Pycnostachya
We made a note of this beautiful hardy flower last month; since then the effect of the drouth on summer flowering plants has been counted up, and the result in favor of this is so striking that in the...
-Asperula Odorata
This pretty, hardy herbaceous plant, says L' Hort. Belgique, enters into the composition of the German perfume, known as maitrank. Hydrangea, Thomas Hogg. - This beautiful pure white variety of...
-A New Hardy Tree, Cedrela Sinensis
In 1862, a tree was introduced to France, supposed to be a kind of Ailanthus. It has now been found to be of a different genus, and is Cedrala sinensis. Quercus Andersoni, a new species of oak from...
-Seasonable Hints. #8
The great anxiety will be at this time to preserve those things that have been growing in the open ground during summer, for, though when they were set out, we had no thought of anything more than sum...
-Communications - Destruction Of Greenhouse Plants By - Gas
During the winter of 1874-5, a large number of valuable plants were destroyed or damaged by gas in the greenhouse of Taplin & Davis of this city. A gas main leaked in a sewer, which communicated by a ...
-Echeverias For Bedding
Probably few plants of late have attracted so much attention for this purpose as those of the genus Echeveria, and deservedly so; as they may be used in a variety of ways, either as carpeting, where l...
-Winter-Flowering Carnations And Bouvardias
As winter flowers are so much in request here, we grow a very considerable number of carnations, which are known as perpetual or tree carnations. These during the winter season are grown in a span-roo...
-Bouvardia
These are hard-wooded plants, but associate best with soft-wooded plants, and should only be grown in a house that is kept well heated during winter. Those employed for bedding purposes make nice pot ...
-Tuberoses In Midwinter
To have Tuberoses in at Christmas, and on New Year's Day, the following course is pursued in the United States, where Tuberoses are admirably grown: - By the 20th of August they are potted into 4-inch...
-Euphorbia Jacquisaeflora
This being one of the most useful winter-flowering plants, it is now deserving of special attention. Plants struck in the beginning of June should now have made growth at least four feet in height and...
-Astilbe
The well-known Astilbe japonica, which is, perhaps, better known as Spiraea japonica,' is eminently valuable to furnish greenhouse flowers early in the spring, though it is a cheap hardy herbaceous ...
-A Vase Of Simple Flowers
A few days since I arranged a vase of flowers for the breakfast table which was much admired by several friends, indeed, so much so, that I am induced to give a description of it, as the effect was pr...
-Croton Weismanni
A remarkably distinct, ornamental-foliaged plant, in habit somewhat resembling a Dracsena, with long, narrow leaves, striped and mottled with gold of the brightest possible hue. It is of very graceful...
-Mignonette
M. This does not want much heat to bring forward. It grows when the thermometer is well down towards the freezing point. Indeed cold frames are better than greenhouses for it. It is late to sow in Oct...
-Seasonable Hints. #9
The past season in most parts of the country has been one of very abundant bearing, and unless the food has been kept up by a liberal supply of manure, there will be many weak and exhausted trees, and...
-Communications - Has The Pear A New Enemy
I send you some tips and branches from my injured pear trees. I hope you can tell me what ails them. The ends of branches, new growths and fruit buds look very much like those of the buttonwood, which...
-Orchards In Grass
One of the most impartial discussions of the relative merits of the different plans of cultivating orchards that we have read for some time is in the Rural Home, of Rochester, N. Y., of August 26. The...
-Orchard Of Godfrey Zimmerman, Pine Hill Nursery, Buffalo, N. Y
We had an opportunity to examine this beautiful orchard recently. It embraces pears, dwarf and standard, cherries, apples, and other fruits. The trees stand on ridges ploughed up before planting, aft...
-Wild Goose Plum
Mr. D. S. Myers, Bridge-ville, Del., says: I send you by mail this day one wild goose plum. I notice in Gardener's Monthly that there is some question about the true wild goose. I hope you will have ...
-Dr. Boynton's Pear Orchard
Some years years ago the most beautiful pears in the world came to the exhibitions from the pear orchard of Dr. Boynton, of Syracuse. The trees at last failed, and went fast to destruction. Dr. B....
-Another Wild Goose
A. Hance & Son write: By to-day's mail we send a couple of specimens of wild goose plum. These were taken from a tree selected as a genuine wild goose out of a lot sent us by Sam'l A. Baker, Davidson...
-Forcing Rhubarb
Keader, Bridgeport, Ind., says: Will you please give us an article in the Gardener's Monthly on the forcing of Pie-plant; the plans and appliances to do the same in a small and also large way, the...
-The Richland Plum
Hoopes, Bro. & Thomas, West Chester, Pa., say: We notice in Gardener's Monthly for August, in reply to G. & S. B., Norwalk, Ohio, you describe ' Richland plum' as a small copper-colored plum, etc, wh...
-Summer Hagloe
G. W. says: Please tell ua whether you meant to say in September number of Gardener's Monthly that the Hame's apple, or Hagloe, is a month later than Red Astrachan. Grammatically it is Hagloe; but El...
-Forestry
The American Forestry Association.: - This society, preliminarily organized last year at Chicago, met, pursuant to resolution, at Judges' Hall, Centennial grounds, during the great Pomo-logical week. ...
-Natural History And Science - Communications - On Graft Hybrids
(Read before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, at Buffalo, August, 1876.) Of late years an impression has prevailed that hybrids may be obtained by grafting as well as by see...
-Notes On The American Grape Vine Mildew
The grape vine seems to afford special inducements for the growth of fungi; Curtis, in his list, enumerating no less than eighteen species which grow upon it. The grape disease, properly speaking, th...
-The Sour And Sweet Apple
I have just read in the newspapers your speech at Buffalo on Grafted Hybrids. Some thirty years ago there stood in my uncle's orchard in Stafford, Conn., a small apple tree which bore fruit, one ...
-Fruit Variations
I enclose you an account of a deformed specimen of Carolina June apple, which was brought in as a curiosity at a recent meeting of the South Haven Pomological Society. The specimen is one of six ap...
-Prairie Flowers
(Callirrhoe involucrata.) Among the earliest flowers that may be seen on these plains is the above member of the Mal-lom family. The general form of the leaf is round, but it is parted or cleft and...
-Trees, Rain-Fall, And The Lakes
M. Faribault, Minnesota, desires to know whether the lowering of the water level of some lakes is not an evidence that the rain-fall is diminishing by the cutting away of the forests? We have no wis...
-Age Of The Mammoth Trees. Sequoia Gigantea
Professor Gray has steadily combated the popular notion that these trees are several thousand years old. Mr. J. G. Lemmon, one of the most esteemed of California botanists, has recently sent a long ac...
-Classification Of The Minute Fungi
Prof. Bessey, Ames, Iowa, says: I must enter a protest against friend Stauffer's article, 'King Forming Fungus,' in September Gardener's Monthly. Had the writer thereof consulted Dr. Farlow, Dr. Peck...
-Communications - Laws For Nurserymen
I see by recent statements in the Monthly that land-owners in Pennsylvania and New Jersey are still living under the old common law rule, that there can be no larceny of the freehold or of anything a...
-Let Us Profit By The Exposition
The Exposition has (Sept. 10) but sixty days more to live, and how many gardeners have seen it? Such, Mr. Editor, were the objects of my reflections while coming home from the fruit show yesterday,...
-Charles Reade On Flowers
Father Leonard is eloquent and Mrs. Gaunt listens to his church discourses with rapt attention. He lives in a sort of monastery with another seminary priest and an old servant of Mrs. Gaunt's, now a w...
-Patents For Plants And Fruits. Lex
It is extremely rare that we decline to admit articles to our columns that are not of a personal character, and never for the reason that the writer differs from our views. Any respectful article is a...
-The Jud.vs Tree
The Cercis canadensis, our Red Bud, is known as one of the Judas trees, on one species of which, it is said by Gerard, Judas hung himself. But popular tradition in the East makes the Elder tree the...
-The Font Grove Greenhouses
At Slinger-land's, 7 miles from this city, on the Albany and Susquehanna railroad, are the Font Grove greenhouses, belonging to James Hendrick, Esq-There are in all about 1,500 running feet of roofs, ...
-Monument To M. Louis Van Houtte
Nearly a thousand francs had been raised by the 1st of August for this purpose, by the horticulturists of Northern Europe and America. Fourth Annual report of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture ...
-Transactions Of The Wisconsin State Horticultural Society
From F. W. Case, Secretary, Madison, Wis.- This is the report chiefly of the mnual winter meeting at Madison last February. The apple, which is the great fruit of Wisconsin, receives exhaustive attent...
-Orchids
F. L. Ames, Esq., of North Easton Mass., has bought the entire orchid collection of Mr. Edward Rand. Mr. Ames' collection of stove and greenhouse plants and orchids is one of the most extensive and se...
-Botanical Party
Dr. Engelmann, W. M. Canby, John H. Redfield, Dr. Asa Gray, of the Botanical Gardens, Cambridge, have returned from a botanical tour in the Carolinas. ...
-Habits Of Van Houtte
A Reader, Geneva, N. Y., says: - In your account of L. Van Houtte it says he begun work between one and two in the morning, continuing until 8 P. M., with less than one hour's intermission. Is there...
-Communications - International Horticultural Exhibition, Of 1877, At Amsterdam, In The Palace Of Industry
His Majesty, the King of the Netherlands, has deigned to accept the patronage of this Exhibition and to express sincere sympathy with the aim the Commission has in view. In consequence, the Exh...
-Potomac Fruit Growers
June On the sample tables were fruits as follows: Strawberries C. Downing, Dr. Hexamar's seedling, Mountain Beauty a promising plant of the Potomac region; seedling Eliza Fillmore, Monarch of...
-The Centennial Exposition
It is but fitting that with the maturity of the exhibition fruits should pour in with great abundance. It has indeed been the great feature of the month. No such an exhibit of fruits was ever made on ...
-The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
The annual meeting took place Sep. 12th to 14th, according to announcement. It is the 48th annual meeting. These are always looked forward to with great interest all over the land. The interests of th...
-Roots, Bulbs, And Tubers At The Centennial
An exhibition of roots grown for cattle feeding, onions, potatoes, etc, will be held in the Pomological Annex to the Agricultural Building, October 2d to 7th, inclusive. Tables and dishes will be f...
-Volume XVIII. November, 1876. Number 215. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground - Seasonable Hints
With the appearance of winter there will be anxiety about the protection of tender trees; and when we speak of tender trees we may as well understand that the list of those things that will stand expo...
-Communications - The Culture Of Fitcher Plants
While reading the English catalogue of Mr. Wm. Bull, which an English friend has sent to me, I was interested in noting that our common pitcher plants were not only cultivated there, but seem to be ge...
-Grafted Rose Acacia
I wonder why nurserymen do not send out small trees of this plant grafted on the varieties of the locust. It takes and grows thereon as vigorously as does the apple on its kind. On a stock, anywhere f...
-Our Centennial Magnolia Tree
Near the boundary of my lawn, on a sandy slope, is a native Magnolia acuminata, which is remarkable for its size and productiveness, and is, no doubt, at least a centennarian in age. At four feet from...
-Sarracenla Drummondii
As stated above, this tree is remarkable for its productiveness as well as size. In fact it is more profitable than any two or three orchard trees in the neighborhood. For the past ten years it has fa...
-Large Lemons
At the nurseries of Storrs, Harrison & Co., of this place, is a lemon tree which is quite remarkable for the size of its fruit. It ripened over twenty specimens the past year, and six of them gathered...
-Akebia Quinata
This has fruited for the first time, as far as we know, on the grounds of Mr W. Canby, of Wilmington, Del. It is as large and very much resembles in external appearance, a papaw. The seeds are in a ju...
-On Naming Flowers For Persons
The Pall Mall Gazette remarks: The practice of naming flowers after private friends or public characters is very pretty; but it may be suggested that a little care in the selection of epithets bestow...
-White Bedding Pansies
In my trial bed of bedding pansies this year I find that Hooper's Great Eastern and Dean's Snowflake carry off the palm from all others, both in purity of color and continuity of blooming. In the whit...
-Pellaea Ornithopus
An interesting and distinct Fern from California. Fronds glaucous-green, rigid, erect, from 9 to 12 inches high, bipinnate; the secondary pinna? all trifoliate, except the ultimate ones, which are sim...
-Bambijsa Argentea Striata
This handsome Japanese plant has been received from Dr. Kegel, of St. Petersburgh, under the name above quoted. Like all the Bamboos, it is of an extremely graceful habit, and, in this instance, the e...
-Stangeria Schizodon
Of this interesting Cy-cad, which has been imported from Natal, only young plants are yet known in this country. These have, as in the original Stangeria para-doxa, a bluntly rounded or napiform stem,...
-Arnebia Echioides
Of the many beautiful plants in flower on the Rockwork at Kew, Arnebia echioides is by far the rarest. It is allied to Lithospermum, of which it has much the habit, and the bright yellow flowers are p...
-Galactites Tomentosa, Moench
Among plants remarkable for their ornamental foliage, the Galactites tomentosa deserves honorable mention. It is a Composite, indigenous to the shores of the Mediteranean, growing from two to three fe...
-New Golden Poplar
We have received from Mr. Charles Van Geert, of Antwerp, a colored plate representing a shoot and foliage of his new Golden Populus canadensis. It is very beautiful, and those who know Mr. Van Geert a...
-Seasonable Hints. #10
A year ago we called attention to the success of a lady who filled her flower-pots to the brim and even mounded the earth in the centre. This plan will not please skilled gardeners, nor ought it to...
-Communications - Verbena Rust
Robert Palmer (in September number) calls this a fungus, and may be correct, although some good authorities say it is occasioned by an insect. In my opinion, it is of more importance to grow verbenas ...
-Rhododendrons Under Glass
Noticing Mr. Parsons' article on Centennial Rhododendrons, I observe that all which are not hardy here he condemns as only adapted to greenhouse culture, but why could not means be adopted for their p...
-Drying White Flowers
Mr. Wermig's instructions, published in The Garden, from time to time, in reference to drying flowers and Grasses, have so much pleased me that I am induced to ask a few questions respecting the prese...
-Standard Cupheas
Admirers of the old-fashioned but extremely pretty Cuphea platycentra, so popular about a quarter of a century ago, will be much pleased with C. Hillfieldiana; for whilst possessing the neat habit of ...
-A Geranium Pyramid
Different people have different ways, but I shall suppose my way to be the best, and I am quite sure it cannot be the worst, because we have perfect pyramids solid throughout with leaf and flower. I f...
-Rose, Tea Duchess Of Edinburg
Mr. J. S. Lovett, Red Bank, N. J., writes: - By this mail I send you a leaf and flower of ' Duchess of Edinburg Tea (?) Rose,' figured in the Gardener's Monthly of August. If it is not too far gone w...
-Gladiolus Brenchleyensis
B., S. E. Central 0., says: - Some bulbs of this fine old variety, planted deeper than usual (four or five inches), were overlooked in taking the others up last fall. The past winter was mild, and th...
-Comparative Value Of Bronze Bedding Geraniums
Mr. Geo. Moore, Waban Conservatories, writes: - I enclose herewith leaves of what are considered the three best Bronze Geraniums Black Douglass, McMahon and Earl Roslyn, all grown together and under ...
-Communications - Notes On New Fruits
Southern Thornless Red Raspberry has more than sustained the promise of last season. Considerably resembling the Brandywine in appearance, it is decidedly better in quality, and customers who would no...
-Blodgett's Seedling Peaches
I decided to-day to put some of my seedling peaches on exhibition, and took nine varieties out, placing them in Division J., No. 6, of the Pomological Annex to Agricultural Hall, making eighteen plate...
-Notes From Tennessee
With your permission I would like to reply to Mr. E. S. N., of Chattanooga, in August number. He objects to our round shape of the genuine Wild Goose Plum. We consider Chas. Downing good authority as ...
-Fruit In Michigan
The fruit crop of Michigan for 1S76 is fair. Small fruits, which are now nearly out of season, have done well, but there is not enough raised in the State to supply the local demand, and large quantit...
-New Grapes
It will be recollected that a few years ago I expressed in the Monthly a desire to have my seedling grapes tried farther south, in a climate where they would attain perfect maturity. Nothing, however,...
-The Strawberry Grub
We are much troubled here with grubs, which eat the roots of strawberry plants in certain localities, whether the ground has been manured or not; and I think the larvae found in manure heaps is enti...
-Analysis Of The Onion
By Messrs. Wellington & Bragg, under the direction of Prof. Goess-man, at the Massachusetts Agricultural College chemical laboratory, being the first authentic analysis of this plant on record. 1.0...
-American Grapes In Europe
At a recent meeting of the French Acclimatization Society there was an interesting discussion on the value and prospects of the American varieties of Grapes which have been largely planted in some of ...
-Influence Of The Stock On Pears
One of the richest of Christmas Pears is Josephine de Malines, and it is also one of the hardiest, ripening here - a very exposed situation in Norfolk, not far from the coast - on bushes in the open g...
-Carter's Round-Leaved Batavian Endive. Earth-Blanching
This is a winter-salad vegetable of great excellence. Sown in July it has afforded a supply for winter use which is especially esteemed. In growth it is particularly compact, less leafy than many othe...
-The Eskbank Bunch Of Grapes
In answer to enquiries made of Mr. Curror respecting the treatment of the vines at Eskbank that produced the 26 lbs. bunch of grapes, recently shown by him at Edinburgh, he has kindly furnished us wit...
-Pruning Fruit Trees In Japan
The Garden reports a conversation with an intelligent Japan gentleman, as follows: The pruning of fruit trees is considered a matter of very great importance, and exact rules are laid down for the &...
-Elvira Grape
Messrs. Bush & Son send us the following from Bushberg, Jefferson Co., Mo., dated Septembr 9th: We send you to-day by mail a sample of our Elvira grape. It is hardly ripe enough, but we thought it wo...
-Fruiting Of Pyrus Japonica
T. S. & M., Nashville, Tenn., write: We send you to-day by mail a specimen of the fruit of' Pyrus Japonica ' grown on our grounds. The ' bush ' bore two of this size and shape, and Jive smaller speci...
-Moth In A Grapery
Mr. H. Hannam, Wilmington, Del., writes: Through the columns of the Gardener's Monthly or otherwise you would greatly oblige me, also my employer, if you could afford us some information regarding th...
-The Earliest Peach
A correspondent of Palmetto, Ga., who is fond as an amateur in experimenting with all the peaches he can get, says he shall not be suprised to find from present appearances that, all things considere...
-Brighton Grape
Under date of September 9th, which is early for Rochester, Mr. Hooker writes us with a bunch of Brighton grapes. It is impossible to judge in these days of the comparative merits of grapes, when good ...
-Japan Persimmon
O., Bucks Co., Pa., writes: Some ten or fifteen years ago I read in some periodical a description by a traveller in Japan of a fruit resembling very much our persimmon, which he described as being ve...
-A New Grape
A correspondent says: I mail you to-day sample cluster and foliage of a new grape we have not named. It is an accidental seedling of Fox parentage, grown a little north of New York. The berries firs...
-California Onion Seed
A correspondent says: I have tried California and Oregon grown onion seed but one year. It did better than I supposed it would do, but not as well as eastern grown seed, and certainly one year's tria...
-Communications - American Arboretums
Since my return from Philadelphia, where I had the pleasure of examining Mr. Meehan's Arboretum, in the Centennial grounds, an idea has presented itself to my mind in connection therewith, that the mo...
-Meehan's Arboretum At The Centennial Grounds
We have not noticed in these columns the arboretum planted by the editor of the Gardener's Monthly, as naturally he would prefer them to be judged by his cotemporaries rather than by a magazine, of wh...
-History Of The Catalpa
Field and Forest for August, a very interesting scientific serial of the more popular type,published by Mr. C. R. Dodge, of Washington, has an article on the Catalpa, to prove that it is not an introd...
-The Catalpa Timber
As sound, solid, durable timber, there seems to be no doubt of the value of the Catalpa. But it must be borne in mind that in the Northern and Western States, it is liable to have its terminal bud des...
-The Locust Tree Slug
The Yellow Locust through large districts of our country is being skeletonized as bad as the Elm. Prof. Eath-von says it is done by the larvae of Hispa sutur-alis, a small beetle. ...
-The German Forests
If the accounts we hear of the change in the climate of Germany during the last fifty years be true, it cannot be on account of the disappearance of the forests. The Department of Agriculture says: ...
-Tree-Planting
A correspondent in Livingston, Illinois, reports that the planting of trees in groves and shelter-belts, and for ornamental purposes, has become very general in that county. Ten years ago 95 per cent,...
-Natural History And Science - Communications - Triteleia Laxa; - Or Seubertia Laxa; - Which?
The communication by W. C. L. Drew in the September number of the Monthly is not only timely, but an exceedingly interesting one to me. The flower which he introduces to your readers by the name of Tr...
-Brodiaea Coccinea
Among the many wonderful plants found in the vegetable world of our State, California, there are few, if any, that arc more curious and interesting than the various Brodiaeas, foremost among which is ...
-Rain-Fall And The Lakes
I was very much pleased with your paragraph on page 310, of the October Magazine, regarding Trees, Rain-fall and the Lakes. Writers on these subjects often run away rapidly with what appears a good ...
-Vernacular Names
As we grow older we get out of all patience with what are called common names. It has been the writer's luck to be a juror in several departments of the Centennial Exhibition, - amongst others Legume...
-How Error Is Propagated
It is more than probable that much of the supposed differences of opinion which prevail on scientific subjects, between distinguished men, come from their imperfect understanding of each other's state...
-Tropical Flora At The Poles
As every intelligent person knows, the remains of tropical plants and animals are found as far as explorations have yet reached, and puzzle philosophers to account for their appearance there. Some hav...
-Vitality Of Seed
When a new form of plant appears, the Botanist refers to all that has been known about it before. We should like to see this sort of knowledge attended to in other branches. Mr. W. H. Seaman of Washin...
-Course Of The Sap
Prof. Karl Koch says in Gardeners' Chronicle: Among practical gardeners and pomologists not only does this error respecting a rising crude sap or raw food prevail, but many of the current notions as ...
-The Warfare Of Plants On One Another
Mr. Lester Ward in the Popular Science Monthly for October, has the following good piece of reasoning: The most frequent and prominent cause of these disturbances of the natural fixity of vegetation ...
-Adaptation To The Environment
It has long been regarded as a law of life, applicable alike to animal and vegetable forms, that each species is exactly adapted to the particular habitat where it occurs; and naturalists, assuming th...
-The Self Fertilization Of Plants
Mr. Thomas Meehan, one of the most acute and thoughtful of American Botanists, has, several times during the present year, brought before the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, the subject of t...
-Seeds Two Thousand Years Old Growing
A correspondent sends us the following from the London Examiner and asks what we think of it: A most interesting observation, referring to the power of germination in seed which is hundreds and ev...
-Orthography Of Botanical Names
J. S. O., Cincinnati, Ohio, asks: Will you please give us the rule for the terminal i in botanical names? For instance.should we write Smithi, or Smithii? [It should in Smith's case be Smithii. It i...
-The Thwack Raspberry
Notwithstanding its uncouth name, is said to be a very good thing by some who have seen it. The growers say it eclipses all other sorts in eight several particulars, which we should regard as doubt...
-Postal Laws
A correspondent writes that we are wrong about the postal laws on seeds and plants; that the obnoxious express rates of last season have been repealed, and that his postmaster receives things from him...
-The Gardener's Monthly
An Iowa correspondent says: - The September number of the Gardener's Monthly is a fine number. I am glad to see by the continued improvement of the magazine, that it is in a prosperous condition. It ...
-Criticism
A highly valued friend writes: - On page 295, in mentioning the new hydrangea, 'Thomas Hogg,'you give it as a variety of 'H hortensis,' when you know very well that it was named in honor of Queen Hor...
-The Tomato
Nothing is more remarkable than the way in which nations will year after year shut themselves up in their prejudices, and keep deaf to evidence that would help them to facts of great value to themselv...
-Miller & Sievers. Australian Tree Ferns
We see by the public papers that for the very fine collection of Australian tree ferns, which formed one the leading attractions of Horticultural Hall, at the Centennial, these gentlemen have had dese...
-The Early History Of The Vine And Pomegranate
The Independent of Oct. 5th, notices the researches of Dr. Birch on Monumental Egypt, and that there is in the work an account of a Botanical collection made by Thotmes III., on the pylons of Karnak...
-W. Forsyth
This old writer on Gardening, The Journal of Horticulture'tells us, was born in 1737, at Old Meldrum, in Scotland. He succeeded in wheedling the Government of England into giving him $9,000, for mixin...
-I. E. Ilgenfritz
Among the many personal features that give interest to the Centennial, Michigan receives credit for the above gentleman, whom she placed in charge of her exhibits. Always courteous and energetic, with...
-American Tuberoses
We were astonished to read in a Boston paper recently an article on the tuberose from the pen of one of Boston's leading horticulturists, that the bulbs are imported from Italy and France, as our se...
-Sir Joseph Banks
The London Journal of Horticulture has a portrait and history of this distinguished Botanist and Horticulturist of the last age. He was born in Lincolnshire, in 1743. He was on the voyage of Captain C...
-Worcester Co., (Mass.,) Horticultural Society For 1875
In the annual report by E. W. Lincoln, Secretary, the society mentions some difficulties to be overcome, but on the whole we understand that this very useful local society is prosperous. ...
-The New South
By Col. M. B. Hillyard, McComb City, Miss. This is a compilation of what has been written by Northern men who have visited Mississippi and other parts of the South, and gives a great amount of informa...
-Ohio State Hort. Society
Ninth annual report from M. B. Bateham, Secretary, Painesville, Ohio. There are some admirable essays in this volume, especially pictures on grass, by Frank J. Scott. On the whole an improvement eve...
-Twelfth Annual Catalogue, Michigan State Agricultural College
This is one of the few successful agricultural colleges ; and it is a pleasure to read what it has to say of itself. Dr. Abbot is President, and R. G. Baird, Secretary, Prof. Kedzie, of Chemistry, ...
-The Centennial
By the time this reaches most of our readers, the great Exhibition will have closed; and we shall soon be in a position to see what gain, if any, has accrued to Agriculture and Horticulture - the last...
-Ohio Fruit At The Centennial
M. B. Bate-ham writes: In your comments on the Centennial Pomological Exhibition, (Oct. p. 319,) you say 'Ohio had a very fine collection of fruit, but we understood that the State would pay no one t...
-Volume XVIII. December, 1876. Number 216. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground - Seasonable Hints
There is not much to do in this department at this season, but much to remember. It is the season of thought, if not of work. How often do we hear people say they cannot wait a life-time for trees ...
-Hardiness Of The Silver Thorn
There is a hedge of this on Meehan avenue in German-town, formerly a part of Median's nurseries, that has been fifteen years entirely uninjured. Mr. Carew Sanders says, that wherever the Wei-gela and ...
-The Gladiolus Disease
When this was first brought to the attention of the Gardener's Monthly, now many years ago, we expressed the opinion that it was of fungoid origin. Of course we had to make the guess from analogy, as ...
-The Centennial Rock-Work
S. O. K., Jackson, Mich., writes: - Since noticing your remarks on the display of Rock-work on the horticultural grounds at the Centennial, the query with me has been why an untutored eye like min...
-Pyracantha Hedges
C. C, Decherd, Tenn., writes: - Can you, through the Monthly, give me any information about the Pyracantha hedge plant? Is it the same as the Virginia White Thorn? Is there any difference as to hardi...
-Names Of Plants
C. W. H., Nashua, N. H. No. 1, Chionanthus Virginicus; 2, Gynmocladus canadensis; 3, Gleditschia triacanthos; 4, Crataegus oxyacantha. ...
-Seasonable Hints. #11
Insects are apt to be troublesome in growing houses, - particularly Red-spider, Green-fly and Mealy-bug. A free use of the syringe is a good preventive. Tobacco-smoke, in two or three light doses, is ...
-Communications - Pot Drainage
Is it necessary to drain my flower-pots? I am asked this question many times during the year, and not only from personal visitors to our establishment does the question come, but from many of our frie...
-Croton Culture
This genus of plants comprises some of the finest ornamental leaved plants in cultivation. Of late years from the South Sea Islands have been introduced some of the best species, some of which are not...
-Gladioli For Winter
It is to be regretted that these highly ornamental bulbs are not generally cultivated for winter blooming. They are as easily grown as hyacinths and bulbs of a like nature, and their cheerful appearan...
-Boston
Last spring this variety of Agave flowered here. It threw up a central stem to the height of four feet, on the top of which the flowers were produced, extending downwards about fifteen inches. They we...
-Violets
A great gardening author has stated that if three flower-pots were kept in a window, one of the three should be devoted to the culture of violets. Well did he know how dear that little flower was to t...
-Forcing Tender Roses
The writer wishes it understood that he makes a distinction between growing plants under glass and forcing them. We grow, for instance, grapes in cold graperies; no gardener would call that forcing gr...
-Pritchardia Filifera,
We give as an illustration with the title page for the annual volume a representation of this beautiful Palm, the recent discovery of which in the lower Colorado districts of the United States has cau...
-Circulation Of Hot Water
In scientific circles there is some interest taken in the fact that the soundings of the Challenger expedition shows that down in the deep water of the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean there are many places...
-Lime For Cellar Floors
M. S. B, Portland, Oregon, writes: I should be glad to be informed through the Gardener's Monthly, or otherwise, how to construct ' Lime floors' for cellar bottoms, and how long after making before t...
-Heating A Cucumber House
P. W., Winters, Yolo Co., California, writes: I wish to inquire the best way to heat a greenhouse, three hundred and twenty feet long and thirteen feet wide. The house is used for the purpose of rais...
-Sunray Fuchsia
W. C. L. D., El Dorado, Cal., says: In July number one of the Monthly's correspondents desires to know who originated the Sunray Fuchsia. It originated with a Mr. Rudd. I think it a very desirable Fu...
-Tar In Greenhouses Again
A correspondent at Ogdensburg, New York, is in trouble with the greenhouse. The leaves of the plants fall off, etc, etc, etc, etc. The pipes are painted by some black material, and this tells the wh...
-Seasonable Hints. #12
Very little can be done now in this department, except by way of preparation for another year. Manure can be placed on the ground wherever required, and Asparagus beds, if not already done, should ...
-Communications - Grapes At Boston
The display of grapes at the Massachusetts Horticultural Exhibition in September last was unusually fine. Some pronounced it the best that had ever been made. The season was remarkably favorable, on a...
-Mrs. Pince's Muscat Grape
By referring to the June number, 1874, page 166, you will find notes about Mrs. Pince's Muscat Grape. I now send by express a bunch of the same, an average one of twenty-two. I do this because I the...
-The Winter Protection Of Grape Vines
There seems to be no other way given whereby the fruit culturist of the Northern States can combat the cold and frosty weather of these northern regions successfully, and produce in perfection the cho...
-The Sicilian Nut Tree
Four or five years ago, seeing the Sicilian Nut Tree extensively advertised as a valuable nut-bearing shrub or tree, I ordered two plants from the proprietor, received them by express, and planted the...
-Muskingum Pear
This fruit which seems to do well in the northeast, is not considered valuable in the vicinity of the city of Zanesville, Ohio, on the Muskingum river. Since the finer varieties have become known it h...
-The Plum Curculio
I wish to write to the public through your progressive Monthly, how we cheated the little Turk out of some Purple Favorite Plums, this year, by casting air-slaked lime over the tree nearly every morni...
-June-Budding Peach Trees In Texas
My June-developed peach buds, where I cut the tops entirely off, are many of them dying; but where the young tree was small enough to bend over, or, where large, was first cut partly in two (as in pla...
-Disease In California Cherries
The California Agriculturist says: Several cherry orchards about San Jose have, within the last two or three years, showed the presence of some disease which has alarmed and puzzled the orchardist...
-Lime And The Potato Beetle
The Garden-er's Magazine tells its readers that when the Potato Beetle makes its appearance in England, not to use the favorite thing on the other side - an arsenical preparation known as Paris Green ...
-Rainfall And Forests
Our European friends are finding some curious facts in regard to rainfall and forests. In France, a Mr. Fautral found that there was much more rain fell in a forest than on a sandy plain not a gre...
-Metallic Substances In Plants
The number of metals absolutely indispensable to all plants, and consequently to fruit trees, is six; namely, potassium, calcium, sulphur, phosphorus, manganese, and iron. There is no doubt, however, ...
-Literature, Travels & Personal Notes - Communications - Views Of Distant Lands
New Zealand, from the insular position it occupies, although much nearer the equator than Great Britain, is said to much resemble it, in the mildness and moisture of its climate. Probably it does, but...
-Visit To Carrollton
As the season of beautiful flowers - in the flower-garden at least - is drawing to a close, it is perhaps a good time to communicate anything new or interesting to the Gardener's Monthly, so that each...
-Forest Hill Cemetery, Utica, N. Y
In paying a flying visit to this famed city of Central New York, I have been induced to see its beautiful cemetery, especially its conservatory, which is at present so interesting to all for its novel...
-The Plum
Our garden plums appear, from the investigations of our Indian botanists, to be varieties produced by long cultivation of the Primus insititia, a species common in the mountains of Asia, from the Cauc...
-Mr. C. M. Hovey
We see it announced that Mr. Hovey will take charge of a horticultural department in the American Cidtivator. We are much pleased at these evidences of a disposition to make eminent attainments practi...
-The Confederate States
Mr. Andrew Murray, as quoted in the Gardener's Chronicle, says the Doryphora juncta, a cousin, if not a brother of our old enemy the potato bug, inhabits the Confederate States. So far as we know, the...
-Geological Survey Of Indiana
7th annual report, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist. This is one of the most valuable surveys at present in progress, and is especially of service to agriculturists and horticulturists, as well as to the...
-Louisiana As It Is
By Daniel Dennett, New Orleans. This is a paper-covered book of some three hundred pages, giving a complete account of the farm-products, grasses, vegetables, forests; indeed the whole natural and int...
-Communications - Potomac Fruit Growers
Prof. Brainard, Chairman of the Scientific Committee, read a paper on Pear Blight. After an elaborate discussion of plant growth, he said: The green and tender portions of the tree are made up of ...
-New Plants
Pentstemon Hctolis One of the prettiest of the dwarf Pentstemous of the Rocky Mountains, forms the subject of a handsome colored plate in the Florist and Pomologisl for November. Dahlia Gr...
-New Plants. Part 2
New Variegated Fern: - Dictyogramma Ja-Ponica Variegated ferns are very rare. Mr. Williams of England has introduced this. The yellowish green variegation is herring boned along the centre of eac...
-New Plants. Part 3
Victoria Mignonette New mignonettes continue to be introduced, but to the general observer do not appear very different from old sorts. The Victoria is now said to be the best. New Plants M...
-New Plants. Part 4
Double-Flowered Lilium Auratum At a meeting of the Central Horticultural Society of France, held on the 11th of last September, M. Duchartre read a letter from M. Boisgiraud, of Tours, in which tha...
-Editorial Notes
The New Palm At the October meeting of the Germantown Horticultural Society, the first premium for new and rare plants was awarded to Edwin Lonsdale, florist of that place, for a plant of the bea...
-Editorial Notes. Part 2
Roses For Winter Buds The Garden says Niphetos, Isabella sprunt, and Safrano, are found to be the best to grow for Covent Garden Market. Tacsoxia Ixsignis The Tacsonias are closely allied...
-Editorial Notes. Part 3
Flora Of California The first volume is now ready, and may be had for $6 of Mr. Sereno Watson, Cambridge, Mass. The proceeds are to bring out the second and concluding volume. Guide To The P...
-Editorial Notes. Part 4
The Horticulturist Mr. Downing's name is so closely identified with the history of the Hor-ticulturist, that the public are apt to forget it was to the enterprise of the late Luther Tucker, of Alba...
-Editorial Notes. Part 5
Nurserymen And Tree Planters There will be held at the Palmer House, in Chicago, on the second Wednesday in June next, a meeting of the nurserymen of the Northwest, for the purpose of organizing a ...
-Editorial Notes. Part 6
Euonymus Americanus An Ohio correspondent calls our attention to the beauty of this native shrub. It is more beautiful than Euonymus atropurpureus and E. Europaeus and varieties, the two in cultiva...
-Editorial Notes. Part 7
Queries Petition - J. H. C. says:- The form of petition in the Gardener's Monthly, page 347, is well timed and should be copied extensively, and signed by thousands and in good time sent to Congre...
-Editorial Notes. Part 8
Names Of Plants J. I., Newton, Mass.- The little leaf No. 1 appears to be a variegated leaf of Eranthemum pulchellum. No. 2, variegated Vinca major. Machines For Flower Pots F. G., Memphi...
-New Fruits & Vegetables
Pitmaston Duchess Pear This is the subject of a colored plate in the February Florist and Pomologist. As represented, it is narrower than the ordinary Duchess, and of a peculiarly pleasing orange c...









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