Most plants of the Arum family of which the well known Richar-dia or Calla is an illustrious example, prove such excellent kinds for room or greenhouse culture, that cultivators gladly welcome any new and good one. When the writer was visiting Mr. B. S. William's nursery, at Upper Hol-loway, near London, last spring, Anthurium ornatum, a new one of this class was in bloom and very attractive. Mr. W. has kindly furnished us with the following description of it: " The Anthuriums comprise a very large family; some of them are unsurpassed for the beauty and usefulness of their flowers, and others for the magnificence of their foliage; but the one? now offered combines both these features; in Well-grown plants the petioles are about three feet long; leaves light green, and cordate in shape, from nine to twelve inches broad; the flowers are thrown well above the foliage on stout flower stalks; the spathe, which is pure white is from six to eight inches in length, and two and three-quarter inches in breadth, tapering towards the apex; the spadix, which is about six inches in length, stands up very conspicuous, being nearly black, but covered with a violet hue; this most interesting plant should find a place in every collection.

ANTHURIUM ORNATUM.

ANTHURIUM ORNATUM.