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The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V20 | by Thomas Meehan



An American garden is not particularly attractive in Winter time, but there is no reason why it should not be so; and when the time comes, which we look forward to, when there shall be a distinctively American style of gardening, much more attention will be given to it than there is now. In our text books of landscape gardening the great anxiety is to bring out the lights and shadows as cast by the umbrageous foliage of masses of trees or of fine specimens. The contrasts of brown and grey of the ground with sunny leaves of the trees, the due proportion of earth, or sky, or water, the periods of blooming of trees and flowers, or the tints of color in which Nature clothes herself all about us - these are the chief concern of the landscape gardener of the books.

TitleThe Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V20
AuthorThomas Meehan
PublisherCharles H. Marot
Year1878
Copyright1878, Charles H. Marot
AmazonFour-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long

Devoted To Horticulture, Arboriculture And Rural Affairs.

Edited By Thomas Meehan, Formerly Head Gardener to Caleb Cope, Esq., at Springbrook, and at the Bart-ram Botanic Garden near Philadelphia; Graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, (London,) England,. Member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Author of "American Hand-Book of Ornamental Trees." etc.

-January. Number 229. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
An American garden is not particularly attractive in Winter time, but there is no reason why it should not be so; and when the time comes, which we look forward to, when there shall be a distinctively...
-Communications. Tuberous Rooted Begonias
On page 327 of the November Monthly,W., Norfolk, Va., with reference to the above, says: As far as tested, they are most suitable for bedding plants, surpassing the geranium in their beautiful f...
-Disease On The Marechal Neil Rose And Euonymus Latifolius
I notice in the November number of the Monthly a complaint from a Philadelphia correspondent of a new disease which has of late attacked that queen of climbing roses theMarechal Neil, and that you e...
-The Tuberose
The beautiful and delicate tuberose requires no encomiums from any pen; its popularity is insured forever. Other flowers may fade in the estimation of Flora's devotees, but the tuberose never. As a...
-The Oriental Plane
Mr. Samuel Parsons gives a timely caution to planters to avoid the American and choose the Oriental Plane in planting. The Oriental seems free from any disease except a little trouble from a white mil...
-Hybrid Tropaeolums
In very dry and hot seasons Nasturtiums are not as good as they anight be, but in seasons such as the last, they are wonderfully beautiful objects. On the grounds of Washington Pastorius, Esq.,...
-Culture Of The Native Water Lily
We are glad to see that this beautiful plant is becoming a favorite with cultivators. A West-ern paper says: The cultivation of the Water Lily is an easy matter, and there is nothing that better r...
-Andromeda Japonica
With a beautiful colored plate the London Garden gives the following account: Japan Andromeda (Pieris japonica) is a tall, smooth shrub, with pointed, lanceolate leaves about two inches long, which...
-Scraps And Queries. Moving Large Trees
Carlos. - Can you give any idea how large it would be safe to move trees ?We have some Norway Maples, a foot round, in the way of some improvements, which we do not wish to lose. If they can be mo...
-January. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Flowers in Winter, flowers in Spring, Autumn flowers, all in turn bring their special pleasures; but the first get the heartiest welcome, and chiefly, we suppose, from the difficulty experienced in ob...
-Communications. Double Ceranium,"Bishop Wood." By Wm. K. Harris, Philadelphia
In your valuable Monthly of November edition, I notice an article with the above heading, by Mr. Woodruff. After reading it I feel called upon to reply. Geranium B. Wood I raised from seed three years...
-Bishop Wood Geranium
I notice the remarks of G. H.Woodruff in the last number of the Gardener's Monthly. 1 can vouch for the Geranium BishopWood being raised by W. K. Harris, having seen the first bloom standing very co...
-On Torenias
The introduction of the newTorenia Fourneri from Cochin China has created quite a sensation in the floricultural world; several articles have already been written about it. and the Gardener's Monthl...
-Crowing The Richardia Aethiopica
Perhaps some of the many lady readers of your Monthly would like to know how to get two flowers instead of one from every flowering sheath of their Calla lillies. As soon as the joint flower is cut, o...
-Glazing
We do not quite understand the following, which we rind in the Polytechnic Review. Illustrations would perhaps he required to make it plain. But as there may be something, if properly understood in th...
-Heating Small Greenhouses
In reference to our note in the November number, the Galena Industrial Press has the following useful facts: We know of an instance where house plants are kept thriving winter after winter in a ro...
-A Fine Geranitm
We like to hear of well-grown plants, and give place to the following from the Prairie Farmer : In a recent issue we alluded to a wonderful geranium, the property of W. H. Perkins, Barnard, Vermon...
-Blandfordia Princeps
This strikingly handsome greenhouse perennial was introduced by Mr. W. Bull, and gained the first prize as the best new flowering greenhouse plant at the Royal Horticultural Society's Exhibition in th...
-Carnation Peter Henderson
Nanz Neu-ner & Co. send us a photograph of which we can truly say that it fully justifies all that they say of it in the following note : We take great pleasure in sending you a photograph of our ...
-Clematis Indivisa
This lovely clematis should be looked after by owners of cool conservatories, who, as it may happen, know not what to plant in them. There may be little excuse for thenot knowing, perhaps; but a not...
-Alonsoa Albiflora
New distinct species from Mexico, introduced by M. Roezl, the distinguished collector, flowering freely, from 12 inches up to two feet in diameter, producing long terminal spikes of pure white flowers...
-Fuchsia Racemosa
A most distinct species, collected by Mr. Thomas Hogg, in St. Domingo,, 1872, but now for the first time offered for sale, we believe, either here or in Europe. It was exhibited in full bloom at New Y...
-Camellias
J. C. C, Phila., writes:I should be much obliged if you would let me know through the Gardner's Monthly the proper temperature for Camellia Japonica and Azalea Indica; also whether they should be kep...
-Cure For Mealy Bug
AHard-Fisted Gardener writes:I agree with you point blank that there is no infallible remedy for curing bug-ridden plants with outany trouble; still there is a plan, that is, my plan, and which I k...
-January. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Many complain of the struggle with insects and fungoid diseases. Some of this may be cured by washing trees in the winter season. Under glass, the best peach and grape growers would never think of let...
-Cooking Puff Balls
Yes, thePuff Ball, or Lycoperdon, is eatable, and makes a very delicious dish; but is not so good asTuber album, the great white truffle. That is an irregular mass, sometimes almost as large as a ...
-Hoosac Thornless Raspberries
In reply to T. I.,Hamilton, III., I would state: that the Hoosac Thornless blackberry has proved to be of very little value - I may say, almost, worthless with us. Although it is a moderately good gro...
-Grape Culture Under Class
Further discussing the above subject, I earnestly desire to assist those who have started to cultivate the grape vine under glass, in order that they may more successfully cope with the rigorous chang...
-Apples In Philadelphla
Apples are selling in Philadelphia, this season, at $3.50 per barrel; Spitzenbergs, on account of their increasing scarcity, bringing from 25 to 50 cents more. If any one can get a new kind that will ...
-Vine Disease From America
Max. Corun charges a new vine disease in France on America, introduced, he says, by American vines. He calles it the Anthracnose. There are white spots on the leaves, which afterward become charcoal b...
-Culture Or Coffee In The Southern States
We see it stated that efforts are being made to introduce coffee culture into the Southern States; and that Government is either to recommend it, or in some way to be called on to aid it. It is a begi...
-Fruit Culture In Alabama
C. C. Lang-don recently delivered an address before the Industrial Convention of Alabama. He referred especially to the apple, peach, pear and grape, and believed no State in the Union better adapted ...
-Californian Fruits In California
Our correspondent Mr. T. G. Yeomans, is traveling in California. In a letter to his family, he says : While it grows that of almost every variety, it is generally conceded, by those who are best i...
-Asparagus Forcing In Paris
I have lately visited a very extensive establishment for the forcing of asparagus in Paris, of which a few words may not be without interest to the readers of The Garden. In all, about a half an acre ...
-Hybridization Of The: Monukka And Black Hamburgh Grapes
The Black Mo-nukka is a grape believed to be of Indian origin, which was received from the late Mr. Johnsonr gardener at Hampton Court, and distributed by the Royal Horticultural Society. It is a grap...
-Stump Apple
While absent from home last Fall, some specimens of this fruit were received from Mr. J. R. Stone. Our contemporary, the Country Gentleman - than whose Hort. Editor, J. J. Thomas, there is none more c...
-Hide-Bound Trees
J. K. S., Cincinnati, writes:Among the Germans over the Rhine, as we call their location here, there is a practice of slitting up the bark of some trees that do not grow freely. They say they are hid...
-Lime For An Apple Orchard
A Bucks Co., Pennsylvanian, writes:My fruit crop has been very good this year; I had nearly as many apples as last year. The prices obtained were from GO cents to $1.20. My apples were extraordinaril...
-Dwarf Apple Stocks
J. G. B., Newburgh, N. Y., writes :I have been a constant reader of your highly esteemed journal for many years, but do not recollect of having seen any detailed account of the history of the so-call...
-The Eucalyptus In Algiers
Mr. Play-fair, the English consul at Algiers, has sent a report to his government on the improvements brought about by the planting of the Eucalyptus. He very properly condemns the nonsense that has a...
-Large Cherry Tree
Though not included in botanical works, the cherry of our gardens is one of the commonest of wild trees in Pennsylvania, and they, in the short time since their escape from culture, have grown to enor...
-A New Product From The Pine
Vanillin exists in the sap of the pine (Pinus sylvestris) and of the larch. For the purpose of procuring it, the trees are felled during the period when vegetation is most active, and are stripped of ...
-Lemon Wood
W., West Philadelphia, writes :Having occasion to have use for some boxwood recently, I found it very dear; I suppose it grows too slow to make a profit in our country, for I have noticed some edging...
-Picea Engelmanni
A correspondent, who is very familiar with the Coniferall of the American continent, writes :Is it possible that the beautiful spruces collected by you and Mr. Hoopes from the highest timber growths ...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Beccar Ticks
I notice in the August number of the Monthly, notice of a new forage plant, Cyno-glossum Morrisoni - Beggars' Ticks. I thought it would be well to call your attention to the same, as there is a mistak...
-Scarcity Of Dogwood
I think the Boston Journal of Chemistry has made a mistake as to the Rhamnus frangula being used for the manufacture of gun-powder; for in Science Gossip for June, 1877, is a comment on a previous art...
-Poplars, Abeles Or Aspens And Cottonwoods
In the Gardener's Monthly for November, 1877, are some strictures upon the name Populus angulata used by my friend, Dr. Furnas,.of Danville, Indiana, as applied to the Carolina Poplar. His stock was r...
-1. Populus Angulata - Michaux, Carolina Poplar
Michaux says this species, which he met under the name of Carolinian Poplar, was found southward, in Virginia, and on the Mississippi and Missouri rivers growing with the Cotton-wood, Canadensis. He d...
-2. Populus Canadensis, Of Michaux
The Cottonwood is considered by Dr. Gray* to be the monilifera of Aiton, and the laevigata of Will-denow. Wood's No. 5 monilifera of Aiton. seems to be different with habitaton the Hudson, near Troy,...
-3. The Virginian Or Swiss Poplar, P. Monilifera Of Michaux
The Virginian Or Swiss Poplar, P. Monilifera Of Michaux, supposed by Gray to be P. monilifera of Aiton, does not apper to have been found in this country by the Michaux' father or son, but they say it...
-4, The Cotton Tree, Populus Argentea, Michx
The Cotton Tree, Populus Argentea, Michx, and according to Gray P. heterophyl la, L., is found in the Middle, Western and Southern States; and Micheaux, especially, refers to a large swamp in southern...
-Poplars
Populus balsamifera - Tacamahaca, or Balsam Poplar, is a very distinct species. This is particularly northern, extending to Stoneleake, lat. 634 Leaves on round petioles, dark green above, rusty brown...
-9. Populus Nigra, L. European
Populus Nigra, L. European, was not recognized by the Michaux in this country, but trees found near Albany, N. Y., on the Hudson, and in New York city, were described by them as T. Hudsonica, and by P...
-10. The Lombardy Poplar
Populus dilatata,of Aiton, is no longer looked upon as a species, but merely a variety or sport from the nigra. This is extensively grown as an alley tree along the highways of Southern Europe, where ...
-Aspens
Aspens, or Abeles, form a distinct group among the poplars. They are usually smaller trees, especially the American species. *This question is already answered by my friend and jury colleague at Vi...
-11. Populus Tremuloides, Michaux
Quaking asp, is here but a small tree of the second or third class, seldom more than twenty to forty feet high, particularly toward the north, where it becomes a mere shrub. A form of this species in ...
-13. Populus Canescens, Or The Populus Alba,Ian-Naeus
Populus Canescens, Or The Populus Alba,Ian-Naeus, the common white or gray poplar, with its many forms or varieties of Abeles, Athenian, maple-leaved and silver poplar. Though widely diffused and p...
-The Wages Of Insects
A botanical friend wrote to the Monthly some months ago, suggesting that the editor hadcaricatured the views of those who dwelt on the great advantages to be derived from cross fertilization through...
-The Root Of The Tupelo Tree
Physicians, when they wait on us, are very particular to have their prescriptions in Latin. They say it avoids mistakes; but when they are among themselves they do not seem as particular. The Medical ...
-Common Names Of Plants
Easy in comparison as these seem to be, no one not in the secret can have the least idea of the labor and trouble they give to those who wish to understand what they hear or read about. A case in poin...
-Agricultural Ants
Dr. McCook, of Philadelphia, has been telling us about ants in Texas that sow, reap, and store grain in granaries. There are some, also, that keep stock : It has been stated by Sir John Lubbock t...
-Abies Venusta
In the vegetable kingdom the conifers bear a markedly high and deserved rank, but none more so than the abies, or fir family. One variety of the abies is found alone within the borders of San Luis Obs...
-Something About Parks
The South Park Commissioners of Chicago have refused further appropriations for keeping up the Botanic Gardens, for the reason as stated that these grounds made no show for the expense incurred. As th...
-Restoring Dead Seeds
Miss B. writes: Let me relate my experience. Three years ago I gathered some seeds of Golden Pyrethrum, and planted half the next spring. Not one came up. I supposed they were not ripe. Yet unwill...
-Angullula Radicola
R. M.. Emporia. Kan., writes:I am troubled with a kind of knot or excrescence growing on the roots of plants, causing me great loss. It is not confined to any particular kind, but has injured Heliotr...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Laws Against The Yellows
In speaking of the last report of the Michigan State Pomological Society, the editor refers to the law in our State preventing the spread of the yellows in the peach. The law was not made universal to...
-Plant Protection
As all understand, a patent gives to an inventor and his assigns the exclusive right of making:, using and selling the patented article for a term of years specified in the letters patent. If correspo...
-European Notes By The Editor, No. 5
At Combe Wood, in Surrey, is the tree nursery of Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, of London. It is a pretty rolling piece of ground, with hills for those trees that love to be above others, and deep peat bed...
-Our Last Volume
We have many compliments on the beauty of our colored plate, which we gave as a frontispiece for our last volume. We appreciate these compliments the more because it was not part of the original progr...
-Value Of A Horticultural Paper
People often say to themselves,I hardly know what benefit a horticultural paper is to me, but like the air and sunlight, we get innumerable blessings we are hardly conscious of. In England they have...
-Patenting New Fruits
The idea so persistently urged for so many years that fruit trees, flowers and vegetables, should be patented does not seem to have many advocates now since we showed how impossible it was that any of...
-Mixing Up English Names
The Gardener's Chronicle, in speaking of the confusion among English names of plants, mentions over two dozen distinct plants to which the name lily is applied, which do not belong to the genus Lil-iu...
-Remakes On Insects, By Prof. C. V. Riley
We have on our table, theProceedings of the Academy of Sciences of St. Louis, with Accounts of Various Entomological Discoveries, by Prof. Riley. There is an account of the larval habits of the Blis...
-Scraps And Queries. Shittim Wood
A lady from Ohio sends us. some leaves of Bumelia lycoides. and the following letter, which we give because it has an interest, though the true shittim wood was most likely Acacia Farnesiana, which is...
-Horticultural Societies. Editorial Notes. Address Of Marshall P. Wilder
(Continued from page 380). Such are some of the statistics which I have been able to gather, but it is hoped that the response of our own Vice-Presidents to our circular will make the report of our...
-The Introduction And Dissemination Of New And Valuable American Fruits
The introduction of new American varieties from seed, adapted to all sections of our vast territory, not only in itself, but as incentives to further progress, connot be overrated. To this, more than ...
-Improvement In Packing And Transportation
Much of our progress in pomology and horticulture is due to the increase of facilities for transportation afforded by railroads and steamboats. Especially is this the case in Southern and Western Stat...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Death Of Thomas Rivers
The decease of this eminent horticulturist, well known to our readers as the anthor of the Miniature Fruit Garden, was announced too late for our last number. We had prepared a brief notice, but give ...
-The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
This, the oldest Horticultural Society at present existing in the United States, passed its fiftieth birthday on the 21st of December, and the occasion was taken to have a happy re-union of the member...
-February. Number 230. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In many parts where our magazine goes it will be necessary to bring up the preliminaries for active spring work. Many delay pruning shrubbery until after severe weather passes, so as to see what in...
-Communications. How Bedding-Plants May Be Arranged
Figure 3 represents what we may callregular flower-beds. Should lie 3 to 5 feet from the walks, and there might be a continuance of these on both sides of a straight walk, with every other to be a c...
-Alpine Plants
In the strict sense, Alpine plants are such as grow in latitudes ranging from the greatest elevation, or perpetual snow line towards the equator, to less elevated situations near the poles. Thus it is...
-Lawns
It is conceded on all hands that a good lawn, well kept, is one of those adornments which ought to be more frequently seen. I wish to offer a few remarks, expressing no new ideas, perhaps, probably...
-The Dioscorea Batatas - Or Chinese Potato
The late Wm. R. Prince, of Flushing, in his fanciful advertising style, declared that in the Dioscoreahad been discovered the alimentary basis of the Chinese Empire. Whether it tills so vast a space...
-The Shade Trees Of Washington
The Parking Commission of the city of Washington, consisting of Messrs. W. R. Smith, Wm. Saunders and John Saul, have planted many miles of streets, and it is conceded to be one of the planting jobs w...
-Roses On The Manetti Stock
Thirty years ago the Manetti Rose was used as a stock to bud the finer roses on. They throve amazingly for a while, till the numerous suckers had it all their own way, when rose-growers voted it more ...
-Rheum Nobile, Hooker
Of this remarkable species of rhubarb, till now unknown in our gardens, I am gratified in being in possession of fresh seed for the first time. This is a native of Sikkim. where it was originally foun...
-Philodendron Amurense
This interesting hardy tree, made known to our readers through Prof. Sargent, is attracting attention in Europe. Mr. Max Leichtlin, writing to the Garden, says : This, a native of Siberia and Mand...
-H. (Rosa Sinensis) Carminata Perfecta
A charming stove plant, in habit resembling H. rosa sinensis, recently imported from the South Sea Islands. It has stalked ovate obscurely three lobed leaves which are deeply toothed, and very large f...
-H. (Rosa Sinensis) Miniata Semi-Plena
This remarbably showy stove plant has firm, almost leathery, ovate leaves, which are coarsely toothed, and brilliant flowers of a vermillionscarlet color, darker towards the base of the petals. The fl...
-February. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The best feature of a garden in Winter is a nice greenhouse, filled with healthy plants. They need not be forced flowers, for there are numbers which bloom naturally at this season of the year. New...
-Communications. Cool House Orchideae
Many people are under the idea that it is necessary to have a very high temperature for all Orchids; but this is a mistake, and has been often pointed out in the European gardening-periodicals, but us...
-Disease In Marechal Niel Rose
I have just read the article by W., of Norfolk, Va., on disease of Marechal Niel Rose, but think he mistakes in assigning the cause to our severe climate. Up to two years ago I think I had the fine...
-Sizes Of English Flower Pots
As it is apt to confuse some of the readers of the Gardener's Monthly, when reading extracts from English gardening papers, in which the sizes of flower pots are too often technically enumerated, I be...
-Hot Water For Mealy Buc
A few days ago I found a young plant of Browallia with a multitude of mealy bugs on it, and as said insect is my favorite aversion, I put the whole affair in the feeding tank of my hot water fixings, ...
-Astrapaea Wallichii
A small tree from Madagascar, having large green leaves and gorgeous scarlet flowers, produced in large heads which are suspended in a drooping manner on rather long stems. In the greenhouses of Europ...
-Orchid Culture
While the writer was in Europe last year, he learned with great pleasure from the leading nurserymen that their trade with America in orchideous plants was very much increasing, and on the whole, sati...
-Beautiful Australian Plants
It is a matter of astonishment that the beautiful Australian plants, generally winter-flowering, are not more generally grown in our greenhouses. Some of them with delicate hair-like roots, suffer fro...
-Double Chinese Primroses
Since the discovery that double Chinese Primroses could be obtained readily from seed, great improvements have been made therein. The Florid and Pomologist gives a colored plate of a beautiful ...
-Dwarf Crested Japanese Cockscomb
We note with pleasure the efforts of our own florists to improve garden flowers. Messrs. Nanz & Neuner, of Louisville, have very much improved the Japan Cockscomb, by developing a regular row of small...
-Coleus Pictus
While in Mr. Bull's greenhouses, near London, recently, the new and very distinct Coleus pictus attracted our attention. We were very much pleased recently to see the same pretty novelty in the collec...
-Summit Of Perfection Geranium
Kretsch-mar Bros., Flatbush, L. L, write : We sent you two plants of a new double seedling Geranium, begging you to report on them in the Gar. dener's Monthly after a Summer's trial. Our seedling, ...
-Thrips On Azaleas
C T. W., Hartford, Conn., writes:I have noticed lately that the huds of some of my Azaleas are growing to look like the enclosed; and while I have no doubt that some insect is at the bottom of the tr...
-February. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In order to grow good fruit, we need only repeat in a general way, that trees require as much food as a crop of corn, or potatoes; but it is very important to keep the feeding roots at the surface, an...
-Communications. Grape Chat
The grape crop here in New England has been in some respects exceptionally good. Our warm and dry October has ripened up many varieties to an unusual excellence, and made us appreciate them more highl...
-Early Champion
There are two grapes of' this name in the market. One originated in New York, and is an early, hardy, vigorous grower, and probably identical with the Tallman. In quality it is only tolerable. The oth...
-Orchards In Grass
When, at the commencement of the Gardener's Monthly, we showed that the best kind of cultivation for orchards was to well care for them in grass, few of our younger readers can have any idea of the st...
-Phylloxera And Grape Rot
The Valley Naturalist tells us that at a recent meeting of the St. Louis Academy of Science, the President C. Y. Riley, alluded to the prevailing impression that the Phylloxera caused the grape rot. I...
-Grape Disease And Phylloxera
It is the misfortune of many good ideas to be so ridden as get run into the ground, and this is the way with the Phylloxera. This pest is bad enough in all conscience. It injures roots to such an exte...
-Tropical Fruits
It is said that plants of the Japan Persimmon are introduced into California, duty free, as tropical fruits.We pass no opinion here on the policy of duties on trees and plants; but are interested i...
-Testing Old Seeds
People often have seeds on hand that they would like to sow, if only sure of their vitality. A correspondent of the Gardener's Magazine gives the following for turnips, and it may do for many others :...
-Scribner Spitzenburg Apple
J. W. B., Plattsburgh, N. Y., writes : Referring to your remarks on the want of a more hardy and vigorous tree of the peculiar flavor of the Esopus Spitz-enburg, and as abundant a bearer, I have to s...
-Rescue Pear
P. D. S., Hartford, writes: - I sent you to-day through the post office a small box with a pear of a variety, I think, unknown, having never seen it at any of our pomo-logical exhibitions. I estee...
-Forestry. Communications. American Forestry
No doubt many of your numerous readers, who have interests outside of the greenhouse and potting-shed, will be pleased with your department of Forestry. This is a branch of industry which has been ...
-Cambridge (Mass.) Botanical Garden And Arboretum
The annual report of the director, Prof. C. S. Sargent, is full of interest. It shows the progress which has been made in the work to the 31st of August, 1877. We make the following extract as of a ma...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Abies Or Picea; Which Is It? By Samuel B. Parsons
I have often been impressed with the mixed nature of foreign nomenclature, and I now notice that you propose to call all conifers with erect cones Abies, and those with pendant cones Picea. You thus m...
-Editorial Notes. Cracking Of The Pear
It must be clear to all who have given close observation to the subject, that there are several, if not many causes, which make the fruit of the pear crack - that one cause is the operation of a minut...
-Scraps And Queries. The Weather In New York
S. F. T., Saratoga Springs, New York, under date of January 4, writes: Thinking that the enclosed might be of some value to show the sudden changes of a northern New York climate, I send it, and also...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. "The Ferns Of North America." By T. G. Gentry
The first part of the superb work, which bears the above title, has lately been issued by the Naturalists' Agency. A work which should accurately describe and appropriately illustrate our American spe...
-Protection To Novelties
In discussing the probable result of a horticultural copyright law upon the sale of inferior sorts, we must, of course, consider its permanent rather than its immediate effect. It may be true that whi...
-European Notes By The Editor - No. 6
One of the most striking contrasts between what may be termed the average crowd in England and America, is a certain respectful tone mingled with considerable familiarity on the part of the former. Th...
-A Bogus Agent
A man calling himself A.M. Waters and other names, professing to be an agent for the Gardener's Monthly, has fleeced! a number of poor gardeners by offering premiums as inducements, worth about seven ...
-Catalogues Of Jas. Vietch & Sons, Chelsea, London
The commercial literature is so voluminous that it is only in exceptional instances we can afford space to enter into details. The leading nurserymen not only spend immense sums in obtaining everyt...
-Trees For Public Work
Professor C. S. Sargent, as we see by the Boston papers, is doing Horticulture good service by showing Bos-tonians how much they have to pay for the lack of wisdom. Instead of going directly to the nu...
-Sylviculture
By Hon Eli K. Price. This essay on forest culture is a paper read before the American Philosophical Society, and by them published in the Transactions. Mr. Price has passed his three score and ten, bu...
-Acknowledgements
John R. Anderson, of New York, is issuing handsome little books, giving the Little Folks described in Dickens works.Little Paul, of Dombey & Son, is. now on our table. The Illustrated Annual of...
-Dr. J. P. Kirtland
It it to be expected that, now its twentieth year, many of the earlier friends of the Gardener's Monthly should be passing away. Our venture had no better friend than Dr. J. P. Kirtland, and, though f...
-Shittim Wood
Thoughtlessly, while writing last month, we gave Acacia Farnesiana as the probable tree, which, as we are kindly reminded by a. correspondent, is a native of the New World.. If we had referred to work...
-Horticultural Societies. Communications. Kansas State Horticultural Society
The eleventh annual meeting of this institution was held at Parsons, on the 11th, 12th, and 13th of December, 1877. Several gentlemen from Missouri, and a lady from Illinois, favored us with their ...
-Editorial Notes. Address Of Marshal P. Wilder. The Perfection Attained In The Canning And Drying Of Fruits
(Continued from page 31). The canning process has been brought to great perfection, and that of drying promises to become even more useful, when it shall have arrived at its utmost development, pos...
-Revenue From Fruit Culture
The foreign market for our fruits is now as well established as that for our wheat. Competent judges unite in the opinion that the European and Australian markets are prepared to take increasing quant...
-March. Number 231. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
This is particularly the month to pay attention to the hardy annuals. The sooner they are sown, the finer they will flower; that is, provided they are really hardy. Tender annuals, such as Globe amara...
-Communications. Ribbon Beds
Of all shapes of beds, the circle is preferable to decorate as ribbon bed. If there is any such in the center of a crosswalk, or other central place, it should be chosen. Fig. 4 represents a bed twent...
-The Ivy In New England
In a communication in the December number, it is stated that the Ivy is not to be depended on as being hardy (even in the latitude of Philadelphia). One of our hard winters a few years ago, was ver...
-The German And The American Globe Arbor Vitaes
These two Globe Arbor Vitaes are now comparatively common around Philadelphia, several nurseries having distributed them extensively thereabouts. The German variety Thuja pumila is a stronger grower t...
-The Rapid Procress Of Our Horticulture
The Monthly will now be well freighted with advertisements enlightening its readers where and how to buy; and especially instructive as showing the rapid progress which horticulture has made since the...
-Rhododendron Occdientalis And Pickerincia Montana
These are two of the most beautiful flowering: shrubs of California, and are found on the summits of the low hills to the north of the bay of Monterey, generally among other shrubbery, but in the shad...
-Additional Notes On The Ailan-Thus. Byb.F.L., Philadelphia
Your Bridgeport correspondent who, I notice, still writes to you regarding the merits of the much abused Ailanthus, has, I believe, not mentioned as yet the fact observed by several naturalists, that ...
-Browallia Roezli
This plant was noticed in the Monthly some time last year, and recommended for the decoration of our gardens in Summer, and the seed catalogues for the present year are also recommending it for the sa...
-The Oriental Spruce
Mr. Samuel Parsons says - and we quite agree with him, only more in its favor - that it is unlike the Norway, even when young, in its silvery bark and dark black green foliage. It is unique among ever...
-The Trees Of Washington
In reference to the remark we made last month in regard to the low cost and excellent variety of the shade trees of Washington, we find the following in a Washington paper before us : Of the cost ...
-Pentstemon Coboea
This is one of the finest hardy species of Pentstemon, and is yet very rare in cultivation. The flowers are among the largest of the genus and are produced in loose spikes of 8 to 12 inches in length,...
-Spiraea Palmata Elegans. New Hybrid Spiraea
Under the name of Spiraea palmata elegans M. Ed. Pynaert figures and describes in the current number of the Revue de v Horticulture Beige a plant, as it would seem, of great interest and beauty. The i...
-Daphne Fortunei
This was sent to the Royal Horticultural Society by Mr. Fortune, from the Chusan Hills, Ningpo, and Shanghai. It is a small downy-branched bush, with thin deciduous opposite and alternate ovate-oblong...
-Stocks For Grafting
Gr. B. G., Manchester, York Co., Pa., writes:Will you be kind enough to answer the following queries through the March number of The Monthly : How and when are the following trees grafted, and what k...
-Is Aspidlstra Lurida Hardy ? - I. C. W
Fishkill, N. Y., writes :Mr. John Pettie, a gardener of the first water, told me a few weeks since that the Aspidistra lurida variegata was a hardy plant, and should be used in the herbaceous border....
-Green House And House Gardening. Commun1cations. Orchids With Other Plants
Having had considerable success in growing orchids in a mixed collection of plants, I think that other amateurs would be glad to do so did they only know how easily it may be done, and in my estimatio...
-Disease Of The Marechal Niel
Having read with interest the remarks of your correspondents on the above subject with some diffidence, in regard to rushing into print and difficulties, etc., I am induced to send you my experience i...
-Antipodal Hyacinths
In reply to the inquiry made about this article in The Gardener's Monthly of November last (page 329), we can say that we re-introduced this very old Dutch method of cultivation some years ago. We exh...
-Tuberous - Rooted Beconias Again By W., Norfolk, Va
Your correspondent, on page 2 of January Monthly accuses me of over-estimating the value of the above acquisition to our list of plants for our-door culture. As he is from England quite recently, he o...
-Anthurium Schertzerianum
This fine plant is a native of Costa Rica, and consequently requires a good warm temperature to insure success in its culture. There are several varieties of this plant in cultivation, some of which, ...
-Stephanotis Floribunda
With this species we have enumerated some of the best stove climbers that can be grown, but none are more admired than the Stephanotis, and it deserves attention wherever there is room for it. Pot pla...
-Winter Decorative Plants
In addition to the many flowering plants grown for decorative purposes at mid-winter, Ferns play an important part, and especially the Maidenhair Fern, A. cuneatum, and the elegant A. gracilli-mum. At...
-A New Fashion In Cut Flowers
A very pretty innovation is to wear the same flowers in the hat or bonnet as are held in the bouquet in the hand; consequently, only flowers that are in season are worn. Now, of course, we have a grea...
-Semi-Double Gloxinias
These are by no means rare, but as yet they can scarcely be termed meritorious. I have recently seen a number of them in flower, but cannot help considering them good flowers spoiled. The outer calyx ...
-Centaukea Clementii
Among the silvery leaved plants now so popular for carpet bedding there are few tribes more useful than the Cen-taureas which give us so many good ones. Some years ago we noted the appearance of a bea...
-Cuphea Roezli
This new and beautiful species, which has been introduced into the market by M. Charles Huber, nurseryman at Nice Maritime Alps), was discovered in the district of Tepic, in Mexico, by M. Roezl, who s...
-Hyacinth Blooming
R., New York City, asks: What has been on an average the result of Hyacinth forcing this year; do they all remain behind the general run, or is it more, so in those regions of our country where the w...
-Flowers In Milwaukee
T. G. A., Milwaukee, Wis., writes : Camellias, Azaleas and Oranges; this class of plants do not appear to do well here. Florists and others get them in a very good condition from the East, but a few ...
-Aspect Of A Greenhouse
Many are deterred from the enjoyment of a a greenhouse or conservatory in connection with the dwelling house, under the idea that certain Southerly exposures are necessary. I would say to tho , that f...
-March. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Grape-vines in the open air, on arbors and trellises, should have their pruning finished before warm Spring days set in, or they will bleed. It does not injure them much, but it looks bad. The pruning...
-Communications. Fruit Notes From California
I shall at present confine my observations to that portion of the State with which I am most familiar - the counties of Alameda and Santa Clara, embracing the great valley which extends from San Puebl...
-The Diospyros Kaki Or Japanese Persimmon
This fruit is found in Japan and China in the same varieties of soil and climate as the wild persimmon of our own country. It will probably succeed as far North as Lat. 42, and from that to the G...
-New English Gooseberries
There are several new gooseberries being put on the market just now, remarkably large, free from mildew, etc. We are glad to see experiments made in this direction, for it is not at all impossible t...
-Neglecting Orchard Trees
The Country Gentleman tells of two neighboring orchards at South Haven, Michigan, one iscultivated, and the owner raises fine fruit. The other allows his trees to stand in grass, and the trees are...
-Apples For Missouri
A correspondent, evidently of great experience, from Caldwell county, tells the Rural World: If I were to plant out a new orchard of 100 trees, I would make it about as follows : 50 Ben Davis, 10 Law...
-New Or Rare Erupts, Vegetables, Etc
Teosinte Reana luxurians Messrs. Vil morin, of Paris, give? the following account of a new grass, which may be worth looking after by our Southern agriculturists:Much has been spoken lately in the ag...
-Cuttings In Arkansas
Mrs. S. S. T., Alexander, Ark., writes:Herein Arkansas almost every thing of the tree and shrub kind grows from cuttings put into the ground in Feb-ruary, but the inhabitants do not generally avail t...
-Fall Blooming Of Apple Trees
J. P. asks : I would like to be informed, if possible, of the reason of and cure for two Maiden Blush apple trees belonging to a friend of mine, blooming for several years past in October and not in ...
-Fruit-Culture For Market
J. C. W., Hudson River, New York, writes : Will you please answer the following queries through your journal? We wish to plant 1000 standard and from 1000 to 3000 dwarf pear, to grow fruit for New Yo...
-Pruning The Old Canes Of Raspberries
M., Newark, Ohio, writes:There is a dispute among our fruit-growers as to the best time to prune out the Raspberry canes that have done hearing. Some say as soon as you have picked the last fruit; ot...
-Linseed Oil For Pear Trees
E. J. B., Philadelphia, writes:Please to publish the following, in order to save others from the annoyance to which I have been subject, and the destruction of fine orchards. We bought a farm, with f...
-Forestry. Communications. Quercus Phellos And Q. Falcata
Some of the Southern species of oaks, among which are the two named above, creep up a considerable way towards a colder clime. In Wood's Botany the location of the Quercus Phellos, Willow Oak, is give...
-The Eucalyptus
Mr. Elwood Cooper, brought up in Lancaster county, Pa., after making a fortune in the West India trade, went to Santa Barbara, California, and settled down to the cultivation of a large ranche - 4,000...
-March. Forestry. Editorial Notes
Yellow Pine It is well worth while asking,. What is the Yellow Pine ? to remember that in the Pacific States Abies grandis is the Yellow Pine. It is also said that Thuja gigantea is; called the Ore...
-Rapidity Of Timber Growth
We have repeatedly given instances of the rapid growth of timber, as opposed to the popular impression, and are glad to insert the following, which we find in a Western paper. We are particularly glad...
-Eucalyptus Fire-Wood
It has been thought that the Eucalyptus would be a great boon to California in the way of fire-wood, but Dr. Baer has recently addressed the California Academy of Sciences on this subject, and insists...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Barrenness In The Fig Tree
We read in the Bible of a barren Fig tree; but of the many hundreds I have seen I know of only one instance, and that in my own orchard. I will record its strange freaks, so that if you or any of yo...
-Notes From Orecon
Old residents say that the rains commenced here nearly two months earlier than usual. There were very few fine days in October, fewer still in November, and the steams were higher than had been known ...
-The Eucalyptus And Therapeutics- By Marquid Digram, Phila
You tell your readers in your January number, what I suspect most of them were previously unaware of, that the action of the Eucalyptus is-not curative but preventative; that is to say, the plant rapi...
-Fungi And Disease
Prof. Burrill, of the Industrial University of Illinois, and one of the most conscientious investigators of minute fungi, has the following attributed to him, going the rounds in the agricultural pa...
-Liberian Coffee
This new species of coffee which is attracting so much attention in Europe at the present time, was brought to the notice of the Kew Gardens, by the Philadelphia firm of Edward S. Morris & Co., who ha...
-Submerged Roots In Winter
A case is reported in the Journal of Forestry, where a Cupressus macrocorpa was submerged for two months in the winter without injury. This accords with American experience. No tree suffers from subme...
-Malformed Apple Blossoms
A correspondent of the Valley Naturalist says:We have recently received some monstrous apple-flowers collected by Prof. Keigh, of New York. There may be seen on turning down the five minute, pointed,...
-Jumping Beans Of Mexico
From the so-calledjumping beans of Mexico whose motions are caused by an insect within, Mr. Henry Edwards has succeeded in obtaining a beautiful moth of the Tortricidae family and probably a new spe...
-The Potato Beetle In Europe
Some of the European entomologists are amusing themselves with pelting Prof. Riley, because he cautioned them to look sharp after the potato beetle. This is what Dr. Candeze, of Liege, says at the Ent...
-The Construction Of A Tree
S. says: Contemplating once a redwood tree in California - three hundred feet high and perhaps forty-five feet in diameter - the question arose, Out of what was this stupendous mass of wood manufa...
-The Ironwood
J. R. P., Frankfort, Ky., writes : Which is the Ironwood, the Ostrya Virgmica, or the Carpinus Americana ? I have always regarded the latter as the Ironwood - in this State - but I see that on this ...
-The Cinnamon Vine
B. M., St. Louis, Mo.. says: 'I have not hitherto appreciated what you say about the disadvantages of common names; but I now do, at least to the extent of three dollars! Years ago the indomitable Bil...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Plant Protection
Last winter, in conversation with a leading nurseryman, I ventured the opinion that not more than one-third of the Pear trees theretofore sold as Souvenir du Congres had been genuine. He agreed with m...
-European Notes, By The Editor. No. 7
I fancy the young men who learn gardening in these days, can scarcely take the same delight in their profession as did the young men forty or fifty years ago; or perhaps it may be that the older ones ...
-Andrew Murray
All who are interested in the coniferous trees of the Pacific coast, will be familiar with the name of this gentleman, whose decease the English papers have just announced. He was among the earliest o...
-Proceedings Of The Worcester County Horticultural Society, Mass., For 1878
From E. W. Lincoln, Secretary. These are always among the most valuable. Horticultural Proceedings we receive. In the present, are essays on the Apple, by O. B. Hadwen; the Pear, by James Draper; the ...
-Vice's Illustrated Catalogue
It is impossible to estimate the good which the modern catalogue does in spreading substantial information. In this before us a species of every genus is given in illustration, so that people at a gla...
-Mound Making Ants Of The Allegha-Nies
By Rev. Henry C. McCook, Philadelphia. Published by John A. Black, 1334 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Price 75 cents. Goto the ant thou sluggard; consider her ways and be wise, was a very good admo...
-Horticultural Societies. Communications. Southeastern Kansas Horticultural Society
The fourth annual meeting of this society was held at Humboldt, on the 9th and 10th of Jan., 1878. The attendance was good, and the specimens of fruits and flowers upon the tables creditable. Mr. Jame...
-Editorial Notes. Addess Of Marshal P. "Wilder
(Continued from page 64). The foreign market for peaches will be very great if prices can be made moderate, and when our refrigerating ships shall be perfected, England can take much of the surplus...
-Cross-Fertilization
Whatever the fruit cultivators of ancient times may have known in regard to the cross-impregnation of varieties for their improvement, we have no evidence, if we may judge by the quality of the fruits...
-Nomenclature
The progress in correct nomenclature has been| most gratifying, and the labors of the American Pomological Society, in connection with its I great exhibitions of fruits, have had a prominent leading i...
-Ohio Horticultural Society
Mr. Bate-ham informs us that the annual meeting of the State Horticultural Society, at Ravenna the past week, was counted the best of the thirty years' history of the society. The officers of the H...
-April. Number 232. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
April is a good planting month. There is not much art in planting trees, though it is often much of a mystery. N]ot to let the roots dry for an instant between taking up and planting, everybody knows,...
-Communications. Carpet Beds
In Germany the arrangement of bedding plants is very neat. At the numerous villas in the vicinity of Hamburg there are some very good ribbon and carpet beds to be seen, the style being light, and not ...
-Notes For 1877
Perhaps the most useful contribution to the public that a horticulturist can make is to give the results of his year's work. 1877 has been so fruitful that it has given us an opportunity to test thoro...
-Preservation Of The Leading Shoots Of Evergreens
One of the false impressions that have long-prevailed with much force and endurance, is the alleged necessity of preserving the top shoots of evergreens. Birds are looked upon with apprehension and di...
-Roses Blooming To The Ground. Mrs. C. S. Jones, Monroe, Mo
The rose is such a universal favorite, that one need scarcely apologize for making any suggestions that might appear likely to aid those who (like myself) must have them blooming both winter and summe...
-Winter Carpet Bedding
The Belgian Horticultural Review tells us that by a judicious selection of low hardy evergreens, carpet beds are had at Vallbon in the Winter time. It gives the following list of the plants employed :...
-Red Beet For Decorative Purposes
In some situations and arrangements it has been used with good effect as a bedding plant, and it is not less effective when used for the purpose I am about to mention. As a receptacle for bulbs, such ...
-Green House And House Gardening. Communications. Orchids, With Other Plants. Oncidiums
Among Orchids, Oncidiums are probably one of the best for an amateur to try his hand on. Though, as a whole, they have not the beauty or fragrance of many other species, their easy culture, free bloom...
-Oncidium Cavendishii
Guatemala, South Mexico; bright thick leaves; blooms in Winter; flower stems from 2 to 4 feet long; flower about 1½ inch diameter; sepals and petals yellow, barred brown lip, bright yellow. Oncidiu...
-Cultivation Of The Verbena
I much doubt if there is another plant in cultivation so widely spoken of as the Verbena, yet there are but few who thoroughly understand the nature of this plant. Some gardeners attempt to grow it at...
-Cinerarias
At p. 234 of the August 1877 Monthly, I referred to the excellence of the Cinerarias grown by my neighbor, Mr. Paterson, of Oakley, Water-town, and now (Feb. 11) I send you a few blos-somsfrom the Oak...
-Vines For A Bay Window
Mr. W. T. Bell in the Venango Spectator gives the following as his choice : Abutilon vexillarium and A. vexillarium pictum; shrubby plants, to be trained.as climbers, flowering freely, and the latt...
-Coal Oil Lamps For Small Window Cabinets
The Journal of Horticulture says : An amateur, writing to us on paraffin lamps for excluding frost, states that he has employed one for three years in his small greenhouse with great satisfaction...
-Leap Plants For Room Decoration
Among the plants which can be used with beautiful effect in room decoration are those known as Sago Palms, of which the most common form is, perhaps, Cycas revoluta, and which indeed is now tolerably ...
-Tuberous Begonias As Bedders
A correspondent in the February London Journal of Horticulture says : The great merits of these plants are as bed-bers. In my estimation they are more beautiful than Zonal Pelargoniums and more en...
-Scraps And Queries. Growing Epiphyllum Truncatum
E. B. C, Winona, Ohio, says :Will the editor of the Monthly please give the method of growing Epiphyllum truncatum and vars, so as to induce them to bloom. I have plants one year from cutting, on the...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Notes On Raspberries
In the February number of 1877 is a statement from the Country Gentleman, that the Wilson's Early Blackberry is not hardy much farther north than Philadelphia; and your statement that you supposed it ...
-Ailanthus And Rose Bucs
Rev. W. H. W., of Reading, Mass., complains that the crop of grapes, in some cases at least, are sadly diminished by the unprecedented number of rose-bugs. Now that gives me an opportunity once more...
-Pear Culture
I will now fulfill my promise. My pear trees are looking finely, have lost but three out of about two thousand by blight, while trees generally in this section suffered greatly. I think I have hit upo...
-Cracking Of The Pear
I see in the Feb. Monthly, page 52, your Notes on the cracking of the Pear; you claim it is clear to all who have given close observation to the subject, that there are several, if not many causes; as...
-Celestia Apples
There is plenty of room above, as was said to the youth who thought a certain occupation too crowded; so with fruit. So the catalogue is full to overflowing, yet there is plenty of room for the finest...
-Fruit Culture In Texas
Professor S. B. Buckley says that the apple does not succeed well in the warmer parts of Texas, unless Southern varieties from Southern nurseries are planted. The blight, which it seems now to be pr...
-New Or Rare Fruits. Brewington Pippin Apple
Mr. Charles Downing kindly sends us a specimen of this apple. Mr. D. says: The apple is of good size, showy, and the quality good, although a little wanting in juice. It will no doubt be valuable for...
-Forestry. Communications. Willow Oak
In your March number J. M. says it would be interesting to know the farthest Northern point that Willow Oak (Quercus Phellos) has been found growing wild. For the information of your correspondent an...
-Eucalyptus At Norfolk, Va
In connection with your remarks upon the Hardiness of the Eucalyptus, it may be of interest to you to know what success is met with in this locality. With slight protection small trees have stood...
-American Forestry And Horticulture At Paris
The forestry exhibit from the nurseries of Thomas Meehan, of Germantown, and which went on theConstitution with the others from Philadelphia, for the Paris Exhibition, is not included in the recentl...
-The Profit Of Forestry
Judging by the following from an English contemporary, they do not calculate profits from the same basis that we do : The expenditure upon the Windsor Parks and Woods exceeds the income from them ...
-Catalpa Timber
When a few years ago the Gardener's Monthly called attention to the fact that the Catalpa was one of the most rapid growing trees as well as giving very durable timber, planters were very incredulous....
-Scraps And Queries. Hardiness Of The Eucalyptus
H., Philadelphia, sends us an extract from a California paper, showing that a Eucalyptus globulus stood in Oregon, and without injury, when the thermometer fell 17 below freezing point, and asks ...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Oil For Fruit Trees
I notice with considerable interest a communication on page 83, of the Monthly, in reference to the bad effects of the use of linseed oil on Pear trees, and also notice that the editor is disposed to ...
-The Japan Persimmon
The illustration and description of the Japan Persimmon, in your March number, reminds me that efforts to obtain satisfactory information from several sources as to the fertility of the plants offered...
-Pear Blight
As we surmised m our last, Prof. Burrill was likely to be misunderstood as he himself explains in the following note. The very careful examination of pear blighted branches by Prof. J. Gibbons Hunt, s...
-The Pear Blight
This is the most popular topic in the agricultural papers just now. We see no reason for doubting the conclusions of Dr. J. Gibbons Hunt, the accomplished president of the Microscopical Section of the...
-Specific Heat In Trees
The Gardener's Chronicle gives the following sketch of some proceedings in Germany: Dr. Bolle recently communicated to the Horticultural Society of Berlin some interesting particulars of the rela...
-Internal Heat Of Plants
In France they are troubled much by May frosts in the vineyards. An article has recently appeared in the Annates des Sciences Naturelles showing that two grape-growers sow the vineyard with rape seed ...
-Slitting The Bark Of Trees
An impression prevails in some intelligent quarters that the bark of trees never becomes indurated, or hide-bound, in technical language, unless something is wrong with the roots. It often does resu...
-Ripening Of Fruits
Prof. Albert Prescott contributes to the Popular Science Monthly a paper on the chemistry of fruit ripening. The sweetest fruits to the taste may not really have as much sugar as those which taste mor...
-Seedless Mountain Ash
Mrs. Lucy Mil-lington writes:Can you tell me how it happens that the berries of some of our Mountain Ash trees have no seeds ? It is only those which the birds spare. All the seeded berries are eaten...
-Seeds Ok Plants From Other Localities
A., Philadelphia, asks : Is there any use in a change of seeds from other localities ? [There may be use, or there may be loss. If. we turn a wheel round, it keeps going awhile after the hand i...
-Pinus Aristata
Mr. Siler, of Ranch, Utah, writes : I send a few cones of Pinus Balfouriana. I also send in saeparate bundle limbs of Pinus Balfouriana, which I hope will prove very acceptable to you. I would like fo...
-The Name Imatophyllum
N., Cuyahoga Falls, O., says :I notice that, in several of our best plant catalogues, the Amaryllid, Imatophyllum is written, Imantophyllum. Loudon says Imatophyllum, and this is doubtless right. Thi...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. History Of The Weeping Willow
In your reply to F, Boston, you say that tradition says that all our Weeping Willows come from a cutting of that one. at Napoleon's grave, and you speak of Capt. Jacob Smith as probably the ancestor...
-Plant Protection. #2
In 1876, Congress enacted a law by which it was made a penal offense, punishable by fine not exceeding $1,000 or imprisonment not exceeding two years, to knowingly imitate any registered trade mark or...
-European Notes By The Editor. No. 8
The public garden at Nottingham is called the Arboretum, and comprises, perhaps, twenty acres, but the ground is of a more than rolling character, and so well taken have been all the advantages that...
-The Boston Public Trees
A correspondent writes that in our remarks on trees for public grounds some injustice might be done. Among articles furnished to the Boston authorities were some for which they paid $150 per 100. This...
-The Post-Office Ruler Again
The Post-office schoolmaster is after Uncle Samuel's bad boys again, and the hands have to be held out for the ruler. Now that our reformed Congress has re-enacted the franking privilege for its membe...
-Why Gardeners Should Marry
As noted elsewhere, theagent has been trapped and caught by the Gardener's Monthly folks, after he has had. for over a year, the good picking under hisagency for many other periodicals, seed house...
-Mr. Robinson's Wild Garden
Of a new edition of this work a recent notice tells us: Illustrations for a re-written and beautifully illustrated edition of this book are now being drawn in black and white by some of the best a...
-Pomological Literature
Among the most important agencies which have contributed largely to the advancement of the pomology of our country, we desire to speak especially of its literature. One hundred years ago this had not ...
-Necrology
But while I congratulate you on the prosperity of our institution, on its increasing influence, and on the lively interest manifested in its objects throughout our country, I am reminded of the absenc...
-Conclusion
Standing here as conservators of American Pomology, enjoying as we do such peculiar privileges for research and discovery, let us use every effort to advance our cause by diligent experiment and obser...
-New York Horticultural Society
At the March meeting of this Society, Mr. Boileau, who has charge of Trinity Cemetery, and is an enthusiastic landscape gardener, addressed the Society on the pruning of fruit trees, having pear and a...
-Communicatons. Dutch Bulbs In The South
I am a recent subscriber to the Gardener's Monthly, and am well pleased with it. I have noticed a complaint of Dutch bulbs deteriorating in the South after a few years. I have this day sent to your ad...
-The Slippery Elm
It is one of the regrets of planters in this region of Philadelphia that we cannot have the grand Elms of our Eastern States, because of the terrible attacks made on them by insects. And just here let...
-Comparative Rose List
I send you a copy of the English election list, and one of Mr. Ellwanger (of Ellwanger & Barry) called the American List of Roses, taken from the Garden of Nov. 17th, 1877, hoping that you may find it...
-Pinus Glabra
This is a splendid tree, and I have often wondered that it has not been cultivated. It is rare about me, indeed, never abundant anywhere ; but last fall I saw very beautiful and stately trees on the e...
-Carpet Bedding
Fig. 13, 24 feet long by 8 wide. 1 is Alter-nanthera Paronychioides major; 2, A. versicolor; 3, A. amoeria; 4, Leucophyton Brownii; and 5, Sedum acre elegans. Fig. 13. Fig. 14 has a diamet...
-Vines
1. Every vine, shrub or tree that approaches the condition of evergreen, is valuable for its winter beauty. Hall's Japan Honeysuckle is the most valuable of all the family of hardy Honeysuckles. It is...
-Lilium Krameri
This superb Japan lily, with others has been imported, in some quantity, direct from Japan, its native country, by Mr. Such. We have hitherto been dependent on European enterprise. Forest Grove Cem...
-The English Daisy
From time to time the beautiful little English Daisy is taken in hand by the improvers, with new styles or at least, some new feature. In taking up Messrs-Yilmorin's (the celebrated Paris seedmen,) ca...
-Green House And House Gardening. Communications. Among The Orchids
The following notes, written from memory, are the result of a flying visit during the first fortnight of December. There is no greater sign of the advancement of horticulture in the East than the i...
-Ralph And Fanny Geraniums
In the last number of your valuable Monthly you notice two Western Geraniums, Fanny and Ralph, raised by John Goode, Esq., of this city. Will you allow me to say a few words in their favor ? I have gr...
-Killinc Mealy Bug
For more than a year I have used kerosene to destroy mealy bug and scale louse, and have found it the most convenient and effectual remedy. 1 apply it to the backs of the insects witn a feather, and b...
-B. Caudata
Sepals and petals greenish white, lip pure white, spotted brown. West Indies B. verrucosa (Mexico and Guatemala) sepals and petals pale transparent green; lip white, with green warts. B. Gireoudiana. ...
-Miltonia
This beautiful genus comes from Brazil. A few species from Mexico are now placed as Cyrtochilum, and these latter are not remarkable for their beauty. Miltonias mostly bloom in the late summer or earl...
-Miltonia Candida
This beautiful plant has from four to seven flowers on the stem, which is upright. Flowers in the sepals and petals are rich chocolate, barred with bright yellow, lip pure white, marked at the base wi...
-Odontoglossum
In the whole orchid family there is no genus that has caused more discussion among orchid growers than the Odontoglossum. Coming, in many instances, from elevated regions, where they are surrounded by...
-Ceranium. New Life
Last week I saw the geranium New Life in flower. It is said to be a sport from the Vesuvius, which is the most popular geranium in England, both for bedding and marketing, and also as a scarlet for wi...
-Watering Small Plants
W.M. G.,Niles, Mich., says:Will you please inform me how you treat thumb pot plants on hot days to keep them from wilting. Watering morning and evening is not sufficient, and it is said that we must ...
-Culture Of Medinella Magnifica
Mrs. E. B.S. writes:Will you please give me in the next number of the Gardener's Monthly the name of the plant to which the enclosed leaf belongs and instructions for its care? I hope you will pardon...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Pears In Grass
The sharp controversy of twenty years ago, on the question, Can pears be profitably grown for market? died away without any decided issue. If the same men could again discuss that point, the results...
-Dwarf Juneberry
In your issue for March I notice allusion is made to the action of our State Horticultural Society, in regard to the Dwarf Juneberry being sold by agents for real Huckleberries. I have never known of ...
-Blight In The Pear Tree
Being somewhat interested in the growing of this desirable fruit, both as dwarf and standard, and watching the successes and failures of fruit growers in this vicinity, and having read with much inter...
-Outside Grape Border
With your permission I will give a few practical remarks on outside grape borders which will probably suit the enquirer on page 83. Having the management of vineries which produced a fair crop of frui...
-Quality And Culture Of Pears
Some recent notices in the Monthly on the quality and culture of pears invite remark. It is plain that the favorites in the garden and nursery need sifting and change, and more, rigid tests of merit. ...
-May. Notes On New Fruits
I send you a few notes in regard to some of the new fruits which I have been testing. Souvenir du Congress pear; fruit very large, bright yellow, with a red cheek on the sunny side; quality good, and ...
-On The Use Of Sulphur
Great care should be taken by authors in the use of words to convey their meaning, for disastrous results may sometimes follow by using the wrong word, or not sufficiently explaining it so that it may...
-Mahaleb Stocks
A correspondent of the Rural New Yorker says:The Mahaleb stock is peculiarly liable to the attack of a worm at the root, very similar to that infesting the peach tree. Perhaps our entomologists can t...
-The Champagne Apple
This has recently been brought to notice by Col. Stichter, of Reading, Pa. It was introduced by Mr. Fehr from Switzerland, fifteen years ago, and grown in his orchard as the Champagne. Mr. Charles D...
-Neglected Orchards
The Country Gen-tleman explains that its paragraph, at p. 38, to which we referred in our March number, was not really intended for neglected orchards, as stated in the paragraph, but as a covert hi...
-Drying Fruits And Vegetables
The progress made in the art of drying fruits and vegetables has been very great of late years. It does not pay any longer to string apples and peaches like beads, and hang them from the garret window...
-Forestry. Communications. Catalpa Wood
The wonderful durability of the wood of the American Catalpa has long been known; but Mr. E. E. Barney, of Dayton, Ohio, has done an excellent work in collecting together several letters written by hi...
-Relation Of Soil-Texture To Timber Growth
Some time during the past season I read an extract from the pen of one of our savans - Prof. Winchell, I believe, on the above subject, which, if I remember correctly, teaches doctrine at variance wit...
-The Eucalyptus In Virginia
I am now prepared to report fully upon the hardiness of the Eucalyptus in this latitude. E.bicolor (though with slight protection of straw and matting) perished the last season - and this is the mi...
-Northern Range Of The Willow Oak
In the current number of your journal for April, 1878, page 113, J. M. says: It would be interesting to know the farthest northern point that the Willow Oak, Quercus phellos has been found growing wi...
-Value Of Fast-Growing Timber
It is worth noting on how slender foundation generally accepted theories often stand, and it ought to be a lesson not to take all preaching for sound doctrine. We all know how universally accepted, a ...
-Trees In North Carolina
The following are the dimensions of some North Carolina trees, as reported from Cherokee county by the Board of Agriculture of that State: White Oak, 13 feet 4 inches in circumference, and 50 feet ...
-Value Of Cherry Timber
A correspondent asks: Why do you think the wood of the escaped Garden Cherry is better for cabinet work than that of C.serotina? See G. Monthly, p. 144, April No. Have you ever seen the former used? ...
-Black Or Yellow Locust
D. says:We consulted your book, but could not ascertain from it if Robinia pseudo acacia (Yellow Locust) is the same as White and Black Locust, and if it is only the soil that makes the difference. W...
-The Wild English Ivy
Some days since, whilst searching for wild flowers, in a forest on the Brandy wine, about a half-mile above Wilmington, Del., I discovered the English ivy - Hedera helix - growing over the exposed roo...
-Concerning Two Species Of Apple
Considering the great economic importance of the apple to the inhabitants of the north temperate zone, I must confess I am disgusted at the small amount of attention it has received from our botanists...
-Oregon Crab Apple
Pyrus rivularis. Doug. It seems to be figured with the incorrect name of Pyrus coronaria in the report of the Department of Agriculture, 1870, p. 414. (See cut. Fig. 1, herewith). Dr. Vasey, in his re...
-The Largest Apple Orchard In The World
The wilderness of Koolan, Maui, contains a forest of Ohias (native wild apple trees) countless in number, stretching from the sea far up the mountain sides. The trees vary from forty to fifty feet i...
-The Vegetative And Reproductive Forces
The Seeding of Wistaria sinensis is a subject full of interest for the vegetable physiologist, and especially for the Darwinist. At the last meeting of the Linnean Society a paper from Mr. T. Meehan w...
-The English Sparrow
M. C, Fort Dodge,. Iowa, writes:I see by the public papers that you are having an excitement about the English sparrow, and are trying to make laws to drive him out. Some of our people are anxious to...
-A Christmas Flower
Reader. Burlington, N. J., writes: Having noticed the following article in different papers, copied from the Boston Free Press: Last year we made mention of a curious plant which John Atwalt had in ...
-Imatophyllum
Plausible and amusing as is the theory, says a correspondent,that this name began as Himantophyllum, and dropped its H in London, the reverse happens to be true. It began in the Botanical Magazine,...
-Insectivorous Plants
Miss M. M. writes: I have just finished Darwin's Insectivorous Plants and see in Field and Forest for November, that C. de Candolle has been investigating the structures and movements of the leaves o...
-Literature, Travels 1 Personal Notes. Communications. Post Office Laws
Since it turns out that our members of Congress pass laws that are liable to be evaded by their dishonest constituents (judging us, of course, by themselves), taking this, the most charitable view of ...
-The Weeping Willow In New Encland
In a recent number of the Monthly, you made inquiry concerning the introduction of the Weeping Willow into New England, and also about the Napoleon Willow, introduced by Capt. Jacob Smith, into Rhode ...
-European Notes, By The Editor. No. 9
While on the subject of public parks, it may be as well to cross the English Channel, and look at some of the French ones, though we shall have to come back to Old England for other matters before we ...
-That Fraudulent Agent
The Country Gentleman has the following from a correspondent:I have read the item headed Swindling Offers, in your paper of Feb. 21st. I have no doubt the person of whom complaint was sent you is the...
-Baltimore Park Commission. Annual Report For 1877
This interesting document shows how much can be done by system. All the parks of the city are under one commission, and one engineer. Mr. Fauls, at a salary of $2,000 a year, superintends them all. Th...
-Horticulture At The Paris Exposition
We have been officially informed that beside the exhibit of capsules, seed vessels, seeds, etc, representing the forestry and horticulture of America, made by Thomas Meehan, the only other representat...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society
Orchid Culture. At a meeting of this society, held July 20th, numerous specimens of Orchids exhibited showed that these pretty flowers are popular. Spikes of Dendrobium filiforme and Cattleya Dowiana,...
-Double Amaryllis
J. D., Bridgeport, Conn., writes : I send you by post two flowers of a variety of Amaryllis, said to be found growing wild near St. Johns, Florida. Will you please let us know through your Monthly wh...
-North American Botany. Bibliographical Index By Sereno Watson. Part The First - Poly-Petahe
Very few persons who love flowers have any adequate idea of how much they owe to the working botanist, whose labors systematize knowledge, so that any one can readily find out all that is known of wha...
-Canadian Horticulturist
This is a new monthly magazine, published at St. Catharines, under the auspicies of the energetic Fruit Growers1 Association of Ontario, and devoted mainly to fruit growing interests. Cultural Cata...
-Willard Cutting Flagg
Horticulture has suffered few more severe losses for many years past than in the death of this gentleman, which occurred at his house, at Moro, Illinois, on the 30th of March, in the 49th year of his ...
-June. Number 234. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Communications. The Amaryllis
(Continued from page 133). A florist told me he had discovered the secret of blooming them well, which was to give the bulbs plenty of sun and regular heat; and I agree as to the regularity of the ...
-Other Fancy Beds
Fig. xIx, is, as it will be seen, seventeen circles of various sizes, constructed on a parallelogram thirty feet long, by six wide. The center of circle a; 1, Thujapsis dolabrata variegata; four speci...
-The Ailanthus
And now about the Ailanthus. I fully believe that it is anantidote for the Rose bug, and other insect pests as well. At least our place, which is plentifully shaded with them, is very free from man...
-California Dicentra
In my botanical researches in California, I have found few flowers which were discovered with as much pleasure as our various Dicentra. I well recollect the first time I found the variety known as ...
-Andromedas
Within the great tract of United States, there is rot to be met with a single species of Erica; but in place of theBlooming Heather, nature has liberally supplied this country with various species o...
-Notes On The Culture Of Native Plants
Seeing some communications on the culture of our native plants reminds me that I used to. do something of that myself. I have found one of the prettiest very easy. O. spectabilis, blossomed in March w...
-A Californian Garden
In this locality, at present date (April 17th), the standard Oranges and Lemons are a little past their fullest bloom, much fruit having plainly set. Some dwarf Oranges, imported from Japan, are hardl...
-Quercus Heterophylla
They seem to know more about the Bartram oak under culture in Europe than we do, for a correspondent of the Garden, writing from Newry, in Ireland, says: - This oak is very nearly hardy, and it re...
-Green House And House Gardening. Communications. Cattleyas
While there may be a question as to the successful culture of some Orchids - coming from elevated regions where they are at all times surrounded by a cool, moist atmosphere, - with regard to the splen...
-Among The Orchid Growers
Talking about Orchids, I may say that General Rathbone mentioned to me, that when he began Orchid-growing several years ago, he knew nothing at all about it, but he got a copy of the Orchid-Grower's M...
-Foliage Plants For Window Culture
Premising that among the readers of the Monthly there are some who like to turn aside from the beaten track, wherein grow Callas, Geraniums, Abutilons, etc, torarer fields and pastures new, I give h...
-The Mennonite Grass Burner
No house in Washington is such a Japanese gem as the home of General Horace Capron. This gentleman, going to Japan in 1871, took with him his carriage and horses. He was soon requested to lend his ...
-Side View Of The " Mennonite Grass - Burner"
EXPLANATIONS. (A) Furnace Door to Fire-Box. (J?) Draft. (C) Pipe. (F) Chamber with Iron Shutter (hinged) to let out heat. This; Chamber has doors on both sides of Furnace. (G) Oven or cooking place...
-A Room Garden
We were agreeably surprised, a few days ago, by finding the Ladies' Floral Cabinet on our table. Not being in sight for so many years, it had passed out of mind. The one before us has a nice illustrat...
-Lady Washington Pelargoniums
M. A. S., Baltimore, asks: Why are these called Lady Washington Pelargoniums? I find no reference to any such in Paxton's Dictionary. [When botanists came to calling all garden Geraniums Pela...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Quality And Culture Of Pears
And first, no pear, new or old, should cumber our lists, not in tree, fruit or pretty nearly equal to the best of its season (say, for Summer) to those luscious favorites which crown your table, till ...
-The Dwarf Juneberry
The Iowa Horticultural Society warns people that agents are sellingDwarf June Berries for real Huckle-berries. What are Dwarf June Berries ? Mr. Sereno Watson kindly contributes the following n...
-June. Notes On New Fruits
A few years ago, I received from the Rocky Mountains some plum trees called the Yose-mite, which is likely to prove of great value in this section. The tree is quite distinct from any other kind of pl...
-A Remarkable Pear
In passing through Thomasville, Georgia, on the 20th of March, I was much impressed with the beauty and rapid growth of a variety of pear know there as the Chinese Sand Pear. I could not recognize it ...
-Slitting The Bark Of Pear Trees
I don't think all trees will bear slitting the bark any more than all will bear oil. It seems to me that your grounds must bear remarkably sturdy specimens that can bear any thing; as we see childr...
-Pear Culture In The North West
We see paragraphs in the papers that the Pear is an utter failure in Illinois, Iowa and Wisconsin. Such sweeping statements are worth attention. The writer of this has seen Pear trees in Michigan as l...
-Enough Of A Good Thing
The English, like us, are getting embarrassed at the number of good fruits. Says the Florist: The varieties of new Peaches of American and English origin have become so numerous, that amateurs and o...
-Ploughing Among The Roots Of Trees
H. J. R., Riverside,Cal., writes:As one of the oldest subscribers to your journal, I am tempted to trouble you with a few questions in relation to the cultivation of the Orange and Lemon. The growth ...
-Stocks For Grafting Gooseberries
Mrs. M. E. W., Sublette, Mo., writes: In the Gardener's Monthly of July, 1875. there is an article from the pen of Albert Benz, Bay-side, L. I., on the subject of grafting gooseberries; and as I am go...
-The Pear Slug
C. B. J., Camden, Del., writes: The pear slug occasions great trouble and loss in this section. Is there no method of preventing their invasions? People here, very generally, I believe, know of the ex...
-Forestry. Communications. Forestry In Southern Kansas
The subject of Forest Culture is without doubt a momentous question, and one of vast importance, in view of the future wants of the whole country. While there is evidently a growing interest in the su...
-Black Walnut
Black Walnut is a handsome, hardy, fast-growing tree. The valuable properties of its wood are so well known that I need not speak of themhere. In a few years from planting the annual crop of nuts wil...
-Honey Locust
Honey Locust is a beautiful, hardy tree, well suited to our soil and climate. The seed should be gathered as soon as ripe in the Fall, and kept in moist sand till Spring, and then planted about two in...
-The Peach Tree
The Peach Tree grows well on the prairies - makes a rapid growth - and for quick returns is a good substitute for some of the slower-growing forest trees. It will produce a large amount of fuel in fou...
-Pine Lumber Of Utah
At a recent meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, specimens of boards from the conifers of Utah, were presented from Mr. A. L. Siler. Juniperus Virginiana, the common Red Cedar, ...
-The Birch
As we look on these trees generally in our gardens, or even in our forests, we have little idea of its great use of the birch Ionian. A lumber paper tells us that the birch is a true hardy mountaineer...
-Persimmon Gum
It may not be generally known, says the Rural Messenger, of Petersburg, Va., that the common Persimmon tree of this State (Diospyros Virginiana) yields at a certain serson a gum, which, when boiled an...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Thesecularchance Of Vegetation
The periodical change of vegetation has often been discussed, and its process has been confirmed in every country. Thus Grisebach in his classical workdie Vegetation der Erde, relates the fact that ...
-Seeding Of Wistaria Sinensis
The fact that Wtstaria sinensis, when supported, that is, grown as a climber - if I understand the phraseology - is seedless; while thetree or self-supporting plant bears fruit abundantly. This, whi...
-New Varieties By Grafting
The experiments on apples, by the editor of the Gardener's Monthly, show that new varieties can be obtained by grafting; and observations, previously recorded by other persons in various departments o...
-Hairs Of Plants - Their Forms And Uses
Under this head, a valuable paper by Prof. Beal is contributed to the May number of the American Naturalist. Representations of a great number of hairs are given, many species having forms, in many re...
-Abies And Picea
The reason why we have to call the Spruces Picea, and not Abies, and the Firs Abies, and not Picea, is thus given by Dr. Engelmann in his recent monograph on the Firs of the United States: I foll...
-Rose Gall
A correspondent sent us, some time ago, a beautiful burr-like gall on a rose leaf. Any such pretty thing sent to the writer of the following letter from any reader of the Gardener's Monthly will be ap...
-Literature, Travels 1 Personal Notes. Communications. From Oregon To Washington A Glimpse Of Three Rivers
From Salem to Portland by rail, Feb. lGtb. The country that, last August, was so refreshing to the eye after the scorched plains of California was now promising, rather than beautiful, presenting chie...
-European Notes, By The Editor. No. 10
As we walk through the streets of our leading American cities in these, our times, it is not unusual to read that Hong Wing, or Hang Lee has a Laundry, and you may enjoy from the street the sight o...
-A Small Fraud
For ten cents or three for a quarter, the brokers and bankers of Philadelphia, near theExchange, were purchasing sticks of the common Sweet Gum, one day last April, on the assurance of the street ...
-Stealing Snowdrops
Two men convicted at Maidstone, in England, recently, of digging up Snowdrop roots in a private garden, were recently sentenced by an English Judge to seven years' penal servitude. This is in striking...
-Gardeners And Farmers
Mr. Peter Henderson made an admirable address before the American Institute Farmers' Club, on the 29th of April. Besides the excellent practical hints as to the formation and management of farm-garden...
-An Exceptionally Honest Man
A Mr. W. V. Andrews, who signs himselfCor. Secretary of the Long Island Entomologist's Society, U. S. A., sends a communication to Hardwick's Science Gossip, advising the English people not to use P...
-French Notes
A correspondent kindly says: - Knowing the desire of the editor that the Gardener's Monthly should be strictly accurate, even to the 'dotting of an i, and the crossing of at,' I make no apology for ...
-Proceedings Of The American Pomolo-Gical Society
We received the volume for 1877 just as we were going to press last month, and had room for only a brief note of Mr. Flagg, the late Secretary of the Society. On looking through it carefully, we are m...
-Germantown Horticultural Society. J. Jay Smith
Philadelphians and their papers sometimes verify the adage that prophets are not without honor save in their own country, and it is to contradict this adage that notice is here taken of the action of ...
-July. Number 235. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Communications. A Lady's Wheelbarrow
I am anxious to bring to your attention a new, light wheelbarrow, patented by a mechanic of this place. He makes a small size for ladies' gardening, which is a great treasure. I have one which I use c...
-How Bedding Plants May Be Arranged
Regular Foliage Beds should properly be some distance from the walks, say 40 to CO feet, and where convenient, be placed behind the carpet-beds for which they may serve as backgrounds, while they lose...
-Sub-Tropical Beds
On the same principles, with such plants as Grevillea robusta, Ficus elastica, Aralia Sieboldi, Rhus glabra laciniata, Acacia lophanta and others. As the surface of these beds will be in view the whol...
-Sub-Tropical Plants Promiscuously
Of beds of any size and shape, where may be used Datura Knightii, Cycas revoluta, Dimorphanthus manschuricus, Eucalyptus globulus, and E. mar-ginatus, Phormium tenax, and P. t. fol. var.: Dracaenas, Y...
-What Is A Garden? By Rus In Urbb
We go up a high mountain, and here the grand view bursts upon us, storming the gates of our soul and letting the vast* sight flood into it and saturate it. Now that we have quaffed the drink, we turn ...
-The Celastrus Scan Dens-Bitter Sweet A Staff Tree
The name of Bitter-sweet of right belongs, solely, to the Solanum dulcamara. Some likeness of its red fruitage, to the fiery crop of the Celastrus, doubtless made our climber its namesake. But our Bit...
-Rhododendrons
Our magnificent Spring weather has made gardening more than usually enjoyable, and there has been little openly expressed hankering after the Horticultural advantages of other lands. The writer of thi...
-Wahlenbergia Tuberosa
Wahlenbergia is a genus being closely allied to Campanula, and affords us many very beautiful hardy herbaceous plants. W.grandiflora is particularly well known in American gardens by its very large fl...
-Lawn Grass
W. B. LeV., Philadelphia, writes: The enclosed sample of grass was grown from seed sold me for Kentucky Blue Grass, and as it makes a beautiful lawn and displaces the Fall Grass, I am anxious ...
-Transplanting Hollies
C. A. D., New York, says: Can you tell me the reason why the Ilex opaca is so difficult to transplant successfully ? I have tried it repeatedly before, but I thought that in a large one having been ...
-Green House And House Gardening. Communications. Among The Orchid Crowers
E. L. Ames, Esq., at North Easton, Mass., has a large and select collection of Orchids, including many fine specimens recently purchased at South Amboy and Albany, and also the extensive and rare coll...
-Notes On Orchids
Being engaged somewhat in growing greenhouse and bedding plants, and especially Orchids, I have been much interested in such articles as have appeared from time to time in the Monthly upon the culture...
-Disease In The Marechal Niel Rose
Having read with much interest the notes of your correspondents in regard to the disease (?); which has made its appearance on the Marechal Niel Rose of fate, and having had personal experience with i...
-Floral Decoration Of The Table
The use of flowers for the table is, we are glad to know, exciting general attention among the more tasteful of our community; even though they be those residing in cottages and setting but simple tab...
-Luculia Cratissima
I noticed a query as to this plant being in cultivation in this country. We had a plant of over one hundred fine heads of bloom last winter, and any of those heads of flowers would perfume a large gre...
-Cure For Mealy Buc
I found, two years ago, before the publication of the same fact by a correspondent of the Monthly, that a solution of White Hellebore and soap puts an end to the slug on Rose-bushes. My next experimen...
-Eucharis Amazonica
I pot all the plants at one time, that is in a compost of turfy loam and sand, well mixed together; let the compost lie at least two months before using, in a dry place, and at the time of potting I p...
-Begonia Frcebelii
This is a newly discovered and recently introduced (three years ago) species, a native of the Republic of Ecuador, and named in compliment to Froebel of Zurich, who first grew and distributed it. It i...
-Double Geranium Ethel Beale
As-most gardeners know, the best of the Double Geraniums have a ragged and confused set of petals. In English works, Ethel Beale is introduced to us as one for the first time presenting a regularly el...
-Span Or Leak-To Greenhouse
C. H. S., Newmarket, Ontario, Canada, says: - Being compelled by the narrowness of my lot, which runs east and west, to build my greenhouse ending the same way, I would be thankful to you for informa...
-Gardenia Flower
J. L. R., St. Joseph, Mo., writes: - With this mail I forward the bloom of a plant for identification. You will see I have been dissecting it. I would send you a perfect bloom if I could procure it. ...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Dwarf June Berry
With your permission I send a few items con--cerning the Dwarf June Berry, of which inquiry was made in March number. I have grown the Dwarf June Berry many years, and prize it highly, as I believe do...
-Dwarf June Berry Again
I am glad this valuable fruit has been brought to the notice of your readers. I think with Mr. Terry, of Iowa, that it is very far from being a humbug. I have this Spring set out several hundred more ...
-A New Stock For The Pear
Having a group of Pyrus japonica seedlings which I noticed to be unusually fruitful, some five or six years ago, I have kept the stock since that time, for the purpose of raising seedlings for hedge p...
-Hybrid Strawberries
Have we any hybrid strawberries ? Several propagators of new varieties of this fruit say yes, and claim to have produced them. Now, let us look a little into this subject. When we plant different va...
-Another Word On Raspberries
The question of the identity of Elm City and Highland Hardy is in a fair course of final settlement. Mr. Charles Downing sent me plants of H. Hardy to plant beside my Elm City, and I sent him the Elm ...
-Cultivating Whortleberries
Several years ago I tried the experiment of transplanting some shrubs of the High Blueberry, Vaccinium corymbosum, into a rich and not very damp garden soil. The two specimens that I planted did so we...
-Growing Grapes In Vineries
Some years ago, some attention was given to growing Grapes on what is known as the extension system; that is, training a Grape vine so that in time one plant filled a whole house. In the hands of a go...
-Swayzie Pomme Grise Apple
Of this excellent Apple Dr. Burnett says in a recent number of The Canadian Horticulturist: We are led in the same connection to speak of the Swayzie Pomme Grise, so named, we have been told, from...
-A Beautiful Turnip
In the Paris market the writer of this saw a beautiful Yellow Turnip introduced to public notice, chiefly through the efforts of Messrs. Yilmorn, Andrieux & Co., the distinguished seedsmen of that Cit...
-Diseased Peach Leaf
R., St. Joseph, Mo., says:I send the leaves of some Peach trees that are entirely out of shape. I notice it on several trees in this section of the country. Please tell us what is the cause of this, ...
-Profitable Cherries
L., Pittsburg, Pa., writes:I am thinking of setting out two hundred cherry trees for profit this Fall; what variety would you recommend me to use ? [The only answer we can give, would be to note ...
-Forestry. Communications. Yellow And Black Locust
In answer to your query with reference to Yellow and Black Locust, I would state that there are two varieties. The Yellow Locust is erect in growth, has very thin sap-wood, is very durable, and of smo...
-Expense Of Preparing Tea
It has been objected that the Tea-plant, though proved to do well in the climate of our Southern States, could not be prepared for a profit in this country, in competition with cheap Chinese labor. It...
-Cherry Timber
The English Furniture Dealer has this to say of Cherry timber:The bark of the Cherry tree is so peculiar, as to render it distinguishable at first sight. The trunk is regularly shaped, but the bark i...
-Timber In California
The Rural Press tells us that so far as the tree question is concerned, there is no cause for alarm; the State is gaining more trees every year than it loses. The destruction of old trees is rapid in ...
-Yellow And Black Locust
Recently a correspondent inquired whether there was any difference between these two, and a correspondent we have gives further information. It is singular that lumbermen often find differences, thoug...
-Report Upon Forestry
By Franklin B. Hough. From Hon. W. G. Le Due, Commissioner of Agriculture. In 1877 Congress ordered the Commissioner of Agriculture to appoint some man of approved attainments, and practically well ...
-The Agricultural Grounds
The Arboretum, at the Agricultural Grounds at Washington, just now is very interesting, the many hun-Ireds of trees and shrubs being in nearly full foliage. Farmers who wish to identify or find a name...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Jumping Beans Of Mexico
Mr. Riley exhibited certain seeds which possessed a hidden power of jumping and moving about on the table. He stated that he had recently received them from Mr. G.W. Barnes, of San Diego, Cal., and t...
-Arrow-Weed {Yerba De Jiecha)
This is the name the shrub bears that produces the triangular seeds that during six or eight months have a continual jumping movement. The shrub is small, from four to six feet in height, branchy, and...
-Gall Of Cynips Saltatorius
Formed in summer on the underside of the leaves of Quercus obtusiloba, Q. macrocarpa, and Q. alba, often to the number of 1,000 on a single leaf: each gall inserted in a deep cavity which causes, on t...
-The Philosophy Of A Fruitful Strawberry
Every one knows that some strawberries bear more abundantly than others; but few could give any intelligent reason why. The leading reason is, the capacity of a plant to stool or make crowns. When a s...
-Geraniums And Snakes
We take the following from an exchange, but it would be worth while enquiring how far away the snakes are driven ? We have certainly seen the garter snake within fifty feet of a Geranium bed: We ...
-Fruiting Of"Wistaria Sinensis
This little matter seems to have created considerable interest. We are glad to have the following corroborative experiences that it is not till the vegetative forces have, in a measure, exhausted them...
-Japan Wrapping, Around Lily Bulbs
T. S., Brooklyn, writes:There was lately in New York a sale of imported Japan Lilies, such as Auratum, Krameri, etc. These bulbs on opening the cases were packed, not in sawdust as usual, but in a co...
-Remedy For The Colorado Potato Beetle
A Philadelphia correspondent writes: The Potato bug has again begun its ravages. Cannot the Academy of Natural Sciences investigate its habits and devise some cheap and sure remedy? A soapy compou...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Scraps From A Brazilian Journal
It is difficult for one whose winters have always been spent in a northern clime to realize that these glorious, balmy days are December and January. In front of the large open veranda upon which I wr...
-European Notes, By The Editor. No. 11
It is singular that with all the criticisms indulged in on Kings and Queens and Nobles, the world is largely indebted to them for very much of which it is proud; and this is especially true of the wor...
-Select Plants Eligible For Industrial Culture In Australia
By Baron Ferd. Von Muller. There are few men who have worked so hard and so successfully as Baron Von Muller to make Botany practically useful to the Australians. The present work of near 300 pages is...
-John Freed
The many visitors to the great Centennial Exhibit will remember the superb collection of fruit, and among the several excellent commissioners in charge, Mr. John Freed. Of his earnest devotion to the ...
-Gardening Longevity
An old lady, the wife of a gardener, died in England recently, aged 105, and it is boasted that she had drank deeply of whiskey every day for twenty years previous. It is generally believed that only ...
-Synoptical Flora Of The United States
Many years ago Torrey and his pupil, Asa Gray, commenced the Flora of the United States; but by the time the work had reached the Compositae or Aster-like plants, the boundaries of the United States h...
-The Native Flowers And Ferns Of The United States
By Thomas Meehan. Illustrated by chromo-lithographs, by L. Prang & Co., Boston. The editor of this journal - the author of the above work, cannot, of course, say anything of its value - this he shall ...
-The Rural New Yorker
We do not know that any one should care to have more than his money's worth in a good paper when he subscribes therefor the full subscription price, but if it is to be, the Rural New Yorker's offer of...
-Centennial Exhibition Of 1876
The following is the report of Thomas Meehan, the Secretary of Group 36, giving, according to the rules of the Exhibition, a review of the progress of the century from the standpoint of a judge at the...
-Maryland Horticultural Society
The practice of having instructive talks about the objects exhibited we are pleased to see is growing. At the Feb. meeting of this Society Mr. Win. Fraser, who has demonstrated in the conservatory at ...
-Belgium International Horticultural Exhibition
Our Belgian contemporary, l'Horticulture Belgique, has given up the whole of its April number to the account of the great inter national Horticultural Exhibition, which appears to have been a great su...
-August. Number 236. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
For a month or two in Spring, when all nature is gushing forth joyously into life, we are content to look on and enjoy the wondrous sights; and when in Fall the whole universe sparkles in autumnal tin...
-Commumcations. Blunders And Mulching
Mr. Beecher's article in the May Monthly, hints of value in both. That of blunders lies in the telling. A good hearty blunder, frankly confessed, not only warns, but instructs. Out of failure often le...
-Rhododendron Occidentale
One of the grandest flowers I ever beheld is the Rhododendron occidentale, or California Azalea. It is a native of California, where it grows along streams of crystal water in thickly wooded districts...
-Picturesque Lawns
The picture effects to be obtained by color in foliage are familiar to all who have studied nature. The Silver Poplars, quivering in the lightest breeze, relieve the more sombre Maples on the mountain...
-The Pines Of Japan
Professor Rein thinks there are only three species of Pinus native of Japan, namely, P. densiflora, P. Massoniana, and P. parviflora. The two first are favorite trees of the Japanese, and are represen...
-Propagation By Layers
Mr. Geo. Syme, an English gentleman, gives to Messrs. S. B. Parsons & Son, of Flushing, the following bit of information, which will amuse those who are acquainted with the modes of propagation in the...
-Blood-Leaved Norway Maple
A correspondent of the Garden thus refers to Acer Schweidleriana:This hardy, free-growing, purple-leaved Maple should not be lost sight of by planters. It is a real acquisition, as far as effective c...
-Tovaria Oleracea
This, by far the most handsome of all the Tovarias or Smilacinas yet introduced to cultivation, is now in flower in the herbaceous grounds at Kew. It approaches in habit the well-known T. racemosa, be...
-Name Of Plant
Subscriber, Pittsburg, Pa. We cannot name your plant from the portion of a leaf sent. It is not a Wistaria, if the whole leaf has but three leaflets, as in the portion sent to us. Amaryallis lon...
-Dark-Leaved Norway Maple
With specimens of an unusually dark green Norway Maple, we have the following from a correspondent at Old Westbury, N. Y.:I enclose a few leaves from a Maple, which is different from any variety I ha...
-A Hardy Gladiolus
A Doylestown, Pa., subscriber says; I enclose flowers of a thoroughly hardy Gladiolus, which has remained out during the Winter for several years past where originally planted, and, as I understand,...
-Variation In The Cut-Lea.ved Birch
A Rochester, N. Y., correspondent says: I send you herewith a couple of sprigs taken from cut-leaved Birch. The tree is fifteen years planted, and large. A few feet from the ground a limb branches o...
-Andromeda Speciosa
With specimens of this beautiful hardy shrub, which is undoubtedly A. speciosa, a Hingham, Mass., correspondent writes: Having read the article on the various species of Andromeda, in the Gardener's...
-Green House And House Gardening. Communications. Cool House Orchids L/El3as
This beautiful genus of orchids is closely allied to Cattleya, and some of the Brazilian varieties are found in catalogues, sometimes as Laelias, and in others as Cattleyas. I think that they all come...
-Mexican Laelias
Loelia Anceps This is the finest of the Mexican Laelias. It has bulbs from four to six inches long, (with one stiff leaf, sometimes, but rarely two.) The flower stem is from two to three feet long,...
-Brazilian Laelias
Loelia Purpurata This is a strong growing plant, with a single dark green leaf on a bulb from six inches to a foot long. In growth, it is like Cattleya, as are most of the Brazilian Laelias. The fl...
-Additional Note On The Mealy Bug
Since writing my paper, Mr. W. S. Hogg informs me that, in his experience, (according with my own, ) a solution of whale-oil soap and hellebore, while ridding plants of most insects, including scale, ...
-Dendrobium Nobile, Versus Novelties
Around us everywhere the New crowds aside the Old, notwithstanding that many of the old flowering plants combined the useful with the beautiful in a high degree. Nevertheless, in some localities they ...
-Variegated Coboea Scandens
Your notice of the variegated Coboea scan-dens, in the May number, leads me to say a good word for it. A year ago I planted out in the green-house a small plant, which exceeded in luxuriant growth any...
-Wallflowers
We take the subjoined characteristic remarks onWallflowers in Paris, from the Gardener's Magazine:Amongst the many rural elegancies that make Paris the freshest and brightest of cities, we must giv...
-Chameleon Wallflowers
A correspondent in the Garden has the following relative to that curious and interesting plant - the Chameleon Wallflowers: This plant is the Cheiranthus Cheiri var. Chameleon, figured long ago in t...
-A Cure For Thrips
A correspondent of the Journal of Horticulture, says: Fumigating once a fortnight the houses in which it is present is a good means to adopt for eradicating it; and we have found that syringing th...
-Luculia Gratissima
This is a vigorous greenhouse shrub or small tree of the Cinchona family, a native of Nepal, and though by no means a recent introduction, it is nevertheless quite rare in our gardens. One of the fine...
-New Zonal Pelargonium, Dr. Denny
All new varities of Pelargoniums, heretofore, have generally had a great deal of sameness about them, but in the new Zonal, Dr. Denny, there seems to be a variety that looks as if it were to be the fo...
-Adiantum Princeps
This splendid Fern, one of the finest of the Maiden-hairs, introduced by us from New Grenada through Mr. Gustav Wallis, and was figured in the Gardeners' ADIANTUM PRINCEPS. 'Chronicle of ...
-Calceolarias
With a box of remarkably beautiful flowers, we have the following note from Mr. Roderick Campbell, of the Forest Hill Cemetery, Utica, X. Y. If the publication of this note shall lead to an increased ...
-Amaryllis
Jas. R. Townsend, New York, writes: Will some of your correspondents, who have had experience, give me some information regarding Amaryllis Belladonna and Vit-tata, and the Nerine. When they should ...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. New Early Peaches
During the past few years many new varieties of early peaches have been introduced, commencing with Alexander and Amsden, in this country, and Early Beatrice, Early Louise, Early Rivers, etc, by Thoma...
-The Dwarf June Berry
You asked the question last Winter, in one of the numbers of your Monthly, What is a Dwarf June Berry? stating that you had never seen one, and did not know that there was such a thing. I have seve...
-Early Peaches
We have to be very careful about reports of earliness or lateness of fruits. At the recent meeting of the Georgia State Horticultural Society, Mr. Robinson stated the Alexander ripened ten days before...
-The Pear-Leaf Fungus - Roesteliacancellata
I shall be glad if some of your readers would give their experience of this fungus, and, if possible, suggest a remedy. I have now for three years been sadly troubled with this parasite. Last year it ...
-Good Fruit Dryers
A committee of the Southwest Georgia Institute Association make the following report: Your committee, to whom was referred the Granger and American Fruit Driers, beg leave to submit the following: A...
-Longworth Prolific Strawberry
As a companion question to what becomes of all the pins? we may have what becomes of old varieties of fruits and vegetables ? There was Longsworth's Prolific Strawberry, for the raising of which the...
-Insect Traps
M. Carrière, of Jardin des Plantes, says the Journal of Horticulture, reports on baits for insects, that beer and water caught 850 flies and other winged creatures; pure beer 631; crushed pear...
-Bower's Early Peach
M. & M., Frederick City, Md., under date of July 1st, send us the following note: We send you to-day another specimen of Bower's early peach, but as it is dead ripe and bruised in places so that the...
-Quince Disease
E. G., No. 35 Wall street, Trenton, N. J., writes: If you please give me some information about a quince tree which I have. It seems as if there is a fly or some kind of insect stings the limb in th...
-Kinnaman's Seedling Peach
D. S. M., Bridgeville, Del., writes: I sent you by mail two peaches, a new Delaware seedling. We call it Kinnaman's Seedling, originated with L. Kinnaman, of Sussex county, Del. A tree now eight year...
-Band For Codling Worms
At the late Nurserymen's Convention, at Rochester, belts for placing around apple trees were exhibited with cotton fastenings on the interior surface, soaked in some poison, probably Quassia, by which...
-Dyehouse Cherry
Mr. R. J. Black, Fairfield County, Ohio, writes: I saw a few specimens of Dyehouse, the culinary cherry recently brought to notice, and which for many years has been giving such excellent satisfacti...
-Forestry. Communications. Yellow Cottonwood. (Iowa Horticultural Report)
The opinion is common in central and eastern Iowa, that Cottonwood is only valuable on prairies for windbreaks, as the wood has little value for fuel or for any uses of the farm or workshop. The varie...
-A Large White Oak
There is a White Oak tree standing in the public highway, about three miles from our town, which I have always believed to be the largest in our State, and have never seen the account of any as large ...
-Hardy Catalpa Trees
A correspondent inquires what we know about the hardy Catalpa. There is but one species of Catalpa that we know of. Some have believed they have a variety that blooms a little earlier than the othe...
-The Hardy Colorado Firs And Spruces
We are glad to be able to announce that in a few years the very valuable Colorado species, Douglas', Menzies, and Engelmann's, will be within reach of all, Messrs. Douglas & Sons, of Waukegan, III., h...
-Forestry In Portugal
Those whose education reaches no further than what they see in the papers, must have a happy time in knowing what to believe. Take this, for instance: It is reported from Texas, sprigs of Pine, H...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. A Murderous Plant-Darlinctonia Californica
No plant indigenous to the Pacific coast is more profoundly interesting than our Darling-Ionia Californica. The eye of the uncultured tourist or listless stock-man, no less than the studious naturalis...
-Lightning-Proof Beech Trees
We are told that English authorities claim that Fig Trees and Cedars are rarely struck by lightning; the Beech, Larch, Fir and Chestnut are obnoxious to it; but the trees which attract it most are t...
-Pintts Ponderosa
The Gardener's Chronicle has been giving some sketches of scraggy Pinus ponderosa, as seen in the Rocky Mountains, which we can forgive for the sake of the picturesque rocks of Monument Park, whichacc...
-Yucca Baccata
Just why the Yucca bac-cata should be called Rocky Mountain Banana it is hard to tell. Perhaps it is for the same reason that we have Rocky Mountain hats, and Rocky Mountain all sorts of things....
-Vitality Of Seeds
Van Tieghem contributes a paper to L'Annuales des Sciences Natu-relles on the reason why some seeds retain vitality longer than others. We have not read the original, but give the following abstract f...
-Curious Cabbage Leaf
C.B. F., Raleigh, N. C, sends a cabbage leaf. Along the stout midrib of the leaf, a large number of leafy processes, as if small leaf blades have appeared, seeming like smaller leaves growing from the...
-Double-Leaf In A Begonia
W. N. M., Oswego, N. Y., writes: I enclose you a rough sketch of a strange freak in a Begonia Rex (var. Queen Victoria). Has the thing ever come under your notice before - two perfect leaves on one ...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Pansy Portrature Or Heartsease Pictures
Poor Jeremiah Crocus! was in trouble no doubt. He looked sorely distressed and woe begone ! His heart was aching, if not breaking! overwhelmed with misery; his soul was in agony, intense! Deep and aud...
-Traveling Notes By The Editor
The writer took a few hours to himself, recently, by a trip to Rochester to visit the Nurserymens' Convention, and we can say that it feels good to be once in awhile out of office, and to be n...
-Virginian Jasmine
Under this name, La Fontaine, an elegant French writer, refers to a climbing plant, which has rosy flowers of the form of a fox-glove, and in which flowers a beautiful insect is born with their blo...
-American And Hardy Ferns
In connection with the remarks made in our magazine recently on the growing fondness of American ladies for hardy Fern gardens, it is pleasant to observe a growing taste for them in this country. Mr. ...
-Death Of James Fleming
This well-known Seedsman of New York, died at New Canaan, Conn., on July 10th. Mr. Fleming was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1833, and was consequently forty-five years of age. He was an excellent ty...
-Geranium And Pelargonium
Memphis asks: Can you tell what is the class now called Geranium, and what is the Pelargonium? They seem now much mixed. Many years ago all were Geraniums - Horse Shoe, one type, and the other the G...
-European Sketches
Mr. W. T. Harding, Oak Hill Cemetery, Upper Sandusy, Ohio, writes: All things and events must at sometime, sooner or later, come to an end; and in some cases, regretfully so. Even the very pleasan...
-Preserving Flowers Of The Night Blooming Cereus
Geo. G. B., St. Joseph, Mo., writes: I have tried to preserve a flower of Cereus grandiflorus in alcohol diluted with an equal quantity of water; but the result did not prove satisfactory. The bloom...
-Centennial Exhibition Of 1876, (Continued From Page 223)
In tracing the progress of Apple-culture through the century, as exemplified by the exhibits, the most surprising suggestion is the increase in the number of varieties, which has made a selection of l...
-Kentucky Horticultural Society
Reports for 1877-78: This does not appear to be strong in members, but is doing good work. Besides much that is interesting to Horticulturists in every branch of the art of gardening, the Strawberry a...
-Texas Horticultural And Pomological Association
The schedule for 1878, says: The objects of this incorporation are: the advancement of the science of Horticulture and Pomology, rural adornment and landscape gardening; to encourage the growth an...
-September. Number 237. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In many parts of the Northern States the leaves will have changed color previous to the incoming of Winter, and the planting of trees and shrubs will commence as soon as the first Fall showers shall h...
-Communications. Picturesque Lawns
A group of Magnolias includes acuminata, fifty feet high, macrophylla, with its superb flowers, twenty-five feet high, Soulangiana, glauca, longifolia, gracilis, and others. Near them stands a Tulip T...
-Watering Of Flower Beds
How often do you water your flowers ? To ask this question, so puzzling to gardeners, is the general inclination of most non-professionals. I, myself, have little advice to give on the subject, but ...
-Seeds And Seed Planting
The curious things about seeds - Some of the secrets - Sowing of flower seeds - Preparation of soil - Covering - Tree and shrub seeds - The critical periods - Subsequent treatment - The three enemies ...
-Stuartia Virginica
We have in this country two species of Stuartia namely, pen-tagyna and Virginica both exceedingly beautiful. In the English Garden, for July 13th, there is a colored plate of the Virginica. Judging fr...
-Trees In Large Cities
The time will probably come when street trees will be a matter of public concern, and not left, as it is now, to private enterprise. As it is now, the householder feels the need of shade from the Summ...
-September. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. New Or Rare Plants
Selaginella Japonica - Messrs. Jas. Vietch & Son, who introduced this beautiful species of club moss from Japan, give the following description of it: Selaginella Japonica. It is caulesc...
-Green House And House Gardening. Communications. Epidendrum
This genus of Orchids is a very large one, containing several hundred species and varieties, and had all the species that were formerly in it been still retained, it would contain about one-fourth of ...
-Alocasia Jennincsii
If this Alocasia was to get anything like the good treatment bestowed upon the finer species of this genus, cultivators would be well repaid for the extra care, for, although a plant which will grow u...
-Window Boxes And Jardinieres
Beautiful flowers, climbing vines and luxuriant foliage, have their beauty greatly enchaned by tasteful receptacles, and those other accessories, such as handsome trellises, tasteful stands, etc., whi...
-Imitation Of Inlaid-Wood
We endeavor to have the wood forming the front of each box of smooth pine, with colored streaks and markings of those clear rich tints peculiar to this wood. The extreme edges are either finished with...
-Flowering Of The Raphis Flabelliformis
A good specimen of Raphis flabelliformis, in my collection, is at present in flower, showing a strong branching spike from the axil of the fourth leaf from the apex of the plant. The main stem of the ...
-Mixing Oil And Water
It is well known what an admirable thing coal oil is in destroying insects on plants when not too strong, but it cannot be diluted with water. In the attempt to mix it, the oil would stay on th...
-How To Make Skeleton Leaves
The Gardener's Chronicle gives the following as Mrs. Cusson's plan: For the dissection of leaves I find the process of masceration too long and tedious, to say nothing of the uncertainty as to the re...
-Growth Of A Marechal, Niel Rose
The Gardener's Chronicle gives the following good growth as something very remarkable, but we fancy some of our American Hose-growers could make a better showing: At Messrs. J. & G. Hayes' nursery, ...
-New Or Rare Plants. Anthitrium Ornatum
Most plants of the Arum family of which the well known Richar-dia or Calla is an illustrious example, prove such excellent kinds for room or greenhouse culture, that cultivators gladly welcome any new...
-Robert's Portable Terra Cotta Dry Stove
Can any one inform a Doylestown, Bucks County Pa., correspondent if Robert's portable patent terra cotta dry stove for heating plant houses, can be obtained in this country, and if so from whom ? I...
-Oiled Sheeting
J. M., Brenham, Texas, writes: Can you please inform me through the Monthly, what will keep sheeting from rotting when exposed to the atmosphere. We have to use it on the roofs of our greenhouses, an...
-September. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The planting of the Pear, Apple, Plum and Cherry will soon be in season; Peaches Apricots and Grape vines, except south of the Potomac being for the most part left till Spring. Choose a dry piece of g...
-Communications. The Crescent Seedling Strawberry
I recently paid a visit to the farm of Ezra Stokes, at Berlin, N. J., where this variety has been planted in alternate rows with Wilson's Albany, Charles Downing, Capt. Jack, Monarch of the West, Grea...
-A New Cherry
The Ida Cherry, a new and very promising early Cherry, raised by E. H. Cocklin, of Shep-perdstown, Cumberland County, Pa., who kindly sent me, by express, a liberal supply, which came in good conditio...
-Grape Culture In Texas
Art article with the above heading in the September number of the Monthly, by Mr. Bustrin, of Dallas, Texas, is entirely wrong in its statements about what I have published on the culture of Apples, G...
-Fruit Culture In Kansas
One would not suppose that Southern Kansas was adapted to fruit, especially the Apple, as the Winters are short and our Summers very long, we would think that Winter Apples especially would ripen befo...
-The Early Peaches In Kansas This Year
This is the eleventh day of July, and the last of Hale's Early is just gathered. The season seems to be about four weeks earlier than is usual. The whole list of early peaches known to the public, so ...
-English Importations Of Fruit
The prevalent impression among the people of this country is that the skilled gardeners of England are enabled, by forcing and careful treatment, to supply most of the fruit required in their country....
-Coal Tar On Fruit Trees
We often see the most absurd notions attributed to the editor of the Gardener's Monthly, and have come tlook at such things as matters of course. In traveling around, little changes occur, and from on...
-Culture Of Orchard Trees
Mr. T. T. Lyon, well-known and an excellent Western fruit grower, and who was one of the pomologi-cal judges at the Centennial, gives some good advice in the Rural New Yorker on the management of orch...
-Gumbo
In a notice of Okra, our good neighbor, the American Agriculturist, which, by the way, we are glad to find as interesting as ever under its new management, says: Though in the catalogues, the plan...
-Mowing The Leaves Of Strawberries
W. H. W., Reading, Mass., asks: Will you please state in the Gardener's Monthly for August, if possible, your opinion about the wisdom of cutting off the leaves of Strawberry plants after the crop ha...
-Insects On The Grape Vine
S. P., Newport, R. I., writes: I send by mail, with this letter, a small box containing a portion of Grape vine root. You will find, by applying the glass to it, it is covered with small yellowish-g...
-Seedling Gooseberry
C. P., Beaver Dam, Wis., says: I send you by this mail a specimen of a valuable Gooseberry, claimed to be a seedling raised in Vermont and brought to Wisconsin about twelve years since, but the orig...
-Forestry. Communications. Felling Trees
As the cutting down and the removal of trees are as much the work of the forester as their planting, and the after care of their growth, I thought the following remarks regarding an idea suggested dur...
-The Byfield Elm
We measured the Byfield Elm, on the land of Benjamin Parsons, Byfleld Parish, Newbury, Mass. The tree is in sight of the cars as one goes to Newburyport, Mass., by Boston & Maine Railroad, some thi...
-The Eucalyptus In Memphis
We see by the Avalanche, of Memphis, that those who want other people to plant Eucalyptus forests instead of themselves, are having a warm time in that part of the world as well as elsewhere. The disc...
-Scraps And Queries. Forest Corporations
H. J. S. writes: I understand you to advocate the planting of forests by corporations. I would now ask you to project, first, a working plan for such companies adapted to the capacity of country nei...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. A Murderous Plant Darlingtonia Californica
(Continued from page 245). The plumule first developes a thin, flat, falcate, green leaf, about half an inch long. Soon it becomes reddened, tubular and veiny, while a relatively large opening appe...
-The True Darlingtonia Leaf
During the second year the creeping, rhizo-matic character of the plant is manifested; also, it increases rapidly in size. The whorl of leaves now produced, from one-half an inch to several inches bey...
-The Saccharine Secretion
Not at all times of the season is a prominent characteristic observable. For several years I did not detect one of the most distinctive features of this insect trap, the saccharine secretion. This phe...
-Cross-Fertilization In Sabbatia Ancularis
This handsome flower, which is quite common in the vicinity of Washington, and which blooms about the end of July, presents a device for the prevention of self-fertilization, which has not, it is beli...
-Crossing And Hybridizing
The subject of hybridization and other crossing has ever been an interesting one to me; hence I read Mr. Miner's article on hybrid Strawberries in the July issue of the Gardener's Monthly, and the edi...
-Fungus Spawn
Recently we noted where the spawn of a fungus had evidently been communicated from a lot of leaves from a wood to a lot of Rhododendrons, destroying large numbers of them. The same appears to have bee...
-Ants On Geranium Roots
It is not often that ants are found destructive to living plants, but we have the following note from Mr. Lorin Blodgett: This Geranium-eating white ant is a great pest. I send a stem of another ...
-Double Lilium Candidum
W. 1ST. M.,. Oswego, N. Y., writes: I trust you will excuse me for troubling you again, but it seems as if I was having more than my share of curious freaks of flowers. I send you by this mail a doub...
-Annual Report Of Fairmount Park, Philadelphia
There have been reports of Fairmount Park before, but we believe none have been issued for some time, at any rate none since the Park began to assume the hopeful prospect of a creditable reputation ...
-A " Day " In California
We have before us an account of a California invention, a transplanter patent rights in every State for sale. The inventor says: Some three years ago I commenced to set out some 200 acres of Eu...
-For Farmers
The daily papers have the following: Ex-Governor R. W. Furnas, of Nebraska, has had to sell both his farm and his city residence. ' For sixteen long, long years, ' he says, ' have I struggled to mak...
-Prof. C. V. Riley
Those of us who know the great value of Prof. Riley's services to knowledge, are pleased to read the following compliment to him from the London Gardener's Chronicle: State Entomologists. If we w...
-T. B. Miner
In a recent number we published a paper from the pen of this distinguished writer for the agricultural and horticultural press. We have had no notice of his death from his friends, all the knowledge o...
-Vegetation Round Constantinople
A long drive through the suburbs of Pera, and over the bare undulating downs separating the Golden Horn and Bosphorus, brought me, on the afternoon of my arrival, to the sweet waters of Europe, a plea...
-Horticulture In Maryland
The American Farmer, of Baltimore, has recently given an excellent account of the progress of Horticulture in Maryland, from the pen of our esteemed correspondent Captain Snow. So much of what he refe...
-September. Horticultural Societies. Editorial Notes
'Centennial Exhibition of 1876, (Concluded from page 256) - In small fruits our century of progress was not as well illustrated as it might have been if the plan of the Commission in relation to the s...
-October. Number 238. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
It is a matter of surprise that the Lily is not more appreciated by our flower gardeners. By a judicious selection they may be had in bloom all the summer season. Last year we saw a selection of this ...
-Communications. Seeds And Seed Planting
Tree and shrub seed are most conveniently sown in boxes two or three feet square and four inches deep. The soil needs only to be rapidly mixed and pulverized with a shovel, thrown into the boxes, pres...
-Ceanothus
Of the many species of flowering shrubs which decorate the hills and valleys of California, few, if any, strike the beholder as more worthy of cultivation than the several Ceanothus. Of this species o...
-Hydranceas
Hydrangea paniculata. Very few, if any late introductions for the garden and shrubbery please me so much as this Hydrangea. Hardy, easily, very easily propagated, very showy, lasting a long time too, ...
-Country Homes
At a meeting of nurserymen from all parts of the Union, held in the city of Rochester, recently, to consider the present condition and future prospects of the business, Mr. Thomas Meehan, being presen...
-The Purple Beech As A Hedge Plant
What is the reason that Purple Beech is not more used for ornamental hedges than it appears to be at present. I should say there is no plant that forms a more beautiful hedge for bounding or dividing ...
-The Grey Pine
Prof. Beal has the following good word for the Pinus Banksiana. We have often wondered why this beautiful small growing Pine was so scarce: This small tree goes by a great variety of other names a...
-Cannas
It is singular that more attention is not given to Tropical plants for borders. They like hot weather, in fact the hotter it is the better they grow. Among them none will do so well as the Cannas. Jud...
-Protecting Park Tress From Cattle
Writing to Land and Water, Mr. Higford Burr, Aldermaston Court, Reading, says: I dare say that most of your readers who take any interest in planting have often remarked how an Oak or other tree ...
-Asphalting Walks
The value of asphalte ought to be more thoroughly understood, considering the benefit it is to amateur and gardener alike, but a great many object to it on account of the color and unpleasant odor in ...
-Aponogeton Distachyon Not Necessarily An Aquatic
It may be good news for many of your readers who are not possessed of ponds or tanks suitable for growing this delicious-ly sweet-scented plant, recently described and figured in The Garden, that wate...
-What Ails The Trees
A couple of years ago the city of Philadelphia concluded that the dirtily disgraceful Independence Square should be made decent. Among other things it was re-sodded. Those who do such work are seldom ...
-The Rosy Snowflake (Leucojum Roseum)
The prettiest hardy bulb in flower in the Kew collection at the present time is this rare little gem. Its blossoms, which are about the size of Snowdrops, are unaccompanied by leaves, and are borne on...
-October. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Room gardening has progressed probably faster than many other branches of gardening. It is not necessary to have the tender things that require skillful greenhouse treatment. There are numberless gree...
-Communications. Orchid Culture In The United States
It is evident that there is an increasing interest in Orchid culture in this country, and I find that any reliable information on their habits is eagerly sought after. Their wonderful manner of growth...
-Glass Panels
Another box has panes of glass slid into groved mouldings, which form oblong panels along the front and ends of each box. These glass panels are embellished in various ways. A truly artistic taste, sa...
-Small Green Houses
During this and previous Winters, several small Green Houses excited my interest, and I have made a note on it, which is here given for the benefit of those who feel a similar interest with myself....
-Amaryllis And Orchids
In the February number of the Gardener's Monthly, I noticed desire of G. H., of Glen-dale, Miss., that some correspondent would tell a little about Amaryllids and the plants related to them now. Amary...
-The Amaryllis
There are many plants allied to the Amaryllis, as we find by looking through catalogues and books on Bulbs. The following were taken from a Dutch list of Bulbs: Alstroemeria - Flowers of great beau...
-Nertera Depressa
Could you or some of your subscribers inform me about growing Nertera Depressa. This pretty little plant with its creeping, slender, dense stems like veins, is worthy of attention. I have tried to gro...
-Coleus Chameleon
Many gardeners complain of this Coleus running out or turning dark; if however, they will carefully cut out all the dark shoots, and allow only the bright colored shoots to grow, the plants will be ...
-Sticmaphyllon Ciliatum
From Brazil this beautiful climber has been introduced. It belongs to the order Malpighia-cece, an order represented with a large number of genera throughout South America, some of which are very pecu...
-Fumigating Greenhouses
This should always lie done after sun-down or in dull, cloudy weather, to avoid burning or scorching the plants. The fumigator which I use is six inches in diameter, and is simply an iron ring formed ...
-Editorial Notes. Belladonna Lily
A correspondent of the Garden has the following answer to an inquiry: Amaryllis Belladonna for flowering in pots should be treated somewhat the same as Val-lota purpurea. After flowering it shoul...
-Asparagus Plumosus
What is known in the cut flower trade as Smilax is so popular that the following note of a neighboring novelty from the Gardener's Chronicle, will prove interesting. An extremely elegant species...
-Acalypha Macrophylla
A plant from the South Sea Islands, belonging to the Order Euphorbiaceae, with foliage showing a great variety of tints. Its stem and branches are furnished at short but regular intervals with exstipu...
-Archbishop Wood And Guillon Mangel-I, Eon Geraniums
G. J. B., writes: I have grown Guillion Mangelleon, and Bishop Wood Geranium in and out-door side by side. There is not in habit, foliage, petiole, truss, or color the slightest difference. They are...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Fruits In Iowa
I am inclined to say a good thing for our season and crops in Iowa, up to this 8th of July. Never had a better season for Strawberries. Some places they were injured by frost while in bloom. The wet w...
-The Small Fruits
Here in the Northwest, the yield of small fruits has been enormous - especially of Raspberries and Blackberries; so much so, that the bottom has fallen out of the market in most localities. A late fro...
-The Sharpless Seedling. J. L. Dillon, Bloomsburg, Pa
A description for your columns of this valuable new fruit the Sharpless Seedling Strawberry, may not be amiss. This berry was raised from mixed seed of the Jucunda, Charles Downing, Wilson and Colo...
-Alexander, Amsdens June, And Early Beatrice Peaches
The first two are ripening now, July 4th. They began June 28th. Early Beatrice is following close, but is behind; and it is much more behind the former two in size and attractiveness, than in time of ...
-Cultivation Of The Strawberry
To cultivate the Strawberry for family use, we recommend planting in beds four feet wide, with an alley two feet wide between. , These beds will accommodate three rows of plants, which may stand fifte...
-The Dyehouse Cherry
In my short note, at foot of page 240, August number, which you kindly copy, the second word should be send instead of saw; and at the top of next page (241) second line, the word kind should be...
-Malacoton Peaches
The Lake of Canandaigua, in western New York, is famous not only for its beauty, but for its historical association. The region in which it lies was once the home of the Senecas, the most numerous and...
-Time To Bud The Peach
After many years' experience in budding the Peach and having had the charge of the budding of millions, I find that early budding invariably does the best, say from August 1st, until September 1st. Ma...
-Codling Moth Destroyers
Mr. P. H. Foster, Bahylou, N. Y., writes: I think you did not understand my meaning when I wrote you, in the August number. I thought it an outrage to procure a patent on such a manner of capturing t...
-Peaches In England
In England Peaches will only ripen their fruit when the trees are trained against a sunny wall or fence. Great care and skill are required in this training, or the parts nearest the ground would be so...
-Popular Pennsylvania Apples
The Pennsylvania State Board of Agriculture is doing good work regarding the collection of statistics of the State. Secretary Edge, in his July blanks, called for information regarding what each respo...
-October. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. New Or Rare Fruits And Vegetables
New Foreign Grape, Welcome. - Mr. James Ricketts, Newberg, N. Y., writes: I send you, this day, by express, pre-paid, one bunch of my new exotic seedling Grape, Welcome, so named by the Examining C...
-Sallie Worrell Peach
From C. W. Westbrook, Wilson, N. C. This came to hand in excellent order, on August 10th. They were medium size, white flesh, small freestone, very juicy, and of an agreeable flavor. Mr. W. says that ...
-Strawberry Leaf Insect
C. J.B., South Framingham, Mass., writes: An insect, new to me, has been very destructive among my Strawberry plants, in one place having nearly killed a three-foot strip of vines which were thrifty ...
-Grapes And Graperies
E. H. H., East-hampton, writes: Please to tell me the treatment of grapery after bearing. Shall I simply give plenty of air? Shall I allow the ground to dry ? Shall I continue to pinch back the shoo...
-Forestry. Communications. The Varieties Of Catalpa
The Monthly has so extensive a circulation, and its editor is such high authority, on all matters pertaining to Forestry, that I fear a wrong impression ma}' be made by his answer, in the August numbe...
-American Forestry
The London Journal of Forestry thinks that the work recently compiled by Dr. F. B. Hough, is a marked compliment to British foresters in this that he has copied so largely from British works on fore...
-The Red Pine
A correspondent of the Michigan Farmer, thus writes of this Pine. There is not much demand for this tree, in the nursery trade; yet we know of a few progressive nurserymen who would gladly try what so...
-Why The Twisting Leaves?
First as to the facts. The leaves of maturo rhizomes - the true Darlingtonia leaves - nro each twisted one half way round whatever the length, whether one half inch, or over three feet. All the leaves...
-The Climax Of Cunning
Now why the peculiar characteristics of the Darlingtonia? Why would not less elaborate machinery answer as well ? Let us see: a tube so capacious as to hold a half pint of insects, the usual meal it s...
-The "Curl" Of The Peach Leaf, Ascowiyces Deformans
There are few cultivators of the Peach who have not been annoyed by the disease known in this country as the curl and in Europe as the blister. About the time the leaves are fully developed in Spring ...
-Adventitious Buds In The Beech Tree
Last Spring, whilst wandering through a forest, I came across a Beech tree a foot or eighteen inches in diameter, which was ornamented as usual with the alphabet in disorder. The letters in this case ...
-Asclepias Cornuti
I have been watching with interest for some days the visits of flies to the Asclepias Cornuti, Decaisne, common Milkweed or Silkweed, the house fly, a large green one, and another having the appearanc...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Editorial Notes. Horiticulture In Maryland
John Feast, the veteran florist, who is now the oldest as well as still one of the most enthusiastic lovers of plants in this community. Mr. Feast at one time had not only the largest commercial estab...
-Horticulture In Baltimore
Captain Chas. II. Snow writes: In an article in the September number of the Gardener's Monthly I am credited with an article on Horticulture in Maryland. The article in the American Farmer was from ...
-John Nicholas Haage
This excellent botanist and founder of the celebrated seed firm of Haage & Schmidt, of Errfurt, recently made a botanical excursion to Switzerland, where he fell from the rocks at Murren and was dashe...
-Professor Asa Gkay
C. W. Quin, in the London Garden, says: We are pleased to learn that at the last meeting of the French Academy of Science, held on July 29th, Prof. Asa Gray, the well-known American botanist, was ele...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Eightieth Year Of Col. Marshall P. Wilder
Col. Wilder's horticultural and agricultural friends thought the eightieth birthday of this distinguished patron of the art of cultivation, a good occassion to celebrate, and met accordingly in great ...
-November. Number 239. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
It is surprising how many elements of beauty we have around us of which we neglect to make any use. Especially is this true of our beautiful Fall flowers and of our remarkably fine Autumn foliage. Of ...
-Communications. "Holywood, " At Long Branch, N.J
This is the residence of John Hoey, Esq.; nearly 200 acres is embraced in the domain, which is located about half a mile from the beach, on a gently rising grade, having a frontage of some 4000 feet. ...
-Lilium Auratum
When this capricious plant finds the surroundings perfectly congenial to its nature, it is capable of immense development, and on rare occasions yields results at which we gaze with astonishment. A sp...
-New Dahlias
Among all cultivated flowers, a constant change and improvement is being wrought through the patient and careful labor of the hybridizer, often almost completely revolutionizing in a few seasons our l...
-A Window Hood For Ornamental Vines
I enclose you a pencil sketch of a wire frame which we have found very effective in training the Virginia Creeper over our windows. It is an idea of my husband's, and has been so attractive here that ...
-The Kentucky Coffee Tree
We find some strange statements sometimes about American trees and American gardening from American correspondents of European gardening papers. One of the latest of these is in a paper on the Kentuc...
-A Pretty City Garden
The city garden of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lord, of New York City, is thus spoken of in a daily paper: The extensive rear yard had been completely transformed into a perfect haven of delight; all that...
-Fruiting Of The Akebia
Those who have not a plant of Akebia quinata, can have no idea what a handsome vine it is. It is so very hardy, has such beautiful foliage, is so free from diseases, grows so rapidly and yet is withal...
-Roses In Round Baskets
It will be unfortunate if the admiration excited by the effect of the round baskets of Marechal Niel Roses, shown at the first Aquarium exhibition, leads to an attempt being made by any society to ado...
-How To Propagate Mistletoe
The seeds-being enveloped in a wet, slimy, or gummy-like substance, it dries and fixes them firmly in a short time, if put on when the bark and weather are both dry; whereas if the bark is wet, and ra...
-White Lobelias
What aristocrats are these lowly-growing flowers, blossoming away all the Summer in pure white loveliness, and yet as proud of their bit of blue blood as is the veriest Bond Street dandy ! An ordina...
-Daffodils
I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host of golden Daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dan...
-The Day Lily, (Hemerocallis)
This very pretty plant is not so generally used as it should be in shrubberies and flower borders, in semi-wild situations, and on the margins of ponds and lakes. For nearly two months past in my grou...
-Double Scarlet Geum
This Geum, which has been in existence for some years, is not nearly so often met with in gardens as it should be. It is perfectly hardy, easily increased by division of the root, thrives well in any ...
-Abies Harryana
New species; Abies Veitchi, Hort., Veitch, not of descriptions. This is the plant cultivated as A. Veitchi, and sent to me under that name by Messrs. Veitch. It differs in appearance from true Veitchi...
-November. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The taste for leaf plants Palms, Ferns, and other plants with handsome foliage is good, but it is a question whether the sacrificing of all our beautiful flowering plants for them is not an extreme ...
-Maxillaria, Lycaste, Trichopilia And Anguloa
I have put these four together, not because they are all botanically related, but that the same treatment will do for all, and they all make their flowers on short stems from the side of the bulbs. Th...
-Maxillaria
This was formerly quite a large genus, but Lycaste, Promennoea, Paphinia, Bifie-naria, and several others have been taken from it, and shorn it of some of its best species. It has, however, a few good...
-Lycaste
These have bulbs from two to five inches high, dark green, and have several plicate leaves from a foot to eighteen inches high. Lycaste Aromatica And Lycaste Cruenta Have yellow flowers about 1½...
-Trichopilia
This is a small genus, but all the species are showy, and easy to cultivate. It does not require as much water as the Maxillarias. They all come from the highlands of Mexico and Central America. The f...
-Anguloa
These are strong growing plants, and probably grow among rotten leaves and moss. The flowers of all the species come up from the sides of the bulbs, and look like tulips not quite open. They come from...
-Artificial Wood Tiles
The most elegant embellishments we have used for wooden receptacles of all descriptions are the rich artificial wood ornaments which are now made in such perfection, and which allow of so many and var...
-Hyacinth Culture
The time has arrived for those who expect to have flowers from hardy bulbs in Spring to look around for their bulbs in time for Fall planting. And as I have already offered my experience in their cult...
-How To Make Moss Baskets
Very beautiful baskets for holding flowers may be made of the longer and more feathery kinds of mosses. We have made them often; and never do flowers, whether wild or garden, look more lovely than whe...
-Venus' Fly-Trap
The well-known Venus' fly-trap, Dionsea muscipula, is the best of all the fly catching plants to keep in a window for occasional amusement, and it is moreover a proper adornment, for the beauty of its...
-Agapanthits Umbellatus
We remember having heard some one say he could not flower the Blue Mexican Lily. It must have been a man, for all the ladies succeed with it. We have hoped before now that Miss G. or some of our other...
-Specimen Phloxes
Sancho Panza asserts that it is not easy to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear, but we can often make something quite as pretty out of some very unlikely materials, and we expect the reader will agr...
-Improved Abutilons
Most of us can remember when Abutilon striatum was introduced and how much it was welcomed to greenhouse collections. Since then, other species have been introduced, and between them hybrids and cross...
-November. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In those parts where the frost has not yet been severe enough to injure the Celery crop, it may have another earthing up. Care must be exercised in the operation not to let the earth get into the hear...
-Communications. Summer Shade For Apple Trees
Numerous have been the articles written in our horticultural journals upon the advantages or necessity of shade from the Winter sun, or protection to the trunks and larger limbs of fruit trees in cold...
-Fast Buddinc
Very few who are unacquainted with the art of budding will believe how rapidly it can be performed by experts. Some twenty years ago when I first commenced the nursery business it was thought that a m...
-Asparagus Culture In England
Referring to a paragraph in a recent Monthly,. allow me to say that as yet there has been no competition for my prize in England, nor will there be for some time, to allow full time for preparation. T...
-Hoosac Thornless Blackberry
I think a large number of the readers of the Gardener's Monthly are looking for some report of this Blackberry, which was advertised with so much promise three years ago. I paid a large price for a fe...
-A Cood Way To Work Over Large Fruit Trees
It might be of interest of some to the readers of the Monthly for me to describe a method of working over some Flemish Beauty Pear trees, upon which the fruit cracked so badly as to render them worthl...
-Vacaries Of The Peach
The communications from Mr. Downing and others in the August and September numbers have moved me to add my mite to the - confusion, shall I say? that dominates the Peach question. But out of chaos com...
-Influence Of The Summer On Hardiness In Winter
The reader will peruse with much interest, Mr. Woodward's notes on Summer shade for the Apple. It confirms a point frequently made by the Gardener's Monthly, that when a tree's vital powers are stra...
-About Moles
We were always taught that it was not polite in company to make fun of stupid peoples' blunders. There is no objection to this amusement when we are by ourselves, and therefore, the reader can take th...
-Green Manure
Sowing the Cow-pea, and ploughing the vines under as green manure, is very common in the South. The Southern Enterprise notices a patch of forty-one acres ready for turning down, on the farm of Mr. Pe...
-Late Peaches
With some large and remarkably delicious Peaches on the 7th of October, we had the following note from Mr. Lorin Blodgett, of Philadelphia. It is remarkable that the Peach is not oftener employed as a...
-A New Source Of Profit
The country being about tired of trying how much frost the Eucalyptus will stand, the Baltimore Gazette calls attention to the fact that a very fine article of Sweitzer cheese can be made from the mi...
-Japanese Mushrooms
One of the industries of Japan is the cultivation of Mushrooms, which are exported in large quantities from that country, and some interesting information respecting them is given by Consul Robertson ...
-New Late Peaches
C. W. Westbrook & Co., Wilson, North Carolina, write: I mail you a specimen each of Harris' Winter, Lady Parham and Baldwin's late Peaches, all free stones. The Harris is a new Peach and ripened last...
-Grape Borders
J. C. S., Normal School, Hampton, Va., writes: I have a lean-to greenhouse twenty-four and a half feet long, and about thirteen feet wide, in which I wish to force Grapes. It is heated by steam pipes...
-Forestry. Felling Trees
Allow me to differ with your correspondent, Margid Digram, in the September number of the. Gardener's Monthly, page 274. His plan of digging up green trees and pulling them over with a rope, looks wel...
-That Weathersfield Elm
While reading the interesting article of Mr. Manning, on the Byfield Elm, I was reminded of the immense Elm I saw in Wethersfield, Connecticut, a few years ago; and I write to ask if some corresponden...
-The Locust Tree
The following statistics of Locust timber cut on the farm of J. G. Smock, near Holmdel, Monmouth County, N. J., show the value of this tree, and the desirableness of planting it more extensively. This...
-A Large Catalpa
Mr. Horace J. Smith writes: I measured a Catalpa tree in Fair-mount Park, on the river drive, west side, this morning, and found it to be thirteen feet in circumference, at an average of one foot fr...
-Locust Timber
We call particular attention to an article on Locust timber in this month's issue, as showing how much more profit there may be in timber raising than is generally supposed. It does not require a very...
-Native Sumac
The Reading Times and Dispatch says: There is a steady market at present for the leaves of the wild Sumac which grows upon the hills and commons of Berks county, the demand being greater than the su...
-Alnus Oregona And Acer Macro-phyllumm
A correspondent writing from Washington Territory, says the Alnus Oregona is an excellent timber tree there. It grows rapidly, makes splendid fuel, and is valuable for charcoal. It is also extensively...
-Lightning And Beech Trees
I see a discussion in the Gardener's Monthly of this question, as to whether the Beech tree is ever struck by lightning. With the general opinion against such an occurrence I think there is no questio...
-Abstract Of Paper "On Hybrids In Nature." By Thomas Meehan, Germantown, Phila
Read before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, at St. Louis, August 1878. The author shows that hybrid plants must be rare in nature, for the following reasons, which with the...
-Wheat And Chess Again
The agricultural editor of the Chicago Tribune has seen, at last, a head of Wheat in which grew something which in color, size and outward appearance was Chess. He then goes on to say: The head ...
-Sulphur And Yellow Fever Germs
Some people have assumed that the yellow fever is caused by vegetable germs generated in the atmosphere. It is very remarkable that no one seems to test the supposition, and decide positively whether ...
-Experiments In Testing Seeds
From time to time experiments have been published in regard to the quality of seeds. Some are bought from one place, some from another, and some from somewhere else. These are counted and sown side by...
-Eradicating Rare Plants
A correspondent of the Gardener's Chronicle, thus goeth for ye man who cleaneth out ye last specimens. We rather suspect he took care to have in his own herbarium a Malaxis paludosa a Cyp-ripedium,...
-How The Root Grows
When the plant is in a natural state, the method of growth of the roots provide it with all necessary supplies. The rootlets, as has been said, lengthen at the extremities, and creep through all the l...
-Pasteur's Theory Of Fermentation
A correspondent asks us to state in the Journal what is the so-called Pasteur theory of fermentation. According to M. Pasteur, fermentation is a very common phenomenon; it is life without air, with...
-November. Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Editorial Notes
Our Chromo. - If our readers will only wait patiently tell next month, we think they will be pleased with a present we shall make them. It is not generally known that we started the chromo gift busi...
-The Postal Laws
There is nothing more to be dreaded than the political grumbler. The wrongs of which he complains are generally unbearable, until he or his party is in power, and then they are beds of down, on which ...
-Royal Love For Wild Flowers
The following from an English paper is only the story of a few wild flowers, and yet it has its thoughtful features which make it well worthy of a place in our columns. It is said that one touch of na...
-Winter Greeneries At Home
We learn by the preface that Rose and Lily Richmond, Mary Miner, Jenny Weeks, Daisy Burritt, and Miss Flora united in asking Uncle Edward to write an account of his successful window gardening, and th...
-Preliminary Studies On The North American Pyralidae - By A. R. Grote, From The Author
This is a part of the report of a commission that has been of immense service to American science. In this, Mr. Grote gives a full account of the new Zimmerman Pine Pest, Pinipestis Zimmermanii, a ver...
-The Journal Of Forestry
A Journal especially devoted to forest culture, and forest interests, was the newest venture in rural litera-ture in London a year ago. The first volume has just been completed, and proves to be a gre...
-Dr. H. A. Swasey
We gave a brief note in our last of the death of this excellent gentleman. We find in Our Home Journal, fuller accounts of his decease: Died - At Tangipahoa, La., on Wednesday, September 18, at 9 a...
-Insect Powder
Why the flowers of the composite plants Pyrethrum carneum and P. roseum, when pulverized to form the well-known Persian Insect Powder, should prove so destructive to insects, while perfectly innocu...
-Bahama Fruits
A large proportion of the area of the Bahama Islands is devoted to the cultivation of fruit, of which Oranges and Pine Apples are the principal, and at the present time the fields in the estates on wh...
-Trade In Flowers At Paris
The trade in flowers and plants assumes extraordinary proportions at Paris. The rents of the stalls in the various flower markets amount to 100, 000fr., so that it may be imagined that no small number...
-The Place For The Sun-Dial
Old Mills, the optician of Milwaukee, sold a sun-dial to Pitman, a short time ago, with the assurance that it was a first-rate timekeeper. About a, fortnight afterwards Pitman called at the shop and s...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
Three years ago this Society inaugurated a system of giving a reception once a year in June, to the citizens of Philadelphia, and on the third annual one, just held, over five thousand persons were en...
-Michigan State Pomological Society
A Detroit, Mich, correspondent, under date of September 21st, says: The Annual Fair of the Michigan State Pomological Society closed here last evening. It was held in connection with that of the Sta...
-Nurserymen And Horticultural Exhibitions
A prominent nurseryman hands us the following for publication, which was sent to him by an energetic secretary of a leading agricultural association, who deserves every success for his endeavors to ma...
-Horticultural Exhibition In England
The Gardener's Magazine says: Horticultural Exbibitions multiply and prosper in every part of the British Isles. The regions in which they occur but rarely and remotely do not usually lack the nee...
-December. Number 240. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
We are again at the end of another year of our labor, glad to feel that they have been of some use in the spread of horticultural taste and knowledge. We are particularly glad to feel that our hints...
-Communicat/Ons. Selacinella Japonica
The plant figured and described in the September Monthly, page 262, under the name of S. Japonica, is S. involvens. And the kind usually grown and distributed under the name of S. involvens, is S. cau...
-The Japan Quince
The very name of the Japan Quince summons up the hopes of spring time in the fiery glow of the old scarlet. How its bloom warms and cheers and brightens the opening of the floral year. In its radiance...
-Hydrangea Paniculata
J. J. S., is right in his estimate of this plant. Its rapid growth, immense trusses of flowers changing from green to white and then to pink, and its autumnal blooming gives it a high rank. The first ...
-Purple Beech For Hedges
B. B., in Garden thinks truly that hedges of this plant would be beautiful. Hedges of common Beech are well known in Europe, and there is no reason why the Purple Beech should not do as well. The ef...
-The Climbing Hydrancea
In reply to the remark of J. J. S., (see October Monthly, page 292) that There has been a story verbally circulated, that somebody was about to bring out a real novelty - a Hydrangea that clings to t...
-Gardens And Cardening In Austin, Texas
Situated on the banks of the Colorado, and rising gradually from the narrow level strip of land on the river, climbing up the hills and nestled in the valleys between, the city of Austin presents a pi...
-Verbena Venosa
This valuable acquisition does not resemble the common Verbena to any great extent. It grows about eighteen inches high, branches freely, and has dark green serrated foliage about six inches high. It ...
-December. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The plants brought into the house in the Fall will perhaps begin to show signs of suffering soon, for insects, over-watering, and sulphurous gases soon begin to tell on the health of the plants. For i...
-Communications. On Various Species Of Ficus. Ficus Parcelli, F. Nitida, F. Cooperi
Ficus Parcelli, F. Nitida, F. Cooperi. Each of the above fruited with me for the seasons of '77, '78; the Fig of the Cooperi was about an inch and a quarter in diameter of an orange red color. Parcell...
-Archbishop Wood And Cuillon Man-Celleon Geraniums
In the October number of the Monthly, G. J. B., says these two Geraniums are alike in habit, foliage, petiole, truss and color. I think he has got only one of the varieties; it may be he has got one...
-Seedling Abutilons And Cereus Crandiflora
In the Summer of 1877, I planted out in the open air, a single plant of Abutilon Boule de Neige at least fifty yards from another Abutilon. At the time of taking up the plant in the Fall, I noticed a ...
-Cultivation Of The Chinese Primrose
(Before the Germantown Horticultural Society). Since the introduction of the Chinese Primrose, nearly sixty years ago, it has been vastly improved through the patience and perseverance of the flori...
-Nertera Depressabanks
It is satisfactory to know that some interest is now taken in this pretty little plant, for, although long known to botanists, it is only of late years, so far as I know, that attention has been besto...
-Amaryllidaceae
There are no more popular plants with the florist or amateur than the very extensive and numerous family of Amaryllids. All the varieties of the genera are plants of royal bloom, and unsurpassable ric...
-Vallota Purpurea
Vallota Purpurea is a late Summer or Autumn bloomer, with very rich, handsome flowers; unlike others of the Amaryllidaceae, the bulbs must never be suffered to dry off. It requires to be kept growing ...
-Amaryllis Formosissima
Amaryllis Formosissima is one of the most beautiful in cultivation; it is frequently sold as Jacobea Lily, and known according to some botanical authorities as Sprekelia formossisima. It is very hardy...
-Double Geraniums
Mr. Conrad Kirchner, of Philadelphia, hands us a dozen kinds of seedling double Geraniums, which he has raised the past season, which shows that new double Ger-raniums may be raised as easily as new S...
-Croton Disraeli
The Various forms of Cro-ton are among the most popular of leaf plants, and as most of them do well in rooms and cool greenhouses, they are well suited to a large class of our readers. It is hard to t...
-A Curious Plant
Mrs. S. E. B., Houston, pointed palmate leaf. The bloom is a large double white, opening in the morning; by noon a delicate pink, by evening a deep rose color, so that my hedge of the plants present a...
-December. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Very little can be done now in this department, except by way for preparation for another year. In the fruit garden, there is not much to be done besides thinning of branches where too thick, cutti...
-Communications. Cumbo
Gumbo is the name of soup; Okra is the plant. Okra is cultivated in every vegetable garden in Texas. The tender pods are boiled and dressed with salt pepper and butter, and always called Okra. Soup, m...
-Some Of The New Fruits In New Hampshire
During the past season I have noticed the growth and general character of some of the fruits of recent introduction - new to us in these parts but old sorts it may be in other sections of the country....
-The Prentiss Grape
We have from Mr. Hubbard, leaves of the Prentiss Grape, showing their hardy and healthy character. It appears to be derived from Vitis labrusca. We have some bunches of this new variety. The bunche...
-Destructive Strawberry Insect
M. C, Cuyahoga Falls, 0., writes: I send, to-day, by mail, some Strawberry plants that are damaged by a little white worm that feeds on the bark of the roots; also some of the worms. They made their ...
-Fruit Growing In Pennsylvania
We quite agree with a correspondent who thinks the enclosed may be a settler for those who think the apple is not profitable in Pennsylvania. Charles B. Ott, of Springfield, is an extensive and s...
-Forestry. Communications. The Hardy Catalpa
In the Gardener's Monthly of November Mr. Horace J. Smith has informed us of the large Catalpa in Fairmount Park, and in your note of this old Catalpa you say, What will these Western friends think ...
-Catalpa Planting In The West
We are glad to learn that Robert Douglas, of Waukegan, is engaged in the delivery and planting of 100, 000 Catalpa trees for the Fort Scott Railroad Company. The Railroad Company has done a good thing...
-Profits Of Forest Culture
We have repeatedly shown that if forest culture were carried on as a business, there is nothing that would be more profitable when well managed. It would not pay when bungled any more than any other. ...
-American Sumac
In some of the earlier numbers of the Gardener's Monthly we pointed out the absurdity of sending so much money to Europe for Sumac when we have quite as good an article in abundance wild at home. It i...
-Scraps And Queries. The Speciosa Catalpa
E. J. M., Egg Harbor City, N. J., writes: I see you think the so-called new Catalpa of the west is different from the eastern one, because the seed vessels are so much larger. Please tell us whether ...
-Carnivorous Plants
Mr. Francis Darwin has proved very conclusively the truth of his father, Charles Darwin's position, that the so-called carnivorous plants do make use as food of the plants they catch. A large number o...
-Curious Growth Of Potato
While digging potatoes recently, I found a large white potato of the Ice Cream variety that had made a new or second growth; it had sent up a branching shoot about eight inches high. On this shoot, ...
-Andromeda Arborea
This is the name of the specimens sent by R. J. Black, Bremen, Ohio. It is known as the Sorrel tree, and in many respects is one of the most beautiful of the smaller trees of Northern Ohio. It is s...
-Structure Of The Stapelia
Some remarkable discoveries have been made conjointly by Messrs. Isaac Burk, Edward Potts and Dr. J. Gibbons Hunt, of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, and which have recently been communi...
-Ovi-Viviparous Creatures
A few years since correspondents of the Gardeners Chronicle and some other English periodicals took strong exceptions to Mr. Thomas Meehan's statement, that snakes would sometimes protect their young...
-Hybrid Graft Apples
Out in the west there is a discussion about graft hybrids, in which the name of the editor of the Gardener's Monthly is brought in. It appears agents are pusing some wonderful new varieties, originate...
-Gymnocladus In Germantown
A correspondent writes to the editor: Your correction of Mr. Hovey is just and well-timed. But does not my good friend know that he has, lo ! these many years, been planting seeds of Gymnocladus, ga...
-Lightning And Trees
B., Hartford, Conn., writes: Noting that you take an interest in the question of special trees being specially attractive to lightning, I enclose a slip and ask your opinion as to whether there is any...
-Advantages And Disadvantages Of Florida
C. 0. S., Seguin, Fla., writes: The greatest trouble I find here is in preventing the numerous insects from destroying the seedlings and plants. The climate is so mild that I find numerous insects r...
-Hybridizing Wheat
A correspondent sends the following which he finds in a public document, from the pen of a high official, and asks us to comment on its absurdity: Another maxim which farmers generally accept as a...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Ascent Of Pike's Peak
September 1st. Hardly knowing what may be the duties of the day, I conclude to be up before the sun, and prospect a little, as that seems to be a significant word here; I also find others of the sa...
-Gardening In America
An English gardener, who has returned to the Old World, thus gives his American experience: As regards the life of a gardener on such a place, I would say that after it is laid out, seldom more th...
-The American Agriculturist
It is a pleasure to note that this venerable magazine has lost none of its youthful force by the change of proprietors. It is particularly a pleasure to trace Professor Thurber's pen through its colum...
-The Blessed Bees
By John Allen. New York, J. P. Putnam's Sons; through Claxton, Remsen & Haffelfinger, Philadelphia. As we said recently of another work, we do not admire these odd titles to books. They smack of th...
-Horticultural Societies
We have a large number of notices of the Winter meetings of various Horticultural Societies to be held early in December, but as that will have arrived by the time the reader gets this, it is of no us...
-December. Literature. Scraps And Queries
Are Nursery Trees Personal Property? M. asks: What is the law about nursery trees? Are they to be considered real estate or personal property? Ought they not, in any event, to be considsred personal...
-Weeping Blood-Leaved Beech - Floral Decorating
Weeping Blood-Leaved Beech The common Blood-leaved beech has a weeping habit when old, and people seeing this have propagated from it, believing it to be a real weeper. But the Belgian nurserymen i...
-Communications. Edible Puff Balls - A Redwood
Communications. Edible Puff Balls The puff ball is wholesome, nutritious and delicious, cooked in any way that mushrooms are. The large, smooth sort contain the most food, and taste like the mushro...
-8. Populus Trichocarpa, Torrey - Business And Pleasure
8. Populus Trichocarpa, Torrey Populus Trichocarpa, Torrey, is western, found in Truckee Valley. 12. Populus Grandidentata, Michx Michigan poplar of nurserymen is a much finer tree, also ...
-Valuable Books For Sale - New Escholtzias
Valuable Books For Sale Mr. R. H.. Rathbun, South Amboy, N. J., offers for sale a set of Paxton's Magazine of Botany, and DeCan-dolles' Prodromus. It is not easy to get these sets, and yet they are...
-The Mealy Buc - Scale On The Ivy
The Mealy Buc I notice your correspondent, Reader, inquires for a remedy for mealy bug : I have succeeded best in keeping them down by using a small stream of water with considerable force. I ...
-Archbishop Wood Geranium - The Beauty Of The Philadelphia Pear Tree
Archbishop Wood Geranium A correspondent writes, reminding the readers of the magazine that the correct name of this geranium is Archbishop, not Bishop Wood. It is a small matter, but we agree with...
-Best Apples For Mississippi - H. E. Chitty
Best Apples For Mississippi The most popular apples in this State, seem to be Schock-ley, Yates, Kentucky Streak, and Nickajack. The last name has a wide popularity in the South. The apple does ver...
-Dr. C. C. Parry - Eryngium Leavenworthii
Dr. C. C. Parry This indomitable botanical explorer is about to make a collecting tour through Mexico. Col. M. P. Wilder It will please our readers to learn that this veteran horticulturi...
-Worm On The Juniper - East India Millet
Worm On The Juniper A Babylon, N. Y.. correspondent says:Please ask, through the Gardener's Monthly, of nurserymen, if they know anything of this worm that is destroying my Junipers. It is a quart...
-The Northern Spy Apple - Transactions Of The Nebraska State Horticultural Society
The Northern Spy Apple The Gardener's Chronicle figures the Northern Spy Apple, and says it is one of the best apples in England. It was first introduced to public notice by Ell-wanger & Barry, of ...
-Vegetable Plants - How To Grow Them - The Chenango Strawberry Apple
Vegetable Plants - How To Grow Them By Isaac Tillinghast, Factoryville, Pa. Published by the author. This is a neatly bound little book of about 100 pages, which expresses its full measure of usefu...
-The American Vines In France - Fruit Of Japan Persimmon
The American Vines In France The French vines grafted on the Clinton,at Montpeil-lier, introduced at once on the report of Prof. Planchon's mission to this country has proved completely Phylloxera-...
-Quercus Phellos And Q. Falcata - Taking Off Potato Blossoms
Quercus Phellos And Q. Falcata To J. M. I answer, that there is a large Willow Oak on the east side of the Woodlands, near the southwest corner of the alms house, and three Spanish Oaks in the Wood...
-Botanical Name Of The Sweet Potato - Horticulture In California
Botanical Name Of The Sweet Potato A Virginia correspondent, writes : Having failed to find out the botanical name of the Sweet Potato plant, I beg you will have the kindness to state its nativity,...
-Horticulture In Japan - Miltonia Spectabilis
Horticulture In Japan The Japanese, after having furnished our gardens with some of our best treasures, are retaliating, and our popular flowers now appear in their gardens. Lamium Purpueeum...
-M. Bicolor - The Catalpa Tree
M. Bicolor I think is only a variety of spec-tabilis with larger and brighter flowers. M. Moreliana This resembles spectabilis very much, both in mode of growth and shape of flower, but i...
-Dogwood Timber - Coffee In California
Dogwood Timber It is found that the timber of Cornus florida, our common Dogwood, is quite equal to Box Wood for some pupo3es to which, in England, Box Wood has been wholly in use; and there is an ...
-The Mammoth Trees Of California - Acer Rufineroe
The Mammoth Trees Of California Two thousand acres, including the famous mammoth grove of Sequoia gigantea, were recently sold at public sale to S. W. Sperry, of Calaveras county, who, it is believ...
-Gardening In Norfolk - Souvenir Du Congres Pear
Gardening In Norfolk The Public Ledger of Norfolk, Virginia, remarks on the growing taste of the ladies and gentlemen of that city for gardening, and attributes much of it to the successful venture...
-The Early Season - Burr Oak
The Early Season Among the most remarkable appearances of the season, was an abundance of curculioby the end of April in Philadelphia. With so much time to work, there will be very little chance fo...
-Native Trees - Parasite On The Codling Moth
Native Trees All the trees I have named, except the Ailanthus and Osage Orange, are natives of Kansas, and can be depended upon. The seed can be easily gathered from them all as they ripen. ...
-Abies Reginae Amelle - Fiftieth Anniversary Of The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
Abies Reginae Amelle A correspondent of the Gardener's Record says that in Greece this species will sprout up and form a new tree after the trunk has been cut down, and that it is the only species ...
-All About Roses - The Crescent Seedling Strawberry
All About Roses Under the name of Journal des Boses, a magazine exclusively devoted to the Queen of Flowers, has been started in France. We note that the editor agrees with us, and against the auth...
-Tea Plants At Washington - Georgia State Horticultural Society
Tea Plants At Washington The Fruit-ist and Florist says: Tea-plant bushes may be seen at the Agricultural Grounds also, which survive the winter almost like privet. We saw bushels of the tea-seed o...
-Western New York Horticultural Society - Luculia Pinciana
Western New York Horticultural Society From ---------. Secretary's name does not appear in the report; but whoever he may be, he has had an arduous task, and one very well performed from all appear...
-Double-Flowered Cinerarias - New Or Rare Fruits And Vegetables. The Sharpless Strawberry
Double-Flowered Cinerarias According to all accounts these continue to improve with each succeeding year. Leaf Blight In The Pear From the following, which we find in the Gardener's Chron...
-Watering Strawberries - Mass. Agricultural Club
Watering Strawberries N. J. R. Sharp-less, Catawissa, writes: The late wet spell has demonstrated to my satisfaction that strawberries are benefited by frequent rains, while in fruit. Now as I pro...
-Primula Japonica - Thomson's Orange Peach
Primula Japonica When this plant was introduced a few years ago, it was supposed that it would soon become popular. But of late it has been neglected, evidently from a want of knowledge in regard t...
-Tree Planting In Switzerland - Acer Colchicum Rubrum
Tree Planting In Switzerland It is the custom in parts of Switzerland to plant a tree on family holidays, such as a marriage, etc, the friends of the family usually furnishing and planting the tree...
-Stokesia Cyana - Campanula Allioni
Stokesia Cyana Among the herbaceous plants exhibited was Stokesia cyana. This is one of the most striking flowers among the compositae, it has large blue flowers, is a free bloomer and comes in flo...
-Beautiful Hydrangeas - Curculio In California
Beautiful Hydrangeas A Newport correspondent speaks of a bed of Hydrangeas in the grounds about the cottage of Harry Inger-soll, Esq., of Philadelphia, which is one of the floral gems of the place....
-Clapp's Pears - Dahlias
Clapp's Pears The article on the Past Century of Pomology was made up from the entry book of the Centennial, in which J. Clapp is recorded in connection with the seedling Pear. But a corresponde...
-The Victoria Lily - Wilder Peach
The Victoria Lily The California Horticulturist says: We are soon to have the pleasure of seeing this famous and interesting aquatic plant growing in a tank in one of the conservatories of the cos...
-Sharpless Seedling Strawberry - Snow Plant Of California
Sharpless Seedling Strawberry In the admirable Descriptive Catalogue of Fruits of Ell-wanger & Barry, just received, there is a beautiful colored plate of the Sharpless Seedling Strawberry. ...
-Fruiting Of The Stapelia - Fine Grapes
Fruiting Of The Stapelia This sometimes, but not often fruits under cultivation. Mr. Amnion Burr, of Dallas, Texas, has had one to seed. It is like most of the asclepiadaceae in form. The flowers a...









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