At a recent meeting of the Torrey Botanical Club in New York, Mr. N. S. Britton, of Staten Island, gave the following table, from observations made at New Dorp :

Trees.

Average age.

Average increase in diameter.

Average increase in ring thickness.

Average increase in height.

Number of trees on which average was taken.

Years

Abies excelsa....

32.6

0.61"

0.30"

1.73'

3

" balsamea...

30

0.38"

0.19"

1.56'

8

Pinus strohus

27

0.51"

0.25"

1.52'

1

" rigida

32.6

0.31"

0.15"

117'

5

" mitis

35

0.45"

0.23"

118'

2

Thuja occidentalis

28

0.32"

016"

1.15'

3

Juniperus Virginiana

59.7

0.21"

010"

0.58'

12

Salix alba

32

1.06"

0.53"

1.62'

3

Liriodendron.

38

0.45"

022"

1.57'

1

Juglans nigra

26

0.41"

0.20"

1.55'

2

Quercus alba

47.3

0.35"

0.18"

0.88'

6

Acer rubrum

28 4

0.45"

0.22"

1.51'

5

Carya tomentosa

70.4

0.20"

0.10"

0.95'

5

Betula alba

34

0.18'

0.09"

1.32'

3

Fagus ferruginea

448

0.36"

0.18"

078'

5

Ulmus Americana

38

0.52"

0.26"

1.31'

2

Castanea vesca

52.3

0.51"

0.25"

096'

7

Sassafras

27.1

0.23"

0.12"

096'

8

Catalpa

32

0.55"

0.28"

139'

5

Ailanthus

31

0.59"

0.29"

1.46'

11

Apple

23

0.65"

0.32"

123'

6

Cherry

29

0.54"

027"

1.40'

7

It would be interesting to know how these figures would compare with others. Certainly we should not expect anywhere else to find the Balsam Fir beating White and Pitch Pine in average annual growth. Such figures as these are very much needed in American forestry.