Most of our readers know by this time Cissus discolor, which, a hothouse plant in England, delights to be treated as a " Summer Vine" in the open air of our country. One of the prettiest sights of this class we met with a year or two ago, in a plant trained over the entrance door of the State Lunatic Asylum at Nashville, Tenn. It must have covered a space fifteen or twenty feet high all from a single Summer's growth, and made a beautiful temporary supply for the English Ivy which had been killed by the unusual severity of the Winter before. We have another species now-becoming known to our' cultivators which was introduced a few years ago by Messrs. Veitch & Sons, of Chelsea, London, who give the following account of its birthplace and peculiarities :

CISSUS ENDRESII.

CISSUS ENDRESII.

"A beautiful stove climber, collected for us in Costa Rica by the late M. Endres, with whose memory we have associated it. It is more vigorous than the well-known C. discolor, and larger in all its parts. Its fine large cordate-obovate and acuminate leaves are from seven to eight inches long, with a breadth of six; the mid-rib veins and connecting veinlets are prominent, and of a reddish color; the upper surface of the leaf has a rich velvety appearance, colored with the brightest green, a deeper shade adjoining the mid-rib and veins; the under surface a reddish brown, the red predominating in the mid-rib and veins. The newest formed part of the stem and the youngest leaves and tendrils are strongly tinged with crimson. The robust growth of this Cissus, combined with its ample foliage, renders it particularly adapted for covering large spaces or tall columns in a warm conservatory, and where a bold and massive foliage is required".