A new, hardy Grape, combining the following desirable qualities, viz.: hardiness, size, beauty, quality, productiveness and earliness, maturing ten days earlier than the Hartford Prolific, and twenty days before the Concord. This is one out of a lot of twenty-five hundred seedlings, and produced its first fruit in the year 1872; it was then exhibited, and has been shown at the exhibitions of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, and tested by the fruit committee every year since. September 7th, 1872, 1st prize; 1873, Annual Exhibition, 1st prize for any variety not named in the schedule; Sept. 5th, 1874, 1st prize for early Grapes: 1874, Annual Exhibition, 1st prize for any variety not named in the schedule; 1875, Sept. 4th, 1st prize for early Grapes; Sept. 11th, 1st prize for early Grapes; Annual Exhibition, 1st prize for any variety not named in the schedule; 1876, Sept. 2d, 1st prize for early Grapes; Sept. 9th, 1st prize for early Grapes; Annual Exhibition, 1st prize for any variety not named in the schedule; 1877, August 25th, first-class certificate of merit; Sept. 1st, 1st prize for early Grapes; Sept. 8th, 1st prize for early Grapes; Annual Exhibition, Sept. 18th, 1st prize for any variety not named in the schedule.

It has also received first premiums from various other societies, and has always taken the first prizes over all other varieties shown in competition. A prize of #60 for the best new seedling, after a satisfactory trial, was awarded in Dec, 1877, to John B. Moore, for the new seedling Moore's Early, by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Description of the fruit: bunch large, berry round, large (as large as the Wilder or Rogers No. 4), color black, with a heavy blue bloom; quality, better than the Concord; vine exceedingly hardy; has never been covered in winter, and has been exposed to a temperature of more than twenty degrees below zero, without injury, and it has been entirely exempt from mildew or disease. Its earliness makes it desirable for an early crop, and more particularly adapts it to New England and the northern portion of the United States.