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The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V21 | by Thomas Meehan



We have often stated that one of the grievous errors of American gardening is that they are too large. American fortunes are not so steady. We have a succession of years of prosperity, and among other luxuries, form a good garden; hut it is hardly put in fair order before we find that its necessary expenses are too large for our income, and the establishment runs down. We see these places everywhere. Here are gardens which ought to have half a dozen men to keep them properly, cut down perhaps to one laborer, besides the gardener; and the gardeners engaged are of the cheapest kind, and for all grudgingly paid. It should never be forgotten that it costs something to keep up a garden as well as to maintain horses and carriages...

TitleThe Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V21
AuthorThomas Meehan
PublisherCharles H. Marot
Year1879
Copyright1879, Charles H. Marot
AmazonFour-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long

Devoted To Horticulture, Arboriculture And Rural Affairs.

Edited By Thomas Meehan, Formerly Head Gardener to Caleb Cope, Esq., at Springbrook, and at the Bart-ram Botanic Garden near Philadelphia; Graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, (London,) England,. Member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Author of "American Hand-Book of Ornamental Trees." etc.

-January 1879. Number 241. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
We have often stated that one of the grievous errors of American gardening is that they are too large. American fortunes are not so steady. We have a succession of years of prosperity, and among other...
-Communications. The Climbing Hydrangea
Too great expectations as to the horticultural value of this much-heralded plant will, I fear, only lead to greater disappointment. It is by no means new, as it was very well figured forty odd years a...
-Gardens And Gardening In Austin, Texas
Of all the plants and shrubs that are cultivated for ornament, none takes such a prominent place as the Rose. People have tried shrubs, such as are cultivated in colder countries than this, but many o...
-The Retinosporas
The Retinosporas are a class of evergreens well deserving of more attention, and of much more general distribution than they have yet received. Most of the varieties mentioned in this article were ...
-Puschkinias
Of this pretty genus of hardy bulbs the Garden says: The species belonging to this small but beautiful genus of Lily worts much resemble some of the Squills in habit and aspect, but differ from th...
-Bedding Plants At Hollywood
Gardener, Pottsville, Pa., inquires: What is the secret of growing one million bedding plants under 40,000 square feet of glass, as this gives twenty-five plants to each square foot? When in Engla...
-Erianthus Ravennae
Mrs. S. E. B., Houston, Texas, writes: I mailed you to-day a plume of Erianthus Ravenna?, one of fifty that grew upon a plant two years old. I think they dried nearly as fine as the Pampas, but not s...
-Lawns
Gardener, Baltimore, Md., writes: Will you kindly refer me to the best treatise upon Lawn Culture, especially with reference to keeping green during Summer droughts, and the exclusion of Crab Grass, ...
-January 1879. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Many of our readers have only a few window plants. These are often kept too warm, too wet, have too little sun light, and have too many insects. In towns, in addition to all these, they have often too...
-Communications. A Model Greenhouse Establishment
The other day, being in New York, I called over to see the new greenhouse erections that I had heard of being made by Peter Henderson, on Jersey City Heights, thinking they might interest some of your...
-Lady Gardeners In Pittsburgh
In your notice of Dr. Johnson's book Winter Greeneries at Home, in the November number of the Gardener's Monthly, you mention the fact of its being strange that Pitts-burgh ladies should have to be ...
-Fern Growing
The following points, obtained from an old German Fern grower, may be useful to amateurs who experience trouble in evenly sowing fine seed, such as Fern spores, Lygodium scandens, Calceolaria, etc. Ta...
-Improved Fire-Bars
Iron tells of a new style of fire-bar devised by an English inventor to secure fuller combustion of fuel. The peculiar feature of their bars is the shape of the spaces left for the air to pass through...
-Heating By Lamps
It has often seemed to us practicable to heat bay-windows and plant cabinets quite sufficiently by lamps. On this a correspondent of the Garden gives her experience: As no one has ventured to repl...
-Rose Cuttings Struck In Heat With The Leaves Left On
This method of propagation is largely practised by professional Rose growers. The operation may be performed from the end of July to the end of September, and even during the Winter. In certain establ...
-Bowiea Volubilis
Climbing amongst low shrubs on the dwarf wall of one of the houses are some specimens of a Cape bulb, Bowiea volubilis. This very strange plant, although allied botanic-ally to the Drimias and Scillas...
-Adiantum Palmatum
This remarkably beautiful Maiden Hair Fern is thus described by B. G. Williams, of Upper Holloway, London, by whom it was introduced: This handsome and distinct species will make an excellent comp...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Grapes And Plants
I have had very fair success in growing Grapes and plants in the same house, and will give my experience, hoping it may be of some benefit to J. C. S., of Hampton, Va. My house is about fifteen feet l...
-Strawberry Blight
We hear complaint from all over our country about the above disease of the Strawberry plant, asking the cause and remedy of the same. It is the general opinion that it is caused wholly by a fungus att...
-Better Fruits On Old Pear Trees
I used to wonder much, when a fruit was said to become more luscious with the age of the tree. The truth came home to me very outspoken in a Pear tree which I planted for a gray Doyenne. It grew in an...
-Some Notes On The Apple Crop Of Western New York
Late frosts in the Spring, and severe wind storms during early Autumn, did much to reduce the crop, yet the yield has been very large. Including barrel, costing thirty cents, prices have ranged for pi...
-An Example Of The Success Of An Orchard Under Crass Culture
There has come under my notice within a year, an orchard of Baldwin Apple trees upon one of the rocky hillsides of New Hampshire, which has never been ploughed; the ground was unusually rocky, sometim...
-Currants In California
Mr. W. B. West, who has recently been successful in adding the Cm-rant of commerce to the list of fruits for cultivation, has just returned from an extended tour through Europe, in search of improved ...
-Good Pennsylvania Apples
Mr. H. M. Engle says that among the Apples that have proven valuable in our State are the following: Summer - Early Harvest, Early Strawberry, Primate, Summer Queen, All Summer, Red As-trachan, Du...
-The Sexes Of Strawberries
The discussion on pistillate and staminate Strawberries, which so raged in this country a quarter of a century ago, and out of which the raising of that excellent hermaphrodite, Albany Seedling, took ...
-Moore's Early Grape
A new, hardy Grape, combining the following desirable qualities, viz.: hardiness, size, beauty, quality, productiveness and earliness, maturing ten days earlier than the Hartford Prolific, and twenty ...
-Idesia Polycarpa As A Fruit
The Gardeners' Chronicle, says: Idesia polycarpa fruited abundantly in several parts of France last season, as we learn from the Revue Horticole. When this tree was first introduced it was stated that...
-Yellows In The Peach Tree
A Michigan correspondent says: At the Annual Meeting of our Society to be held in Paw Paw, ' The Yellows on the Peach,' will be a leading topic of discussion. It is a very important matter with us. W...
-Forestry. Communications. European Larch. Gleanings By J. Stauffer
Among your Editorial Notes, in the December number, 1878, Profits of Forest Culture, you present the results of Mr. Rich'd S. Fay's experiment with the Larch, and high price obtained for railroad ...
-State Foresters
Mr. Horace J. Smith, writes as follows in regard to a State Forester, to the Manayunk Sentinel, and we understand that it is likely a bill in accordance therewith will be introduced into the Pennsylva...
-The White Pine
Among the many trees, spoken of for timber planting, the White Pine is rarely named. And yet it has some points well worth remembering. Speaking of some eastern experiences, the American Cultiv...
-Price Of R. R. Sleepers
A correspondent from Boston, says: You must take a more rosy view of the number of trees that are going to be planted, than I can, if you think the price is going down. Unless time steps in, I expect...
-Natural History And Science. Communications Potato Growth Extra
In looking over my collection of drawings of such objects of interest as have come to my notice from time to time, while investigating vegetable physiology, I have concluded to copy some relating to t...
-Rlchardsonia Scabra, A New Weed In The South
The Florida Dispatch has the following about the Richardsonia scabra: 'Originally from the West Indies and Central America. Introduced into South Alabama several years ago, somehow, and now rapdi...
-Catalpa Bignonoides Speciosa
Mr. E. G. Teas writes to the Rural New Yorker, Mr. Meehan, of the Gardener's Monthly, seems to doubt the existence of this distinct species of Catalpa. It would be interesting if Mr. Teas would g...
-Andromeda Arborea
A Louisville, Ky., correspondent, says: The Chromo in the December number, is very handsome, although the leaves in my own grounds where the Andromeda arborea has been in cultivation nearly eightee...
-Do Tree Trunks Elongate?
M. B., Detroit, Michigan, writes : Recently, in a circle of friends, the question came up as to whether tree trunks elongate. My friend asserted that on a Silver Maple tree near his house, he had occ...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Ascent Of Pike's Peak
(Concluded from page 377. December). When by our comfortable firesides at home, in coming winter time we read, in the morning print the weather record of the preceding day and night, let us remembe...
-Among The Heathen
Mr. Geo. Foust, one of the most enthusiastic lovers of new and rare plants, and an excellent florist, left Philadelphia a year or so ago and pitched his tent among the fishermen of Barnegat. It is bar...
-Henry T. Darlington
The death of the editor of the Bucks County Intelligencer, of Pennsylvania, is among the recent losses to horticulture, though professionally best known in connection with one of the best conducted co...
-Mr. J. H. Klippart
Our readers have mostly learned ere this of the decease of Dr. Klippart, the Secretary of the Ohio State Board of Agriculture, in which connection he has been best known, though his services both to b...
-The California Horticulturist
Our esteemed correspondent, Charles H. Shinn, becomes the editor of the California Horticulturist from the first of January of this year. Mr. S. is so well acquainted, practically, with the needs of h...
-The Botanical Gazette
This periodical is now entering: its fourth volume. It is designed to be a means of inter-communication between botanists, and how well it has accomplished its purpose the numerous contributions from ...
-Diospyros Kaki
History, description, and colored plates, by J. H. Loomis. A beautiful little book. The Persimmons with their numerousnames and prettily colored plates, look certainly good enough to eat. We believe t...
-House Plans For Everybody
By S. B. Reed, New York; Orange, Judd & Co. It was well to think of a book like this, and it has been well executed. It is full of plans for residences, costing from $250 to $8,000, with all needed in...
-Horticultural Societies. Communications. 6th Annual State Fair Of Colorado
Thinking a few remarks on our fair, held here the last week in September, may be of interest to some of your readers, and wishing to bring to the notice of the outside world, so to speak, some of the ...
-New York Horticultural Society
The New York Horticultural Society met at their rooms, 55 East Thirty-third street, New York, on Tuesday, December 3. The officers elected for 1879 were: President, Wilson G. Hunt, Esq., Brooklyn, L. ...
-Horticultural Societies Notices Of Meetings
It does not seem to be understood by some of our readers, that the immense amount of matter contained in our Magazine must take a few weeks to look over and properly arrange, and that afterwards time ...
-The Kentucky Horticultural Society
This society will hold it Annual Meeting in Eminence, January 14th, 15th and 16th, 1879. The following programme has been selected: Reports of Officers and Committees, Election of Officers, Revision o...
-February, 1879. Number 242. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
A gardener writes to know what he shall do with his situation. Three years ago when he engaged he found a place of four acres, mostly lawn, part vegetable garden, and three greenhouses. He was to have...
-Communications. Hydrancea Paniculata
Mr. Parsons in his notes on the October Monthly, page 355 December number, says the first plant of Hydrangea paniculata introduced to this country, was received at Flushing from Japan, in 1862. Mr. ...
-Cultivation Of The Rose
I am aware that the subject which I have selected for my essay this evening, has been so fully treated of at various times that nothing really new can be added. And yet it is at all times an interesti...
-Planting
During the latter part of October any necessary transplanting may be attended to, but the planting of young roses should be deferred until Spring. The ground intended for them should be well trenched ...
-Pot Roses
But at this season of the year the rose is particularly valuable as a pot plant, and certainly no collection of Winter blooming plants can be considered complete without it. Plants intended for this ...
-Protection Through The Winter
Roses of a tender nature of course require sufficient protection during the Winter, and with many amateurs the practice is to pot them, placing the plants in a warm room and watering liberally, but th...
-Insects
The rose is liable to attack from various insect enemies. The rose slug so destructive during the Summer is effectually destroyed by dusting the plants with powdered white Hellebore and lime, or disso...
-Beech Hedges
The European Beech makes an excellent hedge, and is much used for that purpose both in England and on the Continent, where protection from the cold north wind is needed. Mr. Parsons recommends Purple ...
-Destruction Of Trees In Cities By Gas At The Roots
They seem to be suffering from the dereliction of gas companies in Europe, as well as in our country, by the enclosed from the Gardeners' Record: We read in a Dutch contemporary that the magnifice...
-Ampelopsis Vietchii
The common Virginia Creeper is one of the most beautiful and best known of ornamental vines, and its habit of clinging of its own accord to walls and trees renders it particularly useful in ornamental...
-February, 1879. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Out-door gardening will not take on the magnificence that once surrounded it, for many-years to come. The great ambition of the rich man of fifty years ago, was to have a town house for winter, and to...
-Communications. Hot Water Heating. F. W. Poppey, Orange, N. J
In going over some back numbers of this magazine, 1 find two articles on the above named subject, one in the February number 1876, page 44, and the other April, 1876, page 106, both intended to throw ...
-Eucharis Grandiflora
There cannot be too much said in praise of this charming and almost ever-flowering stove plant. It is a plant universally known, and is found in almost every private and commercial establishment. I am...
-Making Flowers For Exhibition
At a recent horticultural exhibition at Liverpool, the Gardener's Weekly Magazine tells us: At the recent chrysanthemum show there one Roberts presented a lot of flowers that were made up of sheer...
-Dahlia Imperialis
We have several times made note of this comparatively new species, and its probable value in out door gardening. It appears it is also useful in conservatory decoration. A correspondent of the Garden ...
-How To Make Moss Baskets
Very beautiful baskets for holding flowers may be made of the longer and more feathery kinds of mosses. We have made them often; and never do flowers, whether wild or garden, look more lovely than whe...
-Areca Purpurea
Mr. B. S. Williams, of Upper Holloway, London, thus describes this pretty new palm: An elegant neat growing palm; leaves pinnate; the stem and petioles are of a bronzy purple color, which makes a ...
-Seedling Carnation
Mr. Wm. A. Bock, North Cambridge, Mass., writes: I send by this mail sample of flowers of a seedling carnation which I have raised. I have tested it now two years and find it to be a very profuse bloo...
-February, 1879. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In practical hints suited to the season, it is very hard to say much that is new, or that has not been often gone over before. The greatest gain of the few past years has been in divesting fruit cultu...
-Communications. Remarks On The Production Of Grapes
Judging from the scarcity and inferior quality of grapes found in our markets and growing on so many places, there seems to be yet a want of proper understanding of the matter, which is the more diffi...
-Cure For Texan Ants
In the Gardener's Monthly for December 1878, C. O. S., Seguin, Texas, complains about the destructiveness of a certain kind of ant which eats his plants, and asks if any correspondent knows a remedy. ...
-Shelter In Orchards
I saw an article lately, about planting trees for shelter. I would suggest that, if the parties would set the trees at regular distances for orchard planting, in any State of the United States, and th...
-The Profits Of Oranges
The Florida Dispatch acts on the same principle that we do,-that success in any undertaking can only be permanent when the exact truth is brought out. It is devoted to building up the interests of Flo...
-New Fruits For 1879
So far as we have been able to learn there has been little movement towards bringing out any remarkable new fruits this spring. There are quite a number noticed in country papers, in which the country...
-Peaches At Christmas
J. M. A., San Diego, Cal., writes: I forward by to-day's mail, one box,(3x3x8 in.) containing threeDecember peaches, which were taken from the tree to-day. Have had unusually early frosts at my nur...
-Forestry. Communications. On The New Variety Of Catalpa
I trust you will not deem me intrusive or troublesome, if I again write you a few lines on Catalpa. The evidence accumulates that there are in several.Western States two varieties, well marked and cle...
-A Catalpa Tree Near Philadelphia
I was reading, yesterday, Mr. Smith's account of the Catalpa tree growing in Fairmount Park, and judging from your remarks following his note, I thought that you might like to hear of another tree of ...
-Precocious Forest Trees
Some learned man has asserted that the prairies of the West are treeless because the texture of the soil is unsuited to the growth of trees. The experience in tree raising on these prairies seem to pr...
-The Large Plane Tree
For years and years we have had served up to us the statement that on the shores of the Bosphorus, is a Plane tree that is 150 feet in circumference. Absurd as the statement is, like many other forest...
-Christmas Trees
The German custom of the Christmas tree, has grown so popular, that in Philadelphia, it has infected all classes, and promises to be a permanent institution. There are over 100,000 houses in Philadelp...
-Boxwood
For some years past the supply of this important wood has diminished in quantity and risen in price. It is derived from the forests of the Caucasus, Armenia, and the Caspian shores. The wood of best q...
-The Big Trees Of California
There is much nonsense afloat about the big trees of California, and Prof. Brewer writes to the New England Journal of Education to enlighten some people as to the real facts. He says :- The first er...
-The White Oak In Maryland
According to the American Farmer, Gen. L. Giddings, near Annapolis, Md., has a White Oak, within fifty yards of his house, which is twenty-one feet in circumference. It is sound and healthy and symmet...
-Sumac For Tanning
B., New Jersey, writes: Attention has several times been called to this subject in the Gardener's Monthly, but I cannot learn where Sumac can be sold if collected. Rhus copallina, which I suppose is ...
-Growth Of Trees In America
The Gardener's Record says: Mention is made of a Weeping Willow fifty feet high, after five years growth in New Jersey soil. Astonishing rate of growth, if true. We think it is not improbable tha...
-Thornless Honey Locust
A correspondent in your February number inquires about the thornless Honey Locust. I would like to say to him that such a variety is found quite frequently in the timber belt along the Neosho, in this...
-The Eucalyptus In California
A correspondent writes: The one hundred and fifty six species (or varieties, perhaps), of the Eucalyptus tree, from Australia, has, owing to its many excellent qualities for both timber and medicine, ...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. History Of Sciadopitys, And Other Japan Trees
Your correspondent, Prof. C. S. Sargent, in his communication to the Gardener's Monthly, published in the last issue of that journal, takes especial pains to warn the public against too great expecta...
-The Climbing Hydrangea
In your January number Professor C. S. Sargent objects to the Climbing Hydrangea being called a new plant, beause Siebold had figured it in his Flora of Japan in 1839. Surely a plant may have been so ...
-Carnivorous Plants. #1
Mr. Henderson's statement of his experiment with the plants of Dionaea muscipula is not fully satisfactory. So far as the operation affected the growth and condition of the plants, the opinion of Mr. ...
-Additional Notes Of Andromeda Arborea
I was well pleased with your frontispiece in the December number of Gardener's Monthly, the Andromeda arborea, and hope it will be appreciated by the readers. It is a tree always admired. It grew in g...
-Carnivornus Plants
In the December number of the Gardener's Monthly appears a very interesting article from Peter Henderson in regard to some recent experiments made by him on the Venus fly-trap Dionaea muscipula. The a...
-Peculiar Formation Of Roots In A Paper Mulberry
On a street of this town a paper mulberry attracted my attention by reason of an unusual development of roots; that is to say, it was an unusual sight to me, though it may be of common occurrence. The...
-The English Sparrow
Concerning the English sparrow eating fruit I can speak positively. Great numbers of them nest in the neighborhood of my house, winter and summer, seeming to enjoy particularly my garden. I have seen ...
-Forest Fires In Washington Territory
We have had our heated term even here where the atmosphere is supposed to be always cool and moist, but old Sol was not responsible. Of course in clearing timbered land there is much burning to be don...
-Natural History And Science
This department the reader will find particularly rich in contributions this month, which shows the widespread interest which is taken in intelligent study of nature. We are glad that this so. We negl...
-Influence Of The Scion On The Stock
In reference to what we have said about credit in another column, we will be particular in saying that the following is an original editorial paragraph from the New York Tribune: One can't mos...
-Leaves And Petioles
It is well to remem-ber that though we speak of leaf blade, petiole, stems, and so forth as distinct organs, they are primarily the same, as curious freaks of nature as they may he called often teach ...
-Prinos Verticillata
A Halifax, Xova Scotia, correspondent writes : Enclosed please find a branch of a small Evergreen, found some hundred mile South from here, and which puzzles our people here. I have placed it among t...
-Scraps And Queries. Blue Grass
An esteemed correspondent says: 'I would ask what you meant by 'Blue Grass' in the last number? Poa compressa is the 'Blue Grass' of all the Eastern country, and merits the name, having a blue color, ...
-American Knowledge In Europe
An American correspondent of the Garden has been criticising it for its ignorance of American plants, and American things in general. On reading it we feel like saying a good word for the Garden, for ...
-About Credits To Exchanges
The New York Tribune is sensitive about credits. In a recent paragraph some New Jerseyman did not want to credit everything to the New York Tribune, though it would be but honest and decent to do so,...
-Grafting Gooseberries And Currants
Our readers will remember that long before the grafted gooseberries made such a sensation at the Centennial, the matter had been brought before them and the whole secret explained in detail by Mr. Cha...
-Harvard Botanic Garden
The report of Director C. S. Sargent to the president of the Harvard University, shows a healthy state of progress. The plants are being arranged in the grounds systematically. In the arboretum diffic...
-Col. Edward Wilkins
Few persons when enjoying the results of progress ever think of to whom they are indebted for so much of their pleasure and prosperity until they lose their friends, and then they stop to think of wha...
-A Generous Frenchwoman
Madame Henri Thuret has, at the price of two millions of francs, or four hundred thousand dollars, lately bought the garden of her deceased brother-in-law, in Antibes, on the coast of the Mediterranea...
-Hon. Morton Mcmichael
The Fairmount Park Commission, one of the most intelligent and honorable bodies connected with the government of Philadelphia, has met a severe loss in the death of Morton McMichael, who was one of th...
-An Address On Forestry
By Dr. John A. Warder. This was given before the Otoe County, Nebraska Horticultural Society on the twelfth of September, last year. It is full of practical matter pertaining to Western tree planting,...
-The Parks And Gardens Of Paris
By Wm. Robinson. London, McMillan & Co. Second edition, from Porter & Coates, Philadel. phia. Some years ago Mr. Robinson, the well known editor of the London Garden, wrote a series of letters from...
-Scraps And Queries. A Swindle
A Vermont correspondent writes: A German, giving his name as Chas. Beauleu, from Erfurt, Germany, has defrauded several florists in New Hampshire and Vermont by representing to have brought with him ...
-American Po3iological Society
It is well to remember that the biennial meeting of the American Pomological Society is to be held this year at Nashville, Tenn., and it is time Southern horticulturists especially are working up the ...
-March, 1879. Number 243. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
With March almost any flower seeds may be sown. Choose a time when the surface is a little dry, and the earth will powder under a slight blow. Sow the seeds shallow, barely covering them, but beating ...
-Communication S Beech Hedges
Mr. Miller has done good service by calling attention to the varieties of the Blood-leaved Beech for hedges. He is undoubtedly correct as to the seedling Blood Beeches reproducing themselves. When in ...
-The New Fasticiate Poplar
I translate from a letter lately received from Dr. Charles Bolle of Berlin, the following information concerning the fastigiate Silver Poplar, which has been called P. alba Bolleana, and which thanks ...
-Arundo Conspicua
Several years ago I was delighted to see a cut of this fine grass in the Garden, accompanied with the statement that it was hardy in Great Britain, and from the information thus received two New Engla...
-Arundo Conspicua Diceceous
Spikelets on female plants mostly five-flowered, pedicellate; glumes about equal in length and lanceolate with conspicuous middle nerves and bicuspidate tips; upper palets shorter than the hairs; the ...
-Art In Arboriculture
We have frequently suggested to our readers how much more pleasure they could derive from their gardens, if more effort were used in bringing out some of the peculiar features of trees and shrubs. We ...
-Legacies For Tree Planting
In the past time Philadelphians have seen the value of trees in cities. The legacy of Elliot Cresson, which was bequeathed in 1857, provides as fol-lows: I give and bequeath to the Mayor and communit...
-Absurd Practices
It is very often the case in horticulture, as well as in many other branches of human employment, that practices often continue after the reasons which induced them have long ceased to exist. It is sa...
-Landscape Gardening
The landscape gardener has in his mind a beautiful picture of the future, and he plants accordingly. The little scattered trees and bushes are put where they will work admirably fifty years hence. It ...
-Quercus Pannonica. Hungarian Oak
A remarkably handsome strong growing tree, one of the finest of oaks, with large deep-lobed leaves of a dark shining; green color. Quercus Pannonica Concordia One of the most effective and b...
-Yucca Gloriosa In Texas
A Mission Valley correspondent writes: A few years ago Yucca gloriosa was abundant on our prairies, and and seemed to me a prince in the floral kingdom. It diversified every landscape twenty-seven ye...
-Planting In The Philadelphia Squares
S. S. P., Philadelphia, asks: Can you tell me who is responsible for the planting of evergreens in our public squares located in the built up portion of the city, as they do not seem to learn by expe...
-March, 1879. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The fern offers itself as one of the best classes of plants to use in house and conservatory gardening. As a rule they are petted too much. There are some kinds which will only do under closely glazed...
-Communications. Orchid Culture
I have read with interest the articles of C. H. S., Baltimore, and others in your columns, regarding orchids and their culture. It is an encouraging sign, that a lively interest seems to have been at ...
-Peter Henderson Carnation
In reply to enquiry Carnation Peter Henderson, in November number we would say the new white perpetual Carnation Peter Henderson is distinct in foliage, growth and flower from any of the varieties n...
-Rose Culture For Winter Blooming
Prize Essay, offered by Mr. Peter Henderson, read before the New York Horticultural Society. At the regular monthly meeting of the New York Horticultural Society, held at the rooms of the society, ...
-Beautiful Fuchsias
It is to be regretted that persons do not oftener try their skill in growing line specimens, as well as in having good varieties. It is just here that true gardening skill comes in. The Fuchsia above ...
-Lantanas
It has always been a matter of surprise that the Lantana has not been more popular than it is in American gardens. Of one species, L.Camara there are now numerous varieties of white, orange and crimso...
-Rest And Labor
In the January Number of the Penn Monthly Dr. J. T. Rothrock, has an admirable article on our weak ones. He shows that the prevalent recommendation of absolute rest, when people feel bad is a mist...
-Cut Flowers
A correspondent inquires whether it is our advice that he build houses for cut flowers, and asks: will not the market become overstocked? We cannot advise; but for the question of overstock, only ...
-Varieties Of The Myrsiphyllum
Subscriber, Frankford, Pa., writes: It is claimed by a large and reliable florist that there is but one kind of smilax in cultivation, that any variation in size of leaf, etc, is owing entirely to ...
-Cool House Orchids
Mr. D. Barker, Norfolk, Va., writes: By this day's mail I send you specimens of two flowers, from the beautiful Laelia autumnalis, grown and flowered in an ordinary greenhouse, the night temperature ...
-Greenhouse Plants
J. B. Cedar Falls, Iowa, writes: I have two ivies standing among my roses in greenhouse, and I have been in the habit of occasionally watering them with soapsuds, as it is good for roses. But this Fa...
-March, 1879. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
When we read the many treatises on fruit tree culture, we are apt to be bewildered by what seems to be the contrariety of opinions; but it very often happens that these differences often harmonize, if...
-Communications. The Dewberry
I see the dewberry is coming into line, among our small fruits in the garden. It has long since held that deserved place in the grounds of N. H. Lindsley, a venerable nurseryman and inventor of Bridge...
-Ants In Florida
In the December number of the Monthly I notice the article advantages and disadvantages of Florida. As the writer wishes to know some method to get rid of the pests as he calls the ants, and I think...
-June Budding Peach Trees
W. K. T., Little Rock, Ark., writes: Would you please give us an article in the next issue of the Gardener's Monthly, giving the modus operandi of June budding peach trees, time of cutting buds, and ...
-Prickly Comfrey
I herewith send you a few roots of the genuine prickly comfrey which I imported a few weeks ago, with a few remarks of what I know about it as a forage plant in England, where I have seen it grown and...
-Peach Yellows
We have been favored with advance sheets of the Michigan Pomologi-cal Society's last meeting in which was a prolonged discussion on the Peach Yellows. An interesting letter from Mr. Byron D. Halsted, ...
-Cold Graperies
Since the advent of the California Grape in Eastern markets it seems to be taken for granted that it will not pay to force the foreign grape under glass. But this does not seem to apply to cold graper...
-Destruction Of Peach Buds
J. A. McK., Cynthiana, Ky., says : Observation for twenty-five years leads me to believe that 12 below zero of still air kills all the peach buds; that 18 injures young trees in a low situa...
-The Yellows In The West
Baird & Tuttle, Bloomington, Ill., write: Referring to the note in the January Monthly in regard to yellows in the peach tree, we would ask is not the disease confined to orchards from Eastern grown ...
-Peach Budding
J. A. McK., Cynthiana, Ky., asks: Will some of our experts tell me just the modern mode of budding. How it is that one can bud, with a tyer, anything like-five thousand peaches in a single day ? We c...
-Forestry. Communications. The Two Catalpas - A Memoir Of The Shavanon
(Intended for the Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Society, but received too late for reading). Having some years since been complimented by the vote of your excellent society with the privileges of hon...
-Trees By Mail
As a usual thing the farther one is away from railroad and express offices the greater will be the necessity for experimenting with trees, because these neighborhoods have seldom any kind of novelties...
-Something Done At Last
The public prints have been very urgent that something should be done to preserve or encourage forest planting. In Pennsylvania, Governor Hartranft was urged to recommend to the legislature that somet...
-Early History Of The Catalpa
The following very interesting note from Hon. Eli K. Price, one of the Commissioners of Fair-mount Park, regarding the early history of the catalpa, has been kindly banded for publication: I have ...
-Larch Timber
In our remarks on Mr. Sargent's notice of Mr. Fay's plantation in the last number, it was said: the Larch is profitable, but it is far less profitable than many other kinds of trees would be; on whi...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. The Rose Bug
In the plain, practical and excellent essay of Mr. Bennett on Rose Growing in Winter, among the Causes of Failure which he gives, he fails to make any mention of the rose bug, probably for the re...
-Conophallus Titanum
The Amorphoph-allus is now well known as a large and very interesting aroid. Since its introduction a much larger one, Godwinia gigas was found in Central America, and was as large as it was thought p...
-The English Sparrow In Washington
Professor C. V. Riley has written a letter to the Commissioners of the District of Columbia correcting some misapprehensions that have been circulated regarding his views of the English sparrow. He th...
-Pice A Macrocarpa
This described as Abies macrocarpa by Dr. Vasey in our pages some time ago, is thus referred to by Mr. Lemmon in a recent number of the Pacific Rural Press: Tsuga macrocarpa., Torr., or Tsuga Doug...
-Pinus Torreyana
A Pacific coast correspondent writes to us of the heavy weight of the cones of this piue, which grows in that region. He says that from curiosity he counted the number of seeds in a cone of average si...
-Honey Dew
Mrs. M. R., Mt. Pleasant. Iowa, says: I would like to enquire the cause of what I am told florists call ' honey dew,' a shiny substance, sticky, that comes on leaves; and the remedy. [In many cas...
-Self-Protection In Plants
Miss S. S. K., asks: The question ' how are plants protected from animals and unfavorable weather?' was referred to me by a botanical class to which I belong. I suppose, of course, it means naturall...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. The Nurseries Of Miller & Hayes
On a recent visit I was interested to notice how rapidly a wild piece of land may be made to blossom in beauty. Here which but a little over half a dozen years ago were nothing but corn fields, old ap...
-Plant Protection
We have a request to publish a series of articles on Plant Patents, which we have to decline, because we have already given a great deal of space to the subject, and see nothing new in the proposed ...
-Low Prices
As we desire to keep our reading pages as free as our advertising columns, we give the following just as it was received : It is always a pleasure to receive and read your Monthly, and I for one w...
-The Fairmount Park Commission
Hon. Alex. Henry has been appointed by the law judges of Philadelphia to the seat in the Board of Fairmount Park Commissioners, made vacant by the death of Mr. Morton McMichael. Like Mr. McMichael, Mr...
-F. R. Elliott
The recent death and burial in a pauper's grave at Cleveland, Ohio - a fate resultant from dissipated habits - should not prevent us from doing justice to the valuable services he rendered to horticul...
-Instructive Catalogues
It is wonderful what an immense amount of intelligent information is distributed in catalogues now, over what was to be found in them a quarter of a century ago. This has particularly struck us in loo...
-Nineteenth Report Of The Park Commission, Baltimore, Md
The parks are supported mainly by a tax on the passenger rail road companies. This source of income yielded $85,575.13 last year. The popularity of the park is attested by the figures 286,041 vehicles...
-Report Of The Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Society
President Hoopes and Secretary Engle have cause to be proud of the production of a volume like this. It is probably unique in beauty and value among any of the kind published, and this too in spite of...
-Proceedings Of The Worcester Co., Mass., Horticultural Society, For 1878
From E. W. Lincoln, secretary. This always comes welcomed to our tables because it is always full of information and valuable suggestions appropriate to all the country as well as to a small county in...
-Taste At Horticultural Exhibitions
The manner in which horticultural exhibitions are sometimes gotten up, is a caution to those who are strong for reform in artistic taste and beauty. Oftentimes the hall in which the ex. hibition is...
-Pennsylvania Fruit Grower's Society
This society held a very successful annual meeting at Reading. Mr. Josiah Hoopes, President, being unwell and absent, Mr. Henry M. Engle, of Marietta, Vice-President, presided. Valuable information wa...
-April, 1879. Number 244. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The English papers are deploring the fact that the rage for carpet bedding have turned away people's attention from other pretty styles of gardening, and some of them are therefore turning their shaft...
-Communications. Scraps
It is perilous to carry grading about a house into Autumn, inasmuch as late rains and early Spring rains will be likely to cut and furrow the surface, and when on a side hill, to wash away no inconsid...
-Anemones
Anemones which are among the oldest of garden favorites and which are highly prized in Europe, are very seldom met with in America even in large collections, yet all who see them when in bloom admit t...
-Skill As Displayed In Cardeninc
Although not a member I have had the pleasure of attending several of the meetings of the Germantown Horticultural Society. I was very much interested at a late meeting in the discussion which took pl...
-Landscape Cemeteries
In Mr. Robinson's Parks and Gardens of Paris reference is made to Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, as the first landscape cemetery established in the United States. If mere rural cemeteries as dist...
-Japanese Autumn Scenery
By and by when the tourist steps through Japan as he now does through America, he may not think our country the only one to admire for its gorgeous Autumn scenery. This is what we learn of Autumn colo...
-Parks As Educational Institutions
One of the Philadelphia newspapers recently had the following paragraph: It is also contemplated publishing a book which will contain the Latin and common name of each plant and tree, which will b...
-Bananas As Summer Bedding Plants
It is not as generally known as it ought to be that banana plants are very easily kept over the Winter, and make admirable ornaments in the open ground in the Summer season in every part of our countr...
-Variegated Honeysuckle
J.C.S.writes: I send a, leaf of honeysuckle from a branch which sported into variegated leaves, this being the only one which was variegated half yellow and half green, the others being spotted, not ...
-Celastrus Scandens
M. asks : Is it possible to have this plant so as to perfect its beautiful seed vessels without planting two together? A gardener tells me it is a dioecious plant, and one planted by itself will not ...
-April, 1879. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Out door gardening will soon claim so much attention and excite so much interest that the house plants will not receive as much looking after as formerly. It often becomes a question what to do with t...
-Hot Water Boilers
I was much pleased with Mr. Poppey's remarks on heating greenhouses with hot water. The paper has some merit if it does no more than induce gardeners to acquire that knowledge that we usually leave to...
-Insects On Roses
There are many little plagues to the rose culturist, especially to those who may have a few plants in pots. Dingee & Conard in their admirable guide to rose culture, just issued, have the following ...
-Orchids For Room Culture
We are not in the advance in the suggestion that orchids will in time become popular room plants, for we find in Mr. Grieves' catalogue the following list as having been found to do well under such ci...
-The American Banner Tea Rose
This is a striped rose, and is a sport from Bon Silene. It originated with Mr. Cartwright, of Dedham, Mass. The Isabella Sprunt which was a sport from Saffrano, and the white Bouvardia which was a spo...
-Greenhouse Location
A subscriber, Philadelphia, says: I have a space between two-houses where I am thinking about building a hot house; it faces south and stands back from the street. The sun strikes the west end about ...
-Pelargonium, New Life
A correspondent writes: H. Cannell's new geranium New Life, figured on page 330, November 1877, is now in bloom at the greenhouse of Mr. Daniel Barker, Norfolk, Va. It is indeed a novelty in the true...
-Forcing Roses
E. H. New Bedford, Mass., writes: I wish to ask a few questions to be answered through the columns of the Monthly. What is the proper thing to do with a collection of pot hybrid perpetual roses that ...
-April, 1879. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The injury to the grape vine by the phylloxera, does not seem as bad as it was a few years ago, probably from increase in the number of its parasitic enemies. At least we find grapes now doing tolerab...
-Communications. Crape Rot And Its Prevention
The disease known as grape rot has prevailed to an unusual extent the past two or three seasons in many parts of Ohio and several of the adjacent States. From what I have seen and learned I believe th...
-A Remedy For The Strawberry Louse
I read Charles Black's notes on the Strawberry Blight, in the January number of your invaluable journal with intense interest, for if the blight continues spreading and no remedy is found it will so...
-Mushroom Culture
The lecture of Mr. J. J. Smith, before the Germantown Horticultural Society recently, has stimulated inquirers in this neighborhood as to the best mode of culture. We have thought it might serve our r...
-A Sawdust Pudding
The Country Gentleman is cultivating the facetious. In a late issue it says: A correspondent of the Gardener's Monthly, living in New Hampshire, furnishes an example of a successful orchard, with ...
-Trick Of The Trade
A correspondent of the Michigan Farmer, complains in that paper that various persons are circulating reports about peach trees from here, or from there, or from the other place, having the yellows, ...
-The Yellows Law
It will be remembered that the peach growers of the Lake Shore of Michigan, believed that they could stamp out the yellows from Michigan by law, and so had an enactment by which any one harboring t...
-Asparagus In The South
Few people have an adequate idea of the great difference between gardening at the North, and gardening at the South. While the Northern people are worrying about what will stand the winters, the South...
-The Cabbage Worm
We see by the following note from P. M. K., Brookston, White County, Indiana, that the cabbage worm has at length reached that far west. The only comfort we can give our correspondent is, that in a ye...
-Forestry. Communications. Large Trees Of Connecticut
In the September number of the Gardener's Monthly, Mr. Gregory speaks of the old elm tree in Wethersfield, as one of great size. Though often noticed for its great size and. spreading branches, its im...
-The European Larch In Massachusetts
Twenty-four or more years ago the late Richard Fay, of Lynfield, Mass., planted about two hundred acres on his estate with forest trees, among which were the European Larch. In connection with the lat...
-Trees For Fire "Wood
If it does not pay to plant trees for family use in States where forests abound, it surely ought in those districts where there is no native woodland. The Greeley Tribune tells of a Mr. Hall of tha...
-The Pine Timber Of California
Mr. J. J. Lemmon says in the Pacific Rural Press, that the Red Silver Fir of the Sierras is Abies magnifica, grows 150 to 200 feet and has valuable timber. The color of the bark gives it the red n...
-Uses Of American Timber I'Rees
The Scientific Farmer says: The butternut is esteemed for the posts and rails of rural fences in America, for troughs for the use of cattle, for corn-shovels, and wooden dishes. Shellbark hickory prov...
-Papaw Bark
A correspondent of the Mobile Advertiser says: The trunk of the papaw would be valuable cultivated for its bark alone. As a fibre it must be far superior to the fibre of jute, and its yield is imm...
-Red Spruce Of The Rocky Mountains
What are known as common or English names, give a world of trouble, as there seems to be no end to their number or application. We have most of us settled down to the belief that the Red spruce of th...
-A Wisconsin Tree
The largest tree in Northern Wisconsin, stands on the land of Richard Bardon, on the bank of the Nemadjin River, a short distance below the mouth of Copper creek, in Douglas county. It is a white ced...
-Pinus Edulis
Mr. N. C. Meeker writing from the White River Indian Agency, has the following interesting note on the Pinion or Pinus edulis. It may be noted that the White River flows westward from the Rocky Mounta...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Carnivorous Plants
In the February number, Mr. C. W. Seeyle in reply to my article on this subject asks if by what I say, I mean to convey the idea that the Dionaea is not carnivorous. I reply to this, that the results ...
-Carnivorous Plants. #2
In the February number of the Gardener's Monthly I see that Mr. C. W. Seelye and Prof. Beal criticise the result, or rather the statement of the result of Mr. Henderson's experiments on Dionaea muscip...
-Mr. Henderson's Experiments
I have read the account of Mr. Peter Henderson's interesting experiments with Dionaea muscipula, published in the Monthly, and reproduced in many other horticultural and agricultural papers. In a r...
-Sciadopitys And Other Japan Plants
Mr. Thomas Hogg has placed me under no small obligation for the information he has given in regard to the first introduction of Cerci-dophyllum. I failed to notice this plant in his brother's exceedin...
-Notes From Washington Territory
We have now been nearly a year in this new land, and of course have observed all changes with interest. We found the spring like those of the East, a fickle season, permitting the sowing and planting ...
-The Aramingus Beetle
At a recent meeting of the Germantown Horticultural Society, Mr. Woodruff the well known florist, exhibited living specimens, and gave in detail an account of its ravages. As stated by Mr. Henderson r...
-Diclytra And Dicentra
A correspondent dissents from our suggestion that now it is certainly known that the botanist Borkhansen originally wrote Diclytra and not Dicentra, we ought to go back to the original name. It see...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Vindication Of The Plant Patent
This measure is alleged to be impracticable by its opposers, but the objection is not well founded. If the varieties could be identified the rights of the producers could be protected. That they could...
-Fradulent Practices
I am quite as strongly opposed to patent plants as you can be. At any time you desire I will cheerfully take the negative on this discussion, and point out wherein and why they would result disastr...
-Wrong Names To Plants
A correspondent calls attention to the many misnamed plants in public gardens as well as private, and gives many instances from the public gardens at Washington, such as Osmanthus ilicifolius for the ...
-The Adams Express Company
It is worth while reminding our readers, that when they send the editor any thing that they wish to prepay, by the Adams Express, the package should always be marked Paid through to German-town, oth...
-An A Wful Warning
Our readers may remember that we did not take kindly to the charge of the New York Tribune, that there was not one of its exchanges that did not almost live by stealing from its columns. And now w...
-Stephen Hoyt
At the good old age of seventy-nine, passed away in the last month of February, one of our best known and most respected nuserymen, Stephen Hoyt of New Canaan Connecticut. He was like so many of our b...
-Andrew M. Eastwick
Among the recent deaths is that of the above excellent gentleman, well-known as the purchaser of Bartram's celebrated botanic garden from the son-in-law and grand-daughter of America's early botanist....
-Flowers And Ferns Of The United States
The editor of the Gardener's Monthly would be very thankful to any friends who may chance to have seeds of any native flowers that may possibly interest him, in order to grow for artistic subjects for...
-Forest Tree Culture On Kansas Prairies-By Max G. Kern
While eminent men are endeavoring to prove that trees are not found on the Western prairies because the chemical constitution of the soil cannot possibly sustain them; and well meaning persons are sho...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society-Mr. James Cruickshanks
We are pleased to note that this society which Mr. Cruickshanks did so much to honor, gratefully passed the following resolutions so well due to his memory: Boston, February 3rd 1879. To the fam...
-May, 1879. Number 245. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Many people are very impatient to begin planting. If the sun shines warmly for a few hours they think it is almost too late to plant trees - even though the ground is half frozen. Practical gardeners ...
-Communications. A Living Tree Alphabet
I have been trying to arrange a tree alphabet so that a tree will stand for or represent a letter or figure, and can be planted so as to spell a name or commemorate an event. I find the initials of ou...
-Renewing Lost Leaders
Your suggestion in the February number -about protecting a tender evergreen leader by fastening to it a slender stick, reminds me of the method by which I renewed the leader of a Cor-sican Pine severa...
-Pentstemons
This genus of plants is so well known that any remarks would be useless; there are, however some of the handsomest members that have been but very sparingly, if at all, introduced to cultivators. Thes...
-Pentstemon Spectabilis
One of the handsomest species, growing two to four feet high. This variety is found on dry hill sides, blooms continually from May to October, - the dryer and more sterile the place the finer bloom; I...
-Yucca Cloriosa In Texas
I wish I could show you here a full-grown specimen of the Yucca gloriosa. It is quite common in this region, and is one of the first objects in the Texas vegetable world that attracts the attention of...
-Garden Notes
The French habit of trimming and cutting back trees in parks and gardens is to be avoided. But there are many effects to be attained by the knife, which deserve consideration. The Catalpa is not a com...
-The Hardy Pitcher Plants
Mr. Geo. Such, of South Amboy, has formed a full collection of the singular, and we may add, world-renowned Sarracenias, and thus describes them : Nothing in our houses proves more attractive than ...
-Sarracenia Drummondi Alba
The pitchers of this are two feet high, slender at the base and widening towards the top, - being shaped much like a tin fish-horn. They are mostly a fine green color, but towards the top are pure whi...
-Value Of The American Linden
The European Linden is so poor a tree in most parts of the United States, as to be rarely in demand now. The American Linden on the other hand, is one of the most popular and most valuable ornamental ...
-Cultivating Native Flowers
Miss Carrie Brown, in her report on botany to the Montgomery Co., Horticultural Society of Dayton Ohio, has this to say for plant culture at the soldiers' home of that city: Mr. Beck, the well-kno...
-Green House And House Gardening. Communications. Propacatinc Rare Plants
There may not be anything new in the following method of propagation; still as I never saw or heard of it before hitting on it, I thought there might be some of your readers like myself. It is near...
-Notes From 1878
Those who fail in the cultivation of ordinary window plants, should make use of their common garden shrubs for winter bloom. I have from Christmas till Spring, a fine show of Lilacs, Daphne, Deutzia g...
-Fine Cyclamens
Having been a careful reader of the Monthly from its first issue up to the present time, and knowing that its columns are open to everything that pertains to the interest of Horticulture, I venture to...
-Floral Notes From Texas
I send some photographs by the same mail as this. Photograph No. 1, beginning at the top : 1, Erianthus Ravennae; 2, Canna and Artemesia; 3, Celosia; and 4, white flowers of the Hibiscus Boo-Yong, tha...
-Sobralia Macrantha
A very beautiful and showy orchid from Guatemala. The flowers are of large size, about six inches across, of a beautiful purple and bright crimson color; only one flower is open at one time, but then ...
-The American Banner Rose
In your last number you seem to express a doubt of how the new striped Tea Rose, American Banner may hold to its description. To give you ocular evidence, I to-day send you two buds, making the statem...
-Habrothamnus Elecans
This beautiful plant is a native of Mexico, and belonging to the natural order Solanaceae, deserves more attention than it gets, for instead of attention from many it gets what the gardener terms pit...
-Floral Progress
The new type of fringed-leaved Coleus seems to be in a fair way to become varied and popular. During a visit to Mr. H. A. Dreer's country nursery last Fall, I noticed no less than eight different kind...
-Christmas Orchids
The increasing taste for Orchids and the higher demand for winter-blooming sorts have induced me to send you a list of those that are now in bloom in some of the gardens near Boston. The list of Mr. A...
-The Victoria Recia And Tropical Nymphaeas In The Open Air
Somewhat late in the spring of 1877 I obtained a young plant of the Victoria Regia. Having never seen this wonderful plant I determined to try the experiment of growing it in the open air. I built in ...
-Insect Powder
Wm Saunders of London, Ontario, well known for his horticultural experience, as well as distinguished as the editor of the Canadian Entomologist, finds the Dalmatian Insect Powder, made from Pyrethrum...
-Forcing Lily Of The Valley
Miss Carrie Brown of Dayton, Ohio, was very successful in blooming Lily of the Valley last Winter, and in response to a request from the Montgomery Co. Horticultural Society, gave the following note a...
-The Store-Plant House In Tower Grove Park, St. Louis
While making a hasty run last Summer through St. Louis on the way to the Rio Grande, the editor was kindly driven around Tower Grove Park by the controller Mr. Henry Shaw, and among other interesting ...
-New Tea Rose Madame Welch
The Bellevue Nursery Co. writes : We send by mail this day one bud of the New Tea Rose Madame Welch, grown by us at our nursery. The plant is in a four-inch pot, and we think that with good treatment...
-Croton "Queen Victoria"
This is said to be the first hybrid Croton that has been raised in England. It is the result of a cross between C. Weismannii and C. interruptum. It far exceeds in beauty any of the imported species o...
-Seedling Cyclamens
It is not generally known that Cyclamens will flower the first year from seed. With some remarkably beautiful flowers came the following note from Mr. D. Barker, of Norfolk, Va. : By this day's ma...
-Carnation, Peter Henderson
Mr. W. A. Bock, North Cambridge, Mass., writes: Noticing in your March number an article from. Messrs. Nanz & Neuner, of Louisville,. Ky., in which they state that they believe some Eastern florists ...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. June Budded Peach Trees
The saving of one year in the propagation of Peach trees having attracted the attention of nurserymen, I was induced to give June budding a trial. My first experiment upon two thousand proved very dis...
-Budding And After Treatment Of The Peach
In answer to J. A. McK., page 82 March number, he is at least twenty years behind on the budding business if 2000 is a hard days work; it is not at all difficult to find men here who can bud 3000, 400...
-Shelter For Orchards
We have noticed of late quite a number of articles in different publications in regard to shelter for orchards, the most of them taking the position that shelter, in a majority of cases, is injurious ...
-Grapes And Plants
There seems to be great difficulty found in growing grapes and plants together. I have had good success in growing both, and will give my experience to your correspondents, hoping it may be of some be...
-The New Grape Lady Washgngton
Having been associated for nearly two years with the originator of the Lady Washington, - Mr. J.H. Ricketts of Newburg, N. Y., - in cultivating and propagating his seedling grapes, and now being pecun...
-Papaw As A Fruit
A correspondent of the Mobile Advertiser says : The Papaw in its wild state is very popular as a fruit, most persons preferring it to the Banana, and still, strange to say no effort worthy of ment...
-Fig Culture
Mr. Geo. P. Needham of Washington, D. C, has given an essay, in winch he wonders why fig culture is not more general at the North. They only need a little winter protection. He says: In the Spring...
-The Tomato Disease
We learn from an exchange that in France, for several years past, the Tomato plant has been subject to a disease which ruins in a week the most promising planting. One writer insists that it is owing...
-Highland Beauty Apple
We have been favored by specimens of this new apple; it is small, about the size and general appearance of the well known Tewksbury Winter Blush. It is one of the sweet class, and a good apple. We a...
-Ricketts' Highland Grape
Most persons know of the famous Ricketts' Seedling Grapes. Unquestionably they are the greatest step forward grape improvement has made. It has been a source of trouble to many that improvers have not...
-The Le Compte And The Sand Pear
Mr. Chas. Downing writes : W. F. H., asks you if the Le Compte and Kieffer's Hybrid are identical ? They are not the same. They are quite distinct. Though the Le Compte is derived from the Sand Pear,...
-White Rosmarin Apple
Mr. F. J. M. Otto, Sandusky, Ohio, writes: I sent you with to-day's mail an apple, the grafts of which were imported from Tyrol by Mr. Grass of this place. Name of apple, White Rosmarin. In Austria t...
-Forestry. Communications. Vernacular Names Of Pacific Trees
Either you have quoted him very badly, or Mr. Lemmon makes some bad blunders about his Sierra trees. Abies magnifica is Red Silver Fir as he says; but the White Silver Fir is Abies concolor, which may...
-Timber Of Kentucky Coffee
Noticing your inquiry in the March number of the Gardener's Monthly in relation to the uses of Kentucky Coffee Tree timber, permit me to say it is one of the best varieties of timber for posts. It is ...
-Our Forests
Much has been said in Agricultural Societies in reference to the rapid cutting away of the full-grown trees in the forests. Some action has also been taken in the legislature to stimulate tree plantin...
-Common Names Of Pacific Evergreens
Mr. Lemmon says, in the Pacific Rural Press, that Monterey Cypress is Cupressus ma-crocarpa; Yellow Cedar, a valuable timber tree in the North, growing 80 to 100 feet high, Cupressus Nutkaensis; ...
-The Profits Of Tree Planting
While those who believe that it takes a whole lifetime to get a wood lot into profit, and who are spending no end of time and effort in getting legislation, the more practical are taking the advice ...
-Imitation Walnut Wood
The following very old plan of staining wood a walnut color is revived as new from a Belgian journal, but is as useful as if only discovered to-day: The wood, first thorougly dried and warmed, i...
-Timber Planting In Canada
We in the States often think that we shall have to look to Canada when our own supplies of timber are gone, but it would appear by the following from the Canadian Farmer's Advocate that they fear gett...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. A Few Magnificent Single Trees Of California
The feeling which moves us when we gaze upon a single tree which nature has planted and trained wholly without human interference, is akin to that lofty admiration which mountain heights, ocean depths...
-Dicentra Or Diclytra
When we were boys we only knew of the Diclytra. Some twenty or thirty years ago, we were told that the original name was Dicentra, that Diclytra came in only as a typographical error. Professor Gray...
-Introduction Of The Cercidiphyllum
Permit me through your columns to thank Prof. Sargent for his frank disavowal of any thought of claiming for his friend, Col. Clark, more than was his due. To explain how his words implied anything el...
-Fermentative Power Of The Papaw
The true Papaw is the Carica Papaya a West Indian fruit tree. That meat hung up in it speedily becomes rotten has been well known for ages. But now that a Dr. Wittmack, a learned German naturalist...
-The Winter On Evergreens
The attempts of the past age to fix the hardiness of plants by the thermometer are now admitted failures. Different seasons, though of the same temperature, affect differently different plants; but as...
-Arrangement Of Arboretums And Botanic Gardens
A correspondent says: Absolute sequence of the orders is a myth in any garden in the world, nor can they all be represented, and even were it possible the orders are too numerous and too tough for th...
-Double Thalictrum Anemonoides
A lover of wild flowers writes : The inclosed specimen I have thought to be a double variety of Thalictrum anemonoides. The plant grows from three to four inches in height, and has no stem leaves ex...
-Sugar From Ash-Leaved Maple
Mr. G. Wright writes: I send you to-day by mail, a small cake of sugar from Boxelder. My trees are eight or nine years old, and about six inches in diameter. Three trees gave twelve quarts of sap in ...
-Dicentra Spectabilis
J. K., West Chester, Pa., writes : I hope you will excuse a remark in regard to the Dicentra spectabilis. When my first plant bloomed, - and that is over twenty-five years since, - I invited the late...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Practicable And Impracticable Cardeners
A correspondent on page 105 of the April Monthly, presents as he asserts some pretty rough facts in regard to gardeners, but it invariably happens that there are two sides to every subject. Does the c...
-Fairmount Park Commission
We have letters occasionally condemning various matters of detail done in Fairmount Park, and with which correspondents we mostly sympathize. But we always take comfort when we consider how much wors...
-Ex-Mayor Henry
We learn that ex-Mayor Henry's public life did not terminate chiefly with the term of his efforts to stop the running of street cars on Sunday. He was elected twice afterwards, and moreover that hi...
-Fleur-De-Lis
According to Flowers and Ferns of the United States the selection of the fleur-de-lis as the national emblem of France, was thus brought about: It is asserted in the old legend that it was sent to the...
-Ferns In Their Homes And Ours
John Robinson, Salem, Mass. New candidates for public favor, in the shape of literary products, are often sent freely for editorial opinion; at other times they come through the editorial exchequer, a...
-Proceeding Of The Georgia State Horticultural Society
J. S. Newman, Atlanta, Secretary. Those who wish to be informed in Southern fruit culture, will find these proceedings almost indispensable. In a discussion on the Le Comte Pear, about which there was...
-Characeae Americanae
Illustrated and described by Dr. Timothy Allen, 10 East thirty-sixth street New York. This is a strictly scientific work; but in these days when a first class microscope is regarded as an essential pi...
-Northern Texas Horticultural Society
The adjourned meeting of the fruit growers took place at Sherman recently. The meeting was held in the court house, and the chairman pro tern., Jesse W. Bell, called the meeting to order at 2 P. M. Th...
-Hoticulture In Cincinnati
At the great exposition to be held in Cincinnati this Autumn, Horticulture has not been forgotten. The premiums are extremely liberal, many being one hundred dollars, and some three hundred dollars. W...
-American Pomological Society
The President Marshall P. Wilder, met with a serious accident, fracturing his leg by a fall down the State House Steps some weeks ago, while endeavoring to influence some legislation favorable to agr...
-June, 1879. Number 246. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
There is nothing in the whole range of American gardening that is the subject of so much solicitude as the proper care of the lawn. We envy the English, and are very apt to believe that if we sow good...
-Communications. Spring Flower Gardening
Among the opportunities which the climate of this country presents, and especially those portions of it which lie south of Philadelphia, there are few greater than those which Spring gardening prese...
-Annual And Biennial Flowers
The fashion of having fine colored leaved plants in masses, helps very much to adorn our flower gardens; but the pleasure which pretty and fragrant flowers bring is wanting, and it is gratifying to ev...
-Notes On Some Garden Trees And Shrubs
Scotch pines are fast failing here; the trunk is bored severely, and often large trees turn yellow and die without any sign of disease. As they so seldom make handsome trees when large, had we not bet...
-Rhododendron Culture
Around this neighborhood where shrub or tree planting is to be done, beds have to be made expressly to insure success. We have here three beds of Rhododendrons, and prepared a fourth last Fall for pla...
-The Tulip Tree
Mr. C. M. Hovey tells the Gardeners' Chronicle that the Tulip tree in America is not a very common tree in cultivated gardens; as Americans are proverbially in a hurry to get up shade trees, as they ...
-Hardiness Of Rocky Mountain Evergreens
It was a good winter to test the point made by Professor Sargent, that Abies Menziesii of Colorado is much better adapted to endure Eastern Winters than Abies Menziesii of the Pacific coast. We examin...
-Carbolic Acid And Weeds
As a weed destroyer, carbolic acid seems likely to prove a 'boon to gardeners. Such weeds as dandelions are killed by one application, the mode of applying it to destroy single plants being to make a ...
-The Virginian Creeper In Europe
It is interesting to see the striking use frequently made of this common creeper abroad, in letting it fall in immense sheets over walls, banks, bridges, and the like. On each side of the Palace of Sc...
-Carpet Bedding With Hardy Plants
A carpet bed near the entrance to Messrs. Veitchs' Coombe Wood Nursery is well worth notice, showing, as it does, what excellent effects may be obtained by the use of dwarf-growing hardy shrubs in wha...
-Gynerium Jubatum
This is a magnificent grass, with a flowing, mane-like inflorescence. The lateral branches of the plume are remarkable for their length and their graceful curvature, and the secondary branchlets are n...
-Pruning Evergreen Hedges
B., Cincinnati, writes: A few years ago my evergreen hedge was very beautiful. The top was so level as if it were a planed board, and the sides so upright that a plumb line would hardly touch a leaf....
-Green House And House Gardening. Communications. The Bon Silene Rose
In the Gardener's Chronicle of January 11th, page 55, R. B., of Philadelphia, speaks in glowing terms of the Rose Bon Silene. Now, Mr. Editor, the Bon Silene is an old rose, known to me and has been i...
-Odontoglossum Rossii And Cattley A Citrina
In the list of Orchids (April number, page 107), you do not include by name the above pretty species of Odontoglossum as suitable for parlor culture, though you refer in a general way to the value of ...
-Boilers
In the February number of the Monthly appears as sensible an article upon the heating of greenhouses as I have seen for some time. F. W. Poppey, the writer of the article, evidently has given the subj...
-About Roses
I send you a copy of a letter which explains itself. The author has charge of one of those beautiful estates near Poughkeepsie, N. Y. He is the most successful cultivator of the rose that I ever met w...
-Veltheimia Viridiflora
This is one of the rare flowers, seldom successfully treated by amateurs; with me it blossomed finely this Spring. As it may be of interest I will give my method of treatment. It will hardly be nec...
-The Philodendron
One of the most easily grown climbers is the Philodendron. It is adapted to a cool conservatory or a bay window, as well as to a warm greenhouse. Its large split leaves are a novelty in vegetation sur...
-A Large Heliotrope. By. Mr. Thos. Lawrance, Ogdensburg, N. Y
I have noticed that you invite descriptions of large or interesting plants, and therefore send you a description of a large and productive Heliotrope; I have had it nineteen years. It is trained espal...
-Cinerarias From Seed
As the culture of the Cineraria has reached such eminence in England, the following note on raising them from the London Gardeners' Chronicle, will be acceptable to our readers : The most popular ...
-Orchid Importing
Two of the largest consignments of orchids that have probably ever beeh made, have recently been received by Mr. William Bull, and it must be gratifying to orchid cultivators to know that their condit...
-History Of The Chinese Primrose
The Chinese Primrose as it first appeared in our gardens in 1821, the date of its introduction from China, was a very different flower from that which we now commonly cultivate under that name. Much s...
-Nephrolepis Davallioides Furcans
The taste for ferns, now so general, makes the introduction of any striking variety very acceptable to lovers of these graceful plants. The one we now illustrate belongs to a genus very well known, on...
-Rose, Hybrid Perpetual, E. Y. Teas
The Garden has a colored plate of this beautiful rose, with the following remarks by George Paul: E. Y. Teas is, perhaps, the finest shaped of any of the Hybrid Perpetuals, and no prettier sight c...
-Beautiful Roses
With some remarkably beautiful roses which we suppose to be Niphetos, we have the following note from Mr. Daniel Barker, of Norfolk, Va: I send you by this day's mail, sample of rose buds the same ki...
-Cyclamens In One Year
It is not gener-erally known that good flowering plants can be had in one year. Mr. Daniel Barker sends some nice photographs on one of which there appears dozens of flowers, and which would not be th...
-June, 1879. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Fruit trees are often thought to be injured by over-bearing, and so they are; but very often bearing trees break down sooner than they would do by having been permitted to bear 'sprouts from t...
-Communications. The Japan Persimmon
In a recent number you enquire in regard to the hardiness of the Japan Persimmon in New York. I will give my brief experience of it here. Last Spring I ordered two trees of different varieties, carefu...
-The Brandywine And Pearl Raspberries-Are They Identical? By J. A. Donaldson, St. Joseph, Mich
In the September number of the Horticulturist for 1869, I find the following editorial, taken from the Practical Farmer: At Reese Pyatt's, on the West Chester road, about twelve miles from Philadelph...
-Pear Trees
No trees have disappointed us like pears. They frequently bear a good crop a few years and then fail. That most excellent pear, the Lawrence, is generally cracking and covered with a fungus like its-r...
-Remarks On A Few New And Old Fruits
Of all the Winter apples we have seen none excel in profuse bearing the Smith's Cider. It is not a rapid grower, especially in the nursery, but it is a beautiful fruit, not of the highest flavor, but ...
-Hardness Of The Japan Persimmon
A few years ago I purchased a dozen Japan Persimmon plants, desiring to be ahead in possessing so reputable a novelty. I kept one plant under protection during the Winter season, and left the rest out...
-How I Was Ruined By A Cooseberry
My name is Smith. The family name is old and honorable. We are very proud of it. It has been traced back to Shem, one of the sons of Noah, with the usual philological modifications. Three brothers of ...
-Peach Culture
The peach growers of Michigan seem to be in a great way about the yellows. I neither see nor hear of it here now, but before peach growing became a science, trees were planted in any kind of soil and ...
-Making Gardens Pay
The English Crystal Palace Company is having the experience unfortunate amateurs often have. We, in this country, often see that when a gentleman finds himself in straightened circumstances he rarely ...
-Adaptation To Circumstances
The great art of gardening is not so much a great stock of experience as in the ability to so profit by experience, as to adapt one's knowledge to varying circumstances. In Great Britain with its mois...
-Productive Strawberries
A paragraph going the rounds of the newspapers says that Mr. P. T. Quinn gathered from one acre of ground on his farm at Newark, 5,487 quarts of strawberries, which netted him in the New York market, ...
-A Strawberry Protector
It is a cheap baked clay saucer, twelve to thirteen inches in diameter, with a hole in the center. The advantages claimed by its use are : A much larger crop; much finer berries; cleaner, and free fro...
-The Jucunda Strawberry
This variety seems to have many ups and downs. When first introduced from Europe, it was soon given up as worthless. Mr. Knox, of Pittsburg, gathered together all the varieties he could find for exper...
-Fruit Troubles
When any of our fruit growers have a little trouble to raise fruit, they generally wish that they could do as they do in Europe. But there too they have enemies to fight, and this is what a correspo...
-History Of Delaware Peach Growing
A correspondent of the Philadelphia Press says : About the time that the great Clayton made his famous boast about Delaware and peach brandy and died, there were some folks who were dimly beginning t...
-Fine Plum Orchard
Some weeks ago we noticed the plum orchard of Judge Ramsdell, of Traverse City, Michigan, an account of which was given by Prof. Beal in the Rural New Yorker. The orchard consists of 700 trees, set tw...
-Grafting Wax
Yellow wax, one pound nine ounces; black pitch, three pounds two ounces; white pitch, three pounds two ounces ; tallow, five ounces. Place the whole in an earthen pipkin over a gentle fire, stirring i...
-Disease In Strawberries
E. S. B., Bristol, Pa., says : In the January number of the Monthly I read Chas. Black's theory of the strawberry blight being caused by the presence of lice on the roots. I shall not demur from such...
-A Wonderful Head Of Lettuce
C. B. Fairchild, Raleigh, North Carolina, sends us a head of lettuce weighing three lbs. It was hard, crisp, and excellent eating. Mr. F., thinks it a distinct variety, and we are inclined to think he...
-The Water Apple
A Bucks County, Pa., correspondent says: The Water Apple is the best apple to plant in low frosty places. I have never seen them injured by frost. Freezing has done more damage in our neighborhood th...
-Disease In Grape Vines
Geo. C, Whit-insville, Mass., writes: I send to your address by this mail, a few grape vine roots, packed in damp moss, taken from a vine border I made six years ago when the vines were planted. The ...
-Forestry. Communications. Large Trees On Long Island
I enclose some slips from a Long Island paper written by Elias Lewis, of Brooklyn, an active member of the L. I. Historical Society, who has made many trips through Long Island noting its geological a...
-A Large Eucalyptus
The exact figures of the Giant Blue Gum of Australia are seldom met with. The Queenslander notes the cutting of a giant Eucalyptus felled in the Dandenong Range, Australia, that had attained the heigh...
-Timber Planting In Massachusetts
The Massachusetts Legislature a few months ago enacted that all plantations of timber trees in this commonwealth, upon land (not at the time of said planting woodland or sprout land, and not having b...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Are Plants Fed Through Their Leaves? By Mr. Peter Henderson
The discussion about the insect eating plants, has brought this in as aside issue, though one of far more practical importance to horticulture than the main question. I know that the position I a...
-Experiments In Cross-Breeding Plants Of The Same Variety
The following article we copy from the American Journal of Science and Arts for May. It formed part of Professor Beale's lecture given last Winter before the farmers' institutes. With reference to it,...
-Experiments With Indian Corn
Yellow dent corn was obtained from two men in different portions of Michigan. In one case the corn had been kept ten years or more on the same farm, and in the other case fifteen years or more on the ...
-Crossing Black Wax Beans
There were, as shown in the plat below, eight short rows two feet apart, with the plants finally thinned on July 10th to five plants about fifteen inches apart in the row. The seed for half the rows (...
-Fruiting Of Wistaria Sinensis
In a note on the fruiting of Wistaria sinensis in Europe communicated to the Linnaean Society, by Mr. W. T. Thiselton Dyer, the author avers, from his own and others' observations, that plants trained...
-Atmospheric Currents
It is one of the misfortunes of meterology, that authors with little knowledge of the related sciences are among its chief leaders. Just now a translation of a work by Professor Schouw, called Earth,...
-Botanic Garden Arrangements
A correspondent remarks : What you say of Botanical Garden arrangements is true. I have seen leading ' Physic departments' connected with some of the leading Botanic gardens of Europe, and they are g...
-The Smallest Orchid Known
Baron Von Mueller has recently announced the rediscovery, after a lapse of twenty years, of a minute creeping orchid, highly remarkable for its extremely small disk-like leaves. This little plant, whi...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Notes And Queries
Why not have a department of the Monthly for Notes and Queries? The following may do for a commencement: A fine large Marechal Neil Rose was sent to a lady this season, and proved so remarkably h...
-Distinguishing Varieties For Protective Laws
I presume Mr. Eugene Glen is the author of the phrase novelty entitling to protection, and if so to him must you look for the definition you require. Also I refer you to Downing's work Fruit and Fr...
-A Rare Chance For Fine Orchids
It is a received maxim that money invested in Orchids is equal to a chance in a good gold mine. The larger they grow the more they are worth, as they increase but slowly under culture, and there are b...
-Prof. Reichenbach
This distinguished botanist, author of the celebrated work the Illustrated Flora of Germany, died on the 17th of March last, in the 87th year of his age. Prof. C. F. Reichenbach, known especially...
-Report Of The Fruit Growers' Association Of The Province Of Ontario, 1878
D. W. Beadle, St. Catharines, Secretary. Dr. Burnett, in his annual address, believes that the difficulties attending fruit growing are steadily on the increase. These difficulties, as we gather fro...
-Mr. E. S. Band
Mr. Rand, as is well known, made a trip to Brazil, a couple of years ago, with the intention of returning in a few months, but he has concluded to remain there longer yet. He seems quite enraptured wi...
-The Fourth Annual Meeting Of The American Association
The annual meeting will this year be held at Cleveland, Ohio, commencing June 18th. The meetings of this association grow in interest yearly. It is composed of the leading men in the nursery trade, an...
-July, 1879. Number 247. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
A respected correspondent thinks our remarks on lawns were not perfect. He believes it is a mistake to leave the mowings on the grass. It shades and weakens the finer grasses, and in this way assists ...
-Communications. How To Treat Evergreens
I have read in a recent number of your interesting magazine, the statement of a writer who thinks it is necessary to take great care of the leading shoots of evergreens. He seems to regard the acciden...
-Caracana Arborescens
You have before called attention to the desirability of this shrub in collections, on account of its beauty when in flower. A correspondent writing from Winnipeg, Manitoba, praises it for its extre...
-The Arrangement Of Lawns
(Read before the Germantown Horticultural Society). A lawn, in order to fulfil its proper use of beautifying a place, must be well made at first, and, thereafter, kept in perfect order. While it sh...
-Propagating Mistletoe
There seems to be no difficulty about this when there is not too much trouble taken. A correspondent of the London Gardener's Chronicle thus describes how he does it: In February last I sowed some se...
-A Late Magnolia
Magnolia hypoleuca has been mentioned and commended more than once, for many noteworthy qualities. It is late, blooming in mid-June, creamy-white like con-spicua, and moreover, of a scent so sweet tha...
-European Bedding Plants
The Gardener's Weekly, gives the following as the most popular bedding plants in the London Park. Alternananthera spathulata, paronychyoides, major, amoena, spectabilis, magnifiea, versicolor, amab...
-The Deutzias
The Deutzias in nurseries are not well understood; the following from the American Agriculturist, is timely, and will help to clear up the confusion : The various Deutzias are among my favorite fl...
-Green House And House Gardening. Communications. Bottom Heat
This term in common practice is only made use of in those cases, where the temperature of the soil in which the plants grow, is artificially raised above that which we find naturally in it, and there ...
-About Potting
It is curious that flower lovers should so often lack the potting instinct. A neighbor brought me a pot of Dwarf Ageratum, complaining that it had stood all Winter without growth. I examined the dish ...
-Perennial Mignonette
That the Mignonette is truly a perennial plant, is forgotten by those who grow it every where from seed. The following from the London Garden is an index of its true perennial character: The comm...
-Daphnes For Window Culture
The Gardener's Chronicle says: Few plants are more worthy of culture for conservatory decoration during the winter months than Daphne in-dica rubra. The glossy green foliage and rich rosy flowers are...
-Popular Bouquet Flowers
Speaking of a Royal marriage last Spring, the London Gardener's Chronicle gives the following details, which may serve to show of what flowers the most Royal bouquets are made in the Old World at th...
-Double-Flowered Ivy-Leaved Pelargoniums
The introduction of M. Liebmann's double-flowered form of the Ivy-leaved Pelargoniums, Konig Albert, some few years ago was a pleasant surprise, being the commencement of a new class of highly ornamen...
-New Abutilons
The Gardener's Chronicle says : The dwarf habit and free-flowering character possessed by the newer Abutilons, render them very useful for various decorative purposes. One of the most attractive v...
-Dracaena Elegantissima
There are few things so useful for room decoration, or for any kind of decoration where there are strong architectural surroundings as the various kinds of Dragon's Blood plants, or Dracaenas. These a...
-Gloxinia Disease
Waverly, Baltimore Co., Md., writes : I have for several years with much pleasure and satisfaction cultivated the Gloxinia. The bloom of a good collection of these plants has a charm so peculiar an...
-Abutilon Darwini
M. S., Pittsburg, Pa., asks : Is the Abutilon Darwini noticed in the last Monthly new? I never heard of it before. It should be worth growing by what you say of it. [It is not exactly new, and ou...
-Variegated Aloe
S. B. B., Warrenton, Va., says : I have an Agave which is quite a curiosity. It was last season a large plant of A. Americana var. For some reason the bud died; it made a new one in a short time, bu...
-Blooming Of Window Flowers
Miss W., Phila., says : There has been a question submitted to me, viz., ' Why do plants bloom better when pot-bound ?' I have looked in a number of books but have not been able to find an answer. I ...
-Seedling Geraniums
S. B.B., Warrenton, Va., sends us samples of seedling Geraniums of that class once known as Scarlets, but now known as Bedding Geraniums. There are now such an immense number of these that it wi...
-July, 1879. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
As already noted color in fruit is a criterion of good culture. So far as out-door grapes are concerned, they are too often allowed to bear too many bunches, when very fine fruit is desired. A good st...
-Communications. Asparagus
A few years since, I repeated in your journal a new way that had been told me of growing asparagus. It was based on the idea that asparagus yearly made new roots from its annual stalk, and a new crown...
-Hardiness Of The Japan Persimmon
J. R., Cincinnati, Ohio, says: Japanese Persimmon was tried in S. S. Jackson's nurseries this last Winter, and was killed. He had several kinds. I wrote to you that my only surviving Japan Persim...
-Cracking Of The Pear
It is generally supposed by American pear growers that Europe is the paradise of fruit growing, but in truth they have their peculiar troubles as we have ours; indeed they have many troubles of a kind...
-Large Strawberries
Philadelphia was this season supplied with an immense quantity of large and luscious strawberries, reminding us of the days when Knox brought in his immense crops of Triomphe de Grand and Jucundas. Al...
-July, 1879. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Scraps And Queries
Injury from Seventeen-year Locust. A Western Missouri correspondent writes: What are called the seventeen-year locusts are hatching out here in great numbers and we would enquire whether they do much...
-Peach Yellows In Michigan
An intelligent South Haven correspondent writes : I have read some things from your correspondents in Illinois in regard to peach trees, which I should have liked to answer. ' The Vagaries of the Pe...
-Timber Growing In The West
Taking up a copy of Marshall on Gardening, published nearly a' hundred years ago, the author predicts that at the rate of destruction of timber trees in England the whole supply will be exhausted ui...
-Catalpa Timber
In many newspapers articles continually appear, warning people against planting anything but the hardy Catalpa. A nurseryman recently showed us a letter from a Georgia gentleman, ordering only the ...
-Forest Fires
Forest fires require more looking after than the woodman's axe. It is a difficult question to decide what to do. It has been suggested that premiums should be paid to those who put them out before the...
-Arboricultural Theology
Generally we read what horticulturists write, perhaps for a whole life time, without being able to detect the political or theological opinions of the writers. But in an address by one of our distingu...
-The California Walnut
Mr. W. C. L. Drew has a good word for this tree, in the Rural New Yorker he says : Trees of this kind were found growing only in one locality in the foot-hills of the Sierra Nevada, but from ther...
-The Blue Gum In California
A correspondent of the Pacific Rural Press controverts the statement made that the Eucalyptus though growing fast is useless as a forest tree. He says: In the gum forest near Haywards, in April, 1877...
-The English Walnut In California
The Pacific Rural Press says: Experience with the English walnut has taught us to regard it as one of the most beautiful and rapid growing trees for purposes of shade yet introduced on this coast. I...
-Our Future Timber Supply
The Journal of Commerce says: The three States of Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota are the only ones that have a supply of timber beyond their own necessities, and at present rate of consumptio...
-Black Walnut; Important To The Cabinet Trade
The N. W. Lumberman of Chicago says: There has been much said of - late about the rapid exhaustion of the supply of black walnut timber in this country. Sensational newspaper writers and hard-fisted...
-William Penn And Forestry
Frutex, Philadelphia, writes: In one of Dr. Rothrock's Fairmount Park Lectures it is stated that there was provision made by William Penn, July 11th, 1681, ' that in clearing the ground, care be t...
-Sowing Timber Trees
T. B., Leavenworth, Kansas, writes: A friend of mine in a part of this State where there is no timber, wishes the Gardener's Monthly to advise him whether it is better to sow seed of timber trees whe...
-Destruction Of Forests
A California correspondent says: There is a very sensible article in the Nation of the 1st inst., on the Present and future of the Sierra Forests, by Prof. C. S. Sargent, Director of the Botanic ...
-Natural History And Science. Communicat/Ons. Carnivorous Plants
Our venerable friend and florist Mr. P. Hen-deson, puts things very nicely in his argument that plants do not feed through the pores of the leaves. Still, Mr. Editor I have to take sides with you and ...
-Fertilization By Bees
A paragragh has been circulating in the newspapers for the last few years and it appears as if it is to continue. As I stumble over it every month or two, I do not quite understand it, and would like ...
-Of Snakes Swallowing Their Young
In reading the Gardener's Monthly just come to hand, I note the passages referring to the curious fact that snakes, at least of some sorts, will swallow their young while they are very small to protec...
-The Crape Phylloxera
The fact that about two hundred and eighty tons of California grapes were received and sold in the markets of Philadelphia during the past season, is sufficient to show that the grape interest in this...
-A Formic Duel
Going one day last Summer to my barn, I was startled by finding a genuine duel in progress on the threshold of the open door. The two largest ants that I am sure I ever saw were in a fierce contest ap...
-Chinese Botanical And Horticultural Literature
A writer in Der Deutsche Garten states that the imperial library of China contains 15,000 works on the cultivation of flowers and botany, whereof about 500 are devoted to the Rose alone. Such quantiti...
-The Effects Of Drought On Plants
The amount of drought some plants will bear with impunity is surprising. Dr. G. Schweinfurth, in Petermann's Mittheilungen, gives an account of his recent journey across the Arabian desert, from Helua...
-Annual Orchids
The general newspaper office, often has handy men in connection therewith who will on the shortest notice write a highly interesting article on subjects they know nothing whatever about. A good ency...
-Salt Lake And Tree Planting
The writer of this was probably among the first to show that the ideas of Humbolt and others, as collected by Mr. Marsh, in his work, that the cutting away of forests, however deplorable from many poi...
-Phenomenal Growth
T. T. S., Roches-ter, N. Y., writes : My attention was attracted this morning, (June 7th,) by the appearance of a Seckel pear tree in my garden. On examination I found a perfect blossom on the end of...
-Talinum Teretifolium
Dr. Peyre Por-cher, of Charleston, S. C, and author of that excellent work, the Resources of the Southern Fields and Forests, writes regarding the statement in Meehan's Flowers and Ferns of the Uni...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Notes And Queries-No. 2
English naturalists are speculating anew as to rats gnawing lead pipes to get a drink; some think they can hear the water running, while others believe they gnaw the lead because their incisors like t...
-Are Plants Fed Through Their Leaves? By Mansfield Milton, Youngstown, Ohio
It is not always the person who has the largest experience in any particular branch of industry, that is the closest observer and possesses the most knowledge of it in every particular. In the cultiva...
-The Wild Flowers Of South Carolina By Mrs. D. W., Summerville, S. C
A friends of yours has kindly sent us this year's numbers of your Gardener's Monthly which have given us the greatest pleasure, so much so, that I am induced to write about a pineland in South Carolin...
-Mysteries Of The Mail Bags
A few days ago the writer received per mail several mysterious looking packages, bearing the post mark of Ranch, Utah, the headquarters of the famous plant collector, Mr. A. L. Siler. Suspecting what ...
-Notes About Trees
The natives of the island of Otaheite, relate a touching legend in regard to the origin of the breadfruit tree. Once upon a time, when there was a famine in the land, a father assembled his numerous c...
-Editorial Traveling Notes. #1
I love New Jersey. It is fashionable to joke about her. Some tell us she was made of the pieces left from the manufacture of other States. It is true there are scenes which you can find in any State o...
-Horticultural Law
The law notes of English Horticultural papers furnish curious reading. Here is one man who had some yew trees in his garden, the branches of which hung into the highway. Some one's horse ate some and ...
-The Pitury Plant
The Peruvians chew the leaves of the Coca (Erythroxylon Coca), and can live without food for days. The natives of Central Australia have a plant they call Pitury which has similar properties. Baron...
-A Popular California Flora
By Vol-ney Rattan, San Francisco, published by A. L. Bancroft & Co. The flowers of California have been described in so many different and generally inaccessible works, that it is no little trouble fo...
-Moore's Rural Life
Mr. D. D. T. Moore, well known as the very successful originator and for many years the editor of Moore's Rural New Yorker, is now at the head of a new venture, with the title above. It is of a very h...
-Letter From Washington Territory
Mrs. Fanny E. Briggs, writes: There is an error in my last letter in the Gardener's Monthly, which I should be very glad to see corrected. It is on page 121. What I wrote was this: ' Who is it that s...
-Essays And Discussions At Horticultural Meetings
Most of our societies now have in connection with exhibitions, short essays of fifteen minutes or so on some practical questions of general interest. At the March meeting of the Maryland Horticultural...
-Premiums At State Fairs
Referring to the forthcoming exhibition of the Pennsylvania State Agricultural Fair, a correspondent says: They do some things better in London in the matter of prizes for an agricultural fair, an...
-August, 1879. Number 248. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The many beautiful effects that may be produced by Coleus and other leaf plants, are not to be overlooked; but the pleasure which hardy flowering plants give is more fully recognized with each succeed...
-Communications. Protection To Trees
It certainly is trying to our tempers after we have planted our trees and bedding plants to have them uptorn by cattle or scratched out by an industrious biddy. To guard the trees and hedges from the ...
-Management Of Lawns
Your remarks on lawn culture in the June number no doubt deserve the premium you so modestly claim, but I wish you had added a few words on how to secure a good first catch of grass in making a lawn...
-Sedum Acer Aureum As A Carpet Plant
Visitors to the Chiswick Gardens of the Royal Horticultural Society will perceive that Mr. Barron has used this most useful Winter and Spring decorative plant in a very serviceable way by employing it...
-Insects On Elm Trees
Rev. J. I., Salem, N. J., writes : I was deploring in Philadelphia the other day to a friend the probable loss of some beautiful elm trees in our church yard, when he said at once, 'why do you not w...
-Injury To Trees
H. W. S. says: I send you enclosed a few specimens of this year's growth of Deodar Cedar, Scotch Larch, Golden Norway Spruce and the American Hemlock, and also Mahonia, as representing more or less a...
-Notes On Garden Plants
F. H., New Bedford, Mass., writes: 1. I send you to-day a specimen of double daisy, Bellis perennis. I never saw one with quilled petals before; did you? I fancy it is something entirely new: is ...
-The Best Time To Transplant Trees
A Shellburne Falls, Massachusetts, subscriber asks whether it is best for her to transplant trees in the Fall or Spring. It is very much a question of exposure. If in a very cold windy place trees wil...
-August, 1879. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Ferns will be about maturing their spores at this season, and as they are seldom of any value to the plant after this, they may be cut off at once, and this will hasten the growth, and help the appear...
-Communications. Abutilons - Specses And Varieties
Your correspondent C. E. P. asks as to the difference between Abutilon mesopotamicum and A. vexillarium. A. mesopotamicum as I understand it, bears scarlet and yellow flowers : is of a drooping or sem...
-Noxious Insects
There are a great variety of insect pests that infest plants, but green-fly and red-spider are most to be dreaded by the window-gardener. Here, as in most other cases, prevention is better than cure...
-Washingtonia Filifera
The Washingto-nia of Kellogg, as applied to the mammoth tree of California having failed because the distinction between it and the prior genus Sequoia not being maintained. Wendland a noted authority...
-Increasing Love For Flowers
Col. Forney's Progress says of flowers in Philadelphia : A love of flowers is spreading throughout the whole community with surprising rapidity, and the evidences of this new fondness are seen on...
-Chinese Primroses
We are glad to see attention given to selecting forms and colors of these popular plants, as there is no reason why there may not be as many kinds with this plant as there are with Cinerarias or othe...
-Lopezia Coronata
For many years we continued to call attention to the simple but yet rare beauty of the Lopezia as a Winter blooming plant. In spite of our recommendation it has been allowed to disappear, and we shoul...
-Livistonia Australis
It is the most southern Palm of the Australian continent,, reaching the snowy range in latitude 37 30' S. when its trunk attains eighty feet in height, and extending thence along the west coast...
-Cissus Endresii
Most of our readers know by this time Cissus discolor, which, a hothouse plant in England, delights to be treated as a Summer Vine in the open air of our country. One of the prettiest sights of thi...
-Xanthisma Texanum
A very handsome Centaury-like hardy annual, with golden flowers, discovered in Texas some fifty years ago, and since found by many collectors, but never introduced into European gardens till within t...
-Raspberry-leaved Pelargoniums
Sweetness and elegance, combined with such freedom of growth and vigor of constitution as permits, without injury, foliage and flowers to be cut in abundance, will always render this Pelargonium a fav...
-Stag's Horn Fern
J. S. R,, Chicago., Ills., says . In walking with a friend through her conservatory, our attention was directed to a fern which she said was 'The Stag's Horn Fern,' but which I had always known as th...
-Plants for Back Walls of Greenhouses
F. B., Baltimore, asks: Would you recommend a Stephanotus for a back wall of a conservatory ? I see it recommended in a paragraph copied from an English paper. Will it do as well here as in English g...
-August, 1879. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The cherry crop has been more than usually good in most places this year; and even the birds have had to rejoice and seem to sing cherry-ripe in every note. But the bird trouble is getting to be a s...
-Communications. Asparacus Culture
In your July number your correspondent,. Gen. W. H. Noble, strikes the right key note regarding the culture of asparagus. Abraham Tan Sicklen, of Jamaica, Long Island, is one of the best growers of as...
-Asparacus - Try For Better Kinds From Seed
There is a future for asparagus as sure of reward to our effort as by its food supply. That lies in the search for better kinds. The Cono-ver's is the first well defined heralded advance from the old ...
-Inarching Crape Vines
A vagrant vine of Isabella that came straying over to a trellis by which I had recently planted some vines, entwined a vine of feeble habit, and thus suggested to my mind the idea of joining the robus...
-Remedy For The Colorado Beetle
I do not know if among the many things you cultivate you include the growing of potatoes. But if you do I would like to suggest among the remedies for the Colorado beetle the use of kerosene. I do not...
-Disease In Raspberries
In our travels recently we came on a gardener who believed he had discovered the cause of a common disease in raspberries. Half of a row was making no canes for next year, the leaves had a curled up l...
-The Hornet Raspberry
One of the most beautiful sights in the fruit line that we have seen for a long time, was a block of Hornet raspberries on the grounds of the venerable P. R. Freas, the fifty-year editor of the Ger...
-Grub In The Vegetable Garden
Constant reader says : I have been considerably troubled in my garden with a grub, the name of which I cannot give. A full grown one being about two inches long, white with reddish head. Last year...
-Sexes Of Asparagus
It is now many years ago since we made the readers of the Gardener's Monthly acquainted with the fact that the sexes of asparagus were on separate plants; that is to say that it was dioecious, and the...
-Preserving Grapes Till April
The Pacific Rural Press says : Grapes in April were on exhibition at the store of Strong & Williamson, on Clay Street. The fruit has been preserved in the powdered bark of the sugar pine, and is, in t...
-Pears For The English Market
England is famous for its hothouse fruit, but does little in the out-door article. The Garden says that a great proportion of the best dessert pears seen in the English markets are imported from Franc...
-Japan Persimmons
The California nursery catalogues are full of the Japan Persimmon. They issue colored illustrations, one of which exhibits the fruit as large as a full sized Baldwin apple, and as rich in color as a T...
-Beckert's Prolific Strawberry
J. B., Allegheny, Pa., writes : We express you this-morning a basket of our seedling strawberries, 'Beckert's Prolific,' a cross between Wilson's Albany and Jucunda. We claim for it size same as Jucu...
-Forestry. Communications. Forest Culture
The Gardener's Monthly for May contained a well written article entitled Our Forests, to which I desire to make a short reply. In many respects I agree with the writer. All that he says about forest...
-Annual Rate Of Growth In Trees
At a recent meeting of the Torrey Botanical Club in New York, Mr. N. S. Britton, of Staten Island, gave the following table, from observations made at New Dorp : Trees. Average age...
-White Cedar
Caught by a sudden shower in New Jersey, the writer took refuge in a shingle mill, where the Cupressus thuyoides, the White Cedar of that section, was being worked up into roofing shingles. Examining ...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Objects Of Sex In Flowers
The reports of this verbal address before the Board at its Spring meeting, as given in some of the Philadelphia city papers were so absurd, that we have much pleasure in giving our readers a very good...
-Are Plants Fed Throuch Their Leaves? By Peter Henderson, Jersey City Heights, New Jersey
In the July number, Mr. Milton seems to think he has settled this question when he tells us his Bilbergias have made a growth without roots, and that when we sprinkle a lot of unrooted wilted cuttings...
-Plant Leaves And Their Functions, Respiration And Exhalation
In Mr. Peter Henderson's article in the June number of the Gardeners' Monthly he says: My practice, which has extended through a period of over thirty-five years, and which I believe has been as vari...
-The Flora Of The State Of Texas. From The "Anzeiger Des Westens."
As the State of Texas is divided from north to south into three well defined zones - prairie, hill and mountains - so she is divided from east to west into three distinctly defined zones of vege-tion....
-The Sleepy Plant
That remarkable plant, of which we suggested last month Rip Van Winkle probably ate, and of which our smart daily editors made so much - it was to add untold wealth, to the coffers of happy humanity...
-Men With Tails
It is now discovered beyond a shadow of doubt that there is a race of men in Australia with tails. Mr. B. S. Williams' plant collector came on them. The 'tails extend about half way down their legs. T...
-Pranks In A Pear
We noted recently the case of a pear from Rochester, which did not push out its petals - that is to say flower - till long after its ovarium, the future pear, had grown, and several weeks after its pr...
-A Poisonous Plant
A Grundy Co., Tennessee correspondent writes: Many cattle poisoned by seed of a pear-shaped fruit, upon a plant about two feet high. The first effect of the poison is excessive thirst, causing the an...
-Agriculture In Print
The way in which sparks of wisdom fly from the columns of some shining lights in the agricultural press is almost blinding. One gravely tells us that the period at which clover is cut for hay materi...
-Botanical Studies
Prof. Meehan, in the Independent, remarks that there are few scientific fields that afford more scope for original and interesting observation than the botanical. There is hardly a day but some studen...
-The Love Of Flowers
Miss Maling and her coadjutors deserve well of humanity for what they have done to diffuse among us an inclination for one of the most wholesome as well as fascinating pursuits. Nobody who has not tri...
-Rats
A Brazilian newspaper has some curious information about the plague of rats, which may well reconcile us to our smaller annoyances from these prolific vermin. They have destroyed almost the whole prod...
-Responses
In the June number of the Monthly, Jacques asks, why not have a department for Notes and Queries. The plan he adopts is a most excellent one, and I hope to see such a department continued in the Mon...
-Notes Of A Southern Cemetery
The horse rail road at Augusta, Ga., has a fitting termination at the cemetery of the town. Getting out of the car here and looking toward the enclosure before me, I queried of the white driver whethe...
-A Lecal Query
One of the misfortunes of this age is, an editor is expected to know everything. But be that so or not, I will ask you, also for the benefit of many nurserymen, especially in the rural district. Suppo...
-Editorial Traveling Notes. #2
Every now and then we read of the wonderful beauty of the English railroad stations, and contiguous grounds, and unfavorable comments made on the condition of our own. But the traveler over the Pennsy...
-Post Office Laws
These have been again tinkered. We have been trying to find out in what way this affects Horticulturists, but cannot succeed, for the Postmaster General has not been able to fully advise as to how the...
-A Grand Old Horticulturist
We have before us a letter from the Reverend Canon Beadle, a well known English Horticulturist, as well as an esteemed Clergyman of the English Church. The letter was written in his 102d year, and is ...
-The Poverty Of Prof. Louis Agassiz
A great deal has recently been made of a saying attributed to Prof. Agassiz, and recently quoted by Vice-President Steele, in an address before the Montgomery County (Ohio), Horticultural Society. If...
-Baron Ferdinand Yon Mueller
This distinguished Botanist, whose work in Australia is so well known and appreciated in the United States is the subject of an admirable likeness in the L'Horticulteur Belgique, for June. From the no...
-Professor Asa Gray
This distinguished botanist had a narrow escape from a serious accident on his recent botanical trip South. He was on the train which broke through the bridge near Wytheville, Virginia, and in which a...
-Rotten Fruit
As the season has arrived for submitting fruit to the editor for names and opinions, we would suggest the propriety of always paying the express charges, and marking on the box paid in full, or pai...
-Report Of The U. S. Geographical Surveys
In charge of Lieut. Geo. M. Wheeler, Vol. VI., Botany, by Dr. J. T. Rothrock, Washington, 1878. The work and the publications of our Government surveys are acknowledged in Europe to be far superior to...
-Report Of Connecticut State Board Of Agriculture For 1878
From T. S. Gold, Secretary. This volume is full of interesting matter. Professor Brewer discusses the varieties of cultivated plants. He shows the differences between varieties and species, and how...
-Dr. David Moore
This distinguished gardener died on the 9th of June, full of years and of honors. He served his horticultural apprenticeship in the gardens of the Earl of Camper-down at Dundee in Scotland, and had fo...
-Adam Spade, The Gardener
By John Smith, ex-curator of Royal Gardens, Kew. Under the guise of a parody, Mr. Smith manages to employ an immense number of puns. These double meaning words are tabulated at the end of the work wit...
-The American Association Of Nurserymen
The fourth annual meeting at Cleveland last month, was very successful. A much larger representation of the best members of the trade were present than ever before, and the subjects were of great prac...
-September, 1879. Number 249. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
There are few flowers more gorgeous in Summer gardening than the Lily; but it is only occasionally that we see very good success with them. Most people fail through having the roots planted where the ...
-Communications. Gardening In The South
Our correspondent, Mr. Saunders, has been traveling South, and contributes the following notes of his gardening impressions to the Canadian Horticulturist: Atlanta, the Chicago of the South, is ...
-Defensive Hedges
The many ill-shaped Osage Orange hedges which a few years ago were so common hereabouts led many to believe the statement to be true that in this country we had nothing to make hedges with to be as pe...
-Growing Specialties
One of the arts of successful nursery or florist business is to find out something in demand, and which one can grow cheaper and better than anybody else. The English papers are noting the success of ...
-September, 1879. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Those who have greenhouses, pits or frames, will now see to having any necessary repairs attended to. Whitewashing annually is serviceable, destroying innumerable eggs of insects, in the war against w...
-Communications. Notes On Palms
Now that palms have been found not to require such a high skill to grow them, nor that all need be supplied with so much artificial heat, as some natives of the hottest parts of the world, and that th...
-Cultivation Of Cape Heaths
The Cape Heath genus, Erica, is esteemed by all lovers of Flora as one of the finest of greenhouse plants, and should be found in every collection of any extent. I however, find it a prevailing idea i...
-Coleus Pictus
It is claimed by most florists, that Coleus pictus and multicolor were introduced from different countries. I have a plant of Coleus pictus, with one branch of multicolor. The different parts of the s...
-Hybrid Perpetual Roses.-Twelve Best For Forcing. E. Fryer, Delaware, O
In the Monthly, for April last, E. H., of New Bedford, Mass., asks for names of twelve best H. P. roses for forcing. I suggest the following list: Mad. Chas. Wood, Louis Canique, Mo. Laing, Roi D'E...
-Flowers At English Weddings
Flowers enter largely into all English festivals, and a great deal of taste is employed in making the most judicious selections. At the recent wedding of the Duke of Norfolk we are told decorations su...
-Flowers On Toilettes
The Ladies' Gazette of Fashion says: A perfect wealth of flowers has been expended on the past Spring toilettes; indeed it would almost seem the gentle goddess had showered on them all her radiant...
-Panax Laciniatus
This beautiful foliage plant is now in some choice collections, but not as common as its merits deserve it should be. Plants that are easily grown and adapted to decoration are much sought for, and fo...
-A Striped Forget-Me-Not
The list of varieties of cultivated Forget-me-nots is by no means numerous, and the addition to it of a pretty novelty that Mr. Cannell showed us the other day is a welcome acquisition. Its flowers, w...
-Dalmatian Insect Powder
G. B. B., Hillsboro, Highland Co., Ohio, says: Your May number speaks of the Dalmatian Insect Powder. Can you tell me whether it is poisonous to human beings, so as to make its use in rooms occupi...
-Propagating Double Petunias
Mrs. J. M., Newton, Ohio, writes: Will some one please tell me how to propagate a double Petunia ? There are no seed pods formed yet, and I would like to know if I can grow some from slips ? I have t...
-September, 1879. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The vegetable season is almost over, though some care may be used to advantage. Tomatoes will still repay care bestowed in keeping them in shape. Those grown on stakes should be tied up, and will c...
-Communications. Japanese Persimmons
In the June number of the Gardener's Monthly I noticed that E. Manning says: The Japan Persimmon tree is like many other expensive, curiosities extravagantly puffed by propagators, and which to the p...
-Fruit Notes From Indiana
The Raspberry season is almost (dosed and it may be a matter of interest to many of your readers to learn the varieties that best succeed in the Ohio Valley, from Cincinnati to Cairo. Between the extr...
-Hardiness Of Japan Persimmon
I have read with much pleasure the articles ill your estimable magazine on the hardiness of the Japan Persimmon, and as far as I can see, the experiments were made on plants grafted on our American va...
-Pear Growing On The Prairies
Some writer made a sensation a few years ago by asserting as the result of his experience that any one would be crazy who should in the future attempt to grow pears on the prairies. Of course those wh...
-The Best Strawberry
We have looked about carefully this year to try to identify the best strawberry, but as we felt inclined to record it, we would read in some reliable paper, or in some letter of the wonderful behavi...
-Book Gardening
A Woodbury, New Jersey, farmer writes to the Liberal Press of that place about the short coinings of Horticultural Book writers. Our friend believed implicitly in books, and when one good man thought ...
-Osage Orange Hedges
Discussions are still going on as to whether Osage Orange is cheaper than wooden fences. That depends. If wood is abundant it may not be. Some talk of the plants robbing the earth for ten feet on eac...
-Testimony On The Sparrows
An English paper thinks Englishmen degenerate when they come to this country, and supposes the English sparrow does, if it is as bad as some American newspapers represent. But American newspapers are ...
-A Sad Fate
The Lancaster Farmer thus pathetically describes the sparrow situation in those parts: Our native birds have almost entirely retired from their old haunts, and have resigned the field to thes...
-The Profit Of Cultivation
In all professions it is chiefly those who aim at excellence who succeed. In fruit growing the market is never glutted in good seasons to the grower of a superior article. Superiority in fact is the...
-The Japan Persimmon
S. B. K., Houston, Texas, writes : It is of much value to know the experiences of the correspondents on the hardiness of the Japan Persimmon. It is however a matter of so much importance that it wou...
-Bower's Early Peach
From Morris & Miller, Frederick, Maryland, received July 30th, six inches in circumference, green with bright red cheek, stone partially adherent, flesh very juicy and sweet. The full value of a peach...
-Alpine Strawberries
C. S. Arm prion, Ontario, Canada, writes : There is in the nurseries of the Renfrew Fruit and Floral Company here, a patch of Alpine Strawberries that were planted two years ago. Last year they were...
-Walterloo Peach
Ellwanger & Barry, Rochester, N. Y., writes : We send you by mail to-day, samples of the Waterloo Peach which we trust will reach you in good order. The fruit is not so large as usual, owing to the o...
-Raspberry From Burlington, N. J
We hardly know what to say of fruit sometimes sent to us, a few samples not being like what they are afterwards found to be. We can only say that some before us from Mr. John Churchman, appear to be o...
-Fruit Notes From Mercer Co., Pa
J. A. N., Indian Run, writes under date July 10th : Fruit prospects. Apples light crop here; pears and peaches medium crop; grapes much injured by insects; cherries and strawberries fine crop - o...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Effects Of Frost On Plants, &.C
The following valuable paper, was read at a recent meeting of the Illinois State Horticultural Society: We all know that many plants are killed by even a short exposure to a freezing temperature, a...
-Carnivorous Plants. #3
Although I am not a believer in feeding plants with raw flesh, I am of a different opinion as regards the vapor from ammonia, having employed it years ago in various plant houses with good results by ...
-Leaf Absorption
You sometimes have your say about the English journals discussing matters easy of solution, self-evident, and long ago proven to the satisfaction of every one on this continent at all interested, etc....
-Gift Der Scheeze A Schanse
An American citizen of Teutonic proclivities went into a prominent lager beer saloon and called for one beer and some of the best Lim-burger cheese. The flavor of the cheese not pleasing him, he calle...
-Snakes Swallowing Their Young
Snakes do swallow their young. When a boy and living in Orange County, New York, about 1837 to 1840, I suddenly came upon a snake known as the speckled and striped, or garter snake. It was disposed to...
-About The Hardiness Of Trees
I have often wondered why our nurserymen or horticultural societies have not supplied us with complete lists as to hardiness of the different varieties of fruit and ornamental trees, shrubs, etc. I am...
-Origin Of Wheat
The College Quarterly says : Since the days of M. Fabre, our leading botanists have admitted that it was most probably derived from .AEgilops ovata, a grass native to the plains of India. We do not ...
-The Doctrine Of Morphology
It is almost wonderful that the doctrine which teaches that all parts of a flower are modified primary leaves, should have such universal assent, when but a comparatively few years ago it was laughed ...
-Growth Of Roots In Autumn And Winter
It has often been placed on record in American publications during the past thirty years, that in this country the fibrous roots of trees grow during the Winter. By the following from the Gardener's C...
-Poverty In Science
A Correspondent says: That is all wrong (in Gardener's Monthly page 254,) about Agassiz. He did not ' leave quite a large estate.' He cannot be said to have left anything of his own making or saving....
-Plurals Of Plant Names
M. J. B., West Philadelphia, writes: Reading the London Garden recently, I learned that Mr. Elwees showed an interesting collection of cut flowers, consisting of Calochorti, Brodises, Alliums, and G...
-Morphology Of A Peach Flower
Mr. J. W. Kerr, Denton, Md., sends, August 13th, a peach branch with six leaves and terminal flowers. It is an excellent illustration of morphological law. An ordinary peach bud is an arrested branch....
-Fruiting Of The Arctostaphylos Uva-Ursi, - Or Bearberry
Mrs. E. S. F., Nan-taucket, Mass., writes : In Flowers and Ferns of the United States in speaking of the common Bearberry, Arbutus, Uva-Ursi, it is said that although the flowers grow in clusters, th...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Responses And Notes
In the July number of the Monthly I noticed a few remarks on the double flowering Chinese Cherry. I should like to have shown you a fine specimen of the old pure white double flowering Cherry that we ...
-Notes And Queries-No. 4
W.B. - John Bay was the first to raise Zoology to the rank of a science; and the first scientific classification of animals was attempted in his Synopsis of Quadrupeds. Modern botany began with Ray'...
-People Are To Live And Enjoy
Gardens afford the many great enjoyment, and hence give a profit; and yet not a word is said or a professor engaged to teach the young how to garden or plant. If the boys must thumb a Greek lexicon gi...
-Perpetual Felicity
The writer noticed some five years ago a brilliant description of a rose named Felicite perpetuelle, and ordered it from London. The felicity has not arrived, for it has bloomed this season for the ...
-Things To Remember
Borage is a useful plant for bees and produces much honey. The Scillas or Squills once bought, and planted from two to four inches beneath the soil in Autumn, will multiply rapidly year by year. No be...
-Lost And Found
Many curious things of lost and found are told. The following is assuredly true. A ring was lost. Mrs. B., while dibbling holes for small plants of celery, dropped her ring into one of the holes. A pl...
-The Strawberry
A correspondent who notes that Shakespeare missed nothing, and who is a student of the great author, remarks that in Richard III, Act 3, Scene 4, the following passage occurs: My Lord of Ely, whe...
-Notes And Queries
The following questions, suggested by articles in your journal, will I hope find a place in your department of Notes and Queries : 1. In Vol. XX, p. 291, Mr. Drew, of El Dorado, Cal., has an intere...
-Notes
In referring to page 23-4 of Gardener's Monthly, it seems to me the Stag's Horn Fern is the Polypodium aureum. As I call to mind the manner the furry stems creep over the surface and sometimes over ...
-Editorial Traveling Notes. #3
An editorial life is peculiar. The editor has two selves. In the field of duty he has to forget the one, and be the other. To him a friend is on a par with an enemy. He often praises the work of those...
-The Post Office Laws
Recently a kind correspondent, anxious to serve the Garden_ er's Monthly, sent a package basted at the ends with sewing cotton, instead of merely turned down or tied with string. For this indiscretion...
-Agricultural Editor Of Philadelphia Press
The Germantown Telegraph says : Thomas Meehan, Esq., the distinguished scientist of Germantown, who had been connected with the Press of this city for fifteen years as editor of the agricultural a...
-The Plant Patent
Mr. D. B. Wier has hit on the sensible plan of trying what can be done practically in this way, instead of writing long chapters on what might be done. While our views must be candidly expressed - tha...
-Scrubs And Spires
It is worth the while I of the next author on the evolution of language to inquire what influence the typographical error has on change. It is a very natural mistake to print spire for spike, and i...
-Lily Emblems
Hulme says that the religion of many people in Ireland can be understood by the lilies - Catholics planting the white and Protestants the orange lilies in conspicuous places in their door-yards. The w...
-Hon. Eli K. Price
This distinguished gen-tleman, who has given so much of an active life unselfishly to the best interests of Philadelphia, and to whom Fairmount Park owes so much, recently passed his eighty-second bir...
-Geological Survey Of Indiana
Eighth, ninth, and tenth annual reports from Prof. John Collett. - Under the lead of Prof. E. T. Cox, the survey of Indiana progresses very satisfactorily. There is one feature especially valuable in ...
-Revision Of The North American LILI-Aceae
Mr. Sereno Watson, one of the most devoted and hard-working of our leading botanists, has just contributed to the Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences an elaborate paper on the Nor...
-Native Plants Of Victoria - By Baron V. Von Mueller
Scientific men usually are great workers; but few we fancy get through so much as Baron Von Mueller, the Government Botanist, of Melbourne, Australia. This time it is a valuable work, in cheap form, o...
-A Year In A Lancashire Garden
By Henry A. Bright. From MacMillan & Co., New York, through J. B. Lippincott & Co., Phila., Pa. - Over and over again, many of us have repeated that a garden is the purest of all human pleasures, but ...
-Georgia Horticultural Society
The fourth annual meeting was held at Macon, on the 29th of July, President P. J. Berckmans, presided. The meeting was well attended. Mr. Berckmans in his annual address, expressed gratification at so...
-The Pennsylvania State Agricultual Society
This body holds its annual exhibition this year in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, from September 8th, to September 20th, in the Main Building of the Old Centennial Exhibition. The holding of a State Fa...
-October, 1879. Number 250. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
As the planting season is upon us, it may be of service to remark that few persons seem aware of the great variety of the material with which their gardens may be adorned. As we go through the coun...
-Communications. Rural Cemeteries
If my memory is not at fault, it was Father La Chaise who first conceived the idea of a Rural Cemetery. He it was who first invoked the aid of the landscape gardener to make the last resting place of ...
-A Fine Weeping Beech
In accordance with a wish expressed by you some time since in the Gardener's Monthly, that parties having fine specimens of ornamental trees would report them, I would inform you that I am the possess...
-Viburnum Nudum
During July and August our grounds suffer in appearance for the want of shrubs in flower, and anything attractive then is welcomed. The Viburnum nudum, though not in flower within these months, is yet...
-Gardening At Salt Lake City
By the list of premiums of the Fourteenth Annual Exhibition of the Desert Agricultural and Manufacturing Society, to be held on the first of October, we may see by the offers what are the chief produc...
-Roses, Geraniums, Etc
A. C, Watson-ville, Santa Cruz Co., California, writes: Seeing you answer questions from correspondents, I should like to have you answer the following questions, if it is not too much trouble : 1. W...
-American Trees In Boston
A correspondent writes: In regard to what you say about foreign trees, I am quite certain that less than ten per cent, of the stock planted in this vicinity is foreign. As a rule, our American trees ...
-Purchasing Roses
Mrs. E., Melrose, Mass., writes: Will you please inform me, through the Monthly, as to the best time to buy young Hybrid Perpetual roses - Fall or Spring? And if not set out till Spring, will they fl...
-Two Good Bedding Tea Roses
Mrs. R. B. E., Melrose, Mass., writes: I have tried two of the newer tea roses this summer - Marie Guillot and Comtesse Riza de Pare - and find them very much superior to the generality of tea roses ...
-Memorial Trees
S. P. B., near Wilmington, Del., writes: If any one wishes to be borne in pleasant remembrance, let him present another with some plants - something that will live and grow. Many years since I recei...
-October, 1879. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The great anxiety at this time will be to preserve those things that have been growing in the open ground during Summer, for, though when they were set out we had no thought of anything more than Summ...
-Communications. Tuberous-Rooted Begonias
I desire to recommend, through the Monthly, these tuberous-rooted Begonias to all lovers of nice flowers. I have grown them for the first time this season, and am altogether delighted with them. I had...
-Night Blooming Cereus
Herewith I send you an article on the Night Blooming Cereus, which strikes me as a beautiful tribute to that singular flower, and which, I think, would be very appropriate in the columns of the Garden...
-Aquatic Plants
Weed is the term applied to plants of no use to us; but as soon as it is discovered they possess a certain merit, they cease to be weeds. Acorns calamus, leaves swort like, hardy; Acorus variegata, ...
-Stenocarpus Cunninghamn
In the Gardener's Monthly for December, 1877, page 360, I noticed a few remarks on Steno-carpus Cunninghamii. We have a specimen here about fourteen feet high that promises an abundance of bloom in th...
-Absorption Of Moisture Through The Leaves
I have in my plant-yard a branch of geranium, broken off from an old plant over two months ago. It has laid on the ground in nearly the same spot since, in a shady place. The end where it is broken of...
-Lantana, Harkett's Perfection
We saw some plants of this growing out of doors this year, and could not help feeling that if it had been an introduction from Europe, instead of an American seedling, it would be in great request for...
-October, 1879. Green House And House Gardening. Scraps And Queries
Double Zonale Geranium, Mrs. Corbin. C. N. Stewart, of Washington, Iowa, writes: I send you a flower from my new geranium, Mrs. Corbin, grown from seed here last year, which is considered here as gre...
-October, 1879. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Once on a time there was a craze on dwarf pears. Millions were raised, and all were sold. Now when a person has anything to sell it is but natural that he should see all the good points in the article...
-The Japan Persimmon Again
In the September number of the Gardener's Monthly, Mr. Samuel Parsons, of Flushing, N. Y., criticises my remarks on the hardiness of the Japanese Persimmon. I gave my experience because you asked for ...
-Budding The Wild Plum
Some years ago there was considerable demand for plum trees budded on the wild Western or Canadian plum; but nurserymen found it very hard to get a good take, and I imagine few are now grown. Howev...
-Forcing Strawberries
Since the issue of the July number of the Monthly, I have received many letters from parties asking me to give my method of forcing strawberries. One gentleman in Connecticut complains, if I understan...
-Sladkaja Apple
To-day I mail you two Russian apples, called Grusscheppka sladkaja. Some few years ago I put in a lot of Russian apple grafts. This is the second year of bearing. They are all summer or autumn fruit. ...
-Improved Asparagus
I agree with Gen. W. H. Noble, in the Monthly for August, that it is possible to improve asparagus, even if the sexes are on differ-ent plants. In the animal kingdom sexes are separate, and improvemen...
-Sex In Asparagus
Seeing your notes on sex in asparagus, I am tempted to write a few lines in* regard to the subject. Twelve years ago, among some trees and shrubs received from St. Louis, there was found an asparagus ...
-A Destructive Remedy
Many years ago the Peabody Strawberry was introduced, creating quite an excitement in the land. It was sold by subscription. I obtained enough plants to make a small bed, but found the grubs had a...
-Three Good Early Grapes
There is so little difference in the time of ripening of the Concord, Hartford Prolific, and Telegraph, that for amateurs there is little to choose between them. The writer made careful tests this sea...
-Progressive Development Among New Fruits
A correspondent of the New Jersey Liberal Press is troubled in his mind as to the best strawberry, and thus growleth: I have been considerably troubled, too, by the wonderful progressiveness or chan...
-A Productive Strawberry
Rev. Geo. S., Lexington, Ky., writes : I may be laboring under a delusion, but think I have a remarkable strawberry story to relate. Last Spring I set some Boyden's No. 30, on ground spread with tho...
-The Lacon Strawberry
E. R. M., Lacon, Ill., writes: I enclose a photograph of the Lacon Strawberry. Please observe that the plant shown had thirteen crowns and one hundred and eighty-nine berries. The large ripe berries ...
-Fungus In Apple Roots
G., Colora, Md., writes : I enclose a piece of an apple root from a small seedling tree. I would like to know, through the Gardener's Monthly, something of its natural history. What is it? What is i...
-Pear Blight
F., Rochester, New York, writes: Is not the Pear Blight a disheartening thing to deal with ? Your magazine could render us no greater service than to investigate the cause, and show us how to cure i...
-Celery Disease
H., East Hampton, Mass.r writes : I have a trouble in my vegetable kingdom that is new to me. I have five thousand celery growing finely, but they seem to be covered with insects; what I should call...
-Benoni And Early Joe Apples
H. D., Galesburg, Mich., sends us the following good note, received after our last went to press, with Mr. Downing's paragraph on the same subject: In Editorial Notes of August number, Gardener's Mo...
-Legislation And Forestry
It is a common theme with newspapers and public speakers that the forests are decreasing; that the country will materially sutler, and that something must be done. The position we have always take...
-Fibre Machinery
There are an immense number of plants known to have useful fibre; but the trouble has been to find machinery that will prepare it profitably. The late Professor Gabb told the writer of this that some ...
-The Profits Of Forestry
Not ten miles from the centre of the city of Philadelphia, on the York road, is a goodly-sized piece of forest land which was covered with young timber, chiefly of chestnut, and which the owner decide...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. The Self-Fertilization Of Plants
[As our readers know, much attention has been given of late years to the subject of cross-fertilization of flowers by insect and other agencies. It is understood that many plants are unable to fertili...
-Abnormal Flowers
I wish to call the attention of your botanical readers to the two following extracts. The first, below, is from a pamphlet giving a short account of the history and present condition of Cyprus, the au...
-The Flora Of The State Of Texas. From The "Anziger Des Westens". No. II
In the fir forests, the dogwood, which is also quite frequent in Arkansas, forms the principal part of the under-brush. It is from eight to ten feet high, and in the month of March bears a great quant...
-Habits Of Fuller's Rose Beetle
As the knowledge of the destructive beetle, Aramigus Fulleri, was early made known through the medium of the Gardener's Monthly, we are anxious to keep a full record of its history in our pages, and g...
-A Census Of Cambridge Botanical Garden
An enumeration has recently been made of the plants in the Cambridge Botanical Garden,by Mr. William Falconer, the curator, with the following results: 1,519 genera, all told; 5,901 species, all told;...
-Picea Pungens
Dr. Englemann decides what has been known as Abies Menziesii of Colorado, and the Abies Menziesii of the Pacific coast to be two distinct species, and has named the Colorado plant Picea pungens. It is...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Notes And Queries No. 5
The writer has been asked to define the difference in value of a study or love for botany and horticulture, and the study of music. The first idea is, that botany and horticulture contribute vastly to...
-Bulbs
A full catalogue of the growers of Dutch bulbs is a curious study. The quantities and varieties are enormous, while the prices vary with the beauty or novelty. Messrs. Krelage & Co. of Haarlem have ta...
-Cranberries
Much skill and money have been expended on the cranberry. Will some one inform the public what is the southern limit of the culture of this valuable fruit. Like the cotton belt, it is said to have its...
-The Poison Vine - Rhus Toxicodendron
It is too much the custom, and it is attended with sad results, to leave fences to the mercy of this vine. A friend attended an archery meeting where the targets were placed each at the bases of trees...
-The Black Cat And Pear Tree
The cat has lately been introduced as a frightener of birds. Let me tell a story, by request, of a useful member of society who had quite a reputation for raising remarkably good butter pears. Mr. B. ...
-What Mr. Wier Has Not Done
In your September number, under the head of Plant Patents, you strongly commend the good sense of Mr. D. B. Wier, of Lacon, I11., in that instead of writing long articles on what might be done, h...
-Editorial Traveling Notes. #4
A brief visit to the Bussey Institute, with which the Arnold Arboretum is connected, gave me great pleasure. The gardener in charge is Mr. Jackson Dawson, whom I found to be a lithe, active, middle-si...
-Uninteresting New Jersey
S. M., New York, says: The most interesting articles in the Gardener's Monthly are always your travels. The trip in uninteresting New Jersey was most interesting. [ Uninteresting New Jersey in...
-Daniel Barker
Our readers will be pained to hear of the death, by typhoid fever, of Mr. Daniel Barker, of Norfolk, Virginia, whose frequent notes on plants have so often interested and profited them. This occurred ...
-Horticultural Exhibit At The Pennsylvania State Agricultural Society
Agricultural fairs we have to leave to the agricultural papers, but the Pennsylvania State Fair being so close to us, we have made a few notes of the horticultural exhibit. The cut flower exhibit w...
-Resignation
With thanks which no language can express, for the repeated honors conferred on me, and for your kind cooperation and support during this long period of official service, and with the assurance that I...
-Progress
When I reflect on the rapid progress which our Society has made since its establishment, how it has risen from the small beginning of a few States, until its jurisdiction embraces a catalogue of fifty...
-Lessons Of Experience
In that address I endeavored to sum up the experience which had been acquired during these years of our association, and the opinions I had so fully and freely expressed on former occasions on the top...
-Advantages Of Cross-Fertilization Or Hybridization Of Plants
What wonders have been achieved in the vegetable kingdom by cross-fertilization in our own time! But still greater wonders are to be realized by this art as time advances, producing new and improved v...
-Thinning And Packing Of Fruit
The importance of properly thinning our fruit trees when bearing redundant crops is more and more apparent. To produce fruit that commands a good price in the market has become an absolute necessity. ...
-Value And Importance Of Our Society
I have often spoken of the salutary influence of our association. The more I reflect upon its operations the more am I impressed with its usefulness, and with the importance of perpetuating it through...
-November, 1879. Number 251. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
It is now so well understood that we may have an immense addition to our list of hardy evergreens if we will only shelter them, that we expect all those who love these varied Winter favorites will tak...
-Communications. The Cercidiphyllum
A note in the Monthly for May, having reference to the Cercidiphyllum, serves as a suggestion that a few words respecting its natural habitat, and value both for ornamental and timber purposes, may no...
-Hardiness Of Japan Maples
Last Fall I got from Philadelphia a plant of the new Japan Maple, Japohicum atrosan-guineum. I planted it out, turned an old nail keg over it which was minus one stave, all joints open and half the he...
-Decay Of Central Park
In a somewhat recent article in the New York Times we find the following : It is needless to recite instances; the whole park is full of illustrations of negligence and want of knowledge. Shrubs ...
-The Laurel Hill Cedar Of Lebanon
One of the two magnificent specimens, perhaps fifty feet high, which so many persons visited Laurel Hill expressly to see, and which indeed was one of America's arboreal treasures, - as the tree so se...
-Insects On Public Trees
Mr. William Doogue has made a report to the Committee on Public Grounds, of the city of Boston, which has been officially published. He says that the city owns 22,254 trees. Some have proposed a heavy...
-Mutilating The Giant Trees Of California
Mr. W. A. Sanders, writing to the Pacific Rural Press, says: Vandalism may sound harsh, but no milder one will express the way that some of these trees have been mutilated. There is an abundance of ...
-Variegated Arborvitae
C. F., Rye, N. Y., writes: Enclosed I send you a variety of Arborvitae, which originated with me as a seedling. It is perfectly hardy, free grower; it stands about two and a-half feet high; four yea...
-November, 1879. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The growing taste for cut flowers is commendable. Thousands who could never be brought face to face with nature, are introduced in this way, and many have enjoyment who never thought of the pleasure a...
-The Bedding At Fairmount Park
The hundreds of thousands who saw and admired the bedding at Fairmount Park during the Centennial, would have been more than delighted with it the past season. It is conceded on all hands that it was ...
-Orchids In The Open Air
At the October meeting of the Germantown Horticultural Society, two species of Stanhopea were exhibited in bloom, filling the hall with their delicious odor, and which plants had been simply hanging o...
-The Victoria Lily
Those of our readers who can recall the horticultural events of thirty years ago, may remember the intense interest excited by the flowering of the Victoria regia, at Spingbrook, near Philadelphia, in...
-The Gloxinia
Attention to these beautiful Summer blooming greenhouse plants seems to be reviving, and the following from the pen of an experienced cultivator in the Garden will be appropiate: To give a succes...
-Stephanotis Floribtjnda
There is nothing more desirable for cut flower work than this. Its waxy, white and very sweet flowers do not wither soon, and hence are far superior to orange blossoms for decorating the hair, or for ...
-Ice Flowers
Who has not admired the fantastic floral devices that may often be seen on frozen glass through the crystallization of water during hard frost in Winter? These are so interesting and beautiful that fo...
-Dracaena Taylori
Many of the beautiful forms of Dracaena that adorn our gardens, are species introduced direct from their native countries, but others are garden forms raised by enterprising florists. Among these last...
-Dennstaedtia Davallioides Youngh - Moore
The following description of this beautiful fern is taken from the Gardener's Chronicle of March 24th, 1877 : This fine new garden fern comes to us from Australia. It is no doubt very nearly related t...
-Gladiolus Papilio - Butterfly-Flowered Gladiolus
This beautiful species was introduced from Cape Colony some few years ago in the Kew Gardens, where it flowered, and was figured; and the following are a few extracts taken from the Botanical Magazine...
-November, 1879. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
What is called Botany, has a different meaning from what it had in old times. When the writer of this was a young horticultural student, he and some four or five others added botany, chemistry, some a...
-Communications. Notes From New Hampshire
The fruit crop of 1879 is a surprise to all, there being much more than was expected. This is noticeable of apples, the great staple fruit of New England. Last year was produced one of the heaviest cr...
-Cats And Pear Trees
About fifty years ago, my residence was on 9th street, near that of Jacob Ballanger, a worthy citizen, referred to in the last number of the Gardener's Monthly, in the article headed The Black Cat a...
-Notes On The Season And Fruits In Western Pennsylvania
1879 brought us here a late spring, and a summer characterized by a few hot days, and many cold nights when the mercury would fall below 50 under glass. This produced on some vines a ...
-Plum Culture In America
It is well known that in consequence of the attacks of the curculio, plum culture once came near being abandoned. Ellwanger & Barry, and the late Dr. Hull, of Illinois, just kept the fruit in peoples'...
-The Brighton Grape
It is not easy to form an opinion of the true value of a fruit from its merely positive character; and hence bunches seen at a show, and tasted in an editorial office, seldom tell much of value. Compa...
-Curculio Proof Plums
We often have plums shown to us in perfect condition, and yet with curculio marks on them to prove that a variety is curculio-proof. But this proves nothing. It is not the cutting of the skin of the...
-The Gregg Raspberry
We see it stated that Thomas Meehan says it is fifty per cent, larger than the Mammoth Cluster. We have no idea that Thomas Meehan ever said anything of the kind. In the first place he would not pr...
-Progressive Fruits
The correspondent of the New Jersey Liberal Press, to whom we referred in our last, now sends us the following additional note. As he lives in a vicinity crowded by those who love the plain language, ...
-Statistics Of Fruit Culture
Mr. J. R. Dodge, of the Census Bureau, 1228 N Street, Washington, D. C, sends us the following letter, which we print hoping that those who may be interested in the success of Mr. Dodge's excellent en...
-Blodgett's Miss Percival Peach
With some fine specimens of this excellent, juicy, late, white, free-stone peach, we have the following memorandum from Mr. Blodgett: I send you a sample herewith of my seedling No. 1, Miss Percival,...
-White-Washing Trees
F. B., Brooklyn, New York, writes: I see you recommend white-washing the stems of fruit trees. I was about to order mine done so, when I happened to read in a standard work on horticulture that it wo...
-A New Plum
C. B., Hightstown, N. J., writes: We send you by mail a small box of plums of the Chickasaw family we think, also one Miner, marked so on the wrapper, to test. The plums are nearly all too hard yet; ...
-The Wager Peach
A. R. P., Honeoye, N. Y., writes : I send you this day by express, samples of Wager Peach, which on account of over-loaded trees, are not quite as large as common. They are noted for their hardiness...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Curl In The Peach
Read before the Illinois Horticultural Society. This disease was more than ordinarily noticeable during the early part of the past Summer. Afflicted trees present a most pitiful appearance; their y...
-The Rose Slug, (Selandria Rosae, Harris)
The rose is undoubtedly beset by a greater variety of insect enemies than any other garden shrub. Among these pests the well known and wide-spread slug has a bad eminence. This insect was first ...
-Remarkable Difference In The Climate Of Places Situated Under The Same Latitude
The climate of the different parts of the world has often been guessed at, even by men of some scientific knowledge, according to the latitude in which the country in question was situated, until Humb...
-Full Of Bugs
It is said that the Entomological cabinet of Mr. Andrew S. Fuller, contains eight thousand species of beetles alone. Mr. Fuller estimates there are over 100,000 species of insects in the United States...
-Picea And Abies
As already noticed in our magazine, these have been confused. What we know as Abies should be Picea, and what are Picea should be Abies. The Firs are the Abies, and the Spruces Picea. About this Mr. L...
-Spruce Family
The Spruces are distinguished from the Firs by their depending cones growing from any of the limbs, with persistent scales and bracts, and, generally, by their scattered limbs and leaves; also by micr...
-Botanic Gardens
A Philadelphia correspondent has been writing to the American Cultivator at Boston, complaining of a suggestion that the Cambridge Botanical Garden is superior, and names the Missouri Botanic Garden, ...
-Coleus
Mrs. D. M. A. asks: Will you please give in the Monthly, the derivation and pronunciation of Coleus, and how to form the singular and plural? [It is an ancient Latin word, signifying a peculiar form...
-The "Rural" Plant
Mrs. D. A., East Brookfield, Mass., says: I have just read Mr. A. C's questions on page 293, Oct. number of the Monthly. His shrub-vine acts exactly like a Variegated Snowberry that I received from y...
-Aunts And Ants
One might suppose a connection between the authors of Pinafore and Sir John Lubbock; the one rings the changes on sisters, cousins and aunts, and the other brings up with his observations on ants only...
-Mosquitoes
The great inventor Siemens once told the writer he knew of no substance but that had its enemy, and he expected his guttapercha cables would be attacked in time. We animals - men - have a sad annoyanc...
-CIVIL Service Reform At The Park
'Sir, I am glad to see sometimes in your notes that you have an eye to the park affairs. A 'guard' so-called, is a man who has great difficulty to know how to pass his time, and what he shall do with...
-Statistics
There are a few persons who don't like statistics, - we propose to afflict them. There are over thirteen million cows in the United States, or a cow to every five persons throughout America; three tho...
-Education
It may safely be said that the attention of thinking American people, if not of all thinking men, is now turning to the fact that the knowledge so-called of the old schools and universities will not c...
-The Flora Of The State Of Texas. From The "Anziger Des Westens." No. III
The valleys of the rivers of the middle zone are characteristically different from each other, as far as their vegetation goes. Hence an old inhabitant of the State of Texas can very often tell from t...
-Editorial Traveling Notes. #5
A couple of years ago I was walking through one of the Paris parks with a small party of friends when one of them dropped a piece of paper on the road. It was not long before an elderly man with a bro...
-Sorghum And Maize Sugar
The Commissioner of Agriculture, has published a circular letter showing what has been done towards manufacturing sugar from Indian corn and Sorghum. Sugar can be obtained from a large number of plant...
-Political Economy
The learned works on the science of political economy, like works on all other sciences have to be re-written from time to time, as new facts come forward to modify old ones. Some curious results have...
-The Notes And Queries
Without doubt most of our readers highly appreciate the Notes and Queries of our correspondent Jacques. Modern literature, even the best of newspapers contain little that minister to the wants of...
-The Native Flowers And Ferns Of The United States
The useful little Botanical Index of Indiana, has not come to our table for some time, but by a communication from a friend, we learn that it has announced that the Native Flowers and Ferns of the U...
-Horticulture At The Centennial
Reports and awards of group 31. Pomology and kindred branches of Horticulture. These have been just issued by J. B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia, in a neat twenty-five cent pamphlet. The reasons for...
-First Step In Chemical Principles - By Henry Leftman, M. D., Philadelphia
Edward Stern & Co. This is a very small book of about fifty pages, but is intended to give an insight into the great science of chemistry. Those who have not time or inclination to go further, as may ...
-Report Of The Entomologists Of The Department Of Agriculture For 1878 - By C. V. Riley, Entomologist
Reading these valuable papers - for none more valuable have ever been issued by the government - it is to be regretted that the author is no longer in that service. There is a chapter on the insects i...
-Catalogue
Agreeably to our former custom, I have no doubt our Catalogue will receive special attention in regard to its enlargement and revision. This is one of the most important labors of the Society. Great a...
-Insects And Diseases Injurious To Vegetation
In regard to insects and diseases which are making such devastating progress in our own and other lands, it is not necessary for me to enlarge, as cultivators are fully aware of the importance of the ...
-In Memoriam
Since our last session several members of our society have closed their pilgrimage on earth, but their labors in our cause will live to bless the world, and their names will be treasured up in our mem...
-Conclusion
In conclusion, with a heart full of gratitude for the many honors you have conferred upon me as your President, I now lay down the robes of office with which you have clothed me for twenty-nine years,...
-December, 1879. Number 252. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
We have frequently urged the importance of planting places very thickly at first, in order both to produce an immediate effect, and also because the shelter which one another affords makes the trees g...
-Communications. The Ligustrum
In the September number of the Gardner's Monthly, page 282, I notice TV. G's remarks on Ligustrums, and that he refers to Messrs. Parsons & Son's classification. On reference to the catalogue of Ornam...
-Lilium Humboldth And Lilium Parryi
These beautiful lilies are natives of this part of California, and a few remarks upon their natural habits may perhaps be of interest and service to those who cultivate them. The}' are as unlike as li...
-Viburnum Plicatum
It takes a plant a long time to become well known, no matter how valuable may be its ornamental character, and this is specially the case with the present plant. It has long been a popular inmate of J...
-Dwarf Catalpa
Mr. Samuel Parsons, Jr., has the following in the Country Gentleman: Again 1 am drawn to say something of catal-pas. Their bright green massive foliage so attracts one by its permanent beauty and hea...
-Adelaide Botanic Garden
Dr. Schom-burgk has just issued his report for 1878, on the gardens and plantations under his charge. The report deals extensively with agricultural and arboricultural subjects as well as with horticu...
-The Virginian Creeper
A correspondent of Mr. Robinson's Gardening Illustrated, writes as follows of our Ampelopsis. We do not think these distinctions have been noted in American nurseries, but they are worth looking into:...
-Various Queries
M. Newton asks: - If it is not intruding too much on your time and space, I would like to ask a few questions. 1. Will the Pear grow on the Osage Orange; has it ever been tried to any extent? 2. ...
-Slipping Of Earth From Side Hills
F. W., Newark, N. Y., inquires: - Please tell me through Gardener's Monthly, or otherwise, what to plant on a side hill to prevent the earth from sliding when the frost leaves the ground in the Spri...
-December, 1879. Green House And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
There is not much requiring special care in the greenhouse. The Camellia is very apt to drop its buds if the atmosphere is too dry; but generally dropping follows any cheek to the roots by which the r...
-Communications. Hints On The Cultivation Of Choice Gloxinias
The Gloxinia has now become a general favorite with all lovers of flowers, and the vast number of fine varieties raised from seeds of the first, of the upright sorts Fyfiana, has created quite a stimu...
-Torenia Bailloni
The Torenia Asiatica has long been known as a very valuable plant in our greenhouses, its drooping habit and profusion of blue flowers making it useful for so many purposes. Some time ago we called at...
-Tuberoses
When any one is disposed to regret that we cannot have nice flowers as they have in Europe, let him look at his tuberoses, and then read the following from the Gardeners' Chronicle: The cultivatio...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Paris Green On Strawberries
As you so kindly published in your valuable magazine my strawberry feat, perhaps you will further indulge me in a little more bragging. I am prepared, sir, to measure crowns with the champion man on s...
-The Jefferson Grape
We are glad to find that one by one the valuable seedlings of Mr. Ricketts are coming in the market. Mr. Burrow has taken in hand to work with the Jefferson, a bunch of which we have now before us. It...
-Water Supplies
The London Gardeners' Weekly says: The supply of water to great towns is fast becoming what is termed a question of the day. The first and principal object in supplying towns with water, as we...
-Artificial Fertilizers
J. R., Brooklyn, N. Y., writes : If consistent with your duty to advertisers, I would like information as to the kind of artificial fertilizer that can be used advantageously on a small garden, clay...
-Those Copyrighted Cherries
Mr. Weir writes: In answer to Eugene Glenn, of Rochester, N. Y., in the October number, I may be allowed to say that to take out a copyright, one has to print the title-page and send it with the prop...
-Hothouse Grapes
Mr. A. Sigler, of Adrian, Michigan, is very successful with his cold grapery. It is singular that more amateurs do not have these adjuncts to garden pleasures. No doubt people can bring Malagas and ot...
-Late Peaches
It is a matter of surprise that those who live in cities do not turn their attention to the culture of a few peach trees oftener than they do. We know of no kind that deserves so well the appellation...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Black Rust On Verbenas
Head before the Illinois Horticultural Society. This is in every way different from the mould or mildew found on the leaves of the same plant and which was the subject of a communication to this so...
-Curious Fungi
Reading an article on fungi some time ago, I remarked that one with which I am unfortu-tunately too familiar is not mentioned, and I think it worth describing. The negroes in our pine-land, Summerv...
-An Abnormal Snap Dragon
I noticed an article in a late number of the Gardener's Monthly on abnormal flowers which induced me to send you the enclosed flower of the Linaria vulgaris which is a very good specimen of the abnorm...
-Eupatorium
There are many varieties of Eupatorium indigenous to America, but none rival the Eupatorium perfoliatum in its medicinal powers. The plant which gave name to the very extensive genus, of which the Bon...
-Pencilings From Colorado
Taking a week's vacation the first of Sept., I was only too glad to spend it among those romantic hills and valleys of the Rocky Mountains, where one's mind never tires of admiring the endless variety...
-Summer Apple Blossoms
I have on my grounds what to me is a curiosity. It is a third crop of apple blossoms. The. trees stand in the nursery in rows - the variety is the Maiden's Blush. Three trees now have apples on beginn...
-The Common Caladium Wild In Florida
During the early Spring of this year I saw the Colocasia or Elephant's Ear, Caladium escu-lentum, growing wild in two widely separated localities in Florida. On the first occasion on the edge of Gaine...
-Fibre Of The Velvet Leaf
Abutilon Avicennae. The Scientific American says that the New Jersey Bureau of Statistics of Labor and Industries have issued, under its seal, an offer from Monsieur Le Franc to pay $8.00 per to...
-Morphology Of Pine Flowers
Mr. James Gordon writes to the Journal of Forestry that the female flowers of Pines are of branch origin, while the male flowers are of leaf origin; and one of his arguments is that as the female...
-Fruit Drying By Cold Blast
An experiment was made at a foundry in Placerville last week, in fruit curing, by blast of cold air. In this experiment about a peck of sliced apples were placed in a sieve and subjected to a cold air...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Notes And Queries No. 7
Scientific and historical researches are leading men to carious discoveries. Not the least will be found in the Contemporary Review for Sept., 1879, Francois Lenormant has an article on The First Sin...
-Honey Making In The United States
I transfer from the Popular Science Monthly the following, which is not only deeply interesting, but will be new to many : The annual production of honey in this country is estimated at about 35,000...
-Rare Trees
Scribner's Magazine for November has an excellent article on rare and weeping trees. It is a good sign that such notices are J acceptable to the public. We could wish that the weeping Sophora were mor...
-English Fruits
Mr. Gladstone in a recent speech, made another point for the English people to consider. He told his audience that they imported five millions two hundred pounds sterling, yearly, of fruits from abroa...
-Notes And Responses
In the Monthly for August, page 225, I notice that you recommend Spirea lobata. I do not recollect ever seeing the name before. Is it a new or rare plant? Please be so good as to describe it. I have h...
-Disgraceful Public Parks
In the November number of the Gardener's Monthly I was much interested. After having taken a walk with you from the Chinese pagoda down and around Kew Gardens and through the park in Paris, I felt jus...
-The Flora Of The State Of Texas. From The "Anziger Des Westens." No. IV
Amongst the representatives of the underbrush along the Guadeloupe we find one from the tropics, Yucca filamentosa, ten to fifteen feet high, straight sword-like leaves of four to five feet in length ...
-Our Colored Plate
The publisher would like to remind the reader that the colored plate he has. been giving annually for some years, is not part of the original plan of the Gardener's Monthly, but is his annual present ...
-Transactions Of The Massachusetts Horticultural Society, For The Year 1879, Part I. Edited By Robert Manning, Secretary
One of the most difficult arts is to report correctly the discussions at agricultural and horticultural meetings. In many of the reports that come before us, it often happens that there is no evident ...
-The Hygienic Prevention Of Zymotic Diseases, By Dr. Thomas Moore, Germantown, Philadelphia
This little treatise though addressed by a physician to human beings, has an equal interest to those who have to care for the health of vegetation. Dr. Moore shows that all zymotic diseases, or those ...
-Dairy Farming
Being the Theory, Practice and Methods of Darying, by J. P. Sheldon, New York, published by Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co. This is issued in parts, of which I, II and III are before us. It is intended ...
-Report On The Progress And Condition Of The Royal Gardens At Kew, For The Year 1878
From Dr. Joseph Hooker, Director. Among an immense number of items of useful information, we may note that the Prickly Comfrey, has been identified by botanists as Symphytum asperrimum; but the one ...
-General Index To The Reports Of The Patent Office And Agricultural Department From 1837 To 1876, Issued By The Commissioner Of Agriculture
We have often wondered why such a work as this was never undertaken. Commissioner Le Due deserves great praise for it. It gives a value to the Reports of the Department almost incalculable. The Ame...
-How To Select Cows On The Guenon System
This pamphlet has a portrait and sketch of the life of Guenon, who was a French agriculturist, and discoverer of the method of determining the milking abilities of cows by the peculiar arrangement of ...
-A Gardener's Privilege
Maryland asks : A subscriber wishes to have the opinion of the editor or of some reader and correspondent of the Monthly, on the following case : A gardener on a private place has, in making pu...
-The American Pomological Society
A great blow to the success of the Nashville meeting is the death of the energetic Secretary, W. C. Flagg, last Autumn. It requires a great deal of correspondence and general hard work in advance to m...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society
The semi-centennial address of Hon. Marshall P. Wilder. This is an admirable contribution to horticultural chronology. The first Horticultural Society in America was one in New York, in 1818; but it d...
-January 1879. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Editorial Notes - Honors To A Florist
January 1879. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Editorial Notes Fuchsias and Ivy. By selecting kinds adapted to open air flowering, and associating them with Ivy, an English correspondent of the G...
-The White-Flowered Oleander - A Large Apple Tree
The White-Flowered Oleander This is largely grown by Mr. Wills for decorative purposes. The plants, which are chiefly imported ones, are grown in a moist, warm temperature near the glass, and thus ...
-Forcing Strawberries Under Glass - Prince Of Wales Plum
Forcing Strawberries Under Glass A fruit grower and farmer writes to the New York Tribune, that Mr. Meehan's view on Strawberries, under glass, may lead some one astray. I have seen the attempt ...
-New Raspberries - Botany At Dayton, Ohio
New Raspberries A reader, Kankakee, Ill., inquires where certain Raspberries, noted in our columns, are to be purchased. We fancy they are not for sale, or notice thereof would appear in our adv...
-Insectivorous Plants - Pennsylvania Fruit-Growers' Society
Insectivorous Plants An interesting paper on Mr. Henderson's article, has unfortunately been crowded to our next. Cure For The Florida Ant Pest C. E's. valuable article we hope to giv...
-Soil - Training Trees And Shrubs
Soil Although the rose will grow in any ordinary fertile ground, it succeeds best in a deep, rich, creamy soil, rather stiff than otherwise, but free from stagnant moisture. If your ground is a hea...
-Protecting A Leading Shoot Of Pine - Sweet Violet, The White Czar
Protecting A Leading Shoot Of Pine B., Cincinnati, Ohio, writes: I have a Silver Fir that I value very much, but every year birds alight on the growing shoot and break it off. It is a year or two ...
-Habranthus - Measuring Trees
Habranthus The Garden calls attention to these as among the most beautiful of Spring flowering bulbs. H. pratensis especially. They are from Chili. Wall Flower F. H., New Bedford, Mas...
-Squirrels And Larch Trees - The Temperaments
Squirrels And Larch Trees It is said on what appears to be sufficient authority, that in some parts of Scotland, squirrels do not confine themselves to seeds, but eat bark, and are particularly des...
-L. B. Case's Botanical Index - March, 1879. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. New Or Rare Peants
L. B. Case's Botanical Index This is a cheap quarterly, after the manner of Vick's quaterly of the olden time. The wood cut illustrations are remarkably accurate, and the information about the plan...
-Betula Alba Fastigiata - Berberis Hakodata
Betula Alba Fastigiata Branches grow very upright, forming an elegant pyramidal tree, resembling the Lombardy Poplar. Betula Alba Purpurea Foliage of a beautiful purple color, as dark...
-Broussonetia Kcempferii - Magnolia Thurberi
Broussonetia Kcempferii Japanese Paper Mulberry. A rapid growing tree, with large oblong leaves of a deep green color and with reddish ribs. Cerasus Japonica Pendula The favorite weep...
-Malus Halleana - Sophora Speciosa
Malus Halleana A beautiful variety of the apple, with flowers of a lively deep rose color at the base, and a lighter shade at the edges. Moras Tokwa A fine species of mulberry, much r...
-Prices Of Orchids - Whale Oil Soap
Prices Of Orchids How popular orchids are in England may be judged from prices often paid for them. At a recent public sale of the bankrupt stock of Rollinson & Sons, some of the moderate sized pla...
-Bartle's American Dewberry - The Apple Tree Borer
Bartle's American Dewberry A correspondent of the Canadian Horticulturist had abundance of flowers of this variety, but none perfected fruit. The Downing Gooseberry In Canada the fore...
-Olive Oil - Insects And Colored Flowers
Olive Oil It is said that a large quantity of Olive oil is made from the seed of the sunflower, and from cotton seed. It is belived to be better for culinary purposes than genuine olive, but thos...
-Strawberry Aphides - The New York Horticultural Society
Strawberry Aphides If any one troubled with this insect will send a few fresh specimens to Mr. Jos. Monell, care of Mr. Henry Shaw, St. Louis, Mo., who is making a special study of this class of in...
-Epping Forest - Kieffer's Hybrid Pear
Epping Forest This tract of 5928 acres of land near London, once a forest but now a forest no more in the strict sense of the term, has been set apart by the corporation of the city of London to be...
-Reforestation - Fern Pillars
Reforestation Chief Justice Agnew, in a letter published in the proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, December, 1878, notices that on his yearly travels over the Pennsylvania Railroad,...
-Progress Of Horticulture - How We Saved The Old Farm - Loring Publisher, Boston, Mass
Progress Of Horticulture The best and most flourishing nurserymen, are those who endeavor to increase public taste among the people with whom they live, Rochester is much favored in this respect. B...
-The Season - The Hollyhock Fungus
The Season A Northern paper, in a kind notice of the Gardener's Monthly, remarks that its hints are far too early for that Northern clime,- which is a good fault. To be too early with our hints e...
-Nierembergia Rivularis - Rare And Good Pennsylvania Apples
Nierembergia Rivularis In the remarkably full catalogue of hardy herbaceous plants, issued by Thomas S. Ware, of Tottenham England, is a pretty figure of Nierembergia rivula-ris, which reminds us t...
-Tobacco - Improved Dewberries
Tobacco The statisticians are reporting a wonderful decrease in the use of tobacco the last year or two. A Mr. James of Reed's Landing, Minnesota, probably believing this to result from a decreased...
-Catalpa Syringyaefolia Aurea - Western New York Horticutural So-Ciey
Catalpa Syringyaefolia Aurea This and not Betula syringaefolia aurea, should have been the name of the rare plant noticed in Parson's collection. Spanish Clover Under this name this M...
-Farm Implements And Farm Machines - By J. J. Thomas New Edition New York, Orange Judd Company - Hardiness Of The Firs
Farm Implements And Farm Machines - By J. J. Thomas New Edition New York, Orange Judd Company This well known and standard work, is in general use by all intelligent cultivators of the soil. No bet...
-Salvia Farinosa - Rose, Queen Of Bedders
Salvia Farinosa This beautiful blue hardy herbaceous plant, which, under the name of Salvia Pitcheri has been occasionally seen in American gardens during the past ten or fifteen years, is being b...
-Azalea, Queen Of India - Seedling Petunias
Azalea, Queen Of India Messrs. Aguste VanGeert & Co., Ghent, Belgium, have issued a beautiful colored lithograph of this new double Azalea, which really seems a great step in advance, though new Az...
-The Glendale Strawberry - European Growth Of The Douglas Spruce
The Glendale Strawberry This is a new variety raised at Akron, Ohio, in 1871, and with some reputation in the West. Fruits Of Michigan Mr. T. T. Lyon has prepared a catalogue of fruit...
-The English Oak In California - Entomologist To The Department Of Agriculture
The English Oak In California The coniferous timber of the Pacific States forms no mean portion of her wealth; and yet the hard woods have to be imported from the Eastern States. Quantities go from...
-The Pennsylvania Horticultural Socr-Ety - Elfrida (Ebert)
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Socr-Ety This, the oldest existing society in the United States, are arranging for their annual display to be held in their famous Hall, on Broad Street, in Philadelp...
-Lucie Lemoine (Lemoine) - Peaches In New Hampshire
Lucie Lemoine (Lemoine) Flowers large; rather loose; of a very pale lilac color, with dark veins on the upper petals. Free flowering. Mademoiselle Adrienne Barat [Lemoine) Flowers lar...
-The Rocklington Grape - Sweet Scented Galium
The Rocklington Grape Mr. John Charlton, Rochester, N. Y., sends a plant of a grape vine, with the following account of it: It is a large showy white grape, of fair quality, good constitution, a ...
-Saxifraga Pennsylvanica - Encouragement For Roses
Saxifraga Pennsylvanica W.H.P.,Iowa City, Iowa. This is the plant you send. It is widely spread through damp meadows in the Northern Atlantic States. Though devoid of beauty, it is an interesting m...
-Lilium Parkmanni - Japan Maples
Lilium Parkmanni This beautiful lily, raised by Mr. Francis Parkman, of Boston, between Lilium auratum and L. speciosum, is the subject of a beautiful colored plate in the London Garden. The color ...
-Begonia Roezlii - Jucunda Strawberries
Begonia Roezlii This new species from Mexico is said to be a very distinct character and very beautiful. The flower buds are said to represent the opening of the European Red Poppy, and the expande...
-A New Raspberry - Noel Humphreys
A New Raspberry J. C. C., Burlington, N. J., writes that he has a new raspberry, a seedling which he has tested four or five years, and which he is now satisfied is worthy of being better known. ...
-Silas Moore - Public Parks And Gardens
Silas Moore By a brief newspaper paragraph we learn of the death of this excellent man. His nursery at Providence was well known. He took an active part in the American Pomological Society, and con...
-Scarcity Of Trees And Shrubs In England - Pests Of California Fruit Growers
Scarcity Of Trees And Shrubs In England The Gardener's Chronicle says that a good variety of trees and shrubs has been very much neglected in England in favor of even slight varieties of evergreens...
-The Coffee Tree - Bees And Passion Flowers
The Coffee Tree Mrs. J. Atzeroth, Brai-dentown, Tampa Bay, Florida, has two coffee trees which have stood out and grown well, and for the first time borne berries this season. The gentleman who, a ...
-The Wheelbarrow - Gardening Illustrated
The Wheelbarrow Pascal, the philosopher, born 1623, we are assured the world over was the inventor of the wheelbarrow. How long it took to find this indispensable machine more useful, perhaps, than...
-The Value Of Absence - Single Tuberoses
The Value Of Absence The editor has been off pulling weeds and tasting fruits about Saratoga, Lake George, the Adirondacks, Rochester and elsewhere. When he gets back on the first of October, and s...
-Tuberose Seed - Grapes In North Carolina
Tuberose Seed C. D. F., Gloucester, N. J., says: Will you please let me know if single Tuberoses can be made to bear seed, and by what process? [The pollen of the Tuberose does not readily fi...
-Mr. Churchman's Raspberries - Magnolia Grandiflora In The North
Mr. Churchman's Raspberries In our notice of this fruit, it was stated that eight berries, in receipt at our office, made an ounce. A correspondent tells us that he saw some weighed of which four m...
-A Fine Elm - Iris Robinsoniana - The Wedding Flower Of Lord Howe's Island
A Fine Elm On the grounds of Mr. J. Fra-zer, of Rochester, N. Y., is a specimen of Ul-mus viminalis, about forty feet high, remarkably beautiful. It is a small-leaved slender-twigged variety, and o...
-Pine Apples - Gathering Grapes
Pine Apples The Banana has become so popular that the Pine apple has fallen in proportion. They are not imported now to the extent they once were. The importation of Bananas is enormous. ...
-The Thwack Raspberry - Protoplasm
The Thwack Raspberry Mr. Ohmer, of Dayton, Ohio, finds this a valuable variety for shipping long distances. Raspberry, Queen Of The Market This is claimed to be one of the best red ra...
-Avocation For Women - Ampelopsis Veitchii
Avocation For Women Attention is being turned by a portion of the press to the topic of gardening as a vocation for women. So be it; and yet it is as well to intimate sometimes that it need not be ...
-Rose Madame Oswald De Kerchove - Mr. Black's Plum
Rose Madame Oswald De Kerchove We have from Mr. Schwartz, of Lyons, a chromo of the above rose, which, if correctly painted shows a yellowish buff tint among the rosy ones, - a sort of Saffrano cha...
-The Plant Or Plants - Perpetual Strawberries
The Plant Or Plants I cannot clearly recollect now whether I saw one or two, but I believe two at Lake City, - were growing in the primeval forest bordering one of the lakes from which the town get...









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