A contemporary asks what evidence there is that this is a hybrid be-tween the Chinese Sand Pear, and the ordinary garden variety? We like to have such questions, for the guesses about hybrid fruits generally have but slender ground to rest on. It would be much better if such plain questions were more often put. In this case it must be admitted that the evidence is wholly circumstantial. The Sand Pear has been raised from seed about Philadelphia for a great number of years, and as far as we know never varied much in its character which is that of a large oval fruit, with the color, form, and tough leathery texture of a quince. Now, among Mr. Kieffer's seedlings, with the leaves and general habit, as all the seedlings have, of the Sand Pear, it produces a fruit with the form of the annexed cut, the rich glowing red cheek of a first class Flemish Beauty, the delicious perfume of the Sand Pear, and the rich melting flesh of our best Garden Pears. Now it may possibly be that this is one of those sports of nature which sometimes occur, and which in the past resulted in the production of a Nectarine from a Peach. It may be a question of great scientific interest to decide whether it is a sport or a hybrid.

THE KIEFFER PEAR.

THE KIEFFER PEAR.

One thing is certain, it is just as different from the ordinary Sand Pear, as if it were positively known to be a hybrid, so that practically the question is one of little moment. As a mere matter of opinion, seeing how closely the original parent tree and the ordinary Garden Pears were intertwined we incline to the belief that it is a hybrid.