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The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V22 | by Thomas Meehan



In Philadelphia and many other parts of the eastern section, the month between the middle of November and middle of December was a very mild period for an American winter, and the garden in many respects was very agreeable. Coniferous trees, with their great variety of tints and habits were particularly beautiful, and since the introduction of colored-leaved evergreens, suggested possibilities that could not have been thought of years ago. There are now Golden Retinosporas, Arbor Vitses and other things, - bronzes, greys and purples, - which would make excellent combinations...

TitleThe Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V22
AuthorThomas Meehan
PublisherCharles H. Marot
Year1880
Copyright1880, Charles H. Marot
AmazonFour-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long

Devoted To Horticulture, Arboriculture And Rural Affairs.

Edited By Thomas Meehan, Formerly Head Gardener to Caleb Cope, Esq., at Springbrook, and at the Bart-ram Botanic Garden near Philadelphia; Graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, (London,) England,. Member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Author of "American Hand-Book of Ornamental Trees." etc.

-January, 1880. Number 253. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In Philadelphia and many other parts of the eastern section, the month between the middle of November and middle of December was a very mild period for an American winter, and the garden in many respe...
-Communications Public Parks And Cemeteries
The Notes of a Southern Cemetery, in August, Rural Cemeteries in October, and Disgraceful Public Parks in November much interested me, as subjects long on my mind, and worthy of the attention of...
-The Pleasures Of Gardening
In conversation with Mr. Bayley Potter, the distinguished English Member of Parliament, who has recently been making observations through this county, in answer to questions by the writer of this as t...
-Improved Roads
The Woodbury Liberal Press tells of one of our correspondents, John H. Twells, who has gone to work and improved the public road in front of his property, at his own expense. It has always seemed to u...
-Azalea Mollis
It is not as generally known as it might be, that this particular species of hardy azalea is far superior to the old class of Belgian varieties; and that varieties almost as numerous as the old kind g...
-Herpestes Reflexa, - A New Aquarium Plant
Our country is so full of interesting aquatics of which little use has been made, that it is doubtful whether any new kinds will be thought desirable. It may be different some day, and then the follow...
-Trees And Yellow Fever
Mr. Stewart, who has resided thirty years in Memphis, writes to the Memphis Avalanche in favor of a large park with hospital to which any person with contagious disease be at once removed. He combats ...
-Blue Grass In Arkansas
J. M. B., Fayette-ville, Ark., writes: I noticed in the Tribune of some weeks ago a statement by the Agricultural(?) editor, that blue grass would not do well if sown in September. On the 20th of las...
-Raising Seedling Roses
A Queer one writes: In your answer to M., last month you say that new Roses are ' generally originated' from seed. Why generally? How can they be raised any other way? I should say New Roses are a...
-The Dwarf Catalpa
Says a Western correspondent: Are you not mistaken for just this once, when you say in the December number, ' The Dwarf Catalpa is the C. Koempferi of the nurseries, whatever it may be botanically;'...
-Ampelopsis Veitchii, And Ampelopsis Tricuspid Ata
A.G.,Cambridge, Mass., asks: Are we to understand from the statement on page 356, (Dec. No.) that Messrs. Ellwanger & Barry have four plants under the two names of Ampelopsis Veitchii and A. tri-cusp...
-January, 1880. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
One time window gardening was universally popular. Then came heaters and illuminating gas, instead of open grates and candles, and the pretty room flowers were banished to the houses of the poor. In a...
-Communications. New Hybrid Coleus
I herewith enclose you specimens of leaves of two dozen of the new Hybrid Coleus which have been originated last Summer from seeds, the product of Chameleon crossed with Multicolor and Pictus. If you ...
-Winter Climbers
The two divisions under which these interesting plants naturally group themselves, when considered for practical purposes, are the hardy and the tender: in other words, such as grow out of doors and l...
-Black Rust
In Professor Burrill's essay which you published in the December No. on this subject, he says that the mould (mildew) and the black rust that appears on Verbenas have been often confounded. He ...
-Portlandia Crandiflora
The Portlandia grandiflora is a splendid stove plant belonging to the natural order RubiaceŠ. As it is a plant to be found only in a few collections, I thought that it would be interesting to some of ...
-Upright Gloxinias
In our last, Mr. Fyfe gave some interesting accounts of the origin of the upright Gloxinia. Some of the plants from which pollen was taken are so widely separated from gloxinia that it could hardly ha...
-Glazing Without Putty
Very few so far as we know ever think of using putty to the outside of sash in our country. The glass is bedded in soft putty, then fastened in with triangular tin sprigs, and neatly painted. It does ...
-Toughened Glass
We have not heard much of this new invention which we brought to our readers' attention a year or so ago. But then it takes a long while for really good things to become generally known. The Gardener'...
-Rubusphoenicolasius
In the winter garden at Kew there is a fine specimen of this very distinct and handsome Japanese Bramble. The fruiting stems, which are from 12 to 15 feet long, have been fastened, on account of space...
-Torenia Fourneri
I was tempted to try this new greenhouse annual from reading an account of it in the Gardener's Magazine, and I am pleased to say that it has proved very beautiful. I do not know whether my treatment ...
-January, 1880. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
A friend suggests that in a magazine which circulates all over the United States, and possibly in no one part more than another, Hints for the month are useless. But the careful reader will note t...
-Communications. Prickley Comfrey
Referring to the close of my note in March last, viz: that it is not all valuable alike, and thanking you for the compliment paid me as being a conscientious cultur-ist, etc., I confess I like to b...
-Lepidium, The Bed Bug Destroyer
The world has, after years of experiments, not yet found the antidote or the cure of the phylloxera. Has it been more successful with that other pest, the bed bugs, that treacherous race which attacks...
-Short Notes
It is a pity that Dr. Grant should ever have adopted for the name of his grapes one so much like Isabella as Israella. The first for sundry i-easons has been abandoned, so far as I know, by cultivator...
-The Turkish Hazel-Nut Trade
A considerable trade has sprung up of late years between the Trebizond district and Great Britain in the article of Hazel-nuts, which are a very important source of wealth on the coast extending from ...
-The Wickersheimer Process To Preserve Animals And Vegetables
The Imperial German official paper, the Reiclis An-zeiger, has the following: - Mr. Wickersheimer, Preparator at the anatomical and zootomical collection of the University of Berlin, has invented a ...
-Good Peaches
The number of peaches which the raisers believe to be worthy of dissemination, is now so great that we want some standard of comparison, below which it is hardly worth while to go, say for instance in...
-Easpberries In Canada
Canada is the paradise of raspberry culture. They talk there about Antwerps and other choice varieties as amongst the most profitable to cultivate. The thickets and wild places abound with delicious f...
-White-Washing Trees
The Country Gentleman takes exception to our advice to whitewash trees, because white looks bad. Our contemporary does not seem to know that white is merely the technical term for lime wash,...
-Kieffer's Hybrid Pear
X says: - I see the Gardener's Monthly quoted as authority that this is an excellent fruit, and others also quoted that the fruit is worthless. How is this; and what is the public to think? [This...
-White Grapes
Critic, Boston, Mass., writes: I see you talk of'white' grapes, now I have never seen a white grape, but I have seen green ones. Would it not be as well to call things by their proper names? [O...
-Japan Persimmon
With a very pretty specimen of fruit, Baird & Tuttle, write: For your inspection we mail you this day a sample fruit of the Japan Persimmon raised in California. We retain a specimen of another varie...
-Queen Of The Market Raspberry
E. P. Roe, writes: I would be glad to learn the origin of the Queen of the Market Raspberry. I have a row of it that I know to be genuine in my test and specimen bed. Side by side with it I have Cuth...
-Various Fruit Queries
F. L. Flushing, Mich., writes: - 1. Is there a known remedy for the destruction of the insect, the larva of which you will find in the enclosed raspberry cane, and what do you call them? 2. How can I...
-Forestry. Communications. Notes On Trees In The Arboretum Of Humphrey Marshall
During a recent visit, in company with Mr. W. M. Canby, to the old garden of Humphrey Marshall, author of the Arbustum Americamimr we took occasion to measure some of his most remarkable trees. Hum...
-Forests Of Australia
Baron Yon Mueller in a treatise on the maintenance and creation of forests, just issued, says that the prevailing timber trees of Australia are the Blue Gums, or Eucalyptus, of which 150 species are n...
-Statistics Of Arboriculture
Prof. C. S. Sargent has been retained to prepare the statistics of arboriculture for the next census. Agri-culture, fruit growing as a part of agriculture, and arboriculture having been provided for, ...
-The Profits Of Forest Planting
In Europe, forest planting has been on the whole profitable, but chiefly when the forest has been under the special care of an experienced forester. In this way they are made to: pay from the very sta...
-Varieties Of Timber
Talking with an eminent ship builder, recently, we found him firm in the faith that there were many varieties-of the same species of tree, though the differences could not be detected by the most expe...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Curious Carolina Fungi
In your December number is a notice of two fungi, by Mrs. D. W., of Summerville, S. C, which, from her description, it is not difficult to identify. The first is undoubtedly Clathnes columnatus, not a...
-The Pear-Leaf Blister
The following excellent exposition of this disease was recently made before the Illinois State Horticultural Society. A wide-spread disease of pear-leaves in this country and in Europe is caused by...
-Climatic Differences
In the Gardener's Monthly for November I read with much pleasure a very interesting account of the Remarkable Difference of the Climate of Places Situated Under the Same Latitude, by F. W. Poppey. ...
-Periodical Disappearance Of Species
There is a tradition among the inhabitants of this locality, that two Sabbatias, which are the only species I have found here, appear but once in seven years; and, although I cannot quite credit the s...
-Distribution Of Plants
The world is full of wonders to every one who has not made up his mind to be astonished at nothing he may see. To the thoughtful mind there is much in nature to inspire wonder and admiration. The wise...
-Note On Caladium Esculentum
In reference to another article in the December number, on Caladium esculentum growing wild in Florida, I would remark that this plant under the name of Tanyah, is extensively cultivated in this State...
-Botanical Orthography
American zoologists have abandoned the practice of using capitals for specific terms that may be derived from proper names. Botanists are urged to follow them, and we notice in some recent numbers of ...
-Morphology Of Leaves
A. G., Cambridge, Mass., writes: What American mor-phologists (see p. 379) would say that all structure was of leaf origin? What have you in view? [It is of course well known to the students of ...
-Fruiting Of Wistaria
Miss E. P. K., Hartford, Conn., writes: We are told that you have spoken in your paper of the fact that it is rare for the Wistaria vine to produce seeds. Our vine, which is about twenty years old, h...
-Evolution Made Easy
The great mathematician, Kirkmau, made the following exquisite translation of a well-known definition: Evolution is a change from an indefinite, incoherent homogenity to a definite, coherent heterog...
-The Beheading Of Flies By A Western Plant
Professor Gray requests those who have an opportunity of obtaining the plant Mentzelia or-nata and M. nuda, both of which occur in our Western plains and prairies, to investigate whether this cruel be...
-The Cork Trees
One at least of the South Carolina Cork trees has perfected acorns, as specimens on my table truly indicate. Cases of the dispersion of seeds was a subject discussed at the British Association. Var...
-Salmon
Whether much has resulted as to placing salmon in the rivers of this country is yet unknown. The extent of the salmon canning on the Columbia river is so astonishing as to deserve notice. As many as t...
-Little Things
The value of little things was never better exemplified than in the career of Chapelier, the Frenchman, who collected all the crusts of bread thrown away in Paris, cleaned them, and put them up in nic...
-Editorial Letter. #1
About Raspberry time I looked in on the pretty little city garden of P. R. Freas, the well known and able editor and proprietor of the German-town Telegraph. It comprises, I should suppose, an acre of...
-Weedy Seeds
B. J. K., San Fransisco, Cal., says: I send you enclosed a newspaper slip, by which you see that a legal discussion is going on as to the damage to be borne by reason of dodder appearing among a crop...
-The Botanical Text Book
Sixth edition. By Professor Asa Gray. Part 1. Structural Botany. Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor & Co., 1879. The botanical labors of Prof. Gray approach the marvellous. How he manages to accomplish so much ...
-Report Of The Department Of Agriculture For 1878
Commissioner Le Due must be congratulated on having produced in this, one of the most valuable reports ever issued by the department. Too often the bulk of these reports has consisted of the co...
-American Manual Of Parliamentary Law
By George T. Fish, Rochester, X. Y. There are few Americans but are interested in the proper management of societies or other organized bodies. Certainly of all Americans, those connected with horticu...
-Russell P. Eaton
This gentleman, for twenty years Editor and Proprietor of the New England Farmer, has parted with his interest in this excellent agricultural weekly. Mr. Eaton is a high-toned, intelligent gentleman, ...
-The Indian Question
A friend who has in past times been the traveling companion of the Editor through wild Western regions, thus writes: I have just returned from south-eastern Kansas, and thought of you when I picke...
-The Superintendents Of Public Gardens
J. says: You hit the nail square upon the head when you say that the most perfect machinery is the most likely to win, and so reasoned a neighbor of mine who has been many years in Select Council. H...
-February, 1880. Number 254. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
When we spoke recently of pruning trees, it is hoped the frequently seen hacking of street trees was not understood. In most of our large cities, street trees have disappeared, in some cases because o...
-Communications. Two Well Kept Places
Being recently on a visit to Sharon, Pa., I visited the greenhouses of Mr. Boyce, also those of Mr. Curtis, judging these gentlemen from collections of plants at both places, they possess horticultura...
-Pressinc Earth Firm
Several days ago I took occasion to send an article to the New York Weekly Tribune, in vindication of that noted horticulturist, Mr. Peter Henderson and firming. I was sorry to see some slurs cast ...
-Wodenethe
The following notes of the beautiful country seat of H. W. Sargent, Esq., of Wodenethe, were contributed to the New York Evening Post: In the highlands of the Hudson, just above West Point, in the ...
-Memorial Trees
Our papers often note the planting of memorial trees by distinguished people in Europe, but it is right to record that this pleasant practice also prevails among ourselves. General Grant recency set o...
-The Destruction Of The Laurel Hill Cedar Of Lebanon
It will not restore the dead tree to life, and all reproach on the poor thing who cut down the tree will do no good now. But it must have some influence on others who might be in the atmosphere of a s...
-The Vine Garden
Portions of one's grounds especially set apart for the culture of hardy and woody climbing vines, would have a very beautiful effect if the trellises were designed to secure a variety of form, and the...
-Spiraea Aruncus
Those who have traveled through the Alleghanies, and have noted how beautiful is this plant in its wild locations, must have sometimes wondered why such excellent material was seldom made to do tribut...
-Dwarf Dahlias
Among the novelties the writer of this saw in the Paris markets a few years ago were Dwarf Dahlias. They were flowering freely in pots when not more than a foot high. The kind we then saw was pure whi...
-Hardiness Of Ligustrum Japonicum
C. A. D., New York, writes: I notice in your pages some discussion respecting what is called Ligustrum japonicum. What plant is meant by this title? Is it Ligustrum ovalifolium, or something else? If...
-February, 1880. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
This is the season when many things will require repotting. Many have a set time and season to do this; but some things require repotting at various seasons. The best time is just before they are abou...
-Communications. Datura Arborea
I send you to-day by mail, a flower for name, together with some leaves from the plant. Please inform us through the Monthly what it is. The tree is a soft hard-wooded plant, and looks capable of at...
-Heating Hothouses
Not knowing whether you accept items from unknown people, but thinking that perhaps what follows might interest some of your readers, we have ventured to mail it to you. Our text, we would quote fr...
-Euphorbia
As winter-blooming plants, some of the species of this large genus of plants are very useful, and ought to get more attention from those requiring bright flowers during the dull season of the year. Th...
-Salvia Splendens Ccerulea. (?) By Peter Henderson
In response to the query of a correspondent, in the January number, asking for some information about the new blue Salvia splendens (?), I beg to report as follows: In the spring of 1879, a Boston flo...
-Fires In Greenhouses
We have often told our readers, as a lesson learned from careful experiment, that wood will take flame: not only without actual contact with flame but also by the long continued accumulation of a comp...
-Everlasting Flowers
Many of the composite flowers have dry involures, which retain their form and appearance long after they have been cut, and enter largely into winter ornamentation of parlors and dwelling-houses gener...
-Flowering Of The Catalonian Jasmine
A Sub. says: Is it intended that the Catalonian Jasmine should bloom in Winter? If so, will you please tell me in your paper what course to pursue. I have tried in vain to make one I have flower ...
-Achyranthus Emersonii
W. T. Bell writes: In reply to 'N,' who asks, in January number for a description of Achyranthus Emersonii, I would say that in habit and the shape of its leaves, it is similar to A. Lindeni; but the...
-Names Of Plants
Mrs. S. E. P., says: Enclosed please find two plants to be named, one of them I found in a collection of ferns, unnamed, and it resembles a minature Arbor vitro. The other is a greenhouse shrub. T...
-Diseased Cyclamens
A Wilmington, Delaware, correspondent, writes: You would confer a favor upon me, if you could enlighten me on the following subject, either through the Gardener's Monthly or otherwise. received throu...
-February, 1880. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
At no time within our recollection has fruitgrowing been on a more substantial footing than now. In amateur fruit growing it is well understood that the kinds which may be best for a market gardener, ...
-Communications. Japan Persimmons
This new fruit has attracted a great deal of attention lately, but those interested in the sale of the trees, have been rather reticent as to their hardiness. Glowing descriptions by Japan travelers h...
-The Peanut
Our Peanut plays no mean part in the oil trade of Europe, judging by the following, which we find in the Gardeners' Chronicle. Our readers mostly know that the Peanut is Arachis hypogŠa. Large qu...
-The Best English Strawberries
In our country the best kind ever raised of Strawberries appear every year. It is remarkable that in England, the country above all favorable to fine Strawberries, they seem to have found perfectio...
-Winter Tomatoes
The forcing-houses at Senator Cameron's, at Lochiel, near Harrisburg, have their usual Winter's attractions in Cucumbers, Tomatoes, etc. On the 8th of January a visitor informs us at least a bushel of...
-The Kieffer Pear
A contemporary asks what evidence there is that this is a hybrid be-tween the Chinese Sand Pear, and the ordinary garden variety? We like to have such questions, for the guesses about hybrid fruits ge...
-Selecting Grafts Of Fruit Trees
J. F., Keswick Depot, Albemarle Co., Va., writes: Will you be so kind as to favor me with your opinion as to the value of grafts or scions taken from the superfluous shoots and twigs of nursery st...
-Forestry. Communications. Pine-Tree Insects
The following, from the annual address of the President of the Entomological Society of Ontarios from the Canadian Entomologist: The City of Ottawa being one of the great centres of our lumbering inte...
-Measuring The Height Of Trees
Just now much space is given to this subject by our contemporaries, - and it may serve a useful purpose to give here a plan which was published by the writer of this many years ago. It is one of those...
-Rapid Growth Of The Osage Orange
Prof. Sargent informs us that the Osage Orange planted by Dr. Darlington, near his home in West Chester, has lately been cut down. The trunk which shows but 47 annual rings, girts. At ...
-Tree Planting In Nebraska
The Union Pacific Railroad has made extensive plantations of forests along its line in Nebraska. These under the superintendence of Mr. J. T. Allan, have been generally successful. The trees are chief...
-Botany Of California
The first volume was issued several years ago. The other volumes are approaching completion. The work of some of the coadjutors have been issued in advance sheets; at least we have before us the Oaks ...
-Wearing Out Of Varieties
F. G-. says What is the received belief as to the wearing out of varieties? My Early Rose Potatoes do not certainly do as they once did, and this seems to be true of other kinds. Is it not the same w...
-Science By The Rev. Joseph Cook
This distinguished gentleman loves to show up what he regards as the weakness of many modern teachers of science, but his lectures show that he is very ignorant of the sciences he professes to review....
-Botanic Gardens
A correspondent of the London Garden says: I see that Mr. Meehan says ' the Cambridge Garden is a long way ahead of anything of the kind in America. The Bartram Gardens have little to boast of but...
-Freezing Of The Sap Of Plants
It is singular that arguments should still be continued in the way they are. A very intelligent correspondent of a contemporary concludes a very good chapter on hardy plants by the following conundrum...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Notes And Queries No. 9
We all like to hear of original occupations succeeding: many things of value are neglected as will hereafter appear in these notes. To-day we introduce a novelty in American culture. M. Desire Corbin,...
-New Use For Soldiers
Great damage to agriculture by swarms of grasshoppers in Hungary, a large area being entirely devastated, the local authorities have been, says an authority, to apply to Budapest for military assi...
-Sad If True
Mr. N S. Shaler in a thoughtful article on The Use of Numbers in Society, [Atlantic Monthly for September), comes to the conclusion that whoever will follow the subject of the wearing out of soils i...
-Keith Johnson
The death of the younger Keith Johnson, son of the great geographical map and book author, is much regretted. He was leading the Geographical Society's Expedition in Africa, and died of dysentery, 130...
-Editorial Letter. #2
Now, when the snow is on the ground, I look back on some of the pleasant experiences of the past Summer season, when I have met the friends of the Gardener's Monthly in many pleasant places; I think o...
-Our Twenty-Second Year - Thanks To Our Contributors
Entering on the twenty-second year of our labors with the Gardener's Monthly, we cannot forbear our thanks to our numerous contributors, by whose generous aid, we have been able to make American Horti...
-The American Entomologist
This magazine suspended nine years, has been revived, with Prof. C. V. Riley as editor-in-chief, and Mr. A. S. Fuller as associate editor. It will in future be published in New York, at $2.00 a year. ...
-Tea Culture
This gives a full history of Tea and Tea culture. In America, attempts at Tea culture have been made certainly since 1828. No real attempt of consequence was made till 1858, - but with the subsequent ...
-Death Of The Founder Of The Gardener's Monthly, Daniel Rodney King
This well known lover of Horticulture died at his residence at Roxboro, near Philadelphia, on the 13th inst., aged 62 years. For some years he has been in feeble health from paralysis, though naturall...
-Those Plant Patents
Though we have often given reasons for believing that patents for new plants are both impolitic and impracticable, it may serve a good purpose to give the following pithy chapter from the New York ...
-Editorial Courtesy
Critic writes: Pardon my question, for I only write because I know you like to have things just right, and I would like to know why you refer to the editor of the Country Gentleman as 'it,' as I no...
-Advertisers And Readers
The publisher hands in a letter from J. Q. A. D., of Owatonna, Iowa, who indignantly orders his Monthly stopped. He ordered from one of the firms advertising in our columns some Pearl tuberoses. W...
-How To Get Good Men Into Public Parks And Gardens
E. writes: In answer to your problem, 'How to get the office to the good man, who does not want it,' I may say, every good man will accept a good office, but may lack the low cunning to obtain it. Th...
-Going Round The World
A good correspondent is still wicked enough to tempt us to envy. He says: Since I saw you I have been round the world. The flora of the East, rich as it is, and novel to us much of it, does not comp...
-Academy Of Natural Sciences Of Philadelphia
The annual election for officers the last week in December, though usually a local affair, had something of a national interest given to it by the issue, on December 11th, of a portion of the American...
-March, 1880. Number 255. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
There are indications that the love of art in landscape gardening is meeting with a fresh revival. There have been several periods within the time of living men, when there was much enthusiasm for thi...
-Prune Shrubs, Roses And Vines
Those which flower from young wood, cut in severely to make new growth vigorous. Tea, China, Bourbon and Noisette roses are of this class. What are called annual flowering roses, as Prairie Queen and ...
-Communications. The Comparative Hardiness Of Certain Japanese Licustrums
In a late number of the Gardener's Monthly, pp. 354,1 notice C. E. P's queries as to the hardiness of Ligustrums Ibota and coriaceum, and the best methods of protecting them. The Ligustrums in questio...
-Origin Of Fuchsia Lord Beaconsfield
In reply to C. E. P., who asks for information respecting the origin of Fuchsia Lord Beacons-field in the Monthly for February. It was raised by Mr. John Laing, Stanstead Park Nursery, Forest Hill, ne...
-A Talk About Coleuses.-By One Of Themselves. Verschaffelth
Only a few years ago, not one of the Coleus family had a place in the gardens of Europe and America, and I have been told, that in our absence gardeners depended chiefly upon plants with showy flowers...
-The Cardinal Flower
Last Summer was the first I ever saw the Cardinal flower under cultivation. The ground was made very rich, while there was a Caladium escu-lentum in the back ground, so it had plenty of water. In its ...
-Lilies
As a general thing the Lily is not a success in most gardens. This is however chiefly from improper soil being used, or their being put into improper situations. The plants rather like the open sunlig...
-Disfigured Lawns
The Farm Journal notes: Germantown, where the editor of the Gardener's Monthly resides, a suburb of Philadelphia, is admitted to be one of the most beautiful towns in the country. It contains almost ...
-American Plants In England
The singular neglect of our beautiful American trees in England, seems to extend to our pretty herbaceous plants. Sir Joseph Hooker, in a recent number of the Botanical Magazine, says: It is indeed a...
-Public Roads
Col. Forney, in a recent Progress, gives the following from a clerical correspondent: As yet we have no public roads in America worthy of being named with the roads in the old countries. The publ...
-Scraps And Queries. Farm Gardens
An Ohio correspondent writes: It is surprising to see how little the isolated farmer cares about the beautiful in nature or art. There seems to be a sad lack of intellectual attainments, home comfort...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Cool Orchids And Their Treatment
Orchid blooms are justly celebrated and well known as the most beautiful of all flowers. Their marvellous and fantastic shapes have earned them such names as the butterfly, swan, lizard, dove flower, ...
-Destruction Of Greenhouse Insects The Peter Henderson Prize Essay
The following article is offered in competition for the $25 special prize offered by Peter Henderson, for the best essay on prevention and destruction of insects under glass: There are few of the i...
-Gloxinias
As the Gloxinia is one of my favorite flowers, I was very much pleased with the practical article on their cultivation in the December number of the Gardener's Monthly. I also noticed the remarks of M...
-Heating By Making Lime
Some years since greenhouses were to be heated by the waste heat from limekilns. It was a good idea, but it does not seem to have made much headway. Probably those who would like to save the heat do n...
-A Pretty Bouquet
It was a very pretty bouquet that was presented by the ladies of Bethlehem to the Editor of the Gardener's Monthly at the conclusion of his little talk on window gardening at the recent annual meeting...
-Disease In Greenhouse Plants
Subscriber, Syracuse,N. Y., writes: Being a constant reader of your valuable Monthly, I would like to ask of you a little advice. I notice as I go from one greenhouse to another, that there are a ...
-German Method Of Making Flowers Bloom In Winter
G. H., Yarmouth Point, Mass., says: I read in the Gardener's Monthly of 1862, p. 330, German Method of Making Flowers Bloom in Winter. I put in a piece of lime about the size of an English walnut,...
-Forcing Lilies
S. F. T., Saratoga Springs, writes: I would like to know about forcing Lilliums candidum and longiflorum. How long it takes from the time of potting to flowering, soil, heat, etc? I wish you could ma...
-March, 1880. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
There is nothing more certain, from cumulative daily experience, than that a great proportion, of the diseases of fruit trees come from the roots being in overheated soil. Species growing naturally in...
-Communications The Japan Persimmon
I send you to-day by mail a can containing two Japanese Persimmons. Perhaps you have seen the fruit before, if not, it will no doubt interest you. It is now fruiting in many parts of California, this ...
-Slitting The Bark Of Trees
The Connecticut Farmer is alive with this controversy. In a number before us one correspondent declares that the God of nature has taught them (trees) how to grow, and contends that the bark could ...
-Varieties Of Vegetables
One would hardly suppose there were so many varieties of vegetables as there are, until they examine some such a catalogue as that of James H. Gregory, now before us. We hear once in a while from the ...
-Firs And Figs
One of the most remarkable studies is the agricultural departments of some newspapers which believe that selections can be made by anybody, and thus save the expenses of careful editing. Just ...
-The Husbandman
Mr. Walter Elder remarks that there is scarcely a branch of science, but is of more especial interest to the cultivators of the soil, than to any other class of the community, and he points out the...
-Large Oranges
We do not know the size of the largest oranges produced in America, but the London Gardener's Chronicle gives the following account of some large ones produced in England: We have received from Mr. J...
-The Schumaker Peach
This is said to ripen between July 1st, to July 3d, in Fairview Township, Erie Co., Pa., where it originated, and instead of the usual ten days notice to the other early peaches to get out of the wa...
-Apples In Illinois
Mr. A. R.Whitney commenced orcharding in 1843. He has 10,000 bearing trees on 150 acres. His heaviest crop was in 1876, when he had 26,000 bushels. Insects are his chief trouble. He keeps his orchard ...
-Green Asparagus
People often say they do not care for white asparagus, because it is tough, that they want nothing but green heads for their table. But it is only when the asparagus first comes from the root stock th...
-The Best Grape
In a letter before us the writer says he has tried twelve of the grapes everywhere recommended as the best, and after half a dozen years of trial, does not regard any but the Concord to be worth gr...
-Permanent Whitewash
P. E. Cobden, Ills., asks: Can you tell me through the Monthly what to add to lime wash to make it stick to young trees through a rainy season? I find whitewash a good protection against rabbits as l...
-Catalpas
F. W. M., says: This timber is said to be better for posts than Locust. Can you give me some information about it? Is there more than one kind of Catalpa, and does one kind spread rapidly, and is th...
-Our Rocky Mountain Evergreens
Mr. Robert Douglas has issued a catalogue in which the nomenclature fixed by the recent careful researches of Dr. Engleman is adopted. It is gratifying to note this cheerful acquiescence of a nurserym...
-Picea Engehnanni, Engelm. (Pinus Commu-Tata, Parlat)
This beautiful tree is the most alpine of all North American Spruces, growing in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, at an altitude of 12,000 feet. It grows from eighty to one hundred feet high, with a s...
-Pinus Ponderosa
We have had the seeds of this tree from the Pacific slope under several names, but in every instance the seedlings failed to endure our winters. The trees from our Colorado seeds have stood the past s...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Those Catalpas Acain-An Inquiry
The great interest we on these treeless plains of the far west have in the success of forest tree culture, is my excuse for referring to the matter of the varieties of the catalpa. There seems to b...
-The Pear Leaf-Mite
In your magazine recently, page 18, Prof. T. J. Burrill, of Champaign, Illinois, is credited as being the first person in this country to discover the cause of what is known as pear-leaf blister. In h...
-Mites In Pear-Leaves
In May many leaves of the pear tree were observed to be covered with dark-brown blotches somewhat like a fungoid growth, but upon examination by Mr. Taylor, microscopist of the Department, these blotc...
-One-Flowered Cancer Root
I am reminded by the note of Mrs. D. W., Sum-merville, S. C, in the December number of the Gardener's Monthly, who describes a Curious Fungi, in form like an English snowdrop, of another curious pl...
-Accidents In Nature
The following paragraph taken from the Press, of July 16th brings to my recollection a fallen pine tree I saw back of the little settlement of Green Cove Springs, on the St. John's river, in the State...
-Eupatorium, Ageratum, Etc
Miss Hunter says: If A. B. will refer to page 127 of the second volume of Barton's Medical Botany, he or she will find the following statement: ' Most of the species of Eupatorium, of which Willdeno...
-Effect Of Cold On Insects
Psyche for January contains a highly interesting paper by W. H. Edwards on the effect of cold on insects. The chrysalids of Papilio ajax were frozen in a temperature of about 32, and kept in the ...
-Buffalo Grass
A. M., says: I have been looking over the February number of the Monthly, and think you are mistaken about the Buffalo Grass not growing at Cheyenne, as I saw it at Greely, midway between Cheyenne a...
-First Impressions
The Duke of Argyle writes his first impressions on coming to America to visit his son and the royalty of Canada. There is nothing particularly striking in his effort, the trees having most struck h...
-Gardening At Hampton Court
If we are not mistaken, Americans have found a rival to Washington Irving, if not his superior. In a short tale, A Passionate Pilgrim, by Henry James, Jr., occur many fine and appreciative passages ...
-Country Places Advertised
There was, not many years ago, an auctioneer named Robbins, in London, famous for the ornate mode of his advertising of mansions and country seats. A wag got up an imitation in which a great advantage...
-Perfumes
The use of perfumes dates back to the most remote ages. From those ancient times to the present they have been a delight and almost a necessity. The Egyptians burned them as offerings to their gods, a...
-Editorial Letter. #3
Standing in the observatory at the top of the Lucy Linder-man Library, on the south side of the Lehigh xiver, one has a beautiful view of the town of Bethlehem, on the north bank of which the chief pa...
-Dreer's Coleus Plate
It is seldom that we notice advertisements in the editorial columns, though we are often asked to do so. We desire to avoid even the appearance of anything being paid for directly or indirectly, which...
-Addressed Envelopes
It is a pleasant thing to receive a stamp when one desires a reply to a letter, but we must again beg of our correspondents not to send stamped envelopes, with the addresses already written on them. I...
-Robert Fortune
It is said that republics are ungrateful to their benefactors; but according to the Gardener's Chronicle, it is the same story all round. It says: In this great country, where the arts and sciences ...
-American Roses
By H. B. Ellwanger, reprinted from the proceedings of the Western New York Horticultural Society. This is one of the most interesting papers that have been contributed to horticulture for some time pa...
-Worcester County, Mass. Horticultural Society Transactions For 1879
Mr. E. W. Lincoln, Secretary. It is always a pleasure to receive these annual proceedings, and we can envy a society which has so intelligent a gentleman and enthusiastic horticulturist for secretary,...
-Priority Of Discovery
Querist. We have seen the paragraph you refer to, but have no disposition to join in the controversy. We may say however, that we believe entirely too much is often made of the credit notion. A man di...
-Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Society
The Annual Meeting of this very useful body will be held at Gettysburg, on Wednesday, January 19th, 1881. The next annual meeting of this Society will be held in Bethlehem, Pa., on Wednesday and Th...
-Kentucky Horticultural Society
The peach seems to have been unusually complimented by the Horticultural societies this season, the Kentucky society, as well as some others, having given it the post of honor in their proceedings. Ho...
-Nurserymen's Association
This body will hold its next meeting in the Grand Pacific Hotel, Chicago, on the 16th of June, 1880. We believe it will be profitable for all having the best interests of the trade at heart to attend....
-April, 1880. Number 256. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The best time to plant evergreens is always a disputed point, - some preferring the early, others the later spring. But the average planter takes the earliest advantage, for there is always enough to ...
-Communications. A New Border Plant
This plant, Bambusa variegata, grows to about four inches in height, having a wide grass-like leaf of a yellow-green tint, edged with white. The flower resembles the grape hyacinth, being of a purple ...
-Ducks As Insect-Destroyers
Being obliged to manure heavily a very sandy soil, and use whatever rich earth I could lay my hands on, the first year of gardening, on a new place, I was, as the spring advanced, terribly annoyed wit...
-Notes From England On Primulas, Etc
I think Primula rosea is quite as hardy as P. acaulis. I have some plants of it in an artificial bos, and although we have had five weeks hard frost without snow, and the plants were covered with a mi...
-Making Lawns
To properly make a lasting lawn, and to keep it in good order, taxes the highest skill of the horticulturist, and when well executed, is the masterpiece of ornamental gardening. Without it all other i...
-Fragaria Vesca
This pretty species is a native of our country, as well as of Europe, though not as often met with as the Virginian or common strawberry. It is the parent of the Alpine class of garden fruits. It may ...
-Grafted Conifers
Mr. A. Fowler, the distinguished gardener at Castle Kennedy, when looking at his own beautiful plants, wonders why there should be any prejudice against grafted conifers? The chief reason is that the ...
-Introducing Skylarks
Every once in a while some one writes to a nurseryman: I wonder why you nurserymen do not grow this or that, and it generally happens that they have been growing it all their lives, or have over and...
-The European Winter
The Belgian Horticulturists are already counting their losses over their terrible wintry battle-field, and reports like these are continually coming in. One from the Commune of Hastiere, says: Pe...
-Varying Taste In Gardening
A correspondent, writing from an old city south of the Ohio, says: Twenty odd years ago there were several large nurseries near this city, where one could get full assortments of trees and shrubs, -...
-Winter Gardens
These are becoming popular, in connection with public parks in England, and might with much propriety be introduced into our own country. Four or five acres are covered by glass, and plants almost har...
-Too Many Roses
Frederick Schneider II., President of the Horticultural and Agricultural Society, at Wittstock, Germany, writes to us that he thinks there are too many Roses. It is now too late for the time he fixes ...
-List Of Questions
Name and occupation of the correspondent. Address and date. I beg to answer the following questions: 1st. Which are three most perfect roses as regards construction and form, substance, shape, habi...
-Ligustrum Japonicum
C. E. P. writes: In the Monthly for February, page 40, I notice some remarks on Ligustrum Japonicum, by C. A. D.; also your request for specimens. I do not know L. ovalifolium, and can find no descr...
-April, 1880. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In this part of the world window plants are not given their summer airing until May, but every opportunity is taken to let them have all the open air possible, by opening windows and sashes wherever p...
-Communications. Portlandia Crandiflora
In an article in the January number of your magazine, a writer on the Portlandia grandiflora expresses the opinion that it would grow to the height of twenty feet, which opinion I am happy to say I ca...
-Ferny Facts And Fancies
In the Monthly of December, 1879, I see Mr. Parnell answers the query of J. S. R. as correctly and concisely as any one can do, without seeing the plants in question. The allusion to the Rabbit's, o...
-Origin Of Fuchsia Globosa
Many will remember the time when the old Fuchsia gracilis (magellanica) and F. globosa were the only ones generally grown till the hybrids with F. fulgens came in. A correspondent of the Gardener's Ch...
-Rupp's Primroses
We noticed last season the efforts of Mr. Henry Rupp to improve the Chinese Primrose. We have now before us a box of flowers in seventeen beautiful varieties. The variations run not only through shade...
-Crotons
Of the many who have heard of croton oil, few know what an important feature Crotons play among the vegetation of the earth. The number of species known is enormous, and they are found in wet or dry p...
-Injurious Effect Of Gas On Window Plants
We have always urged that it was the fumes of illuminating gas, rather than the dry air of heaters, which rendered the cultivation of window plants so difficult. How injurious these fumes may be, may...
-Cutting Camellia Flowers
Jane says: Our gardener insists that I must only twist off the Camellia flowers, and put a wire through for a stem; that it will injure the plants if I cut a piece of the stem off with the flowe...
-Plant Queries
Mrs. M. W., Quaker Hill, K. Y., asks: Will you, or some of your readers of the Monthly, please give me a little information through its columns about the following plants: What are the requisites f...
-Verbena Culture
Mrs. R. P., Clyde, N. Y.,says: In your February number, 1880, in your reply to a Delaware Correspondent, who is in trouble with diseased Cyclamen, you name disease, but fail to prescribe remedy. I ha...
-Centaurea
W. A. B., North Cambridge, Mass., writes: I have raised a new plant; it came up two or three years ago among other seedlings. I did not take much interest in it at first, but since it began to grow 1...
-Fine Cinerarias
From Louis Gloeckner, Albany, N. Y., with a box of very beautiful Cinerarias, we have the following note: With this letter you will find box of samples of Cineraria. Three years ago I got a package ...
-Frames For Tender Plants
W. M. G., asks: Will you please inform me through the Gardener's Monthly, what I can use as a substitute for glass to cover frames in the spring that will keep out the drying winds and hot sun, and ...
-April, 1880. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Fruit trees that have proved undesirable from any cause, may be re-grafted with more favored kinds. This is an advantage with some varieties. It takes an age, for instance, to get the Seckel Pear into...
-Communications. Non Production Of Fruit Trees. What Are The Causes? By H. M. Engle, Marietta, Pa
Read before Penna. Fruit Growers' Association, Jan. 22d, 1880. I am well aware that this question is easier asked than answered. There are no doubt various causes of unproductiveness, but I wish to...
-The Future Of Asparagus
I lately gave voice through the Monthly to sanguine hopes of better asparagus. I fondly thought that, like other joyous helps which the garden gives the table, asparagus might look for a future of sto...
-Early Grapes
M. P., writes as follows: In a catalogue of a responsible Ohio nurseryman received a short time ago I notice, Moore's Early Grape, offered for sale, and it is claimed for this grape that it is ten d...
-Packing Apples For Distant Markets
Many believe that some packing material should be used in the barrels to keep apples from bruising each other; but we have never known this to be necessary when the apples were sound, and properly bar...
-Ricketts' Grapes
In the Rural World Mr. Husmann gives an account of a visit to this well-known raiser of seedling grapes, and says: We had expected to find Mr. Ricketts' seedling grapes highly cultivated and in a ...
-"Cultivating" Fruit Trees
Some of our excellent fruit growers still insist, that jagging away at the young feeding roots of orchard trees all summer long is cultivating them. We have often shown that this kind of cultivati...
-Mushroom Growing
We have frequently stated that the chief reason why so many fail in growing mushrooms is because no care is taken to prepare the material first. In the usual way fermentation is too rapid. The Journa...
-The Sweet Potato In England
We called attention recently to the curious fact that only now, after a hundred years of American experience, were the English people beginning to know anything of sweet potatoes. In a recent number o...
-Forestry. Communications. Large Live Oaks
Neither of the five live oaks, Q. virens, of which I write, are as large as the Cawthorpe Yorkshire oak, mentioned in your January number, but they are very respectable sticks of timber nevertheless. ...
-How To Prepare Sumac
The New York Times says: Sumac is not a merchantable article until it is properly prepared. The preparation consists of gathering the leaves in July, along with the fine twigs, drying them under cove...
-Scarcity Of The Hemlock Spruce
Official returns show that in New Brunswick the Hemlock Spruce (Abies canadensis,) is becoming as scarce as in adjacent parts of the United States. It is found only in certain parts of the island, an...
-Curiosity Of The "Woods
Says the Salisbury, N. C, Watchman: Seven miles west of Salisbury, on the premises of James B. Gibson, is a botanic curiosity in the shape of a gum tree. About ten years ago one of the prongs (it bra...
-A Wonderful Tree
In the birch wood of Culloden, Scotland, there is a remarkable tree worthy of note. Somewhere about thirty years ago a little giant of the forest was blown down in a storm, and fell right across a dee...
-Re-Wooding Of Mountains In France With Ailantus Glandulosa
A writer in the Bulletin de la Societie d'Acclimation de Paris, says the Gardeners Chronicle, recommends the Ailantus for re-wooding the mountainous districts of France. He asserts that the Russians s...
-The Walnut And Its Uses
A scientific gentleman, commenting upon the abundant supply of walnuts now arriving in the French capital, enters upon a learned discussion as to the merits and virtues of that fruit and the tree whic...
-Forest Culture
A. most successful undertaking in forest culture is being carried forward by Mr. B. F. Peck, of Bethany, N. Y., who commenced his plantations four or six years ago. He has ten acres in his new woodlan...
-Durability Of Timber
Creek, writes, and we fully agree, In your explanation of the reason why reports on the duration of timber vary so, you overlook the fact that good healthy trees will make more durable timber than...
-Catalpa Bungei
Storrs, Harrison & Co., Painesville, 0., write: As there is considerable interest at present manifested in the different varieties of Catalpa, we mail you a pod of Catalpa Bungei. This Catalpa appear...
-Catalpa Speciosa, Warder
A middle-sized tree with grayish-brown much cracked or furrowed, at last slightly flaky bark and light, yellowish-gray wood; leaves large, truncated or more or less cordate at base, slenderly acuminat...
-Nicotiana Suaveolens
Reading in the Februray Monthly, Mr. Henderson's experience with Salvia splendens coeru-lea, has tempted me to give my own with a plant under the name which heads this note. I bought my plant of a Bos...
-Blue And Other Colored Class
The London Gardener's Magazine gives the following translation of a paper read recently before the Central Agricultural Society of France which will be read with great interest in our country where Ge...
-Hybrid Flowers
There is yet a wide field unexplored in the physiological conditions involved in the infusion of distinct individuals in one hybrid form. In chemistry the union of two different bodies always results ...
-Fertilization Of Yucca
The Garden says: I fancy insect agency is talked of in a very unscientific way by too enthusiastic followers of Mr. Darwin. I remember reading Professor Riley's dogma that the Yucca could only possi...
-Destruction Of Insect Eggs, Etc.
Reveu V Horticulture Beige, says that horticulturists expected to derive some compensation for the wonderfully severe winter of 1879-80, in the destruction of insect eggs and larvae, and are thunder s...
-Foliation
Inquirer, Burlington, Kansas. So far as known the buds of plants burst into leaf solely from the action of heat on the buds, and the temperature of the earth has nothing whatever to do with the act ...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Notes And Queries No. II
The green color of plants is, as is well known, due to the presence in the cells of chlorophyl granules, which consists of a protoplasm base containing a green coloring matter. To the chlorophyl which...
-Herbaceous Plants
We must keep some beds for color, but not carry this to excess. Spring flowers are the loveliest of all, and the art of the gardener is shown in securing a regular succession, from the early Crocus to...
-How To Make A Living
It should be one of the missions of the press to give encouragement to enterprises that are calculated to supply unsup-plied wants, for there are many people who feel that they could earn a living if ...
-Fossils Of South Carolina
Few persons are aware of the importance attached to the South Carolina fossils, especially those of Ashley river. These are now being worked largely, and the product exported for manures. Sea fowl in ...
-Drainage
England may in some senses thank herself for the ruin of her late crops. She has for many years drained her land to such an extent that all the rain-falls flow immediately into drains, not stopping lo...
-Editorial Letter. #4
A few days at Saratoga cannot but impress the lover of gardening how slow the beautiful art progresses. Here where so many of the most intellectual come for rest and recreation, one would suppose that...
-Public Squares Of Boston
When some time ago we noticed the filthy condition of the public squares of Philadelphia, and which give the city such an unfavorable impression in the eyes of strangers, much discussion ensued about ...
-Forest Hill Cemetery
Boston cannot boast of fine public parks, with all its advancement in horticulture: but it does have places for the burial of its dead which are equal, if not superior, to any in this or any other cou...
-Injustice To Gardeners
Employers are often imposed on by bad gardeners; and again there are often good gardeners who are imposed on by bad employers. Of this last class the Gardener's Chronicle gives the following illustrat...
-American Coal In England
A correspondent of the Garden says: Anthracite is extensively used and very highly spoken of by Mr. B. S. Williams, of Hol-loway. He prefers it to coke, because it is more powerful, and, therefore...
-Balm Of Gilead
Dr. De Hass gives the following particulars as to this far-famed specific for all diseases: The name of Gilead was sometimes applied to all trans-Jordanic Palestine; properly, however, it included onl...
-Mosaiculture
M. Chretien (writes our Lyons contemporary) has this year given us in the Pare de laTete d'Or, some pretty examples of what he terms mosaiculture, in the shape of beds containing mottoes and device...
-Fifty Years An Editor
The Germantown Telegraph has just passed its fiftieth year under the sole and continued editorship of the well-known P. R. Freas. The most remarkable feature in this half century of work is that the p...
-A Long Term Of Service
One of the pleasantest features of gardening in England is the kind personal relations which often grow between employer and employed. The famous gardens and grounds of St. Clare, in the Isle of Wight...
-The Cambridge Botanic Garden
Prof. C. S. Sargent's report of the garden for 1879 is before us. It is the last report he will make, and it must be gratifying to him that he leaves the position of Director with the garden in such a...
-Greenhouse Catalogue Of Robert Buist, Sr
No one can have any idea of the immense number of excellent catalogues which come to our table with please notice attached to them. It would take one-fourth our space in the busy months to do justi...
-Practical Taxidermy, For Sportsmen And Home Decoration
This is not a large book, but it is pleasantly written, profusely illustrated and neatly bound, and is an excellent little book for boys, or those who may be called to a life in the woods, either for ...
-Obituary
Died, at Bloomsdale, near Bristol, on the anniversary of Washington's birthday, Feb. 22d, 1880, David Landreth, one of nature's noblemen, and a gentleman in all that makes society of interest. Inherit...
-Alexander Burnett
Among the deaths of the month we regret to record that of Mr. Alex. Burnett, the well-known florist of Reading, Pa., which occurred on the second of March, of cancer in the throat, in his 65th year. M...
-Jacob Stauffer
Our well known and highly esteemed correspondent, Jacob Stauffer, of Lancaster, Pa., died on the 22d of March, in his 72d year. As artist, botanist, engraver, photographer, printer, soldier, civil pub...
-May, 1880. Number 257. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
There are few things more annoying to the good gardener than fall grass in the lawn. Our summer heats are rather hard on the kinds of grass usually employed for lawns, while the hot weather is just wh...
-Communications. The Hollyhock
I notice in March number of the Gardener's Monthly, an inquiry about the old-fashioned Hollyhock, if there is any place where they do flourish as in days of yore. In these parts they do. I have seen t...
-Improvements
The proper handling of shade trees is a matter of special importance to the public. I have in mind a long row of superb maples flanking a village street, and matched by equally fine trees across the w...
-Essay On Horticultural Progress
Read before the New York Horticultural Society March 9, 1880. (Concluded from page 132). It is estimated that there are 500 florist's establishments within a radius of ten miles of the City Hall, N...
-Hollywood Park
Long Branch, N. J., one of the finest summer resorts on the American coast, is not only noted for its bathing facilities, beautiful drives, villa residences and hotel accommodations, of which the West...
-Pruning Injured Trees
The winter in Russia, as in other parts of Europe has been one of unusual severity. Dr. A. Philibert, of Moscow, writing to Jean Sisley, of Lyons, France, speaks of the probable injuiy to fruit trees,...
-Tom Thumb Arbor Vitae
It may be within the recollection of many of our readers, that although it was well-known that the Tom Thumb Arbor vitse was raised from the common arbor vitse, and that it is common for this and many...
-How To Propagate Mistletoe
A correspondent of Gardening Illustrated, says: At this season of the year, when so many possess Mistletoe berries, it may interest some to know how to obtain plants from these berries. Select two o...
-The Japan Snowball
Not only in America have the merits of this beautiful shrub been overlooked; Shirley Hibberd notes the same of Europe, and says: If we have to say again and again that this or that is not sufficient...
-May, 1880. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. New Or Rare Plants
Rose Jules Chretien Judging by the colored lithograph just issued by Mr. Saul, we should think that this new crimson hybrid perpetual Rose is a very beautiful kind. A singular peculiarity is that t...
-The Hollyhock In Connecticut
Besides the note in another column, we have the following from Mr. T. S. Gold of West Cornwall . I notice an inquiry in the Gardener's Monthly, pp. 70, ' Is there any part of the country where the o...
-May, 1880. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Plants that have been in windows or greenhouses must now be set out to get their summer airing. Usually they are simply set out in the pots in which they have been growing. If there are a large number...
-Communications. The German Method Of Preserving Flowers
I observe that a lady correspondent in the Marqh number complains she cannot succeed in making things bloom with the German method of submersion in chemically prepared water. The ladies of my househol...
-Forcing Lilium Candidum
In answer to the enquiry of S. F. T., in March number of Gardener's Monthly. Lilium candidum treated as a greenhouse plant is an object of great beauty. It blooms early and naturally, and with less ca...
-Orchids At Baltimore
Having half a day at my disposal while at Baltimore the past week, I availed myself of the opportunity of visiting the orchid-houses of Capt. Chas. H. Snow, at Edgewood. They are not large, and are he...
-Theimandevilla Suaveolens
In the Gardener's Monthly for February 1880, page 44, Mrs. S. E. P. inquires as to the best method of cultivating and flowering Mande-villa suaveolens. It should be remembered that in its native count...
-Steam Heating In Greenhouses
W. D. Phillbrick, Newton Centre, Mass., says: I notice in your February number an article by R. G. Parker & Co. on Heating Hothouses, in which the writer advocates heating by steam, and says he used ...
-Damage By The Larv/E Of The Rose Bug
Having been very skeptical myself in regard to the amount of damage committed by the Rose Bug grub or maggot, 1 will give you the following experience of mine which may be of interest to the readers o...
-Amaranth, Sunrise
In Mr. Vick's Magazine, for Dec. 1878, there is a colored plate of this new Amaranth. The lower leaves are of a purplish red, and crowned with leaves of brilliant flame color. With his usual caution, ...
-Plants For Greenhouses In Summer
In visiting the various plant establishments in this country one feels disappointed in seeing nothing but Carnation Pinks, Bouvardias, Cal-las, Abutilons, etc. EThese seem to be only productions of th...
-Neatness In Gardening
It has often occurred to me on my many visits to various greenhouses in this vicinity and elsewhere, that there is a general tendency to neglect the details and a want of care in all gardening operati...
-Lamp Stoves
For small cabinets, - even small greenhouses in some instances, - lamp stoves would prove effectual heaters, but not much has been done with them. We give the following suggestive hints from the Lond...
-Heating Small Conservatories
The increasing taste for flowers about dwellings calls for better means of heating than has hitherto been effected. Almost all attempts to use the regular house heaters fail; not because the air from ...
-May, 1880. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In the cultivation of garden crops, the hoe and rake should be kept continually at work. Weeds should be taken in hand before they are barely out of the seed-leaf, and one-half the usual labor of vege...
-Communication. Progress In New Fruits
In the January number of the Gardener's Monthly, you state that Mr. P. Barry referred to the changes which had taken place in the last quarter of a century. An old catalogue revealed the fact that nea...
-The Jefferson Grape
I have a vine in my possession, sent me with some other seedling grape vines, on trial by Mr. Ricketts, the celebrated seedling grape grower of Newburgh, N. Y., one of the seedlings being his celebrat...
-A Raspberry-Root Insect
This paper was received in its proper season from Mr. Csesar, but it being in the holiday season I could hardly find time then to give it its proper attention. The roots spoken of in his note I forwar...
-Japanese Persimmons Again
About the latter part of April, 1878, one of a firm of importers came here from California with several thousand trees of different varieties, which he planted out with the view of working up a large ...
-Firming The Soil
A practical nurserymen or gardener can estimate the value of Peter Henderson's persistent teachings in regard to firming the earth about seeds and plants, and no one without practical knowledge or exp...
-Californian Fruits
It is interesting to note how the Royal Crown passes to various fruits, as they travel through our land. In Boston the pear would be the king of fruits; in New York, the apple; in Philadelphia, the st...
-New Bush Beans
As noted recently, our catalogues have now an immense number of kinds to choose from, and one can scarcely see where there is place for another one. But the English papers advertise the monster, and...
-California Raisins
The Riverside Press tells us that one firm received $794 for the raisins made from 890 grape vines, - and that the total expenses were $478.88. This only gives a a net profit of 12 cents per vine. It ...
-Forestry. Communications. Pine And Oak Forests
There is a theory abroad, that in the light sandy soils of districts bordering the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts, the pine and oak invariably succeed each other when either is removed by the agency of fire...
-Timber Statistics
From a late issue of the Lumbermans Gazette, I compile a few figures and facts showing the immense slaughter taking place in our timber lands. The figures cover the operations in only a few locali...
-Planting Trees
As the subject is of national importance, we lay before our readers the following particulars of what a single man has done in this matter of planting. David Landreth's first tree plantings in Virgini...
-Tree Planting In Massachusetts
We are pleased to learn from the Boston Herald that tree planting in Massachusetts is progressing. A few farmers in Nantucket and Cape Cod began about thirty years ago raising forests in this manner...
-Profits Of Timber Culture
About three miles from the residence of the writer, and in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, is a piece of chestnut timber land, about thirty acres, which was cut off forty-five years ago, and a new ...
-Scraps And Queries. Trees For Southern Kansas
W. M., La-zette, Cowley Co., Kansas, writes: I am about to plant somewhat extensively of various trees. I planted twenty-five Tulip trees, one year old last spring, and they all lived through a very...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Blue And Other Colored Class
(Concluded from page 120). Thus prepared, the six glasses were placed side by side, in the light, in the temperate house of the Museum. These experiments, to all appearance so simple, proved a veri...
-Some Early Virginian Spring Flowers
Few of our native spring flowers come earlier to gladden the earth with their fragrant presence, than the delicate wax-like Epigsea, or Trailing Arbutus. Its leaves are heart-shaped and evergreen, but...
-Shortia Calacifolia
The history of this extremely rare native, is now quite generally known, but for the sake of those who may not have heard of it I may say it is a neat and pretty little plant with Pyrola or Galax-like...
-The Missouri Botanic Garden
Recently we had to note that as a whole, the number of species cultivated in Cambridge, entitled it to the distinction of being the best botanic garden; that is to say, the best as regards the number ...
-Pronunciation Of Botanical Names
L., Baltimore, Md: How should Deutzia be pronounced? We have always said it as if written Dootzia, but our German gardener insists that it is a German name and should be pronounced Doytzia? [You a...
-Australian Botany
Mr. R. Fitzgerald, the Deputy Surveyor-General of New South Wales, has issued another part of his admirable work on Australian Orchids. This says a correspondent is the fifth decade of an opus i...
-Scraps And Queries. Foliation And Heat
E. F. H., West Plains, Mo., writes: In the March number of the Monthly, pp. 87, in answer to ' Inquirer,' Burlington Kansas, you say: ' So far as known, the buds of plants burst into leaf solely from...
-Books And Flowers
I can tolerate life said a would-be philosopher, if I have abundance of books and flowers, and he was not far wrong. Somebody makes the following verse: The hunter a fawn to Diana will slay; T...
-Planting A Tree
A beautiful custom, not too frequently followed, is the placing of a tree for a friend in his own grounds. Queen Victoria does this in memory of her visit, and her loyal subjects point it out as one o...
-Vegetation And Electricity
It may be that electricity is to play a great game in cultivation. So far, it is ascertained by experiments that the influence of electricity is probably modified by the species, by climate, season, t...
-Terrapins
Good, and the best things some times run the risk of being all eaten up, - the supply scarcely meets the demand. Such an article is the delicious terrapin, now so high priced as to be deniable to the ...
-Gardeners And Situations
Never for many years have we had so many gardeners applying to get situations. The country is overrun with them, and not one in a dozen will find anything to suit him. They are mostly newcomers into t...
-Floricultural Missionaries
It is surprising that those who love flowers and gardening, and know how much their own pleasure is advanced by having nice gardens and flower culture everywhere about them, do no more than they often...
-Evolution And Creation
By George C. Swallow, Professor of Natural History in the University of Missouri. Works of the character of this little pamphlet seem to crowd our table. This, coming from a distinguished Professor...
-Natural Science And Religion
These are two lectures recently delivered before the Yale Theological School, and now issued in book form. Our interest in the work from a horticultural point of view is chiefly derived from a stateme...
-Good Crops
We have read this pamphlet by Mr. Parry with a great deal of interest, but we must confess that the question how to avoid the blight, (fire blight) is not answered satisfactorily to our mind. Mr. Parr...
-Commercial Relations With Canada
Letter to George Brown, Esq., of Torouto, by Wharton Barker of Philadelphia. This tract enters on a discussion of the commercial relations between Canada, and the United States. It shows that the infl...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
As already noted in our magazine, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society had but a comparatively small interest in the magnificent Horticultural Hall of Philadelphia, which was owned by a stock compan...
-June, 1880. Number 258. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
About this season of the year, trees and shrubs transplanted in spring will often show signs of weakness. If so a severe pruning will help them. Sometimes there are hollow spaces about the roots - pla...
-The Alternanthera As A Lawn Plant
A carpet-like effect may be produced with the Alternanthera on a smooth lawn in the following manner: cut strips or figures out of the turf of any shape determined on, from three to four inches deep, ...
-Two Hardy Ferns
The Wissahickon is the name of a creek which coming from the north for some distance, empties into the Schuylkill river, Philadelphia. For several miles before reaching the Schuylkill, the Wissahickon...
-A South Carolina Garden
Professor Sargent writes: I was much interested while in Charleston, South Carolina, last month to find in an old garden near the foot of Calhoun street, belonging to Mr. David Jennings, an old sing...
-The Transplantation Of Trees
The King of the Belgians has purchased a large horticultural collection at Enghien, and among the trees is a giant palm, a Sabal umbraculifera, which is 42 feet in height, and the crown of which is ab...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Cool House Orchids
Since writing the Orchid Articles in the Gardener's Monthly, I have received letters of enquiry on the subject of Orchids, and others requesting me to continue the articles. I hoped that some of the o...
-Carnation Peter Henderson
A certain florist publishes in his catalogue, a caution to his customers, in regard to the above carnation, saying that it is almost worthless for the cut flower trade, by reason of losing its fresh a...
-Orchid Culture
In reply to Mrs. R. P., page 106, respecting the cultivation of Cattleya Mossia?, I have found this to succeed best in a temperature of 65 to 75 in summer to rise with sun heat, and 55 ...
-Eucharis Amazonica
Mrs. E., Melrose, Mass., asks: Will some one familiar with the culture of Eucharis, inform me through the Monthly if it can be grown as a house-plant? I read in a newspaper report of Mr. Tailby's es...
-Fuchsia Earl Of Beaconsfield
For the information of a correspondent of the American Gardener's Monthly - who asks in what year this Fuchsia was raised, and who was its raiser? - we may state that it was raised some seven or eight...
-June, 1880. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Much of the success of the fruit grower comes from his ability to forsee consequences. The quick-eyed fellow sees at once when something is going wrong, and does not wait till the tree is dead to find...
-Communications. Beurre Clairceau
The April Monthly says: This pear is voted in the United States not fit for any month. This I think means in Philadelphia and special localities. Elsewhere it turns out not only a surely handsome ...
-Beurre Clairgeau Pear
In the last number of your journal some one bears down heavily on the Beurre Clairgeau Pear. For the past ten or fifteen years I have grown and ripened perfectly, as delicious pears from the Beurre Cl...
-Potatoes And Melons
In your May number you allude to those who grumble at the anticipated fearful crop of potato weeds. I am not of that party. I welcome the volunteers. My experience has been that they excel the spri...
-Grapes
Lady Washington Originated by J. H. Ricketts, Newburg, K. Y. A cross between the Concord and Allen's Hybrid. Bunch very large, compact, shouldered; berry medium to large, deep yellow, pink where ex...
-Raffia Fibre
Mr. Theo. Schuster, agent for Mr. Wunderlich, places on our table a sample of this fibre. It is very strong, and is much better than anything we know for tying material where strength and neatness is ...
-Hybridizing Strawberries
J. G. B., Princeton, 111., writes: I am trying in a small way to hybridize strawberries, raspberries and blackberries, and of course there are difficulties to the uninitiated, and it occurred to me ...
-Forestry. Communications. Central California Forestry
The idea of planting forest trees is steadily gaining ground, especially in Fresno, Tulare, and Mariposa Counties. The timber principally planted here is Blue Gum, (Eucalyptus globulus) and Locust; ho...
-Forest Fires
We have always contended that the only way to make timber culture a permanent success, was not to keep before the public mere sentimental notions regarding it, or to pick out all the rosy scenes about...
-Catalpa Wood
G. M. F., Henderson, Ky., writes: I sowed, recently, a considerable quantity of Catalpa seeds for timber, and now 1 am told that there are two kinds, the White and the Yellow Catalpa, and that the wh...
-Growth Of Timber
C. B. P., Albany, Ills., writes: I have just been looking over The Gardener's Monthly, for September, 1877, and noticed a note on the rapid growth of hickory, and I send you a little of my experience...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Extract From My Note Book
Before setting out on the little jaunt up the Brandywine creek, I came upon a Paper Mulberry overhanging a fence at the Corner of 13th and King streets. This mulberry, like one which I had previously ...
-Ferns Of Southern California
The southernmost part of California possesses a great diversity of climate. There are low hills whose sunny recesses are unvisited by frost, and mountain peaks 12,000 feet high, whose summits are whit...
-Notes From Washington Territory
Another year has brought us little additional knowledge of the country and its climate, except as to its capacity for storms. The winter had been unusually cold and stormy, and cold rains continued wi...
-The Tallow Tree
An Australian paper says: The Chinese Tallow tree, Stillingia (Exeacaria) sebifera, and several other plants of Southern Europe and the Levant, are succeed-ing well and require very little attention....
-Picea Pungens
Professor Sargent writes that the following extract from a letter from Mr. John F. Baldwin, of Otley, Iowa, is interesting as showing that Picea pungens (Abies Menziesii of the Colorado botanists) w...
-Range Or Indian Corn
S. P., Del. Co., Pa., writes: There was a long article in the Practical Farmer, some years ago, on Zea Mays, our common Indian corn, in which the writer says that it could only be grown in North Ame...
-Drying Flowers
Miss H. says: Will you insert a query in the next issue of the Monthly as to whether there is any preparation known to preserve the color of dried plants; what it is, and from whence obtained? [V...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communication. Notes And Queries No. 13
Locusts die off in August, but before this occurs, the females bore holes in the ground on the slopes of the hills sufficiently large to insert their bodies; then the males, it is ascertained, cut off...
-The Cotton Worm
The United States Government stands high in the estimation of the people of other nations, by the aid it gives to scientific explorations and investigations, and it is chiefly because of its interest ...
-Go West
Dr. Cyrus Thomas, of Illinois, a member of the United States Entomological Commission, kindly reports to young men with an inclination to go West, that the loss from the chinch bug in Illinois alone, ...
-Poison Vines
We cannot recollect that any of the copious writers who described the wild plants in the Philadelphia Park, commended or even enumerated the great amount of poison vines; lately they were brought to n...
-Kind Words
While sending an interesting note for publication, a correspondent says: I was much interested in the last number. In my humble opinion it has improved wonderfully since 1872, when I first became a ...
-Dignity Of A Seedsman
In the recent election in England for members of Parliament, one of the candidates for South Lincolnshire was Mr. Chas. Sharpe, the well-known seedsman. The other candidate was a gentleman of leisure,...
-Prof. Cope And The Academy Of Natural. Sciences Of Philadelphia
Prof. Cope continues his attacks on the Academy in The American Naturalist, much to the regret, we are sure, of his best friends. It would not be just to Prof. Cope to say he does not believe in his o...
-S. Sands
Now and then we read of some one whom, it is said, brain-work has killed: but we have always doubted whether the sound, legitimate use of the brain was any more trying to life than any other kind o...
-Intelligent Florists And Landscape Gardeners
Referring to the Editorial Note in our last, a correspondent from Rome, Georgia, says: I read with much interest your recent editorial on this subject. It is just our situation here. I have long des...
-Coffee Culture In Liberia
That a man is not regarded as a prophet in his own country, often has apt illustrations. In our country, Mr. Ed. S. Morris has not been wholly overlooked in connection with the industrial developement...
-Pear Progenitors
The Florist and Pomologist has the following: In the course of a series of lectures, published some short time since by the late Prof. Karl Koch, the origin of our various fruits is one of the subje...
-Lecture On Squashes
No doubt the members of the Camden Microscopical Society were astonished at a proposed lecture on squashes, but by a report in a Camden paper of the remarks, they evidently went home instructed. Wh...
-The American Garden
This little paper, formerly owned by Messrs. Beach, Son & Co., has been purchased by Messrs. B. K. Bliss & Sons, and the first number of the new series appears with Dr. Hexamer as editor. Its scope ma...
-Practical Camellia Culture
By Robt. J. Halliday. Published by the author. General hints on flower culture tell a great deal to the flower culturist, and there are many good works of this character. But there is much need of spe...
-American Grape
Growing and Wine-Making: by George Hussmann, Professor of Horticulture in the University of Missouri. New York, Orange Judd Company. - Professor Hussmann, noted as a grape-grower, has already issued a...
-Horticulture At The Paris Exposition
M. Charles Joly has issued a little work entitled Etude sur le Materiel Horticole, which reviews and does justice to the numerous horticultural exhibits of the Paris Exposition. These exhibits consist...
-Muscle Beating: By C. Klemm, New York: M. L. Holbrook & Co
We do not know that horticulturists need any theory of gymnastics. A spade or a hoe is warranted to cure the worst case of dyspepsia. If people have no garden, there is the axe and the woodpile, and t...
-Col. Vernon Harcourt
So recently as our last number we had to note the generous action of this gentleman toward his aged gardener. It is now sad to have to record his death, at Buxted Park, in his eightieth year. It is re...
-Death Of E. J. Evans
The York Press says: It is with many sincere regrets that we announce the death of our esteemed and much-lamented fellow-townsman, Edward J. Evans, Esq., who departed this life on the evening of Mond...
-Notes From Col. Wilder
We hope Col. Wilder will pardon our giving the enclosed extract from a private letter. It will, we are sure, gratify his world-wide friends to note his continued enthusiasm in horticultural pursuits: ...
-Correction. #1
Mr. P. A. M. Vau Wyck sends the following: In my description of the Jefferson Grape, there is one mistake which I wish you to correct in next issue. The article says: ' I have fruited this variety te...
-The Nurserymen's Convention
As already noted, the annual meeting will be held this year at Chicago, June 16th and 17th. The Pennsylvania Railroad Company, with its usual liberality to these enterprises, will issue round trip tic...
-New York Horticultural Society
It is a pleasure to note the increasing strength and activity of this young society. It promises, if it continues in its present course, to become the most popular society in the United States. It ...
-July, 1880. Number 259. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Lately we were in a very stylish garden, which had at considerable expense been remodelled by a distinguished landscape gardener; and we were seated with the excellent proprietor in a summer house,...
-Communications. A Handsome Town
We have had occasion to note that the care of streets and sidewalks should properly be regarded as a work for horticultural societies or horticulturists to take in hand. What can be done when the righ...
-Beautifying Railroad Lines
About a month ago, during a trip to Pittsburg over the Pennsylvania Central Railroad, I noticed that the company was fertilizing, in a very liberal way, the inclined banks by the sides of its tracks, ...
-Standard Roses
It is well known that Standard Roses, as they are called in Europe, and which give so great a charm to European gardens, are almost a failure in our country. But we are satisfied from some observation...
-A Flower Sermon
The English papers tell us that on Saturday, May 1st, the Rev. Canon Farrar preached a flower sermon at the Slough parish church, at which about 1000 children, chiefly belonging to the parochial s...
-Hydrangea Paniculata
It will be remembered that last season Mr. Chas. H. Miller pointed out in our pages that the Hydrangea paniculata, and H. p. grandiflora were distinct varieties. We have heard this questioned since, n...
-Elaegnus Longipes
This perfectly hardy and very desirable Japanese shrub, is at present in fine fruit in the Kew collection. A figure of it is given in the Gardener's Chronicle for 1873, p. 1014. It is a spreading ever...
-American Trees In England
Nothing more amazes those familiar with the beauty of American trees than to note the indifference which English planters show for them. Through their parks and gardens we travel for days and see litt...
-Standard Plants
Those who visited the grounds around Horticultural Hall in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, last year, must have been struck with the singular beauty of the tree Lantanas, that is to say, plants trained ...
-Old-Fashioned Gardening
A Lady writes to the Gardener's Chronicle: For 1 think the love of flowers and of gardening grows with advancing age and inability to garden, and the same lady who as a girl thought it a great nuis...
-About Honeysuckles. Loniceras
A writer in the London Garden gives the following interesting sketch of the Honeysuckles known in English gardens. It includes the upright as well as the twining kinds. It is interesting, as enabling ...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. How To Crow Chinese Primroses Successfully
As many florists in the culture of Primroses, and parties growing them for their own use, fail in their cultivation, it may be of importance to point out some of the causes. In many cases the seeds ar...
-Heating Greenhouses
In answer to W. D. Phillbrick in April No., I would make the following statements of greenhouses No. 1 and 2. No. 1. No. 2. 2000 feet glass. 500...
-Fragrant Flowers
The pleasures of gardening, both indoors and in the open air, are greatly promoted by the introduction of sweet scented flowers. At the present time in many collections, the Olea fragrans, Daphne Indi...
-Stephanotis Floribunda
Mrs. B P. wishes to know of a white climber for her conservatory, I think S. floribunda will answer her purpose. Equal parts of turfy loam and peat with sand to insure porosity will form a good compos...
-Window Feowers
We all like brief, pithy paragraphs, telling a great deal in a few words. Here is a good specimen from the pen of Captain Franklin Howland, who does the Farm and Home column of the New Bedford Eveni...
-Bouquet Making
The Gardeners Chronicle tells us: We have heard a lady who was an accomplished flower painter lament that, although she could portray flowers on canvas in a way to elicit the approval of those compet...
-Anthurium Andrearium
Those who know the great beauty of the Flamingo plant, Anthurium Scherzerianum, will be glad to know that a new beauty of this class has appeared under the above name that is likely to be quite as pop...
-Prices Of Orchids
We have often pointed out to our readers, that one advantage of owning a collection of Orchids, is that they increase in value with age, while many other plants become too large and unwieldy. Hence if...
-July, 1880. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonabe Hints
It takes a long while for a good idea to become popular. The Gardener's Monthly long ago showed the advantage of rooting Strawberries in small pots for fall planting, and expressed an opinion that the...
-Communications. Progress In New Fruits
Under this heading, in the May No. of the Gardener's Monthly, Mr. Chas. Downing refers to a statement said to have been made by me in regard to the changes that had taken place during the last quarter...
-Facts Are Stubborn Things
Under the heading of Editorial Notes, in the March number of the Monthly, page 79, I see the God of nature, man, has something to say against slitting the bark of trees. With equal propriety, the...
-The Peach Aphis
I notice you frequently write about the Peach Yellows. We know but little about the yellows here: in fact I do not know that I can say I could certainly point out one single case of the yellows. I ...
-Protecting Young Apple Trees From Borers
The apple tree borer (Saperda bivittata) is the most destructive insect in our young apple orchards. More trees are killed by this insect in New Hampshire than in any other way. In large trees there s...
-The Sweet Pippin Apple
I write to you in regard to a seedling apple that has been in cultivation about eighty years, and has some very valuable qualities. So I send you a specimen of it, and would like to have your opinion ...
-A Furore In New Grapes
A gentleman in the East advertised for the first time, a year ago, a new Grape; and now we read in the annual address of a distinguished pomologist, that said grape is making a 'furore' in Ohio. ...
-American Grape Vines And The Phylloxera
The Gardener's Chronicle says: As to the powers of resistance to the grape-louse offered by certain of these American varieties (for this precious faculty is not possessed by all), there is no doubt ...
-The Mann Apple
The tree is full as hardy as the Duchess of Oldenburgh, and the fruit will keep as long as the Roxbury Russet. Mr. Moody, of Lockport, has kept the Iruit in good order until the first of July in an or...
-The Phylloxera In Europe
We know very well that the Phylloxera is a native of the new world, and has been introduced into the old; but the French have the question yet under active discussion. The editor of La Vigne Fran-cais...
-Peaches
On May 11th, came to hand some forced Peaches from Mr. Charles Black, Hights-town, N. J. Saunders, Amsden and Wilder, were all about the same size, about 2 1/4 ounces in weight, very much alike in gen...
-Forestry. Communications. American Forestry
An excellent account of some of the good work being done in American Forestry appeared recently in the Boston Herald, and which we give our readers below. We might take exception to some of the ideas ...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Ferns Of Southern California
By this time we have ascended the ravine far enough to find a few oaks and pines on the steep sides, mingling their shade with that of the alders and cottonwood which border the stream. Here and there...
-On The Fertilization Of Yucca
Read before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, at the meeting at Saratoga, by Thomas Meehan, Fellow of the Association. In the transactions of the Academy of Science of St. Lo...
-Notes From South Carolina
I should like to call the attention of your readers to a valuable plant growing profusely in these regions, known in the botanical parlance as Liatris odoratissima, but to us at the South as Vanilla G...
-Directions Of Nutrition
Prof. Karl Koch, in one of his lectures, says: The view held by pomologists and fruit gardeners, that the nutritive substances move only in a downward direction, is refuted by their own practices. ...
-Fungus Spores
A species of Phallus, a fungus which appears regularly in the same spot in successive years, producing an immense number of spores - millions on millions, probably - and which, from their dust-like na...
-Destruction Of Plants In Winter
It has been often recorded in our magazine that it is the hygrometrical condition, conjointly with the thermometrical, that decides the hardiness of plants in most cases where the tissues do not burst...
-Forests And The Atmosphere
The Gardener's Chronicle says: From concurrent ther-mometric observations made in forests and away from them, at 1.40 and at 14 meters above the ground level, M. Fautrat arrives at the following con...
-The Golden Cup Oak
The golden cup oak (Q. chrysoleps) is a puzzle to botanists; and well it may be, since it occurs as a lofty forest tree and also as a tiny bush. Dr. Kellogg, of San Francisco, pronounces the dwarf for...
-Relative Influence Of Sex In Fertilization
It has been stated that, in order to obtain double flowers, it is advisable to make use of the pollen from double flowers, where it is possible to obtain it, and to apply it to the stigma of simple fl...
-Varieties Of Pitcher Plants
Mrs. C. writes. I would like to ask you about some Sarracenias which we found during our southern trip. Two varieties we have not found described - one with a bright yellow flower, about the color of...
-Indigenous And Exotic
F. K., St. Louis, Mo., writes: We have here an abundance of a white flowered weed which is one of the worst of our wild things. But when talking with a friend recently about it, I was corrected. He ...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Notes And Queries No. 14
The Black Oat, Avena sativa, has become a terrible weed in South Australia, which is singular, as the variety, the sterilis, its near relative, is a great blessing to California, over which it has bee...
-Matilda
Yes, it is one of the curious and new impressions of travel to an American to find large trees growing in European ruins. At the old Schloss at Baden Baden, they are found growing in what must have be...
-More Wax
The white Chinese wax has a curious history. It is the result of an unhealthy condition aggravated by an uncongenial climate. In the province of Keen Chang there grows an abundance of the Ligustrum lu...
-Editors And Correspondents
The Garden says: Our friend Meehan is enlightening us as to our decadence, in his Gardener's Monthly: - ' England may in some senses thank herself for the ruin of her late crops. She has for many...
-Charles C. Frost
Lord Byron somewhere tells us that it is one of the easiest things in the world to be a self-sacrificing philosopher when all the world is looking on and applauding the good deeds. Generally, the devo...
-The Almond
The Almond, like the Pomegranate, is one of the very earliest trees mentioned in ancient literature. The history of the tree is bound up with that of the original annals of mankind; we have a referenc...
-Rosewood
One of the American journals says that it has puzzled many people to decide why the dark wood so highly valued for furniture should be called rosewood. It color certainly does not look much like a ro...
-An Ancient Seed Shop
The Standard of Sept. 27, in its report of the recent excavations at Pompeii thus speaks of the discoveries that were made: As it was impossible to be at all the points of interest, ten new excavati...
-Flowers And Ferns Of The United States
Charles Robson & Co., Philadelphia, Penna. The second series of this work is now complete, and the bound volumes ready for issue. This makes now 192 of the handsome wild flowers of our country that ha...
-Success With Small Fruits
By E. P. Roe. Dodd, Mead & Co., New York. Have you seen Roe's ' Success with Small Fruits?' said the good Col. Wilder, as the writer of this took his arm to walk into the old South Church. The repl...
-Mississippi Valley Horticultural Society
Arrangements have been made on a scale that must ensure success, by which a Mississippi Horticultural Society is to be established. An exhibition on a first-class scale is to be held September 7th, 8t...
-Nurserymen's Meeting At Chicago
By the time this appears in print the annual meeting of the American Association will have been held at Chicago, and it is to be hoped with a success it deserves. It is composed of the best men in the...
-August, 1880. Number 260. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Over and over again, as we travel through the country, are we impressed with the fault of over-large places. Many gardens are laid out in the flush of some temporary business success, and they become ...
-The Public Squares Of Philadelphia
We pointed out last year the disgraceful condition of these little gardens in the great city, and the city daily papers have since taken up the subject with a will. But it seems to us there is nothing...
-Pruning Of Osage Hedges
Mr. James Hogg says in the Rural New Yorker: The season after they are planted each plant will throw up several shoots; these are to be shortened back the ensuing spring to within six inches of the ...
-Hardy Ever-Blooming Roses
We want nothing worse in the gardens of the Northern States. Our improved prairie roses are beautiful while they last, as is the old crimson Boursault, and others; but when we come to ever-bloomers we...
-Improved Hepaticas
This pretty American plant, Hepatica triloba, or Silverwort, is very popular in England as an early spring flower. The Gardener's Record says: There is now, says the Garden, in great beauty at the Ha...
-Roads And Paths
As already noted in the Gardener's Monthly, it is a matter of surprise to every intelligent foreigner, that with so much in America to praise, our roads and paths should be generally so execrable. He ...
-Euonymus Radicans
We have called attention to the merits of this very hardy evergreen as a wall or tree creeper. Mr. Shirley Hibberd in the Gardener's Magazine, has also a word to say in this connection: This cheap, f...
-Tree Or Standard Wistarias
The plan of first training a Wistaria up a stake for a couple of years, and then taking away the stake and compelling it to be self-supporting, has been urged at various times during the past twenty y...
-The Cedar Of Lebanon
This interesting tree is not very common in America. It suffers like many coniferous trees, from cold, frosty winds when young, but if protected a little till it is eight or ten years old by other tre...
-Rose La France
M. Guillot, Jr , Rose grower, 27 Chemin-des-Pins, Lyon-Guillotiere (Rhone), is the raiser of the magnificent rose under notice. M. Guillot, Jr., gives the following particulars as to how he obtained t...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Notes Of Fuchsia Serratifolia
Among the many varieties of Fuchsias that have been introduced into cultivation, the Fuchsia serratifolia is one of the most distinct, and is worthy of being more extensively cultivated than it is. As...
-New Life Geranium
Had this novelty maintained its original price I would never have been its happy owner; but when it fell from $5.00 to 50 cents, one could quite well afford to add such a very distinguished plant to a...
-Culture Of Pimelia Hendersoni And Other Plants
The excellent hints on this topic by the editor of the Gardener's Monthly, from time to time, has induced me to note a few of the beautiful genera which compose the flora of New South Wales, and which...
-Cut Flower Trade
The cut flower trade for some years has been growing with wonderful rapidity, till now in New York city alone the business has reached several million dollars annually. Growers of cut flowers realizin...
-Carnations
The variety called Peter Henderson, sent out by Nanz & Neuner, a few years since, I have found to be the best white I have yet grown for winter bloom. It is a stronger grower and better bloomer than D...
-Steam Heating Of Greenhouses
I have frequently been spoken to by friends to give people interested in horticultural progress, and especially in the construction and heating of greenhouses, the benefit of the results obtained by m...
-Steam Heating. #1
Steam is not simple enough, for we cannot trust it to the care of any boy or any laboring man, who does not understand it, without the danger of the steam either condensing or exploding. Whereas an ex...
-Good Greenhouse Plants
There are no doubt many among your readers who are interested in beautiful greenhouse plants, and I have thought the accompanying list of the best of these from New South Wales and other parts would b...
-New Double Var. Sweet Alyssum
Single variegated Sweet Alyssum is not a nov-elty, but this year I am indebted to Mr. John Goode for a double variegated, appropriately named the Gem. Seeing it advertised in the Horticulturist, I sen...
-Floral Gossip
We must not place the rose American Banner in the same category with rose Beauty of Glazenwood, for the latter was considered a fraud from the first time it was exhibited, by such judges in Englan...
-Improvements In Propagating
Possibly in no department of gardening has there been such wonderful progress made as in the art of propagation. It is pleasant reading to go back over the gardening of magazines of but a quarter cent...
-Scraps And Queries. Orchid Culture
Mrs. R. P. writes: Permit me through your columns to return thanks to Walter Gray, of Philadelphia, for replies to inquiries as to orchid culture, etc, also for article on same subject by Chas. H. Sn...
-August, 1880. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The Grape-vine at this season will require attention, to see that the leaves are all retained healthy till thoroughly ripened. It is not a sign of healthiness for a vine to grow late; on the contrary,...
-Communications. Marketable Pear Trees
As the Monthly is the best medium through which to reach our eastern nurserymen, you will please allow me room to find a little fault and offer a few suggestions. It is a fact well known that about...
-Japan Persimmons In The Orchard House
A portrait hangs on the wall before me, and the benignant features of an upright and intelligent gentleman seem to gaze steadfastly from the frame, at the writer, and a kindly smile lights up the once...
-Making Things Pay
Those who make the most money in business are often those who have the knack of making two or more things work into each others hands. Now some people will go to work to make a business of poultry rai...
-Standard Gooseberries
It is now some years since the idea of grafting gooseberries was first introduced to the attention of American horticulturists by Mr. Bulot through our pages. The subsequent experience with the foreig...
-Cracked Pears
Who ever has had anything to do with pears must have noticed how con fused are the ideas of writers about pear diseases. We read of pear blight, and cracked pears, the writer evidently not recogn...
-Edible Earth
We find the following in an English paper: Dr. Lowe, New York, has recently tested a sample of earth eaten by the Ainos, or aborigines of Japan. Several pounds of the earth are mixed with the bulbs o...
-Josephine De Malines Pear
It is not uncommon to find letters from America, in European magazines, which tell very strange things. But a paper of another sort is one in the Garden of May 8th, by Mr. H. Hendricks, of Kingston, N...
-Scale On Orchard Trees
As already stated in our magazine, the writer of this applied pure linseed oil to the scale on hundreds of his apple or pear trees with complete success, while others who have tried it complain that i...
-Yellows In The Peach
A Michigan friend says: You will see by the proceedings of the Washtenaw County Pomological Society, that your views on the Yellows are somewhat misunderstood as I think. I send you the Michigan Far...
-The Orange Gooseberry
H. M. Engle, Marietta, Pa., writes: We send you to-day Orange, Cluster and Houghton Gooseberries. You can judge their comparative earliness. We find the Cluster sold for Houghton, but the latter, - ...
-Forestry. Communications. The Confused Catalpas
Considerable confusion still exists in some quarters, it would seem, as to which of the two Asiatic Catalpas, now in general cultivation in this country, is Catalpa Ksempferi, and which is the Chinese...
-Editorial Notes. Forest Fires
Our attention has been called to the following from the New York World: A lecture of Mr. B. G. Northrop, Secretary of the Connecticut Board of Education, on Rural Improvement, has been publishe...
-Natural History And Science. Three Varieties Of Asclepias
Many varieties of the Asclepiadacse or Milkweed family, natives of Virginia, are now brightening the woods and fields by their showy flowers. Among others, the variegated Milkweed or A. variegata, wit...
-The Resurrection Plant
A very odd plant was recently given to me that is a native of Western Texas. The roots and leaves seemed perfectly withered and dead. I placed it in a goblet of water, and in a few hours observed that...
-Growth Of Trees In Frozen Soil
In your May number, page 151, in reply to E. F. H., you say * * * Again cases, etc. * * * There is every reason to believe that in that severe winter the ground in that border was frozen two or three...
-Water On Rocks
Even the continuous dropping of water will in time wear away the hardest rock. Nothing in nature is absolutely still. Motion seems an inherent property of matter. In some cases this motion which seems...
-Poisoning By Stramonium
The Philadelphia Public Ledger says: Mr. and Mrs. Chambers, Mrs. White and Mrs. Allen reside at 2450 North Fourth Street, the latter two being boarders. Mrs. Chambers formerly resided in New England...
-The Origin Of Life
No one who sees any form of plant-life but wonders if it were always as it is now. The history of the earth shows that there has been a succession of forms in plant-life. Thousands of species have bec...
-Freezing Of The Sap In Plants
In many discussions differences of opinions arise from failure of one side to grasp just what the other means. A good illustration of this is furnished by the following from the pen of Mr. Hovey to th...
-Wilson, The Ornithologist
The little stone building used in connection with a wheelwright's shop, in which the celebrated Wilson taught school, on the west bank of the Schuylkill near Gray's Ferry bridge, Philadelphia, on a re...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Notes And Queries-No. 15
Dr. Rosenthal counts, among twelve hundred useful plants, three hundred and sixty species which are fit for weaving, spinning, basket-making, cordage, etc, species which are distributed over the whole...
-Odors
There can be no doubt that something is yet to be learned or re-learned with regard to scent. In dogs, etc, instinct is credited instead of smell. The ancients, it is thought, knew or studied somethin...
-Trees Of Fairmount Park
The Fairmount Park Commission of Philadelphia have issued a catalogue of the trees and shrubs, not of the whole Park, but of those only which are to be found within a reasonable distance of the famous...
-Phylloxera In Europe
We have from Mons. Andre, Secretary of the Central Horticultural Society of France, 49 Rue Blanche, Paris, a circular letter in relation to the ridiculous action of the Berne Convention, by which hort...
-Prof. Cope And The Academy Of Natural Sciences
A friend who disapproves of the peculiar attitude of Professor Cope towards the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, calls our attention to some points in our June paragraph, which he thinks d...
-Dust In Fishy Water
The British Trade Journal, of June 1, has a savage review of an American work. It complains of a dangerous looseness in the use of language, and finally concludes that this looseness is intenti...
-The Fiftieth Year Of An Editor
The Philadelphia Press gives the following account of an interesting occasion, which, from the world-wide renown of the distinguished Editor we transfer to our pages: The semi-centennial anniversa...
-Correspondence
One of the commonest of letters is the one like this. Several weeks ago I wrote to ask you whether toads eat bugs, and now I have the Monthly to hand, and no notice is taken of my communication So...
-The Oleander
Mr. Shirley Hibberd says: This handsome shrub is one of the most poisonous of its class, and therefore should be handled with care, for if the hand is cut when pruning it a dangerous wound may be th...
-Introduction Of The Moss Rose
For an answer to an Inquirer we have referred to many old authorities, and the results of our search are that Parkinson in his Paradisus, published in 1629, Rea in his Flora published in 1665...
-Jean Nuytens Verschaffelt
There are few Americans but know that famous bedding plant Coleus Verschaffeltii, which, after all the newer introductions, remains the prince of the tribe. The following from the Gardener's Chronicle...
-The Coming Of Christ By James Caleb Mcintosh
At first we wondered why any one should send a book like this to a horticultural magazine for review; but on glancing through it we see what suggested it. According to Mr. Mcintosh, the last train,...
-Gardening And Gardeners
The following explains itself: - I noticed in the May number of the Gardeners' Monthly an editorial in which it stated that localities in which energetic florists with a small capital could do well a...
-Notes And Queries. #1
Mr. A. Pichard, Tallahassee, Florida, writes: I read in the Gardeners' Monthly, which I received a few davs ago, two articles with errors I think you will be willing to rectify. 1st. Page 183. Communi...
-Kansas State Horticultural Society
The tenth semi-annual meeting of the Kansas State Horticultural Society, will be held at Hutchinson, Reno County, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, June 1st, 2d and 3d, 1880, in response to an earnest ...
-The Nurserymen's Association
The Chicago meeting was very successful. Over a hundred of the best firms were represented. T S.Hubbard presided, and responded in a good address to the welcome of Chicago through Edgar Sanders. Tree ...
-Camden Microscopical Society
The last meeting; of the Society may be called visitors' night, having been devoted entirely to the instruction and entertainment of the members and their friends. Isaac C. Martindale gave an inter...
-September, 1880. Number 261. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In most of the countries of Europe, summer gardening is the most attractive, and most that is done there is with that view. With us the spring and autumn are more enjoyable, and if American gardening ...
-Communications. American Roses
(A paper read before the W. N Y. Horticultural Society at Rochester, Jan. 29, 1880. A monograph of roses, which are of American origin, has, I believe, never before been attempted; not, perhaps, be...
-The Trumpet Vines
Confusion exists in nurseries regarding the names of many things; and it is well to take every occasion to get right. Recently we had our attention called to three trumpet vines, as Bignonia radicans,...
-American Trees In French Gardens
The Bulletin de la Societe Linneenne de Normandie, 1876-77, just issued, has a biographical sketch of Victor Leroy, botanical-horticulturist, of Lisieux, from which some extremely interesting facts in...
-Landscape Gardening
M. P. D , Zanesville, Ohio, writes: - As we subscribe to your valuable Gardener's Monthly and Horticulturist through our news-dealer, we thought we would address you about some books advertised in th...
-Ampelopsis Veitchii
A , Geneva, N. Y. writes: We wish to call your attention to what seems a great injury to the Ampelopsis Veitchii. On the residence of George S. Conover. Esq., is one of the largest plants in the Sta...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Cut Tea Rose Trade-Safrano, Bon Silene, Isabella Sprunt
Of the roses that are forced for the cut flower market.Teas, Safrano, Bon Silene, Isabella Sprunt, Cornelia Cook, Douglas and Niphetos; Noisette, Marechal Neil; Hybrid Perpetual Jacqueminot; Hybrid Te...
-Steam Heating. #2
We are very glad to see that our little article on the heating of greenhouses has at least succeeded in agitating the new, or perhaps more properly, reviving the old idea of the effectiveness of steam...
-Sash Bars
Having had considerable experience with grooved sash bars, I beg to be permitted to state through these columns why I failed to appreciate their efficacy. The dripping of condensed vapors never, to my...
-Cypripedium Barbatum
In reply to Mrs.R. P., page 237, having no sue cess with the cultivation of Cypripedium bar-batum, it is probable that the roots are in bad condition. I would advise to re-pot the plant at once in goo...
-Increase In The Florist Business In Cincinnati
It may interest some of the readers of the Gardener's Monthly to learn that the city of Cincinnati is famous for its florist and cut flower trade The Cincinnati Floral Company takes one of the leading...
-Carnation, Peter Henderson -Its Value For Cut Flowers In Winter
I have been favored with an opinion on this subject from thirteen different florists, and they are all favorable to the variety, although two of them mention that there has been some dispute as to the...
-A Huge Azalea
When on a hurried run in Boston early in the summer we passed over to Prof. Sargent's and saw his huge Azalea decora; one of the finest specimens perhaps in the world. The writer made a rough estimate...
-Disease In Mareschal Niel Rose
A., Geneva, N. Y., writes: We have a good Mareschal Niel Rose in the green-house, four or five years old, which has grown and blossomed freely. On the old wood there has appeared at a foot from the ...
-Ants
Alpha informs us that ants rapidly made a midnight move after a lawn was sprinkled by an artificial fertilizer, and a rose bush also infested, was cleared of the intruders similarly treated. We have n...
-Greenhouse Bulbs
E. M., Oxford, Miss., writes: Will you be so kind as to give us in your valuable Monthly some account of the proper treatment of Alstromeria after they have bloomed? I had some to bloom beautifully,...
-Azalea. Answer To E
Mr. R. J. Halliday, Baltimore, writes: 10 Azaleas, Double, distinct kinds. Bernhard Andre, violet crimson. Bouquet de Roses, bright clear rose. Borsig, or Flag of Truce, white. Francois De Vo...
-Earthen Flower-Pots
A Subscriber says: Some two or three years ago I read an article in the Scientific American of an invention to make flower pots with a composition of loam, peat and other mixtures, to be used prin...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. New Early Peaches
The result of another season has strengthened my conviction that on our grounds Cumberland is the earliest peach yet fruited, closely followed by Saunders and Downing, with Alexander, Amsden and Musse...
-The Old Seckel Pear
I had heard from a friend, of the old, original accidental seedling, the parent stock of all of that ilk extant, and the story gradually infected my imagination. It began to haunt me. I saw it - In m...
-Ripening Of Raspberry Canes
When we come to inquire whether a Raspberry or Blackberry is hardy, it simply comes to asking whether any grower's plants are healthy. The Raspberry and Blackberry are naturally natives of very cold c...
-Trapping Dogs And Cats
An English judge says: Where a defendant caused traps scented with strong smelling baits to be placed on his land, so near to the plaintiff's house as to influence the instinct of the plaintiff's dog...
-Grapes In Grape Houses
From an excellent article in Mr. Robinson's Gardening Illustrated, we have the following about mildew, which will be of service to some of our grape growers: Before proceeding further, I would cautio...
-Popular Strawberries
The following is the list of strawberries for which premiums were offered by the New York Horticultural Society; and it gives some idea of the great number of kinds that have some popularity about the...
-Questions In Fruit Culture
Not having had time to reply personally to the following questions, we give them here, hoping some of our readers will help the writer: At the last meeting of our Horticultural Society I was appoi...
-The Parnell Peach
J. H. P., West Point, Ga., writes: I send you to-day a present of one small crate of a new variety of peach, originated by me here, and called the Parnell last Saturday by the Atlanta, Ga., Pomologi...
-Bowers' Early Peach
M. & M., Frederick, Maryland, July 12th, write: We send you this morning a small box of Bowers' early peaches for inspection; could have sent you some a week ago, but not perfect specimens. They are...
-Mabket Gardening
An English Gardener, La Fayette, Ind., writes: On page 162, June number, Mr. Henderson, in speaking of the progress of this country and in England, states things that are not facts. It may be simpl...
-The Kreigh Raspberry
K. writes: I send you by express, prepaid, a box of my new seedling Raspberry, of which, perhaps, you will remember Mr. F. Merceron saying something about at Bethlehem last winter. What I claim for i...
-September, 1880. Forestry. Cummunications. Forestry In North America
The Pertinent Laws and Regulations, and the Future of North American Forests. Translated for the Gardener's Monthly by G. W. De B. Prom time to time, we hear through the public press of enormou...
-American Forests In Europe
It is remarkable that while those who are writing about American Forestry, do little to tell us of forestry in our own land, a distinguished European has written a work specially on American Forestry....
-Tea Culture In The United States
That the Tea plant is hardy in any of the States south of the Potomac, has been known for a century at least. As frequently stated in this magazine, the only question involved is whether it can be pre...
-Duration Of Timber
We give in another column a sensible article on Catalpa posts. It shows that what we have said about the variable nature of the same kind of timber, deserves close attention. There is no doubt but the...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Fertilization Of Yucca
Noticing what you said in the last Gardener's Monthly about the fertilization of the Yucca, I thought you might be interested in knowing that I have gathered seeds of angustifolia for three years past...
-Dr. Tanner's Fast
The difficulty which scientific men find in getting out of beaten lines of examination, too often leads them to neglect opportunities which might have resulted in valuable knowledge. The case of Dr. T...
-Pickweed
In the August number of Gardener's Monthly, just come to hand, I read your extract from the Philadelphia Public Ledger of some people being poisoned by Stramonium which was gathered, prepared and dres...
-Change In A Rose
N. G. W., New Albany, Ind., says: A friend of mine has a white rose that sent a young shoot with leaves on it from the center of one of the blooms. How can this be explained? [The flower of a...
-Change Of Character In A Fruit Tree
Miss J. K., Columbus, 0., writes: Do trees which have for years borne fruit, that is freestone, ever change their nature and bear mostly clings? Let me state my case. In 1862 my father, (John H. K...
-Freezing The Sap
Geo. W. D., Kent, O., writes: I was much interested in what was said in your valuable Monthly in regard to foliation and heat, but was, I confess, startled by your statement that the sap is never fro...
-Honey Dew
D. S., Newburgh, N. Y., writes: I trust you will pardon me for asking of you some information in relation to what is usually called Honey Dew. From my boyhood I have noticed that at certain seaso...
-Wax-Wort
J. D. H, Peacedale, R. I., writes: On the rocky hills of Salem, Mass., I observed effects of golden flowers that almost rivaled the famous Gorse of Great Britain. Upon inquiry, I found it was called ...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Notes And Queries-No. 16
Galvanized wire may do great injury to climbing plants. Make a note of this. Terra Cotta. There is a story going the rounds of an ignorant traveler, who in reading exhibition catalogues, asked who ...
-Bee And Other Culture
The account of the vast product of bee culture in the United States in the December Notes and Queries has excited some astonishment. That thirty-five millions of pounds of honey and wax should constit...
-Progress Of The Town Of Greeley
The writer of this saw the town of Greeley eighteen months after it was founded by N. C. Meeker, R. A. Cameron and Horace Greeley, and was favorably impressed with its prospective success. At the foot...
-A Garden In New Brunswick
It is the season of roses at Fredericton, and this year the crop appears to be very fine. In this respect the garden of Mr. Alfred Ray is probably unequalled. Indeed, his rose garden is a garden of it...
-Mahlon Moon
Among the deaths of the past month we are sorry to note that of Mahlon Moon, nurseryman of Morrisville, near Philadelphia. Mahlon Moon was a member of the Society of Friends, and always had a warm lov...
-M. B. Bateham
As we are sending our matter to press we have news of the death of Mr. Bateham, on the 5th of August, in his sixty-seventh year. Although born in England he was educated in America, and started in ear...
-Dairy Farming
By J. R. Sheldon, New York; Cassel, Petter & Galpin. Part 12, just issued, gives the whole history of cheese-making in England. Perhaps, as a matter of profit, English makers cannot compete with Ameri...
-Origin Of Life
What a mystery. ' No evidence that any live creature has been produced from anything that had not life before.' So from the beginning, so to the end. And so another old friend has gone, Robert Buis...
-Humbugs In Horticulture
Read at the Annual Meeting of National Association of Nurserymen and Florists, held at Chicago, June 16, 1880. The life-time experience of any man is too short not to be imposed upon by many of the...
-Burr's New Pine
I have grown this berry in my own garden without intermission since 1856, and when it has had decent treatment it has always given me a large crop of its delicious fruit. I have had it beside the Wils...
-French Vineyards
We have been honored by an invitation from Senator Guizot, Lavaline, to have the editor present at a Congress of French Vineyardists, to be held at Clermont Fer-rand, in France, on August 31st and Sep...
-Horticulture In Texas
The Sixth Annual Meeting of the Kansas Horticultural Society took place at Houston, on July 21st and 22d, under the auspices of President A. Whitaker. From the reports we judge there must be great hor...
-Georgia State Horticultural Society
The annual meeting was held at Atlanta, August 4th and 5th, and was remarkably successful. Presi dent Berckmans presided. The city itself is a marvel of prosperity. It is not so many years ago that it...
-October, 1880. Number 262. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Over and over again for years past we have dwelt on the great necessity for shade to the soil, as the great one thing which the cultivator has to learn from American works and from American experience...
-Communications. Woman In Horticulture
Read before the New York Horticultural Society. My few words will not consist of compliments to woman. However deserved, they belong to the social rather than the horticultural circle, to the drawi...
-La France Rose
Here in Rochester the La France Rose is proving itself worthy of its name and fame. Nothing can excel it in beautiful, delicate color, exquisite and abundant perfume, and profuse, constant blooming fr...
-Three Popular Honeysuckles
Just now, in June, when Honeysuckles are in flower, is a good time to note the differences in the kinds. The three most useful climbing Honeysuckles are the brachypoda or Japan, flexuosa or Chinese, a...
-Lilium Parryi
This new Lily already noted in our magazine, is thus referred to by Max Licht-lin in the Garden, as appearing at Baden-Baden: Lilium Parryi is not, I consider, the showiest of American Lilies, but it...
-Public Spirit
Geo Hubbard of Connecticut, says: 'Nearly all our towns are full of objects of natural beauty, easy of development, and very many of them rich in legendary and historical associations. What is greatly...
-Lily Culture
People in our country buy Lilies and other rare native things, and stick them in common garden ground, and when they die only wish they had the climate of England to grow these nice things. But in ...
-October, 1880. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The taste for cut-flowers, like the taste for bedding plants, has grown to such proportions as to almost overshadow the love of beautiful winter-flowering plants, which in the past made the greenhouse...
-Communications. Hygienic And Therapeutic Relations Of House-Plants
Read before the Alumni of the Auxiliary Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, February 6, 1880. The old question of the effects of living plants on the air of houses is one of conside...
-Neat Greenhouses
Some people have associated such a, tropical idea with the sight of a greenhouse, that they positively shrink from entering it on a warm day, and this idea is fostered by the custom, and in the explan...
-Moss Mulching
For want of a better name we have given this to a practice that we have recently introduced into our greenhouse department. Sometime about the first of January of this year, one of our young men sugge...
-The Fragrant Olive. Ry C. E. Parnell, Queen's, Long Island, N. Y
In the Gardener's Monthly for April, 1880, page 106, Mrs. M. W. asks for information concerning the treatment of the fragrant Olive. The Olea fragrans, or Osmanthus fragrans of some botanists, is a ha...
-Some Handsome Plants
While visiting the large establishment of Robert J. Halliday, Pennsylvania avenue, Baltimore, we were shown some new, rare and beautiful plants, viz., Louis Chretin a Rex, or ornamental leafed Begonia...
-Plants In Living Rooms
The excellent papers on plants in living rooms by Dr. Anders, of Philadelphia, which we published, and now have attracted more than usual interest in Europe. The Record says of it: There was once,...
-Decorative Art
The Gardener's Chronicle tells us that recently a ball to the Prince of Wales was given by Mrs. R. C. Naylor, in Bel-grave Square, and to give sufficient accommodation to the numerous guests a spaciou...
-October, 1880. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
We do not know that under the head of Seasonable Hints we could do better than repeat what we have once said before, that we feel that the advice constantly given to subsoil and under-drain, and manur...
-Communications. Protection Of Trees From The Sun
Read before the Nurserymen's Convention, at Chicago, June 17, 1880. Trees suffer more from the effects of the sun, directly and indirectly, than the majority of tree-planters will acknowledge or co...
-Splitting The Bark Of Trees
I wish to give my experience in regard to splitting the bark of trees. I have on my place several Early Richmond Cherries, and tried the experiment of slitting the bark on about half of them. Resul...
-Standard And Other Gooseberries By H. G. Hooker, Rochester, N. Y
Inquiry is made in the Monthly as to the success of the Standard Gooseberries introduced into this country during the Centennial year Some of the standard gooseberries which were exhibited on the Cent...
-Other Gooseberries
The experience of some years enables me now to speak of some American varieties of Gooseberries as grown here in Rochester somewhat extensively. The Downing holds a good place as a strong and very ...
-The Tyson Pear
It seems strange that this delicious Pear should receive so little notice. Mr. Downing and Mr. Field give a mild description of it, without any peculiar qualities to recommend it. In this climate it i...
-Mealy Bug In Hothouse Grapes
The Journal of Horticulture says: If vineries are not badly infested, the vines should have all the loose bark removed after pruning, and be well washed with Fir tree oil at the rate of half a pint t...
-Artificial Pine-Apples
The Pine-apples of nature, as we get them in our markets are pigmies in comparison with the work of a skilled English gardener. The Journal of Horticulture says: A correspondent desires to know the w...
-The Sea Radish
At a recent meeting of the the Edinburgh Botanical Society, the President exhibited two first and second year's plants of Raphanus maritimus, showing that it is at least of biennial duration. It is sa...
-October, 1880. Forestry. Cummunications. Forestry In North America
The Pertinent Laws and Regulations, and the Future of North American Forests. Translated for the Gardener's Monthly by G. W. De B. (Continued from page 278). What possible benefit can be derived...
-Catalpa Posts
At this time there seems to be quite a boom in the Catalpa tree. In current literature on the subject the impression seems to prevail that Catalpa wood placed in the ground for posts, etc, is practi...
-Wood For Paper Makers
In the report of the Fruit-Growers' Society of Ontario, as made by the Canadian Horticxdturisi, is the following: It was stated that in many places a demand had sprung up for soft woods, such as Bass...
-Queries. Fall-Planting Larch
M., Amherst, Mass., writes: Will you have the kindness to inform me'if you have ever practiced fall planting of the European Larch. We have a lot of seedlings that we are thinking of transplanting fo...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. The Apple Leaf Fungus-Roestelia Canceliata
The September number of the Gardener's Monthly contains a notice of the Annual Meeting of the Georgia State Horticultural Society, and upon the subject of the relation of the apple leaf fungus to that...
-The Clinc-Stone Apricot
In answer to the article in the September number on the Change of Character in a Fruit Tree, I will say that I most assuredly do mean that the tree in question is an Apricot and not a Peach at all....
-Sedum Meehani, Meehan's Stone Crop
In the Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, issued September 1st, Dr. Asa Gray has the following: Sedum Meehani. Glaucescens, 2-3-pollicare, radicibus fibrosis perennans, foli...
-The Annual Rings In Trees
An interesting observation on the relation of the age of Gum trees in Tasmania to the number of concentric circles in their trunks is recorded in the Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Ne...
-The English Sparrow
F. L., Cincinnati, O., writes: Will you please answer in the Gardener's Monthly, briefly, whether the English sparrow is graminivorous or insectivorous? So much is said in the papers on either side t...
-Native Californian Tobacco
Prof. Rothrock is of the opinion that the early natives of California smoked the leaves of Nicotiaua Cleve-landii, A. Gray - a species only quite recently described. It is a small plant with small flo...
-Change Of Habit In Creatures
It is not as often recognized by naturalists, as it might be, that any living thing will change its habits when it becomes its interest to do so. Insects generally have preference for some particular ...
-Germination Of Seeds
It is a well-known fact to all who have had experience in sowing tree seeds, that the period required for germination is of the most uncertain character. Sometimes seeds sown will germinate the same s...
-Genista Tinctoria
Mrs. Mary P. G., Lynn, Mass., writes: The golden-flowered plant which J. H. D., of Peacedale, R. L, saw at Salem, Mass., is the Genista tinctoria, as you suppose. It grows abundantly in the rocky hi...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Gardeners And Situations
Referring to the articles in May and August numbers of the Gardener's Monthly - I for one would heartily endorse your editorial remarks. The Scriptures teach us to do good to all men, especially the h...
-Notes And Queries-No. 17
One of the greatest sources of enjoyment resulting from the possession of a garden is the endless variety which it affords, both in the process of vegetation as it goes forward to maturity, dormancy o...
-Copper In Plants
Observations communicated to the Academy of Sciences through the distinguished chemist M. Bertholet, show that all plants, large or small, grown on primitive rocks or on soils directly derived therefr...
-Natural History
The squirrel is extremely wise. Given a three inch post, the squirrel can always keep out of sight. You may go round and round, but it will always be on the other side. The brain of an ant is believ...
-Horticultural Information
One of the great innovations in horticultural literature by the Gardener's Monthly at its establishment was the introduction of numerous small paragraphs instead of making up the whole magazine of a f...
-The Late Robert Buist
For the first time since his accident, Hon. M. P. Wilder visited the rooms of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society at its August meeting expressly to do honor to the memory of Mr. Buist. He paid an...
-Wilson's School-House
The Oologist, referring to our illustration of Wilson's school-house, says: Grossart's Life of Wilson, 2 volumes, 8 vo. (Paisley, 1876) contains an engraving of Wilson's school-house, about which ...
-Introduction Of The Potato In Salt Lake City
In the Contributor, a monthly magazine published at Salt Lake City, there is an extremely interesting account of the first settlement of Salt Lake City under Brigham Young, by Wil-ford Woodruff, one o...
-Origin Of The Noisette Rose
An American correspondent of the Belgian Horticultural Review, Mr. Jonathan Evans, writes to the editor an account of the origin of the Noisette Rose, which we may translate from the French as follows...
-How To Tell Wheat From Cheat
A Persian poet, Jami, thus answers the question, What shall the harvest be? One was asking of a teacher, ' How a father his reputed Son for his should recognize? Said the master, By the st...
-The Lily Of The Field
John Ray, a distinguished botanist, who flourished at the end of the last century, says that Tulipa was the name of a peculiar hat worn by the Dalmatians on some occasions, and which was of the form o...
-Napoleon's Willow
The Gardener's Record says: - When the Empress Eugenie started on her pilgrimage to the scene of her son's death she took with her slips from a willow growing in Dean Stanley's garden, to plant at t...
-Experiments At The Michigan Agricultural College
This is a lecture by Prof. N. J. Beal. We have often remarked that the vice of horticulture is that many of its teachers will talk for an hour rather than experiment five minutes. Prof. Beal is a wort...
-Penna. Horticultural Society
The Annual Exhibition was held this year in connection with the State Fair, in the hall of the Permanent Exhibition Company, which, as many readers may know, is the large structure covering twenty acr...
-Instructive Horticultural Societies
The plan of having instructive lectures on the plants, fruits and vegetables exhibited, inaugurated by the Germantown Horticultural Society a year ago, has added largely to the attendance and membersh...
-A New Agricultural Society
August 27, 1880, during the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a meeting was organized, Prof. Caldwell in the chair, and Prof. A. J. Cook of Michigan Agricultural Coll...
-November, 1880. Number 263. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The professional tree-trimmer of large cities usually waits till winter before he commences his destructive practices; but we note many trees about the Philadelphia streets are being beheaded while th...
-Communications. The Best Autumnal Roses Amonc Hybrid Perpetuals
What a misnaming there is of a large part of the varieties which go by the name of Hybrid Perpetual Roses ! Many splendid sorts in June, like Marie Rady, Jean Liabaud, and all of their type, yield no ...
-Cross-Fertilizing And Raising Roses From Seed In England
Mr. Ellwanger, of the firm of Ellwanger and Barry, Rochester, N. Y., who is doing much to elucidate the origin of American and English Roses, having requested information respecting the varieties rais...
-A Plea For The Old-Fashioned Lavender
In a number of your magazine, a correspondent pleads the cause of the Wallflower or Dame's Violet, as it was called in the old-fashioned days, when it was the favorite of highborn ladies. There is a...
-Garden Scions
Verbena venosa is a good old favorite. It is not hardy here, but winters well in a cold frame. It bears seeds abundantly, but old plants come into bloom several weeks before the seedlings; hence the d...
-Cranston's Rose Nursery At Hereford, England
The nurseries were established in 1785 by the grandfather of the present proprietors. They comprise 130 acres, of which 60 are devoted to Roses. It has one house, 140 by 25 feet for Rose cut flowers, ...
-Public Parks And Gardens
The New York Independent says: - We have noticed, from time to time, in our columns, the public spirit and liberality of some who have, at great expense and labor, provided public parks for the peopl...
-Kentucky Blue Grass
L. P., Pittsburg, Pa., writes: I am advised to use Kentucky Blue Grass for a lawn, - but I should suppose a green lawn is the great desideratum, and the blue of this grass disagreeable. What is your o...
-Hardiness Of Hyacinthus Candicans
Mrs. R. B. E., writes: I notice Mr. Hovey says in his catalogue that this bulb is ' hardy with the protection of a cold frame, but is better taken up and planted in the spring like the Gladiolus.' P...
-November, 1880. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The greenhouse will now begin to look more natural, after having had the stock housed last month. With many plants having probably been taken up out of the open ground, dead leaves will daily appear, ...
-Communications. Cut-Flower Trade. - Mareschal Niel
It was not long after the first importation of M. Niel from France, that its great value to the cut-flower trade was discovered. It became at once the king among the cut roses. Its large size, solid l...
-Paullinia And Euphorbia
To C.'s inquiry, in September Monthly, I would say: Probably Paullinia thalictrifolia, is a new comer; at any rate it is a stranger to me, although I am well acquainted with the genus. P. barbadensi...
-The Catalonian Jasmine
In the February Monthly for 1880, page 44, a subscriber asks for information concerning the treatment of the Catalonian Jasmine. The Catalonian Jasmine, Jasminum grandi-florum, is a native of the E...
-Peter Henderson Carnation
I notice that the discussion on Peter Henderson Carnation is still occupying a place in your columns. I suppose the position I took in regard to this Carnation in my April price list is the cause o...
-Hygienic And Therapeutic Relations Of House-Plants.BY Dr. J. M. Anders, Phila
Read before the Alumni of the Auxiliary Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, February 6, 1880. (Concluded from page 297). Deeming it necessary that the experimental data should re...
-Orchid Growing
The old notion that orchids must have expensive houses and expensive skill before they can be successfully grown, has been very much against their culture. A few days ago we saw a Stanhopea with sixte...
-Burbidgea Nitida
New plants appear continually, and somehow, the old ones disappear, though frequently possessing more agreeable points than the novelties. But even in the oldest collections we find sometimes Hedychiu...
-Palms
J. D. S., Upper Sandusky, Ohio, says: I wish you would prepare or have prepared for the Gardener's Monthly directions for the treatment and care of palms, for the benefit of those who have neither c...
-Fish Hook Cactus
A lady from Virginia writes: Will some of the readers of the Gardener's Monthly tell me how to treat a young Fish Hook Cactus? I received it a few days since by mail from Arizona. I have always consi...
-Half-Hardy Greenhouse Plants
Mrs. R. B. E., Melrose, Mass., asks: Will some one inform me through the Monthly if Jasminum officinale is hardy in this latitude. Also the winter treatment of Possoquera longiflora. It only grows f...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Market Cardeninc
When I came to this country I held a good many such notions as English Gardener, p. 276, with reference to the cultivation of the soil. I thought that ploughing was not so beneficial as digging, tha...
-The Plough Vs. The Spade
An English Gardener from Lafayette, Indiana, in your September number, without much preface, accuses me of stating things that are not facts, but I find when he goes on a little farther that hi...
-London Market Gardening. An English Gardener Vs. Peter Henderson
I am sorry to see the unbecoming strictures of an English Gardener, from Lafayette, Indiana, p. 276, on the remarks (p. 162) of Mr. Peter Henderson on the London Market Gardens. Instead of analyzin...
-The Early Rose Peach
In your September number, on page 270, in the department of Fruit and Vegetable Gardening, in the communication of Mr. H. M. Engle on the subject of New Early Peaches, I observe the name of Early Rose...
-Killing Codling Moth And Canker Worm
There seems to be no doubt but that water, in which Paris green or London purple has been put, and pumped over the trees through a hose from a garden engine when the fruit is first forming, will prove...
-Plums
Geneva seems to be making a mark in the Plum trade. We noted last year bow abundant and how profitable they were in that city. This year the trade has spread, and we noted cases with prime Green Gages...
-Fire Blight And Yellows
In regard to fire blight, Dr. J. G. Hunt, in a communication to the Gardener's Monthly, some years ago, demonstrated to our entire satisfaction that it was caused by a small ferment fungus. Professor ...
-Asparagus And Grape Insects
W. H. P., Kingston, R. I., says: My Asparagus for two years has been eaten by what at first seems to be a small black fly, which later turns to be a kind of slug or worm. These infest it from the lat...
-New Native Plums
Mr. Charles Black says: We send you to-day by express a box containing a branch of the Native Plum sent you last September to show you its productiveness. The trees are all loaded with fruit, as much...
-New White Grapes From Col. Wilder
First-class white grapes are not numerous and there is room for more. Col. Wilder sends us a sample of a needling of which he gives the fol-lowing account: - I send by mail a few grapes from a second...
-Hayes Grape
With some excellent fruit comes the following letter from Mr. Moore: - I forward you per mail to-day a few berries of our new White Grape - ' Hayes.' This grape is a pure native, and was raised from...
-Seedling Grape
A Catawissa correspondent writes: I send you this day, express pre-paid, one box of grapes, seedling of the Salem, but of far better habits. With us the Salem does not ripen its fruit, mildews gener...
-Isham Sweet Apple
Messrs. Baird & Tuttle say that Isham Sweet was sent out by F. K. Phoenix about four years ago. Originated with Mr. Isham, of Delaware, Wis. We have seen the fruit, and believe it possesses qualities...
-Fruit Insects In California
R. S., San Jose, under the date of August 8th, writes: - Our fruit trees here are now infested with what they call the Red Scale Insect. It has destroyed thousands of trees. Concentrated lye has b...
-November, 1880. Forestry. Cummunications. Forestry In North America
The Pertinent Laws and Regulations, and the Future of North American Forests. Translated for the Gardener's Monthly by G. W. De B. (Concluded from page 307). A Boston authority of the highest na...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Virginia Autumn Scenery
Our own swamps and low grounds are displaying attractive pictures for us to treasure in our memories of these autumn clays, and bring forth to brighten a dismal cold evening in winter. There is one th...
-Asclepiadaceae
I note with pleasure reference to this most interesting family by your correspondent (page 245), and it has often occurred to me that its several members have been too little known and appreciated by ...
-Convolvulus Arvensis
Cultivators will do well to look after this pernicious weed, which is fast taking the country for its own. It is so very pretty that it is likely to appeal to sympathy to let it stand a while. A recen...
-Abnormal Buds
Mr. Chas. Henderson writes: I mail you to-day a couple of joints of Stephano-tis floribunda. You will notice that the bud instead of coming out at the axil in the usual way, has shown a disposition ...
-Correction. #2
Notes and Queries was not favored with proofs of his notices picked up from all sources, except the newspapers, else would Bam-ber wood have read Bamboo, and John Penn's home in England would have app...
-Quinces
The man who shall cure the quince fruit from its knots, and give us a fair, equable, preserving material as free from worms as a good apple, will do the housekeeper a prodigious service. Some cultivat...
-California, Colorado
A gentleman now in California writes of what must be to an American a novelty of interest: I am just going to Mr. Cooper's (at Santa Barbara) to be present at the whipping of his extensive grove of a...
-Gardening In The Southern Mountains
Editorial Letter: - It had long been my desire to see the deciduous magnolias and the many beautiful trees and shrubs of the Southern mountains in their native homes. But the country in which they gro...
-The Gardener's Monthly For 1881
As the magazine is about to enter on its twenty-third year the publisher would be favored by any assistance its friends may give in making it known to any of the newer votaries of the art of gardening...
-He Only Stole A Flower
In Philadelphia, there is what is called a prison agent, who goes through the penitentiary and has power to procure the release of prisoners, or a shortening of the time of those he may think deserv...
-Noticing Catalogues
We often get requests to notice catalogues, which, had we space, we should be glad to do. If we had but a local circulation, and only a few score came to our table, we might do it; but few have any id...
-Keeping One Cow
New York: Orange Judd Company. This little book may, perhaps, legitimately come under the Reviewer's pen in a horticultural journal, as many a man, who has but one little patch of garden, would like t...
-Gladioli Or Gladioluses
M. B. asks: - In a recent number you say ' Gladioluses,' when referring to the plural of Gladiolus. Other papers use Gladioli, which certainly is the Latin plural. [We have been over this so often, ...
-Floral Designs
The florists of Philadelphia had a gala time at the late exhibition of the Pennsylvania State Agricultural Society. The highest premium for the most original floral design, $80, was taken by Hoopes, B...
-Fine Geraniums
The proceedings of the New York Horticultural Society says that Messrs. Hal-lock & Thorpe, of Queens, Long Island, N. Y., exhibited Double and single Pelargoniums, (by which we understand bedding ge...
-December, 1880. Number 264. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
We have frequently urged the importance of planting places very thickly at first, in order both to produce an immediate effect, and also because the shelter which one another affords makes the trees g...
-Communications. Park Decoration In The West
While attending the National Convention of Nurserymen at Chicago, in June last, a number of us made a hasty visit to the parks of that wonderful city, and were-perfectly surprised at the splendid resu...
-Carden Scions
No plant has stood the drouth more unflinchingly than Vinca rosea. Planted out it keeps green and stocky, and is in blossom all summer long. Raised from seed in a hot-bed or warm greenhouse in Februar...
-A New Method With Tuberoses
I call it a new method, because it seems to be such, or at least a method not generally known. It has been very kindly furnished me by a florist resident at Concord, N. H., who was induced to write me...
-The American Banner Rose
In the introduction of new plants, there has been none of late years which excited more interest than the above-mentioned rose. And if we were to regard the various opinions which we have heard expres...
-Gladiolus Communis
Among hardy plants of attractive appearance which one seldom sees in collections, is the Gladiolus communis. It flowers in June with the roses. It does not generally make such a strong growth as the t...
-Tree Roses
Some years ago I tried experiments with tree roses, working them by budding four feet high on the common Prairie roses as stocks. The first winter they were carefully tied with rye straw. It proved an...
-Raising Plants
The seed can generally be purchased of any seedsman. I bought mine at Landreth's. I soaked the seeds in water for forty-eight hours before planting. When treated thus they sprouted almost as freely as...
-Cultivating Or Tilling
In the spring, when the ground is warm enough to cause the plants to show the first symptoms of life by pushing, I put a quantity of the best barn-yard manure in the trench or ditch, and on that place...
-Subsequent Treatment
In the autumn the plants treated as above stated had grown in single stems, from three to six feet high, depending on the earlier or later start. The stems were quite thick. These I laid down witho...
-Laying Down
I have this year adopted a plan that I deem a great improvement, and I have done it with stems varying from a quarter to an inch diameter, thus: I cut off with nippers a number of stems to the height ...
-Climbing Hybrid Perpetuals
Mr. D. F. Fish, excellent authority, believes that some of the Hybrid Perpetuals will do to train as climbers, or pillar roses, and gives the Garden the following list: Neither must it be inferred...
-Varieties Of Norway Spruce
A. T. McN., Jackson, Mich., asks: Will you please answer through the medium of the Gardener's Monthly the following questions: I have noticed that there is a considerable difference in the appe...
-December, 1880. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
To grow flowers well, good potting is essential; but few know in what good potting consists. The hole in the bottom of the pot is to let out the water; but few take care to keep the earth from choking...
-Communications. Cut Flower Trade -Hybrids
There has been much difficulty experienced by the growers in raising Hybrid roses for the cut flower market; and thus far with the single exception of Gen. Jacqueminot, all efforts have been almost a ...
-Bryophyllum Calycinum
In reply to Mrs. R. P., who inquires in the August Monthly, page 237, for information respecting Bryophyllum calycinum, I would say that it belongs to the Natural Order Crassulacese, and that it is a ...
-Watering Creenhouses With A Hose
Many very good gardeners have a prejudice against using a hose in watering their greenhouses. It is hard to tell where such a prejudice has originated, but it is undoubtedly nothing more or less than ...
-One Use Of Slate In Greenhouse Building
I have received many valuable ideas from the pages of the Gardener's Monthly during the past few years, and by way of return give an idea that I have put in practice and found to work well in my own c...
-Cool Orchids.-Stanhopeas
Although strictly speaking all the species of this curious genus are not cool orchids, they all are as well adapted to cultivation in any ordinary greenhouse, as many of those which are found at great...
-Striped Pelargoniums
I see that the lovers of fancy geraniums look for Mr. Cannell's New Life as original. It is nothing new for the gardeners of Newport to see a striped geranium. I have one for the past eight years, of ...
-Plumbago Capensis And Jasminum Grandiflorum
Few attempts at floriculture are more discouraging than that of growing plants in the winter in an ordinary sitting-room, hoping for a continuance of flowers the whole season; for if we except Ageratu...
-Ivy-Leap Pelargonium Gloire D'Orleans
This very fine and distinct variety is one of the floral treasures Mr. Barron secured for this season at Chiswick. For its pleasing and distinct color, of a bright, pale, rosy-magenta hue, much deeper...
-Double Bouvardia - "A. Neuner"
A double white Bouvardia is among the most recent of desirable novelties announced. We recently noted that a double white Bouvardia had been introduced; and we have received a living head of flower...
-The Brighton Grape
It is not often that new fruits not only stand the test of experience, but grow in popular favor. The Brighton Grape seems one of these few good things. It ripens about the same time as the Hartford P...
-Swamp Muck
B. H., Woodbury, N. J., sends in the following, and asks what we think of it: Some time ago we remarked that an acre of swamp muck of good quality, three feet deep, was actually worth $25,000 (twent...
-What Is Swamp Muck?
It is as needful and wise in debate to define your terms as to catch the hare before you snuff the savory stew. Half the world's disputes are over words, not things; over the outward and visible sh...
-The Catawba Grape
The impression has gone abroad that the Catawba grape, like the old favorite, White Doyenne pear, has played out in the West, unless grown in some favorite spot like unto Kelly's Island. But it i...
-Fay's Prolific Currant
The Rural New Yorker figures this variety. By the way in which the artist has arranged the base of one raceme so as to line with the apex of another, the racemes appear to be from six to twelve inches...
-Growing Pine Apples
E. O. N., Tracy City, Tenn., writes: A short notice of large Pine Apples in October number of the Gardener's Monthly makes me bold to inquire about pineries in this country. Would you not yourself, o...
-Natural History And Science. Cummunications. Caladium Esculentum
In the October number a correspondent from Texas writes that he was unable to find this plant growing wild on the Brazos River, etc.; thus somewhat refuting the fact of its being naturalized in that S...
-Abies And Picea
As our readers know, fir trees have been erroneously called Picea, and spruces, Abies; the error originating in England. Spruces have always been correctly called Picea, and the firs Abies on the Cont...
-Pronunciation Of Terms
An amusing example of the need of accuracy in naming plants occurred the other day, when a gentleman new to his collection of greenhouse treasures discoursed too much on his elegant collection of Cam...
-Gems And Greengrocery
The Natal Mercury, speaking of the South African Diamond Fields, says that next to diamonds, potatoes seem to be the dearest thing, ú6 10s. having been given for a bag of them. At this rate, however p...
-Robert Buist - (See Frontispiece)
On July 13, 1880, died at Rosedale, Philadelphia, Robert Buist, aged seventy-five years. Horticulture does not yet know the full value of the friend it has lost. When John Bartram was wandering throug...
-The Western Farmer Of America. A Letter To Him By Augustus Mongredien, Of London, Eng
As the Gardener's Monthly is a horticultural and not a firming paper, we fancied there was a mistake in sending it to us for review, but in a note our Sincere Friend, Mr. Mongredien, tells us that...
-The Vircunias
Virginia according to the official figures just issued, has only increased twenty per cent, in population during the last ten years. It is one of the most magnificent States in the Union; the only wan...
-Mr. Laxton's Paper On Roses
In our last appeared an excellent paper on Roses, by Mr. Laxton, sent to us and revised especially for our pages by the author. At the same time he informed us that the bulk of the article had already...
-Prof. C. E. Bessey
It has been announced that this accomplished botanist has undertaken the Botanical department of the American Naturalist, which is an excellent thing so far as it goes. If further he could influence t...
-The Characeae Of America
By Dr. Timothy F. Allen. Published in parts by S. E. Cassino, Boston, Mass. The Clmracese comprise plants which are often seen in aquariums, and must have attracted the attention of many who have obse...
-Horticultural Societies. Communications. The Mississippi Valley Horticultural Society
The Mississippi Valley Horticultural Society held its first annual exhibition in the large hall of the Merchants' Exchange, this city, on September 7th, 8th and 9th. The display of fruit was large and...
-Lilium Caroliniense - Button-Hole Bouquets
Lilium Caroliniense American Lilies have been supposed to have no fragrance, but Mr. Watson, in a letter to Mr. Vick, says the above named old but little known species is sweet scented. Cult...
-The Amaryllis - Fertility Of Forest Trees
The Amaryllis It is wonderful how the taste for these bulbous plants has grown. Europeans have hybridized and crossed the species and varieties, till they have become as numerous as dahlias. The be...
-A Large Oak - January Meetings
A Large Oak What is believed to be the largest oak in England, is at Cawthorpe, in. Yorkshire, and is thirty-eight feet four and a. half inches round, five feet from the ground. It would be interes...
-Desmodium Pendttliflorum - Eupatoriums
Desmodium Pendttliflorum This very beautiful autumn-flowering perennial plant, is now becoming well known in gardens. The American Agriculturist notes that one very often seen under this name is re...
-Red Cedar - Alyssum As A Basket Plant
Red Cedar Some one sends wrapped in a Denver paper, some branches of Juniperus Virginia. This, the Eastern Red Cedar, meets the Western Red Cedar, Juniperus occidentals in the Rocky Mountains. They...
-Chrysanthemums - Root Pruning
Chrysanthemums It was thought that these had about reached the climax of improvement, but by some new kinds we saw recently in the grounds of W. K. Harris, of Philadelphia, we learned that new beau...
-Tomatoes In England - Apples And Pears In Eden
Tomatoes In England These must be getting into some favor at length in England, - when new English varieties are being advertised, Nisbet's Victoria is among the announcements of the season. The fr...
-Improved Lemons - Illustrated Catalogues
Improved Lemons Geo. C. Swan, of San-Diego, California, sends a sample of a seedling lemon which he names the Olivia. It is very juicy, and thin-skinned, and these are good points in a lemon. Lar...
-Boyle's Nurseries, Philadelphia - Illustrated Annual Of Phrenology For 1880. S. R. Wells & Co., N. Y
Boyle's Nurseries, Philadelphia For a long, long while, Boyle's greenhouses have had a good local fame in Philadelphia, though not known much beyond. They now pass into the hands of Mr. John Donn, ...
-Ammon Burr - The Japan Climbing Fern
Ammon Burr We have only recently learned of the death of this well-known horticulturist, who died at Dallas, Texas, in the Spring of last year. His wife and daughters are still keeping on the flori...
-Lantanas - Improved Chinese Primroses
Lantanas We should like again to call our readers attention to the great value of the Lan-tana as a summer-blooming plant for American gardens. Few things beat it in beauty, - and the hotter and dr...
-Drip In Greenhouses - Peach Growing
Drip In Greenhouses Many plant houses injure plants by permitting the condensed moisture or leakage to drop - to drip as gardeners say. To avoid this a groove is made at the end of the rabbet or th...
-The Allen Peach - Scarcity Of Wood In Pennsylvania
The Allen Peach This is another new candidate for earliness. Mr. Bateham believes it is two weeks earlier than Hale. It is an Ohio seedling. Winter Apple For Pennsylvania Among the remark...
-Catalpa Kaempferi - The Flowering Raspberry
Catalpa Kaempferi We have yet letters insisting that the dwarf, flowerless Catalpa is C. Bungei, and the lobed-leaved flowering one is C. Ksempferi. All we can say is that this is clearly not the c...
-Geography Of Pellaea Atropurpurea - Herman Munz
Geography Of Pellaea Atropurpurea In the Native Flowers and Ferns of the United States, it is stated that this pretty Fern has been found in Greenland. A friend who has made the geography of ferns ...
-Brambleton Gardens, Norfolk, Va - Aristolochia Sipho
Brambleton Gardens, Norfolk, Va Since Mr. Barker's death, these promising nurseries are being continued with Mr. B. Reynolds as superintendent. The collection is rich in orchids as well as other ra...
-Origin Of The Mareschal Neil Rose - Double Geraniums
Origin Of The Mareschal Neil Rose A correspondent of the Gardener's Chronicle believes this rose to have arisen from graft hybridization. The Broad Fir In our country we confine the word ...
-Thanks - Winter Nelis Pear
Thanks Mrs. J., Brooklyn, kindly writes: By the recommendation of a friend I have subscribed for the Gardener's Monthly, and must write and thank you for the preparation of such a work. I am amaz...
-New Peas - The American Philosophical Society
New Peas It is remarkable that amongst the myriads of varieties of peas, new or old, Daniel O'Rourke is still the most popular. Thousands of bushels are raised by single firms alone for seed. ...
-Dr. A. C. Williams - Apples And Pears On The Potomac
Dr. A. C. Williams A postal card with the above signature, addressed to the Editor of the Gardener's Monthly would have received immediate attention if the post office and full address had been ...
-A Large Potato Order - English Names
A Large Potato Order It is an ill wind that blows no one any good. A Dublin seedsman has received an order from the Duchess of Marlborough for 1200 tons of seed potatoes to be distributed among the...
-The Waratah - John Dick, Jr
The Waratah While we in America sing the praises of our native Rhododendrons, the Australians glory in the Waratah, which with the immense heads of flowers certainly makes no mean rival to the Rhod...
-Dr. Howsley - Destroying Wood Lice
Dr. Howsley A friend writes: The venerable Dr. Win. M. Howsley, of Leavenworth, Kansas died at Central City, Nebraska on Mar. 5th, 1880. He was afflicted with Bright's disease of the kidneys for ...
-Clinton Flower Market, New York - June Budding Fruit Trees
Clinton Flower Market, New York From 100 to 150 wagon loads of pot flowers are emptied here every morning in the pot-flower season. Callas, Geraniums, Fuchsias. Pansies, Daisies, and Polyanthus, ar...
-The Electric Light - Hybrid Heliotrope
The Electric Light The English papers are filled with accounts of the growth of plants by the electric light. Much difficulty has been found in forcing flowers and fruits in that country from the l...
-Ring Marks In Trees - Nebraska State Board Of Agriculture For 1879
Ring Marks In Trees Some doubts as to the value of rings in tree growths as usually understood are lost by experiments in South Wales. The rings counted on a tree known to have been planted eightee...
-M. Souchet - Blight, Mildew And Rust
M. Souchet This French horticulturist has died recently. He is well known as the raiser of many Gladiolus and other florists' flowers, and to fruit-orowers through having first sent to this country...
-Large Japan Persimmon - Beet Sugar Culture
Large Japan Persimmon The largest fruit matured in California so far, measures about eleven inches round, and two together weighed a pound and a half. Cherry - Ne Plus Ultra Mr. Charles A...
-First Biennial Report Of The State Board Of Agriculture Of Kansas - The Steel Blue Grape Beetle
First Biennial Report Of The State Board Of Agriculture Of Kansas From J. K. Hudson, Topeka, Secretary. Applicants for these should send 20 cents postage to the Secretary. Cemetery Gardening...
-Apple Trade - Drouth In Kansas
Apple Trade It is hard to decide which way the current of trade flows. The California papers of last winter had glowing accounts of successful and profitable shipments of apples to California; and ...
-The Horticultural Authority - The Hardy Heaths
The Horticultural Authority A pleasant quarrel as it stands is going on between the Rural New Yorker and the American Agriculturist, as to where the great horticultural authority of the United Stat...
-Rooting A Sago Palm - The Cream Of The Strawberries
Rooting A Sago Palm A Belvidere, N. J., correspondent writes: I asked your advice in regard to a Sago Palm, with two crowns; you advised splitting. I did so, but unfortunately one had neither root...
-European Peas - D. Waldo Lincoln
European Peas We think it about time American pea growers set about raising their own varieties, so as to have kinds suited to our hot and dry climate. We had the opportunity of noting many of the ...
-C. C. Langdon - The Best Rose
C. C. Langdon This gentleman, whose retirement from the nursery business in favor of his son, we have recently noted, has been nominated by one of the political parties in Alabama as a candidate fo...
-Xanthoceros Sorbifolia - Big Cucumbers
Xanthoceros Sorbifolia This rare and beautiful tree can be propagated by root cuttings. The Hemlock Spruce It seems almost a matter of experiment whether trees do well or not in any part ...
-Poplar For Paper - The Marshfield Elm
Poplar For Paper In a recent trip through Southern Pennsylvania, we saw repeated handbills that Poplar was badly wanted. We supposed that this referred to the true Poplars - Populus - but a frien...
-Nurseries In Canada - Autumn Berries
Nurseries In Canada A Brookville (Out.) correspondent writes that there is not a nursery in all Eastern Canada. The Plough Versus The Spade We have a note from Mr. Henderson in regard to ...
-Cornelia Koch Rose - Rose Perle Des Jardins
Cornelia Koch Rose Mr. C. M. Hovey, in a remarkably interesting supplement to Mr. Ellwanger's history of American Roses, says that Cornelia Koch is the correct orthography of this rose. It is prono...
-Orchids In America - Mushrooms
Orchids In America The ease with which tropical orchids can be grown in America as compared with the old world is leading to their more general culture. A friend who has just returned from a visit ...
-Hennetta Peach - Retrogression
Hennetta Peach We have from the raiser; specimens of this. It is a large yellow peach, very much in the way of the Susquehanna. It is said to be a very late peach, ripening in Kentucky some seasons...
-A New Varnish Plant - The Town Of Greeley
A New Varnish Plant It is said that an iron tool that had been found in Africa neglected after cutting down one of the large Euphor-biaceous plants of that country, was found years afterwards as br...
-Agricultural College, Sappora, Japan. Third Annual Report - Propagating The Maiden Hair Tree
Agricultural College, Sappora, Japan. Third Annual Report This institution, in which Americans have been the chief teachers under the Japanese Government, shows by this report to be in an excellent...
-Lapageria - California Pears
Lapageria This is a very popular cut flower plant in England, - some having houses exclusively devoted to it as we have of Myrsiphyl-lum, or Smilax, as it is popularly called. There are two vari...
-Brett Peach - B. F. Johnstone
Brett Peach Mr. Jos. H. Ricketts, New-burgh, N. Y., writes: In your last issue of the Gardener's Monthly you name in the list of Southern Peaches, Mrs. Brett as one of them. It is a mistake, it di...









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