Last year, 1878, a trusty student at my suggestion, tested some peas with the following results. They are early peas, somewhat mixed, of moderate size and smooth. They were raised the year before. He soaked in water for one day 50 peas which were " buggy " and 50 which were sound, taken from the same lot. They were kept damp for five days when one of the " buggy " peas sprouted and nearly all of the sound ones. Again, in a damp place in the greenhouse, he placed 25 sound and 25 weevil-eaten peas. After six days all the sound ones grew, and only four of the damaged seeds. On June 5th, in good warm soil, 12 sound peas and 25 " buggy " were planted. Of this lot, all the sound ones grew, and only three of the ' buggy" ones. The weevil-eaten seeds produced feeble plants.

This year, 1879, from the same lot of peas 500 weevil-eaten peas were counted out and tested in ten lots of 50 each, in the greenhouse. By the side of these, 500 apparently sound peas were tried. All the latter germinated except four.

The following table gives the number which germinated in each lot of 50 of weevil-eaten peas:

1st lot of 50............

12 grew

2d " ............

10 "

3d " ............

8 "

4th " ............

12 "

5th " ............

17 "

6th "............

11 "

7th............

12 "

8th " ............

18 "

9th............

17 "

10th............

13 "

Total grew..............

130

This is 26 per cent. Some insist on it that a test in the open air is the only sure and fair one. It may be so, sometimes, but not always, unless very great pains are taken. For example, the moles are often troublesome in our gardens, passing along the rows and taking many of the peas and sometimes nearly all. Perhaps wrink led or very large peas of some varieties would be less injured by the weevil than those above tested.