Tropical America and the West India Islands have contributed no more beautiful class of plants to European greenhouses than that which embraces the various forms of Croton, and much enterprise has been exhibited during late years by European nurserymen in introducing new species, and raising new forms by the florist's art. In America, we value them for indoor decoration as our European friends do; but in addition we can have them for outdoor ornamentation, for they thrive admirably in the open air in our climate. In Philadelphia during the past season, we have often stopped to admire a magnificent specimen grown in a tub, standing in the small city garden of one of the wealthy residents. It is probably six feet high, and about five feet wide. We fancy the owner would not part with the beauty for "love or money," certainly we should not. We love to see attention turned to the introduction, and herewith give as illustration a rare one, the "Princess of Wales."

CROTON GLORIOSUS (Princess of Wales).

CROTON GLORIOSUS (Princess of Wales).

This is one of the long-leaved drooping forms of Croton, and is perfectly distinct in character. It conies from the New Hebrides. The leaves are from 1 to 2 feet in length, sometimes plain and sometimes strongly undulated. The ground color is green, and the variegation creamy-yellow, very variable in character. In some there is a creamy-yellow mid-rib, with a band on each side; in others the mid-rib is bright green. The markings are of the maculate style, with here and there large blotches of clear creamy yellow, and in other parts clouded markings of smaller confluent blotches and spots. Occasionally these conditions are reversed, and there are longish patches on which the ground color is creamy, relieved by a few clouded green markings. The spreading arching habit, and the maculate style of variegation, are the characteristic features of this useful decorative variety. This was one of the twelve New Plants with which Mr. William Bull gained the first prize at the International Horticultural Exhibition held at Dundee, in 1876.