Under this name Messrs. Kift & Sons, of West Chester, introduce a lily of which the enclosed is a representation. The flowers and foliage indicate that it has a close relationship to the form of L. longi-florum, recently named L. Harrisii. The difference is that while that seems to produce flowers ranging from three to twelve on a stem, this one runs from that to fifty-two, the number on this one engraved. It is simply more floriferous than that one has been found to be. This arises of course from some fasciation of the stems, and its value will depend on the permanency of this fasciation. For our part we see no reason why such a character may not be permanent in plants raised from offsets, as lilies are. If it prove so it will be an extremely valuable plant to the cut flower grower.

LILIUM LONGIFLORUM FLORIBUNDUM.

LILIUM LONGIFLORUM FLORIBUNDUM.

The Latin names given to these forms of Lilium longiflorum, we regret, as tending to botanical confusion. We think it far better that garden forms should have simply garden names, and the Harris and the Kift lilies would have been honorable names enough to distinguish these garden forms We shall be glad when this Latin practice is left wholly to European gardening.