When in Geneva in the spring of 1879, the writer was much impressed with a large greenish-brown, and generally fine looking apple, shown to us by Messrs. Chase. It was remarkably heavy for its size,which we always take to be an unmistakable sign of a good keeper. There are, perhaps, enough of good winter apples in the North, but the South is deficient, and we believe the Langford seedling will be invaluable to them. It was raised by Mr. Thos. J. Vickers of Kent county, Md., who gives the following account of it:

LANGFORD APPLE.

LANGFORD APPLE.

"I think in 1852, or about that time, the original tree (a little switch) was dug up along a fence row, and planted near an old house, then neglected and forgotten until it began to bear. At that time there were no peach or pear trees or fruit of any kind grown for market in Maryland. This apple, by whomever tasted, was always pronounced a most delicious fruit, but I thought I could get a better apple from the nurseries and bought the most noted kind (winter varieties),and now I am grafting every one of them with this. It is known only in this immediate locality. The tree is now large and bears every year, and has done so without fail since it was seven or eight years old. I honestly think, considering its fine flavor, excellent keeping qualities, vigor and hardiness, it should be planted by every one planting an orchard."