Lilies and Amaryllids have much in common. One of the chief distinctions is that the lilies have the fruit superior, the amaryllids fruit inferior. By this we mean that the petals and sepals, in these plants called the perianth, seem on the young seed vessel in the amaryllids, and below it in the lilies. We see therefore by our cut that the Bomarea is one of the amaryllids. Most of the amaryllids known to our readers are low bulbous plants, but the Bomarea is a climbing greenhouse plantt and is of great beauty. It is properly one of an old, and in the days of the old gardeners, well-known genus called Alstroemeria, and as the writer of this saw it when it flowered in Mr. Bull's new plant establishment a few years ago, we do not know now any reason why it should not be an Alstroemeria. Sir Wm. Hooker, however, seems to have considered it to have some good distinctions from Alstroemeria, and so with such good authority we must let the name go as it is.

BOMAREA CARDERI.

BOMAREA CARDERI.

There are some half a dozen of those allies of Alstroemeria known as Bomarea, all pretty. But of this one Mr. Bull says, and with which we wholly agree:

"The most beautiful of the Bomareas yet introduced. It is a glabrous twining plant, with dark purplish stems, and produces its charming bell-shaped flowers in pendulous terminal umbellate cymes; the large heads of blossom making the plant a most attractive object. The individual flowers, in size and shape, remind one somewhat of those of Lapageria rosea, but are rather more contracted towards the mouth, and of a lighter rose pink color, and the ends of the segments are spotted with purplish brown. It has been sent from the United States of Colombia by one of my collectors, and is an extremely handsome greenhouse climber."