As already known to our readers, it is the design to have in Boston an Arboretum, of which that city may be proud, and which will act favorably on Arboriculture and Forestry all over the United States. Professor Sargent, the only person we believe in the United States who has ever been elected to a chair of forestry, and who has already done so much to bring the subject of forestry in a common sense way before the people of the United States, is doing his best to make this arboretum worthy of its foundation. It has been too much the habit to look on science as something for the learned and not for the common people, and hence arboretums and botanic gardens have rarely been popular with municipal authorities. In Europe where some "Royal" personage has condescended to patronize, they have been in some sense successful, though too often containing nothing that any one but a lover of an abstract fact could admire ; Kew gardens in England, and Shaw's Botanic Gardens at St. Louis, are some exceptions.

The former fortunately fell under the sensible direction of the Hookers, father and son, who managed to unite the common pleasure of gardening which every body liked, with that true science so few appreciate, but which is for all at the botton of all progressive education; and the St. Louis garden was fortunately owned by a wealthy gentleman whose horticultural tastes supplemented his love for botany. Boston is fortunate in having its proposed arboretum in Prof. Sargent's hands, who equally with the gentlemen we have named, fully appreciates the fact that popular garden enjoyment can be associated with sound science without in the least doing violence to it. In a visit the writer made to the proposed arboretum last summer, it was with pleasure we listened to Prof. Sargent's views, showing how it was proposed to convert a mere school for Arboreal Science, into a cheap pleasure ground for the city.

Hoping to aid in this good work for the city of Boston, we have had the following engraving made at our own expense. It shows what the grounds would be as an arboretum only, and what it might become as a public garden if the city authorities would grant the land the city owns, and represented by the darker lines, to be used in connection with the arboretum purposes. As it is, the student of Forestry will always find profit in his pedestrian rambles from tree to tree; as it then would be it would connect with main streets, and beautiful drives as indicated on the map, could be led through it in different directions. With the whole place thrown open to picnicers and pleasure parties, nothing would be eventually more popular with the average Boston citizen. This is the way it appears to an outsider, if such a one may be allowed to meddle with Boston's affairs. We wish Prof. Sargent every success in the accomplishment of his public spirited work. If the public lands were thrown in, the park would be one hundred and sixty-eight acres.

THE HARVARD ABORETUM.

THE HARVARD ABORETUM.