Everybody knows that the hole at the bottom of a flower-pot is to let the water out. Plants need watery air, - but water is only for aquatics. But in ordinary flower-pots, after the hole is made, the pot is set on a smooth board, or other hard flat surface, and there might as well be no hole in the pot so far as letting the water out is concerned. The Whildin pot remedies this by three small holes at the sides. There is the additional advantage that worms cannot get in from the bottom, as they usually shelter themselves under the bottom of the pot. The only objection we can find is that the holes are too small, and will be liable to get choked. They should be as large on the sides as they usually are on the bottom, or at least nearly so. Another great advance in pot manufacture is the shoulder, though this has been noted before in our magazine. The great " mortality" among pots is in the summer season. In the usual way they wedge into one another, and, forcing outwardly, large numbers are cracked and broken by the wedging, while lying in long rows during the useless season.

The shoulder prevents wedgings, and this is an immense benefit.

SECTIONAL VIEW.

SECTIONAL VIEW.

THE WHILDIN FLOWER POT.

THE WHILDIN FLOWER-POT.