In our former remarks on the curious family of Nepenthes, or Pitcher plants, it was very difficult to account for the many peculiar forms they presented in a state of nature, on any hypothesis of good to the individual or the race. Perhaps these reflections may be carried further when we consider how easily these natural forms may be changed by art, and that these forms, so far as we can judge from any physiological reasoning are just as-well adapted to make their way through the great "struggle for life," as those which are supposed to have been evolved from direct contact with this struggle.

NEPENTHES MORGANAE.

NEPENTHES MORGANAE.

We give here an illustration for the reader to compare with the others of one of these artifi cial productions, a hybrid raised by one of our correspondents, Mr. James Taplin, when he was superintendent of the famous establishment of Mr. George Such, of South Amboy, New Jersey, and named by him Nepenthes Morganae, in compliment to Mrs Morgan, the well-known plant lover of New York. The stock was secured by Messrs. Vietch, of Chelsea, London, who thus describe it. "It is of a dwarf neat habit, furnished with smooth pale green leaves with red midribs. The pitchers are flask-shaped, with two rather narrow ciliolate wings, when fully grown are from six to eight inches in length. On the younger plants the pitchers are beautifully mottled with bright red and pale green; in the older plants they are almost self-colored and blood red. The lid is always pale green, offering a remarkable contrast to the richly colored asciduim or urn.