Once there prevailed an impression that orchid seeds never grew. They seem to produce seeds freely enough. If we examine a patch of native orchids, it is rarely that we do not find abundance of capsules with many thousands of the dust like seeds in each. But it is only occasionally that we see evidences of seedling growth about the old plants. Indeed it a notorious fact that a native locality can soon be destroyed by the continual digging up of the flowering roots. No young ones come on to take their places. In the vicinity of Philadelphia, and of all populous places, numbers of orchid localities have been destroyed through the roots being dug up by plant lovers.

It seems to have been left for a few skillful plant growers to discover, that the orchid rcquires a very nice conjunction of circumstances for its seed to grow; and that these delicate conditions do not often occur in a state of nature now, whatever they may have done in ages long since past. Under culture, the intelligent cultivator can control these conditions. Mr. Dominy the aged propagator of Messrs. Veitch, had no difficulty in making orchid seed grow. This knowledge gained, hybridization naturally suggested itself and great numbers of very beautiful forms have been originated by him in this way. Messrs. Veitch continue to bring out beautiful novelties that have been raised in this manner. The one we now illustrate is one of these. It was raised at their nursery from Chysis bractescens and Chysis aurea. The flowers are large and of elegant form; the color of the sepals and petals are nankeen yellow with a large rosy blotch towards the apex; the lip is bright yellow, with numerous purplish red spots and markings.

The plant grows freely with a habit intermediate between that of the two parents.

CHYSIS CHELSONI.

CHYSIS CHELSONI.