This, we suppose, rendered into English, would be " Mr. Kal-breyer's Haemanthus." But it does not mend the matter much. The name seems hard, but after all should Mrs. Kalbreyer happen to be a leader of fashion on Walnut street, the ladies would not worry much over the hardship of remembering the name. It is no harder to remember than scores of names of people we meet in everyday life. Perhaps it is easier to remember a hard name that is fashionable than an easy one that is not in the lower world. But the plant is not English, but African, and hence has no English name, - and were we to give its common name, if the Africans ever had a common name for it, it would not perhaps help the matter very much.

But it seem to be a very pretty thing, - one of the many pretty things introduced to gardens by the enterprise of Mr. Wm. Bull, of Chelsea, London. Its showy inflorescence is of immense size, a single head often producing upwards of a hundred of its attractive flowers which are of a bright reddish vermilion color. The filaments are brightly colored, while the golden anthers have a pretty effect in contrast with the mass of glowing color. It is closely allied to Amaryllis, Brunswigia, and other well known African bulbous plants, and requires to be treated just as we do others.

HAEMANTHUS KALBREYERI.

HAEMANTHUS KALBREYERI.