In view of the lesson on Nepenthes given in our last, it seems that an illustration of another, to follow it, showing in what respects one species may differ from another, may be very useful. The present one was recently introduced by Messrs. Veitch, from Madagascar, through Mr. Curtis. Occuring thus at the extreme western limit of the Nepenthes range, it is found to possess characters in its leaves and pitchers which clearly distinguish it from the other species and hybrids to cultivation, and render it an important acquisition in this remarkable class of plants.

The moderate growth of the young plants seem to indicate that the species is of rather dwarf habit. The leaves are smaller than those of most of the large-pitchered kinds, being but from five to seven inches long by one and a half in breadth, tapering at the base into a short, broad amplexicaul stalk, and narrowing gradually into an acute lance-shaped point.

NEPENTHES MADAGASCARIENSIS.

NEPENTHES MADAGASCARIENSIS.

The pitchers, which are from six to eight inches long, are extremely ornamental and striking on account of the richness of their coloration, being the deepest colored known, and rivalling in this respect the magnificent N. sanguinea. They are furnished with two handsome fringed wings in front, and an oblong lid suspended (in the young pitchers) horizontally over the mouth.