Palms have their homes in tropical climes. Their remains are found in arctic geological formations, but nothing like palms grow there now, so tropical are they that they barely enter the limits of the United States. In the Atlantic region of our country, the Palmetto and other allied species are found from, say, Louisiana eastwardly down through Florida, and a few years ago a species was found coming up on the west into California. This was at first supposed to be a Brahea, a genus allied to Corypha, which is well known to those who love to grow palms. With better knowledge it was found distinct from Brahea, and it was placed in Pritchardia, under which name our pretty California Palm is yet generally known in collections; though as it has been still better studied it is found by Wendland not to be even a Pritchardia, but an entirely new genus which he names Washingtonia. However, the widespread name of Pritchardia in connection with the California Palm, gives an interest to all those of its old name, and with which it is so closely allied.

We now give an illustration of a new species just made known to horticulturists by Mr. William Bull of Chelsea, near London. It was discovered in the South Sea Islands by one of Mr. W. B.'s Plant Collectors, and takes rank amongst the most distinct and attractive palms ever introduced. Of robust compact habit, producing large handsome leaves, which are nearly orbicular in general outline, with a wedge shaped somewhat truncate base; the venation is palmate, and the margin for the greater part of the circumference is divided into narrow oblong lobes, each of which is slightly notched. The leaves are originally flat, but become convex above as they grow older; they are of a dark shining green color above, paler beneath, and the surface is quite destitute of pubescence.

PRITCHARDIA GRANDIS.

PRITCHARDIA GRANDIS.

The Palm recently figured in our magazine is Licuala grandis of Wendland.