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The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V24 | by Thomas Meehan



In starting on our New Year's journey, it may be well to remind the reader that gardening is to be followed chiefly for the pleasure we derive from it. Pretty flowers and handsome trees, beautiful lawns and artistically designed grounds, are the essential elements of gardening. As in other rational enjoyments, the more intelligence and mental culture we throw into the work, the greater enjoyment does gardening afford. At the present time there is something of a revival in true gardening taste. Works on art in gardening, publishers tell us, are in more than usual request, and fine books like "Scott's Suburban Home Grounds," have a more than usual sale...

TitleThe Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V24
AuthorThomas Meehan
PublisherCharles H. Marot
Year1882
Copyright1882, Charles H. Marot
AmazonFour-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long

Devoted To Horticulture, Arboriculture And Rural Affairs.

Edited By Thomas Meehan, Formerly Head Gardener to Caleb Cope, Esq., at Springbrook, and at the Bart-ram Botanic Garden near Philadelphia; Graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, (London,) England,. Member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Author of "American Hand-Book of Ornamental Trees." etc.

-January. Number 277. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In starting on our New Year's journey, it may be well to remind the reader that gardening is to be followed chiefly for the pleasure we derive from it. Pretty flowers and handsome trees, beautiful law...
-Rarer Ornamental Trees And Ornamental Gardening
(Prize Essay for Massachusetts Horticultural Society). (Concluded from page 359). Among the lindens, our attention is attracted by a curious variegated linden, which shows leaves spotted and str...
-Orchids
Mr. Hunnewell has gathered together a large number of these, especially the freer blooming and more serviceable sorts. There are large pans of Cypripedium Doyanum, a handsome leaved as well as a prett...
-Ipomaea Crandiflora
On page 269, September number of Gardener's Monthly, you ask for some information about Ipomaea grandiflora. In reply, will say that I have cultivated it for the past five years and find it to be a ve...
-Golden Plume Arbor Vitae
We are glad to find our excellent contemporary, the American Agriculturist, in the field with us against the European absurdity of long Latin names for mere garden varieties. It christens Retinospora ...
-History Of The Manetti Rose
This variety, once very popular in America as a stock to bud garden roses on, is said, in a recent treatise on roses, to have been obtained from Como by Mr. Rivers over thirty years ago. We do not k...
-Fine Chrysanthemums
At the November meeting of the Germantown Horticultural Society, some remarkably fine varieties of Chrysanthemums were exhibited by Mr. Walter Coles, gardener to J. I. Blair, Esq , of Belvidere, New J...
-Florida Jute
The mixing up of common names among numerous plants, is a fearful pest to the intelligent reader. The newspapers tell us that a plant which grows wild in Florida - Florida Jute, produces an article ...
-Injured Bark
L. W., Philadelphia, writes: Some vandal permitted his horse to bark two of my maple trees, both within three feet of hitching posts. The weather and growth of trees burst the strings with which I ...
-January. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Flowers grown in pots often need re-potting while they are growing. This is an operation requiring much thought and care. As a rule there is more danger of a plant being in too large than in too small...
-Tree Carnations
These now indispensable winter flowering plants, want a very light, place to do well. They do not generally care about very large pots - about five or six inches - but they are very much benefited by ...
-The Cincinnati Floral Company's Establishment
Those who are conversant with horticulture will do well to pay a visit to this extensive plant establishment. In addition to the many thousands of new plants this enterprising company is forming a lar...
-A Hothouse Alarm To Guard Against Frost Or Great Heat
To any one who has had the care of a hothouse during one of our terrible northern winters, the mere mention of a frost suggests hours of anxious watching and apprehension. I have sometimes thought tha...
-Tar Water For Insects
In conversation to-day with a farmer friend, I got from him what I think every planter should know. As he is a reliable' man, I give you his statement, believing you will confer a favor on many of you...
-Growth Of Plants By Electric Light
We do not know how the idea originated that plants do not grow in the dark, though the idea seems widely prevalent in Europe. In America it has been proved that Indian corn grows more rapidly by night...
-Sick Trees And Flowers
Mr. Walter Elder, of Philadelphia, makes the very good point that the knowledge obtained from long experience and close study of the laws of health in vegetation, is deserving of as much pecuniary rew...
-Choosing Hyacinths
A correspondent of the Garden says: Nothing, I am told by an eminent seedsman, amuses the trade more than the prejudices of gardeners on the subject of Hyacinth bulbs. Customers come to the shop and ...
-A Royal Bouquet
Success in floral arrangements - whether such consist in their disposal in a vase, a bouquet, a button-hole, or any of the many ways in which flowers are now so much used - depends upon the taste of t...
-Cymbidium Eburneum
The increased attention given to orchid culture in the United States renders any information about them particularly desirable. Some of them are particularly handsome, and many of these have in additi...
-Seedling Coleuses
John S. F., Evanston, | Ills., writes : By this day's mail I send you two of my seedling Coleuses, which I think are an acquisition to our list of Coleus; they are good bedders. I had them planted ou...
-The Truth As Applied To Tree Agents
Having recently noticed in your magazine, also in the New York Weekly Sun, some remarks in regard to tree agents, it would seem, notwithstanding the ingenious letter written by a Ro Chester dealer, an...
-Stealing From Gardens
It appears that in England as well as in America, there are lawyers and judges who do not know the law. In a recent trial for stealing hot-house grapes, the prosecuting attorney said: It was a pa...
-Shippers And Growers
Mr. M. T. Brewer of San Francisco, in an address before the California Horticultural Society, contended that the fruit grower should consider the interest of the shipper his own interest. As it was, s...
-Painted Labels
The writer was just in from puzzling over some tree labels, just after a rain shower. These labels had been written less than two weeks, and were almost illegible. On the table were some samples of...
-Bees And Grapes
The honey bees,like many other creatures, seem to profit by experience and grow wise in their generations. Every year there is increasing trouble in Germantown gardens from the ravages of bees on grap...
-Curing The Yellows In The Peach
There is a prevalent belief that when a tree once has the disease known as the Yellows, it can never be cured. Yet we frequently read of apparently well authenticated cases of cure. When these are bro...
-Henderson On Delusions
Few men keep doing so much for horticulture as Mr. Peter Henderson does, by his shrewd, practical common sense. He may sometimes get wrong, but he is generally right, and always does good. In a recent...
-The Keiffer Pear
We are watching with some interest the behavior of this interesting hybrid, as it comes into bearing in other than its original locality. The editor of the Germantown Telegraph reports on some which h...
-Ruby Currant
The American Garden has a pretty illustration of this variety which was raised by Mr. Jacob Moore, the originator of the Brighton grape. The branches, as represented here, are five inches and a half f...
-The Two Sisters Pear
Pears and other fruits are so often named after the raisers, discoverers, or places where found, that it is worth noting when one can be named after some peculiarity of its own. The Deux Soeurs is a...
-Progress In Raspberry Culture
Mr. N. Ohmer, of Dayton, Ohio, writes : Raspberries are attracting much more attention at this particular time than ever before. Raspberries have always been appreciated more or less on account of f...
-Japan Persimmon
Mr. P. J. Berckmans writes : I send by mail two specimens of Japanese Persimmons. The large is Tanenashi or Seedless, not ripe, but may become eatable in a couple of weeks. Fruit is not more than two...
-Timber Is King
Prof. P. W. Sheafer, of Potts-ville, in his excellent paper on the geology of Schuylkill county, says : In Schuylkill county we are specialists. We are dependent on one substance; coal is king. We ...
-Protection To Forestry
The United States Government is already doing much to protect the lumber interest in so far as it concerns the destruction of our forests, and there can be no reason why it should not recognize the sa...
-Protection Of Forests A Necessity
By S. Van Dorrien. New York : B. Westerman & Co. This is a pamphlet of thirty-one pages, which goes over and over again the same old story: trees, clouds; clouds make rain ; rain makes springs ; sprin...
-Waters Of Lake Ontario
The daily papers say that: No little concern is felt by persons interested in the harbor accommodations of Lake Ontario by reason of the assured fact that the level of the lake has fallen steadil...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Science Notes By Professor T. C. Porter, Easton, Pa
In a recent number of the Monthly you say with a doubt, that you encountered the famous potato bug on the plains of Colorado in 71. In 73 I saw a stalk of Solanum rostratum in a new street on the outs...
-Work For Natural History Clubs
In young clubs it should not be a point to get new facts, so much as to familiarize the members with common ones. This is best done by each member making original observations and repeating them, inst...
-Hygeinic Value Of Jussieua Grandiflora
Dr. Cartwright of Natchez, attributes the exemption of some districts of Louisiana from malarial fevers to the abundance of this pretty, creeping aquatic plant. We feel bound, as news-gatherers, to re...
-Torch Lilies
The great objection to common names is that they become so very common that each plant gets a score, and no one knows what the other person is talking of. It is not altogether because names are hard t...
-Autumn Flowers Of The Berkshire Hills
An English lady, after a trip in late autumn through this beautiful district of Massachusetts, writes : I have just returned from a most delightful trip (principally by carriage and horses) through ...
-White Cedar
F., Vineland, New Jersey, writes: In the East where I came from, the Arborvitse is known as white cedar; but here I find a very different wood called white cedar. What is the proper one, and how do...
-Early Weeping Willows In America
W. Kite, Germantown, says: I see in thy Monthly some notices of willow trees. If it will be of interest I can tell of one. In the yards back of the old mansions on the north side of Chestnut str...
-Twin Apple
James H. Cook, Strathroy, Ontario, sends a very pretty specimen of a twin apple. Such cases sometimes occur. The two original stems are less than one-fourth of an inch apart. From this upwards there i...
-Bracts And Leaves
In a recent number we gave, in a reference to Antigonon, some idea as to how large leafy calyxes are seen to represent the leaves they really are. This change from leaves to floral parts is more readi...
-Goldsmith
Who does not like Goldsmith and his writings does not enjoy one of the most genial and pleasant authors of the English language. The series of English men of letters, small as they are, give to the ...
-The Rose
The passage Mary Ann would seek from Spencer, is this : Eternal God, in his almightie power To make ensample of his heavenly grace, In Paradize whylome did plant this flowers; Whence he it fetch...
-January. Literature. Editorial Notes
Our Correspondents. [A friend in Indiana, pleasantly writes: I was very much pleased with Mr. Harding's 'Under the Hawthorn,' which in this connection was doubly interesting to me. But the Monthly...
-The Phylloxera In France
By the kindness of Mr. Charles Joly, we have received the report of M. Tisseraud, on the efforts made to conquer this foe to the vineyard during the year ending 1880. It is very pleasant to learn from...
-Laws Against Weeds
A correspondent from Berlin, Conn., writes: I have been querying of late what course our law makers will take when next they meet, in regard to the law about carrots and Canada thistles. No atten...
-Diamond Tuberose
After our letter-press was struck off for last month, we received a brief note from Nanz & Neuner not to make any note of it. It was of course too late. After this the advertisement came to the publis...
-Law Of Branches Overhanging Neighbors
The Philadelphia Public Ledger says : Two persons own land separated by a line fence, which is common property between the two parties. One has an apple tree on his side of the fence, whose limbs o...
-Scholarly Writing
Sometime since we noted the request of a correspondent to excuse his poor writing, as he had not the benefit of a scholastic education. We copied a piece from a school book by Comstock, and hoped ou...
-Southern Nurseries
Nothing gives us more pleasure than to see or hear of the increase or prosperity of first-class Southern nurseries, for there is no part of the Union which has so many facilities for the best specimen...
-T. R. Trumpey
Among the many changes so frequent in gardening and nursery establishments it is pleasant to note the fact of Mr. T. R. Trum-pey having just passed his twenty-fifth year as propagator to the Messrs. P...
-James Markey, The Celebrated Potter
On the evening of November 15th, James Markey, who has gained a national reputation as an expert greenhouse workman, dropped dead of heart disease, near his residence on Jersey City Heights. Though on...
-The Flowers And Ferns Of The United States
When this work was commenced it was regarded as but an experiment, and it was issued as an experiment by Messrs. Prang, who promised to issue one series of 196 chapters only. So far as popular support...
-Proceedings Of The Georgia State Horticultural Society
President P. J. Berckmans. We note that the Nickajack apple is losing favor in Georgia. In regard to peaches, the Alexander seems the favorite among the societies. Numbers of new-fangled things, with ...
-A Practical Treatise On Tree Culture In South Australia
By J. G. Brown. Published by the Forest Board of South Australia. South Australia sees, as other portions of the earth see, the absolute necessity of looking forward to its forest interest. It has ...
-Plants Of Indiana
Catalogue by the editors of the Botanical Gazette and Charles Barnes, Lafayette, Indiana. Local catalogues are of great value. They not only aid the collector, but they serve very materially those who...
-Indian Corn
An essay by Prof. Beal. This is another of those little pieces of excellent work which Prof. Beal is continually performing. One might read a heavy volume on corn, and not learn more than is taught he...
-A Glimpse At Michigan Horticulture
By Charles W. Garfield, Secretary of the State Horticultural Society. This should have been entitled Michigan Pomology, for it deals with this single branch of horticulture. It shows a wonderful advan...
-The Hessian Fly
By Dr. A. S. Packard, Jr.; being Bulletin No. 4, United States Entomological Commission. Published by the Department of the Interior. This is another of the very useful treatises published by the U...
-Various Questions
G. McC, Boulder, Colorado, sends us various questions, written on both sides of a sheet of paper, which prevents us from classifying them, as it is generally best to do; so we have to find a place f...
-Horticultural Societies. Communications. Horticultural Exhibitions
On page 320 of the Gardener's Monthly, for October, you ask why do not exhibitors exhibit, and say that those engaged in getting up exhibitions have generally to get on their knees and beg of exhibito...
-Pennsylvania State Horticultural Society
We have notice that the next meeting of this body, formerly the Fruit Growers' Society, will be held in Harrisburg on the third Wednesday in January, 1883. George D. Stitzel, Reading, Pa., is Presi...
-State Horticultural Societies
Most of these have their annual meetings in January; and after a while we shall have requests foru notices, to appear in our January number. It does not seem to occur to all of our readers that the ...
-Horticultural Exhibitions
According to a recent paper by M. Joly, the first horticultural exhibition ever held in France, was by order of Francois de Neufchateau, Minister of the Interior. It was held in 1798, and brought out ...
-Essays At Horticultural Meetings
The Germantown Horticultural Society had essayists who were appointed at one meeting to prepare a paper for the next. This worked well for a little while, but it was found in time that all the work fe...
-February. Number 278. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
It is often a matter for surprise that the English should grow what they call American plants better than we can. These plants form the greatest attraction of their grounds. Why should not America ...
-Some New Roses Of 1881
Tea, Etoile de Lyon (Guillot), splendid yellow, large, free bloomer, strong grower. Tea, Beaute de l'Europe (Gonod), very vigorous, like Gloire de Dijon, large, very full, dark yellow. He Bourb...
-Public Gardens Of St. Louis
One of the favorite parks of St. Louis is Lafayette, and a beautiful place it is. Thousands of people gather here, more particularly on Sunday, and are seen wandering through the shady avenues, or s...
-Browallia As A Blue Bedder
In reply to W. D, who asks for the name of a blue bedding plant in the January Monthly, page 8,I would say that I know of none better than Browallia elata major, (grandiflora of some catalogues). This...
-Blue Flowers For Massing
For W.D's., Sandusky bed, instead of the blue Lobelia (you suggest) to accompany the Achry-anthus and Centaurea would be the Ageratum John Douglas, and then the Achryanthes and Centaurea will have t...
-February. Notes From The West
How we all admire a beautiful lawn, during summer, with a well selected collection of ornamental trees, shrubs and vines, properly trimmed and otherwise cared for, but how desolate and dreary this sam...
-A Few Hints On The Chrysanthemum
Having received several inquiries respecting the Chrysanthemums I exhibited at the Ger-mantown Horticultural Society, probably a short article on their culture would be interesting to lovers of this b...
-A Blue Bedding Plant
W. D., Sandusky, Ohio, says: Can you give me the name of a bedding plant that can be used in ribbon gardening, as blue, in making a banner or flag (Union), with acharanthus and centaurea for red a...
-New Dahlia, "Juarezii"
The grandest novelty of the year, and not only a novelty but a most valuable and useful decorative plant for all purposes through the late summer and autumn months. Its blossoms are of a rich scarlet,...
-Improvement Of The Common Garden Marigold
Among the triumphs of modern garden art is the taking up of old garden flowers, and making them yield to the improving ideas of the florist. Every body knows the common garden pot Marigold; and, prett...
-The Diamond Tuberose
We are crowded this month, and have hardly room for all the long correspondence on hand in regard to this plant. It seems sufficient to note that Nana & Neuner say they were aware that an attempt was ...
-The Drop Worm
W. F. Bassett, Hammon-ton., N. J., writes : If I understand what you call 'Bag, or Drop Worm,' I think you are in error on one point. Some of the cocoons are doubtless empty, but others are full of ...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Cultivation Of The Chrysanthemum
With very little care and simple treatment I have good success with these. I propagate in March ; as soon as well rooted pot them in two and a half or three inch pots, pinching them if they grow too l...
-Isotoma Lonciflora
In the December issue of the Gardener's Monthly I have noticed the remarks on Isotoma longiflora, and was surprised at the price asked for this plant. Isotoma longiflora, or Rapuntium, or Hippobroma l...
-The Australian Clory Flower Clianthus Dampieri
At Oakley, Mount Auburn, on November 20th, I saw a lovely specimen of this most gorgeous plant. Last spring Mr. Allan, the gardener, had a lot of seedlings, robust plants in good blooming order; some ...
-Tricopilia Tortilis And T. Suavis, By C. H. S., Baltimore, Md
The above Orchids can both be cultivated in the same way though they come from different countries. Owing to their mode of flowering they are best cultivated in pots, and I find that they are impatien...
-The Oleander
The Nerium, commonly called the Oleander, is a much neglected though a very beautiful plant. It is an erect-growing, evergreen shrub, of the easiest culture, abundant in flower, exquisite in fragrance...
-Dendrobium Cambridgeanum
G. C. will find this plant do best to grow it on a block of wood or in a basket, with peat and moss ; suspend it from the roof and as near the glass as possible. It requires plenty of heat and mois...
-On The Culture Of The Camellia
The soil heat adapted to the growth of Camellias is a mixture of peat and rotten sod in nearly equal proportions, with a little silver sand added. Where the soil is peculiarly light and sandy, a less ...
-Dendrobium Cambridceanum
This fine Orchid from the north of India deserves more attention by lovers of the beautiful than it gets. It is a deciduous drooping species and is shown to best advantage when grown in a basket, give...
-Jasminum Gracillimum
We have briefly noted this novelty in our last year's volume. It seems to be an introduction of more than ordinary value, on account of the great demand for first-class winter-blooming flowers. We giv...
-Begonia Schmidt
Although we have several times referred to this pretty addition to the popular Begonias,we continue to have inquiries concerning it, and have thought that the following sketch of its history, furnishe...
-Harris' Lilium Lqngiflorum
Mr. Kift places on our table a plant of his Floribundum, to show how freely it flowers. It having been grown in a three-inch pot. This is indeed remarkable. We have no doubt in our mind that Mr. ...
-February. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In managing the vegetable garden the highest excellence should be aimed at. This is the chief source of pleasure in a garden. If one can take no pleasure in his garden, - If the watching of the beauti...
-Fruit Crop In Tennessee
In this part of the South, the fruit crop of the season just closed affords a subject for reflection and thought that is worth looking into. Not that there can be any remedy, as the territory affected...
-Forcing Strawberries In Pots
P. F., Jersey City, N. J., in your November Gardener's Monthly, asks for a few hints on strawberry forcing, which no doubt will be interesting to most readers of this paper. I will state the method ...
-Fruit Notes From England
I have been interested in your American fruits and have obtained many sorts for trial in the past few years. I have a good stock of them now, and next season hope to fruit quite a number of them. Of s...
-A New Tree Label
J. H., Stan wood, Iowa, writes: I send you a sample of a new Label designed to be used on all nursery stock. The name is to be written on the outside, and inside it is also to be written, to keep a...
-Phylloxera Laws
The Am. Naturalist says : The existing laws regulating the traffic in plants with a view of preventing the introduction of the Grape Phylloxera, are thus summarized in the annual report of the Syndica...
-Protection From Drouth
While some are talking of contrivances against drouth, Mr. C. M. Clay, of Madison, Ky., gives us the following excellent ideas: Deep cultivation is therefore essential to all high culture. It gives...
-Grapes For A Cold Grapery
S. H., Yarmouth, Mass., says: I wrote you last month, but it may have arrived too late. Which is the best vine for a cold grapery, Gros Colman or White Syrian, and which are best vines to get from...
-Culture Of The Quince
Mrs. Alice M. A., Kennett Square, Chester Co., Pa. This lady inquires for information as to the cultivation of the quince. It is remarkable that so little has been said of the culture of this fruit in...
-Profits Of Forestry
It is very difficult to gather .from figures in foreign works whether the forestry of the old world is profitable or not. For instance, one of the best in England is said to be the 20,000-acre forest ...
-Rapidity Of Growth In American Timber Trees
In Europe - at least that part of it which influences our literature - forest trees grow slowly and endure long. The preservation of old forests, and especial protection to young ones, becomes a q...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Fertilization Of Kalmia
The stamens of Kalmia are drawn down and backward by the expanding corolla, to such an extent that, when released from their attachment by insects in search of honey, they throw their pollen up and fo...
-Kalmia Poisonous To Sheep
Since writing upon this subject for a previous number of the Gardener's Monthly, I have been informed by a Hammontonian who formerly owned a sheep farm in Pennsylvania, that he had often seen sheep po...
-Night-Opening Flowers
The fact related in the Gardener's Monthly of November, 1881, page 341, of a Cactus flowering usually at night, and by exception in the daytime is very interesting, and it would be of great interest t...
-How Trees Spread Over Cleared Land
If a large tract of land is cleared for culture, and, after some years it is neglected, it is not long before forest trees spring up all over it. This is a well known fact, especially in the Southern ...
-The University Of Missouri
Some of the agricultural colleges have been great failures, and the agricultural papers are full of the language of woe thereat, and wish them all abolished. But they are not all so by any means, and ...
-Flowers Of A Fig
Talking to some young folks recently about flowers and fruit, and remarking that no one could produce an instance of any fruit without flowers, a young lady said that surely there were no flowers on t...
-A Lucky Botanist
There is a great deal in industry, but after all there is such a thing as luck. Only think, said recently to the writer of this, friend Isaac C. Martindale, the well-known banker and botanist, of Ca...
-The Candle Tree
This Chinese tree, which for a hundred years or more has been one of the popular street trees of New Orleans and other Southern cities, is creating some attention in California just now. It is believe...
-Movement In Roots
At the Cincinnati Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Dr. Beal presented a paper on The Movements of Roots in Germinating Indian Corn, of which the following is an abs...
-Flowers Of South Carolina
The following extract from a letter of a lady living in a small country village in South Carolina will please our readers: You must be aware how very difficult has been in our State, the collection o...
-Fruiting Of The Maiden Hair Tree
Mr. B. Landreth writes: In the report of a meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences in the Philadelphia North American, I read that Mr. Meehan referred to some seeds of the Salisburia, or Ginko bil...
-Evolution Of Heat In Plants
D. P. F., Hanover, York Co., Pa., asks : Can you tell me where to find any information in regard to the evolution of heat in the growth of plants? Is there much heat evolved and is this in propor...
-Bananas From Seed
D. B. W., Crockett's Bluff, Arkansas, writes: You say 'it is generally known that the ordinary banana never produces seed.' ' The fruit is a pulpy seed vessel, but the seeds never perfect.' I can h...
-Cambridge Botanical Gardens
Dear Editor: As it is not true that the late Mr. John A. Lowell left $20,000 to this establishment 'on condition that it be called the Lowell Botanic Garden,' we should like to have you contradict th...
-The Mandrake
Not poppy nor mandragora, Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world. Shall ever medicine thee to that'sweet sleep. Which thou owldst yesterday. Othello hi. 3. Mandrake is a solanaceous plant ...
-Grouping
Nothing perhaps in the way of a small group can excel the Dogwood and Judas tree planted almost in contact. They bloom early and together, the one nearly white and the other red. The Eucalyptus, as...
-Ants
A new traveller in Africa has come across a part of the country where ants are found as large as roaches, and prove themselves masters of man and beast. They make every known animal disappear, infesti...
-Under The Willows At Lichfield
An able and pleasant writer, much impressed with the grandeur of arboreal beauty, thus feelingly alludes to his leafy favorites. Trees seem almost human in sociability, and in isolation. And while a...
-Horticultural Hall, Philadelphia
This beautiful building, destroyed through proximity to a burning church, a year or so ago,has been rebuilt by W. L. Schaffer, President of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, and was reopened on ...
-High-Toned Papers
The publisher once in a while drops into the Editor's box items he thinks may be of interest to his department, and among others he finds just now the following from W. H. 0., Geneseo, N. Y., Pleas...
-The Uncertainties Of Expositions
The Emperor of Germany offered a premium of $3,500, at the great Exposition at Sydney, for that exposition of an industry that should be likely to prove most valuable to Australia. After all we have h...
-The "American Naturalist"
The December Number closes the 15th volume of this admirable monthly magazine. It is one of those able scientific serials of which Americans may well be proud. A marked feature is the employment of sp...
-Transactions Of The Massachusetts Horticultural Society For 1881. Received From Secretary, Robert Manning
Since the celebrated T. A. Knight and his contemporaries made, by their contributions to the Transactions of the Horticultural Society of London, a work of reference valuable for all time, we know of ...
-Art Museums And Their Uses
By Dalton Dorr, Secretary of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. This is an appeal for an effort in the direction of higher art education, and the establishment of industrial educ...
-The Flower
Once in a golden hour, I cast to earth a seed, Up there came a flower, The people said, a weed. To and fro they went Through my garden-bower, And, muttering discontent, Cursed me and my...
-Lines On A Head Of Cabbage
The best poets are often familiar with numerous branches of science; on the other hand men devoted to science are not unfrequently gifted with the poet's fire. Prof. T. C. Porter, the distinguished bo...
-"Ozone" For Curing Meat
R. B. Warder writes; And has it come to this that even so high-toned a journal as the Gardener's Monthly lends its aid to the popular delusion that sulphurous acid gas ' is simply and purely ozone, a...
-March. Number 279. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
There is no doubt the fashion now common of clipping evergreens till they look like the little mossy toys children play with, is an abomination not to be tolerated in tasteful grounds. But it is not w...
-A Blue Flowering Bedding Plant
In the Gardener's Monthly, just at hand, you ask if there is anything better than lobelia for a blue bedding plant. There is. The dwarf blue Ageratums are far ahead of it for free flowering during the...
-Ageratum
There are two varieties of Ageratum that I have found growing in the river bottom, near me, and on the Post Oak hills, beyond the river. The variety growing in the bottom is sometimes two-feet high, a...
-Florist Flowers
Those who take an interest in the improvement, as they believe, of florist flowers are now receiving little encouragement from a class of writers in English journals, some of which claim that better r...
-Ornamental Rhubarb
We have several times called attention to the great beauty of the large-leaved herbaceous plants, when set out as specimens on the lawn or worked in with shrubs or trees, even in massing. The common g...
-Rare Trees In Germantown
The death of Mr. Norton Johnson, of Germantown, Philadelphia, removes the last male representative of a family which has been closely identified with the fame of Philadelphia as a horticultural and bo...
-A Fine Ohio Thorn
L. B. Case, Dayton, O., writes : In a former note to you I expressed a doubt of there being an evergreen thorn in this latitude; at least I never had seen one. It was never my good fortune even to s...
-Winter Flowers In Texas
Mrs. S. E. Byers, Houston, Texas, under date of January 9th, writes : I sent you a cigar-box containing a few roses with my card, from the out-door flower garden. I scarcely hoped that they would rea...
-Clerodendron
The showy Clerodendron (C. speciosissi-mum) forms a dwarf branching plant, growing from four to six feet in height with large cordate leaves and a furrowed almost square stem. It is also one of the mo...
-Coelocyne Cristata
All Coelogynes are beautiful - in fact, all flowers are beautiful - nature is not the author of anything ugly ; but she appears to combine in some particular objects more attractions than in others; t...
-Greenhouses Heated By Steam
Mr. Fowler's article about steam heating for greenhouses in December number, is in the right direction. It is throwing money away to pay two dollars for what can be bought for seventy-five cents. I sa...
-Cut Flowers In Eastern Cities
Many of the plants used for cut flowers are grown in open ground during summer, and transplanted to the forcing-houses in the fall. The past season interfered very much with the summer growth of these...
-A White Heliotrope
A pure white Heliotrope, long desired, seems to have been at length produced, judging by the following from the Journal of Horticulture: Fragrant flowers are general favorites, and any improvement up...
-Ixora Splendida
Among the most valuable flowering plants are those furnished by the order Rubiaceae, of which the well known Bouvardia may be taken as a type. There are other genera closely allied, which are also ver...
-Asparagus Plumosus
J. R.G. St. Stephen's Ch. P. O., Va., writes: Can the Gardener's Monthly tell me if Asparagus plumosus is hardy. From the beautiful print of it and the editorial endorsement I am anxious to get it...
-March. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The pruning knife often injures as much as it benefits, and hence arises two schools in gardening, namely, those who prune on all occasions, and those who prune not at all. As an instance of very bad ...
-Pruning Fruit Trees
It is doubtful whether there is any other subject connected with fruit raising upon which there is such a wide difference of opinion as that of pruning. Two wide extremes are held by different men ...
-Fig Culture At The North
In a note before me from Mr. Thos. D. Lloyd, Barrie, Ont., Canada, he is quite jubilant because he has ripened figs in the open air. I sincerely believe that we can grow better figs in our climate tha...
-Culture Of Teasel
Our attention has been called to an article in the January number of the Gardener's Monthly, written by P. D. Barnhart, of Banksville, Pa., in the course of which he gives a reply to the question aske...
-Sowing Seeds
It requires much judgment to sow seeds properly. It is an art that cannot be completely taught, though a few hints may be given to put the learner on the track. We must first remember that it requires...
-Hothouse Grapes
Few people have an idea of the vast strides which have been made in the skilful culture of the hothouse grape. The Florist and Pomologist, has recently placed on record the full notes made at the Nati...
-Plum, Bassett
The Bassett Plum is receiving encomiums at the West. Prof. Budd speaks well of its doings at Ames, Iowa, and doubts whether it is a variety of Prunus maritima. Stark & Co., of Louisiana, Missouri, hav...
-Raspberries In The North
The raspberry is a native of high northern or mountainous regions, and hence we read of success with kinds in the cooler portions of our country with varieties which, becoming enervated by climates th...
-The Earliest Peach
In some extended observations at Rochester the past season, Mr. W. C. Barry finds the Brigg's Red May ripe on July 24th, though he had splendid specimens of Alexander and Amsden on July 26th. Waterloo...
-Raspberry, Shaffer's Colossal
This seems to be one of the native class, perhaps of the race of the Black Caps. Mr. Green compares it with the Mammoth Cluster. It is in season about the same time, and roots from the tip, as do othe...
-The Blackman Plum
The secretary of the Rosebank Nurseries, at Nashville, says : This variety was first brought to our notice last year. It originated in Nashville, Tenn. It is an accidental seedling from a tree of the ...
-Linseed Oil As A Remedy For Scale
Our readers may remember that the writer tried linseed oil on his own fruit trees with admirable results, and fortified by this experiment gave the result of his experience to the readers of the Garde...
-Gros Colmar Grape
A correspondent recently inquired about this variety. An English grape grower, writing to the Gardeners' Magazine, names it at the bottom of his list; but has the following good points to note concer...
-A Fine Peach
Mr. T. V. Munson, Denison, Texas, under date of November 10th, 1881, writes : To-day I mail you a specimen (medium or under) of a new Peach originating in this Grayson Co., several years ago, and whic...
-School Of Forestry
There is a school of Forestry at Nancy, in France, and the Forestry Department of India, is having young men educated there for service in the East Indies. There is no school of forestry in England, a...
-Joaquin Miller On Forestry
We are not of those who admire Joaquin Miller's poetry, but his prose on forestry in the recent number of the Independent, is just of the right stripe. He thinks as we do, that the owner of a forest w...
-Elms Of Ohio
At a recent meeting of the Montgomery Horticultural Society, Mr. Snyder claimed there were three distinct kinds of elm, namely: the yellow, red and white. The yellow will split like a chestnut; the r...
-Ailanthus Timber
How ever this tree obtained a reputation for durable timber we never knew, and have been surprised at the enormous demand for timber planting in the West. A correspondent of the Country Gentleman fro...
-Spruce Gum
Forty thousand dollars' worth of chewing gum is gathered in the State of Maine every year. In Oxford county is a man who makes it his business to collect spruce gum. Every year he buys from seven to ...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. The Bacteria Theory
When you say, in the February number, that none of Cohn's experiments prove that bacteria ever interfere with life, you give utterance to the plain truth in regard to all other experiments, and theo...
-The Influence Of Electric Light On Plants
Translated for the Gardener's Monthly from the Berliner Tribune. BY S. M. How much of human progress we would miss if we could not master electricity! As it is, space and time are almost annihilate...
-Fremontia Californica, And A Howl
Our Fremontia was once known as Cheiranth-odendron Californicum. I revere the name of the man who changed it. There are probably very few of your readers who have ever seen the Fremontia in bloom; ...
-Coco Grass
D. B. W., Crockett's Bluff, Arkansas, writes : In our travels in Arkansas we came across a grass with the local names of 'coco grass' and 'Johnson's grass,' near the mouth of the Arkansas river. ...
-The Past Season In California
A correspondent from Nordhoff, Ventura County, writes that there has been no rain there for nine months, to January 17th. Sheep have been offered at 75 cents each, and no buyers. Streams-for irrigatin...
-Pritchardia Grandis
Palms have their homes in tropical climes. Their remains are found in arctic geological formations, but nothing like palms grow there now, so tropical are they that they barely enter the limits of the...
-Influence Of The Stock On The Graft
Dr. Sturtevant in the proceedings of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, has an exhaustive paper on this subject. Thirty-eight cases where there appears to be some influence, and twenty-six where...
-Literature, Travels &Sect; Personal Notes. Communications. Prof. C. V. Riley And The Yucca Moth
The above is the title of an editorial in the October number of the Gardener's Monthly. Though containing reflections upon others, as well as myself, I have taken no notice of it till now, which I hop...
-The Wild Garden. Letter From Mr. W. Robinson, The Editor Of The Garden
I had never much reason to suppose that you sympathized greatly with plain ways of talking about things, especially about plants. But I am sure you do not want to be unjust to my book, and therefore I...
-Legend Of The Cornelia Cook Rose
This rose we believe was raised by Mr. Koch, florist, of Baltimore, in the usual way that new roses are raised. He will no doubt be amused at the following account of his efforts, as given in the Phil...
-Pennsylvania Fruit Growers' Society
This Society, after a struggle of twenty-two years with a limited name, becomes the Pennsylvania State Horticultural Association. Under its old. name it was found next to impossible to interest the ...
-The Florist And Pomologist
This very beautiful monthly magazine gives in its January number colored plates of Lilium Parryi of California, and L. polyphyllum from the East Indies. It is one of the most valuable European magazin...
-Produce Of French Vineyards
By the kindness of Mr. Charles Joly, we have received the statistical results of last year's crop of wine in France. For the eight years previous to 1879, the average production of wine each year was ...
-Report Of The Royal Gardens For 1880. From Sir Joseph Hooker, Director
As in our country, so in the old world, government printing is slow work, and it seems slow work to read in 1882 of what was reported on a year ago. On reading this admirable report, one cannot help w...
-Annual Report Of The Chief Signal Officer Of The Army To The Secretary Of War
As we recently noted, among the silliest of questions is that raised by some of the leading newspapers, Of what use are expeditions to the North Pole? No one knows of what use to humanity any new fact...
-Horticulture Of Boston And Vicinity
By Colonel Marshall P. Wilder. It is surprising what a wonderful amount of work Colonel Wilder has done for one of his years. The writer of this was talking of Colonel Wilder with the venerable Genera...
-April. Number 280. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Just now the newspaper wits see in Oscar Wilde a shining mark. They have their fun at the aesthetic craze, and their little giggles go the rounds. Perhaps the philosophy of Mr. Wilde has been run to t...
-Public Squares Of Philadelphia
The sketches of public gardens and private grounds which, from time to time, appear in the Gardener's Monthly, are, I am sure, read with pleasure by thousands. It is worthy of the cosmopolitan charact...
-A Blue Bedder
In bedding, some of the principal points seem to be often lost sight of. One is in the use of plants dissimilar in height, and that cannot be trimmed to it. If flowering plants are used in conjunction...
-Novelties
It is difficult for purchasers who are compelled to buy by catalogue to judge of the value of horticultural novelties, and probably always will be so. Many new things are thrust on the market with wha...
-Improvement Of Agricultural Grounds
A large number of Agricultural and similar societies have permanent exhibition grounds, and it is sad to reflect that these bodies, which one would suppose to be leaders in art and culture in true tas...
-Trees And Shrubs For The Sea-Side
'W. C., Bay view, Gloucester, Mass., writes : Will you please be so kind as to inform me what kind of shrubs I can find hardy enough to withstand our extreme peculiar climate, on the north-west si...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. The Rose-Growing Craze
The readers of the Gardener's Monthly in remote rural districts are unconscious of the extent to which the culture of roses is extending in and around our large cities. In consequence of the extraordi...
-Hinze's Red And White Carnations
Mr. Hinze tells me, since the January number of Gardener's Monthly appeared, he receives scores of letters inquiring about his carnation seedlings. And as Mr. Hinze is not accustomed to English writin...
-Hot Water Boilers
During many of my summer rambles among the horticultural establishments of this vicinity I have noticed a tendency to discard the old smoke-flue, and to use hot-water heating apparatus in houses of an...
-Odontoclossum Cervantesii And Trichopilia Suavis
Anticipating C. H. S.'s reply to the inquiry of F, regarding the treatment of the above, permit me to say that there have been two distinct plants offered by the importers as Odont-oglossum Cerva...
-Luculia Cratissima
This beautiful plant is worthy of a place in every collection however small it may be. None but those who have seen a specimen can form any idea of its beauty, when covered with its immense Hydrangea-...
-Cultivation Of Eucharis
For the third time 1 have succeeded in flowering this valuable plant in greenhouse temperature, and as many persons own it who only have a greenhouse, with your consent, Mr. Editor, I shall briefly st...
-Medinilla Magnifica
This fine growing Melastomaceous plant, being a native of the hottest part of the world, requires a very strong heat at all times and also liberal feeding. It can either be grown in a mixture of peat ...
-Glazing
Having built a house with permanent rafters, and desiring to glaze it in such a manner that the glass could be easily removed in the summer, I stretched ordinary candle wicking from end to end of the ...
-Raising Chinese Chrysanthemums From Seed
Dr. H. P. Walcott, of Cambridge, has succeeded in raising a large number of Chinese and Japanese Chrysanthemums from seed. Some of his seedlings are of good merit, especially a pale purple and a chest...
-Heating By Steam And Water Combined
I notice in the Gardener's Monthly that the subject of steam heating for greenhouses is attracting a good deal of attention at present; and, if agreeable, I will relate our mode of heating with steam ...
-A Cheap Plant Stand
We made a very effective plant stand for our front yard last summer in the following manner: A cedar stake two or three inches in diameter was driven into the ground so as to stand firmly and of the r...
-Rhyncospermum Jasminoides. Mrs. M. D. Wellcome
I have a very attractive climber with the above name that I think cannot be extensively grown, or I fail to find it in any of my catalogues, though from the largest floral firms in this country. It wa...
-Cirrhopetalum Medusae
This is a very rare Orchid and seldom found in collections, and is a most singular plant. It has flowers in masses having the appearance of heads with long hairs hanging from them, these hairs being t...
-Small Greenhouses
It may be interesting to some who are not blessed with ranges of glass-houses, and whose wants exceed their means, to have a trifle of the experience of one, who for three short years enjoyed a very...
-Justicia Calycotricha
A plant which is much more valuable than is commonly supposed is Justicia calycotricha. When cut the in florescence is most useful for vases, and it lasts in beauty a considerable time. The flowers ar...
-Dinner Table Decoration
This is a matter which many take great interest in, and to which they devote much attention. Like all other fashions it needs to be changed to retain admirers. When the numbers at dinner vary and the ...
-Camellia Bud Dropping
W. F., Sandusky, Ohio, writes : I have a Camellia (double red) which has about fifteen buds. They seem to be on a standstill, and I think they should be opening now. I have had them this way befo...
-Plum Stocks For Peach Trees
As you invite testimony on this question in your November number, I give my limited experience. The growth of Myrobolan stocks is so vigorous that I was tempted to bud the peach upon it, three years s...
-How I Grow Celery
I think there are few localities better adapted to celery culture than that around Detroit city. The soil is well suited, being heavy and of a dark sandy nature. Of course celery will do very well in ...
-Yellows And Peach Culture
Enough has been said about the character and causes of this so-called disease of the peach by experts. I do not propose to explain the origin or character of it; but give a few hints of practical expe...
-The Cros Colmar Grape
In your January number of Gardener's Monthly, I noticed an article of inquiry about the size and quality of the Gros Colmar Grape. I would not differ very materially from the answer it received from t...
-Petite Marguerite Pear
My Petite Marguerite Pear has fruited with me here, three seasons. The last season I picked five bushels, and placed them for marketing in baskets graded ten to the bushel, and took one dollar per bas...
-A Curative And Preventative For Thrip On Grapes
As the time is drawing near for starting our early graperies, I wish to relate to the profession and horticulturists, my experience of last season with grape growing under glass. For some years back I...
-Japan Persimmons As Tub Plants
I notice in the January number of the Gardener's Monthly that Mr. Berckmans, of Georgia, sent you some specimens of Japan Persimmons and that they were good fruit. You say all the trees planted around...
-Bentley's Sweet Apple
I send you two apples by mail - Bentley's Sweet - which you will see described by Downing. I don't remember ever seeing it mentioned in my nurseryman's list or catalogue, and presume it cannot be in g...
-Japanese Persimmons
It may be of interest to you to know that the Japanese Persimmon is hardy in Virginia, latitude of Norfolk. Grafted plants imported in 1879, bore fruit the past season which ripened on the tree at the...
-Longevity Of Apple Trees
The minds of horticulturists in this prairie country are very much exercised over the seeming fact that apple orchards must be renewed every fifteen or twenty years, and the question naturally suggest...
-Winter Nelis Pear
Several articles have lately appeared in the Gardener's Monthly, with regard to this Pear, which I think is deserving of the notice taken of it. Thirty-six years ago I got a tree of it, with some othe...
-Profitable Peaches
It is a nice thing to have peaches to sell when your neighbor has not any. The winter of 1880-81, which destroyed so many fruit buds, made a fortune for the owner of trees which escaped and thus furni...
-Over-Cropping
President Barry tells the members of the Western New York Horticultural Society that In the management of fruit trees over-cropping is a great and very general evil. A tree overloaded with fruit can ...
-Forestry. Communications. Ailanthus As A Timber Tree
I noticed an article in Country Gentleman on Ail-anthus. We grow the tree but do not recommend it for durability; and you may recollect how quickly I called your attention to an error in Gardener's Mo...
-United States Timber Laws
We recently referred to the evasion of the timber laws in Oregon. The law is : Any person who is the head of a family, or who has arrived at age of twenty-one years, and is a citizen of the United S...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Wild Garden
The season of the year is now at hand in which we can go with pleasure to the woodland, the hillside, and the meadow, and find objects worthy our closest attention and consideration. The love of flowe...
-Poisoning By Kalmia
In a previous number of the Monthly I saw Mr. Bassett's article on sheep poisoning by Kal-mia. I at once wrote to Mr. Stratton, the herdsman on Montauk Point, who has had years of experience in the ca...
-Pawpaw
Some one takes one of your correspondents to task for spelling Papaw, Pawpaw. The latter orthography is perfectly correct, the word is very often spelled so; and, moreover, it represents the accepte...
-Arum Family
Almost all our readers are familiar with the Indian turnip - small roots from the woods which blister the mouth when raw, but are wholesome mealy esculents when roasted. The children know the flowers ...
-Pinus Arizonica
This was once believed to be but a form of P. ponderosa, but Prof. Roth-rock on Wheeler's Expedition believed it might be distinct, from its leaves being always in fives instead of in threes - as the ...
-Coco Grass, Johnson Grass, Means Grass, Cuba Grass, Guinea Grass
A. F. K., Thibodaux, La., writes: In the February number of the Gardener's Monthly, 'C. B.W.,' Crockett's Bluff, Ark., speaks of Coco grass and Johnson's grass. They are entirely distinct. Coco is,...
-Botany In California
Mr. J. C. Lemmon, of Oakland, California, the famous explorer, writes: We wish you could have been with us in Arizona (Mr. and Mrs. Lemmon) when at last the Alpine park was reached. A lovely r...
-The Australian Bottle Tree
A correspondent inquires what is known of this curious tree of which he sends us a sketch. There is no account of it in standard works of reference. Mr. Isaac Burk, of the Philadelphia Academy of Natu...
-Absorption Of Metallic Poison By The Roots Of Plants
Professor Phillips, of the Western University, recently lectured in Pittsburg on the Absorption of Poison by the Roots of Plants. If these poisons become soluble the roots will absorb a little, but ...
-Frost And Peach Buds
A correspondent inquires what degree of temperature a peach bud will stand without injury? It is like asking what degree of temperature will make a man feel comfortable. We have known some people to f...
-United States Seed Distribution
It is interesting to remember that the want of a proper medium for the distribution of the rare seeds and plants which must necessarily come into the possession of a government like the United States,...
-Sensitiveness Of Trade
When a tradesman has an overstock of anything, the most rational thing in the world is for him to conclude it is better to get something than nothing, and he had better sell for something than let go ...
-A Lover Of Trees
The London World says, alluding we suppose to effects of the severe winter of 1880-81, which would now only the past summer show its full effects : The destruction of trees on Lord Haddington's esta...
-Art And Science
Mr. John Williamson the well known botanist of Louisville, is also famous in art. The Kentucky papers speak in high praise of some etched plaques of brass on exhibition, in which the ferns and other p...
-Thomas Potts James
The members of the American Pomological Society have many of them learned before this, of the death of one of the founders, and for thirty years the treasurer of the Society, Thomas P. James, who died...
-Our Winged Friends
This is an essay read before the Pennsylvania State Horticultural Association by Mr. Simon R. Eby, and now published in pamphlet form. It is an excellent plea for the birds. There is of course another...
-Pennsylvania State Agricultural Report For 1881
Pennsylvania, regarded as a very slow State, advances rapidly when once it makes up its mind to go forward. It is only five years since it followed other States with a State Board of Agriculture, ...
-Fruit Growers' Association Of Ontario, Report For 1881
If there be any one left who thinks Fruit Growers' Associations are made up of men who meet together to talk only of the prospects of the fruit crop, and the probable effects of the winter on pric...
-Mulberries
Many trees are famous because of their dimensions, others on account of their longevity, many are esteemed for the excellence of their produce, and there are many more yet that are exceptionally beaut...
-Michigan State Horticultural Society
From secretary Garfield, Grand Rapids, Michigan - Without derogation to the work of other State societies, it will be only fair to this to speak of it as a model one, or of its report as a model docum...
-The Malefactor's Tree
There has been controversy whether the tree on which Judas hung himself, was the large tree Elder of Europe, Sambucus nigra, or the Cercis siliquastrium, the Red-bud, or Judas tree. The partisans of...
-Tree Peddlers And New Subscribers
G.M., Rochester. N. Y., writes: Mr. Meehan says in the Monthly that the ' tree peddlers are an unmitigated nuisance;' yet our 'tree peddlers,' as he calls them, are neither slandercus nor do they e...
-The Detroit Carnations
John Breitmeyer & Sons, Detroit, Mich., say: Looking over the advertisement pages in the March number of the Monthly, we, to our surprise, notice on pages 13 and 27, an insertion by Mr. Aug. D. Myliu...
-May. Number 281. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
We cannot do better this month than refer to the excellent hints of Miss A. G., and then take for a text the following query from Mr. George Wright, of Table Grove, Illinois : I have some evergreens...
-May. Communications. The Adornment Of Small Yards
A narrow border of gay flowers has a very-pretty effect when set next to an open fence, especially if bordered with grass or a grass plat. Stiff looking plants, such as box, should not be used for bor...
-Budded Roses
It is the universal testimony of those in a position to know the facts in the case, that there is a great and rapidly increasing interest in the cultivation of roses. The magnificent new Hybrid Perpet...
-Hardy Cypripediums
As I have had some experience in growing the hardy Cypripediums which Q inquires about in the March number of the Monthly, I am glad to give any hints which may help to encourage the cultivation of ...
-Calendula Meteor
This much-praised plant, I think, will be short lived ; at least it will be so with me, when I can get rid of it. Two years ago I thought from its many recommendations we had got a yellow that would b...
-Chestnut Hybrid Rose
Two years ago I received a plant of the above Rose, planted it in a deep, rich bed in the rose-house. The first year it made strong growth, which didn't ripen well, and I was awarded two blooms for my...
-Wild Roses
While we cannot ask any one to love less the beautiful roses of refined culture, we ought not to forget the glorious charms of the wild rose. They make good sized bushes as ordinary shrubs do, and are...
-The California Mammoth Tree In Europe
Thousands have been tried in the Eastern United States and failed. They die from a species of fungus, which takes the oldest leaves first, and the branches die from below upwards during the summer se...
-Bedding Pennyroyal
Wm. P. Harding, of Mount Holly, New Jersey, says : My last summer's travel gave me many opportunities of seeing numerous things made use of in the modern style of flower gardening, as were never tho...
-Fremontia Californica
W. L. F. Hanover, Mass., writes: I would like to ask 'Collector' in regard to Fremontia, about which he writes so instructively, whether the plants he mentions, as growing at the highest altitude, ...
-Talk About Lilies
F. A. B., Philad'a., asks : Can you not write out for the readers of the Gardener's Monthly the talk you gave on Lilies at the State Horticultural Society ? By an abstract I saw in a Harrisburg pa...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Tropical Orchids In Open Air Of Summer
In the April number of the Gardener's Monthly, Mr. Taplin wants to know if C. H. S. has had any experience in growing orchids under the shade of trees in the summer. About eight years ago a friend o...
-Rondoletia Speciosa Major
Rondoletia speciosa major is a comparatively rare evergreen stove or hothouse plant belonging to the natural order Cinchonaceae. It forms, when full grown, a dwarf shrub of compact habit from five to ...
-Fumigating
Thrips and aphides succumb to tobacco smoke, but in order to make fumigating effectual for thrips repeated doses are necessary. It is not the amount of smoke that hurts the plants, but the hot smoke. ...
-Orchid Growing
The extent to which the culture of orchids has reached, since the Gardener's Monthly and other magazines have done so much to simplify the mystery with which the older times loved to surround their tr...
-Bridal Bouquets
The London Journal of Horticulture tells how these are made in England : It should be nine to ten inches in diame ter, the surface slightly convex, broken occa sionally by a raised flower or spray o...
-New Or Rare Plants. Croton Recurvifolius
The English people never seem to tire of new Crotons. They are among the gayest of their hothouse plants. In our country there is the additional advantage that they thrive admirably in the open air du...
-Isotoma Longiflora
John G. Eisele says : In regard to what Mr. De Niedman volunteered to state in the February number of the Gardener's Monthly, concerning I. longiflora: First, I received the seed from which I raised...
-Blue Carpet Bedder
F. N. J. asks: What is your own opinion of the best blue carpet bedder, after all the discussion there has been on the subject ? [We do not think just what is needed has yet been suggested. It ...
-Black Flea On Heliotrope
Florist, Des Moines, Iowa, says : A little black flea in spring attacks my Heliotropes, Primroses, Sweet Alys-sum and other plants, and works great destruction to their foliage. What can I do to de...
-Universal Side Cleft Crafting
In the spring of 1881, I practiced with much success a method of grafting, which I submit for trial to the readers of the Gardener's Monthly interested in the subject. I cut the scions with shears ...
-Fig Culture Again
We, at the North, are now growing tropical and semi-tropical fruits, to wit, melons, cucumbers, tomatoes, etc. I wish we would add the fig to the list. General Worthington of Ohio, who has cultivated ...
-Lichens And Tree Fungi
Though the Iceland moss, a species of Lichen is known somewhat in our cookery, it is perhaps the only one of this class which is used by us. In Japan there seems to be a great number of desirable ki...
-American Jute
In answer to our inquiry as to this rare plant which is to be introduced from the East Indies to Florida, we find that it is not the jute - the real Corchorus - but our old friend of the past centu...
-Drying Apples Whole
Recently we had a note as regards the process by which apples were dried whole in England. We have had in response an answer to the inquiry, and believe it is not generally known. We find the followin...
-Insect Laws
They have insect laws in California. Commissioners, three, are appointed, who make the by-laws and enforce them. Here is one by the Commissioners of Nevada County : It shall be required of every ...
-Fruit And Vegetables On The Sacramento
It is worth putting on record that the first vegetables planted at Yuba Dam, or as it is now called, Marysville, in California, Briggs, the famous orchardist, set out, in 1841, a ton of potatoes, whic...
-Highland Beauty Apple
Mr. E. P. Roe writes : I send you herewith per express, prepaid, a few of my new seedling apples, 'Highland Beauty,' which is a seedling from the Lady apple. Last year was not the bearing year and we...
-Calloway Cling Peach
Mr. T. V. Munson, Denison, Texas, writes: On page 83, March number Gardener's Monthly, you insert my letter of November 10th under 'A Fine Peach.' I should have written further facts, obtained since,...
-Fruits And Trees In Kansas
J. B., Sa-lina, Kansas, says : I have a cottonwood growth at my place two years old, of sixteen inches in circumference and over twenty-two feet high. In 1880, I sent a sunflower stalk to the nati...
-Hybridizing Grapes
M. S. W., Fonthill, Ont., says : We are anxious to know the art of hybridizing grapes. Our Mr. Stone, of Rochester, advised writing to you to see if there was not some publication on that subject. ...
-Forestry. Communications. United States Timber Laws
The quotation of the law in your April number is incorrect. As the amended law now stands, it requires but ten acres to be planted on each quarter section of one hundred and sixty acres, and in like p...
-Ailanthus In South Jersey
The reference of Mr. Douglas, in the April number of the Monthly, to the Ailanthus as a suitable tree for our Jersey shore, suggests some further observations upon this tree and its adaptation to the ...
-Forestry Nonsense
The good cause of forestry would prosper much faster if it could be relieved of the load of humbug and nonsense which it has had to carry - a load packed on its shoulders by sensationalists, who seem ...
-Growth Of Forest Trees
It has often been noted in our magazine, that Forestry experience in Europe is of little value for forest culture in our country. The English Oak, for instance, which is so slow a grower in England, t...
-European Forests
The Journal of the Society des Agriculteurs de France publishes some interesting particulars with regard to the forests of Europe and the rapid consumption of the timber which they contained. Sweden a...
-Scraps And Queries.The Romance Of Forestry
A New Jersey correspondent, whose official position gives weight to his words, says : Allow me to commend heartily your pertinent and opportune criticisms upon the various forestry schemes and paper...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Winter In Washington Territory
Are there any readers of the Gardener's Monthly who would like to know how life goes on up here under the fir trees? There is plenty to do as any one will believe who will make an estimate of the labo...
-Heredity In White Variecation
I enclose you a leaf of a white collard which I have for years been trying to perfect. I was first attracted by a few plants of light green with white veins, by sowing seed from the whitest every year...
-Nertera Depressa
In woods in the Eastern United States we have a very pretty trailing evergreen plant of small size known as Mitch-ella repens, and sometimes commonly called Partridge berry. The little plant is covere...
-Vegetation Of Arizona
Mr. J. C. Lemmon gives the following very interesting sketch to the California Academy of Sciences : Arizona Territory comprises a large cross-section of that broad interior region between the Roc...
-Papaw
W. G. B. says : One of your correspondents, on page 120, April number, seems disposed to set at defiance all authority as to the orthography of papaw. We are accustomed to follow Webster. Those who...
-Yellow Fruited Choke Cherry
F. W. W., Eau Claire, Wis., writes: I have a tree of the Choke Cherry with fruit of a bright yellow color; otherwise the tree is the same as the common variety. I have never seen this before and wo...
-Rosal Monstrosity
Mrs. M. P., Lynn, Mass., sends a very interesting specimen and says: I enclose a bud from a Douglas rose growing in my greenhouse. Can you explain why it should grow in such a singular manner? Ple...
-Health And Ailanthus
T. F. B , Allegheny, Pa., writes: On reading the following item I deemed it so very unjust that I clipped it for your judgment: In other cities the attention of the boards of health have been ...
-Note On Colors
Mrs. M. P., Jr., Lynn, Mass., remarks : I have been much interested in the discussion of a 'blue bedder' in the later numbers of the Monthly. I can indorse all that W. Robertson says of the Agerat...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Letter Of A Californian Nurseryman
The enclosed has been handed to the Gardener's Monthly by a friend in Southern California, from one of the best nurserymen in the State, residing in Nevada county. The fact that he has sense enough ...
-Canis Ferox Cum Kettlebees
I see you have got a kettle to the tail of my Fremontia dog that howled in the March number (page 87). In many cases the kettle is the more important appendage, but it seems to me that in this in...
-Plant Patents Again
Those who try honestly to find out how the discoverers of new trees, flowers or fruits may reap the benefit of some just legal protection such as discoverers in the arts receive through the patent off...
-Favors
A correspondent kindly suggests that he would be glad to communicate some interesting facts to our magazine, only that he fears he should thereby annoy some agricultural journals, who think he should ...
-Decaisne
Mr. Harding writes : The Cincinnati Weekly Commercial, March 29th, says: ' M. Decaisne's career, says a Paris letter, is encouraging. He entered the Garden of Plants in 1824, as journeyman gardener....
-The History Of The Camellia
The Camellia japonica or Japan Rose, the species from which nearly all of our more valued garden varieties are descended, is, as we have already seen, said to have been introduced in 1739; but it is n...
-Satisfied With The Flowers
It had been determined to start a Horticultural Society for the town and county of Northampton, and the working committee applied to the Earl of Winchilsea requesting his patronage and pecuniary suppo...
-Jesse Storrs
The Ohio nursery trade loses one of its representative members in the founder of the Storrs & Harrison Company of Paines-ville. His death occurred on the 21st of March. He had reached the ripe age of ...
-Dr. W. H. Leggett
The death of Dr. Leggett is announced as we go to press, which will be received with regret by the many botanists who have long profited by his labors as Editor of the Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical...
-Chemistry Of The Farm
By R. Warington, New York; Orange Judd Company. Mr. Warington has been connected with the celebrated establishment of Lawes and Gilbert at Roth-ansted, where agricultural chemistry has been made to pr...
-A New Work Ok Destructive Insects
Messrs. J. B. Lippincott & Co., of Philadelphia, have arranged for the publication of a complete illustrated work on the insects injurious to horticulture and agriculture. It is to be prepared by Mr. ...
-A Gardeners' Society
E., New York City, says': Many gardeners of New York desire your views as to the formation of a gardeners' society in this city. Be kind enough to let us know through your next issue what you thin...
-Rhyncospermum
Prof. Bailey, Brown University, Providence, R. I., notes : The real name of the so called Rhyncospermum jasminoides mentioned in April number of the Monthly, is Parechites, and it belongs to the Apoc...
-June. Number 282. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
It sometimes seems to one endeavoring to direct the public mind, and improve the public taste, that his labors are all but thrown away. As we go through distant cities, and note how barbarous practice...
-June. Communications. The Adornment Of Small Yards
Stands of flowers may be used to advantage in some yards, filling a blank space on a pavement. If these cannot be used, groups can be made of pot flowers, some being raised in the centre by boxes or b...
-Hyde Park, St. Louis
Hyde Park is situated in the northern portion of the city and contains about fourteen acres. The trees are young and do not afford sufficient shade at present from the sweltering heat of the summer su...
-The Arboretum, Derby, England
It is announced in recent advices from England, that applications will be made to Parliament for power to transfer the Derby Arboretum grounds from control of the present trustees, and vest (he same...
-Pruning Ornamental Trees
I beg a small space in your columns, to say a word or two against the method of pruning flowering shrubs, so prevalent among gardeners throughout the country. Perhaps a good name for this method would...
-Culture Of Hardy Cypripediums
I notice under head of Scraps and Queries, page 70, March number of the Gardener's Monthly, your correspondent Q. wrote asking for information as to the treatment of our hardy Cypri-pediums. I have...
-Pyrus Salicifolia
A note on this deciduous tree may not be out of place now that the planting season has arrived. It is surprising it is not more planted, and would be perhaps if it was more generally known. It grows i...
-Health And Shade Trees
Rufus W. Gris-wold, M. D., of Rocky Hill, Conn., has some remarks on the destruction of shade trees as a sanitary measure, in a popular medical magazine from which we take the following: A very intel...
-Kew Gardens
These gardens, under the able management of Dr. Joseph Hooker, Director, and Mr. John Smith, Curator, have become the pride of the great mass of English people, and the admiration of the world. Even t...
-Indian Cherry
This is the name of the pretty spring flower referred to in the following card from a correspondent at Walkertown, King and Queen's County, Virginia. Botanically, it is Amelanchier Botryapium, and tho...
-Cattle In Cities
A Burlington, Iowa, correspondent says: We are still outraged in this town with roaming cattle, horses and geese. Why is it that I never see any articles in the horticultural nor agricultural papers ...
-Variegated Arbor Vetaes
Messrs. Douglass & Sons, Waukegan, Ills., send us specimens of some silver and golden forms of American arbor vita3. They are very beautiful, and it is good work to watch the beds of seedlings, and se...
-June. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
There seems to be a growing taste for greenhouses, chiefly, as it would seem, for the purpose of having flowers at command all winter. At this season the resolve is usually made by those who have none...
-Attendance On Steam Boilers
In response to Wm. H. B.'s queries, I would say that the fires in a steam apparatus may be left oyer night. Steam may be carried up or down at pleasure if certain rules are followed - and the temper...
-Culture Of The Chrysanthemum, Etc
This subject seems to have laid dormant for some time. I have seen no mention of it in the Monthly of late until a recent issue, February number, page 38. I believe in that writer's method of cultivat...
-Greenhouse Notes From St. Louis
In Tower Grove Park palm house there is a group of bananas, in the centre of which is growing the largest specimen of Musa sapientum in this country. The stem and leaves are colossal. The smaller memb...
-Rhyncospermum Jasminoides
No doubt Mrs. M. D. Wellcome is right in saying this charming plant is not so extensively grown as it should be. But we may find it advertised in many catalogues. I have at present a small plant in bl...
-Bouquets In The London Market
A correspondent of the London Journal of Horticulture remarks : One of the most attractive and original bouquets that I have seen for some time I recently noticed in the grand row of Covent Garden Ma...
-Arranging Flowers For Evening Effect
A correspondent of the London Journal of Horticulture gives the following good hints : Let a close-fitting shutter be provided for the window, so that if necessary daylight may be excluded while arr...
-Flowers On The Dinner Table
A correspondent of the London Journal of Horticulture thus describes what he regards as a tasteful arrangement of a dinner table which he saw: It was a small circular one, having a cup and two tall ...
-Passiflora Princeps
This is an excellent climber for a warm greenhouse, and flowers freely when properly treated. It should not be pruned much, and none of the old flower-stems must ever be removed. It flowers again and ...
-Pavonia Makoyana
Tropical malvaceous shrubs are particularly well adapted to American gardens. They like our summer heats, and flower the whole summer long. The genus Pavonia has much in common with Hibiscus, Althaea ...
-Questions On Steam Management
S. P., Brooklyn, New York, remarks: In reading your last issue, I found several communications in regard to heaters for greenhouses. I have also heard several gardeners talking in reference to ste...
-June. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Of the many projects for securing a plum crop, none have been permanently successful but jarring the trees. It is not a great task, but it needs to be persistently followed. The plum knot, is less pre...
-The Muck Question
It seems a little strange that there should be any difference of opinion upon the subject of muck, as a fertilizer. Muck may be defined as vegetable matter, preserved in water; generally in water that...
-Rust In Blackberries
As there is just now so much complaint of rust in blackberries, especially the Kittatinny, anything which will aid in avoiding or combatting it will be hailed with great pleasure by all lovers of th...
-The Flat-Headed Borer
This is very destructive to apple trees in Ohio. Mr. Robert Steele thus characterizes it in a paper before the Montgomery County, Ohio, Horticultural Society: The pupa, like the worm, is white, but t...
-Osage Orange Silk
Prof. C. V. Riley called attention some time since to the fact that the common silk worm would do as well on osage orange leaves as on mulberry, Last year the Women's Silk Culture Association, of Phil...
-Juglans Praeparturiens
A California correspondent submits the following questions, which, not being well versed in the history of this particular variety, we should be glad if some correspondent can answer : 1. How large...
-Disease In Pear And Apple Trees
C. W. T., Hulmeville, Pa., writes : I was yesterday looking through a very fine orchard in this vicinity when my attention was called to a row of Seckel Pear trees, some twenty-five of which had b...
-Strong's Method Of Grafting
A Bucks Co., Pa., correspondent says : The 'strong' method of grafting is at hand just in time for trial this season. I think with the editor that it is a very strong method indeed. That it has never...
-Forestry. Communications. Forestry Notes, By F. L. Olmsted, Brookline, Mass
I hope that your May editorial notes on forestry and forest growth may be followed up. As to effect of forests on water supply, it is in question that the removal of forests increases the variability ...
-Seedling Forest Trees
Major Ben. Perley Poore thinks the government should issue instructions to ignoramuses how to sow forest tree seeds, so that they may be spared the results of their ignorance in bad planting. He says ...
-Legislative Forestry
It would be an interesting but curious subject of study to find out who it is that gets up the forestry legislation which takes place in so many States every year, and which is remarkable for nothing ...
-Cultivating Forest Trees
It must not be forgotten that the growth of forest trees left to struggle as they may, and perhaps with poor soil amongst other evils, affords no sort of guide as to the rapidity of growth, and time o...
-Tree Planting In Australia
The Colony of South Australia encourages forestry in various ways, even to the extent of giving the trees to the planters. Before us we have a list of trees on hand in the government nurseries, publis...
-Forest Fires
Ontario is said by the daily papers to have lost $10,000,000 by the forest fires of last season, - and next year, and another, and another, she will probably lose $10,000,000 every time. And yet all t...
-Value Of The Ailanthus Timber
A Cana dian paper has the following: The Ailanthus is another valuable timber tree which is easily grown. The timber is very durable, and is especially valuable for railroad ties, as it holds a sp...
-Notes From Waukegan, ILL
R. Douglas & Sons write : Your experience with Yellow Pine corresponds with ours. We have purchased seeds of Yellow Pine time and again, and found them turn out P. rigida; indeed we have now for the...
-Catalpa At Beaver Dam, Wisconsin
Mr. Perry writes as follows : The old Catalpa tree is probably C. bignonoides. Catalpa speciosa planted two years ago made rampant growth last year - four to five feet. A little tip of unripe woo...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Note On The Buzzard
An old vulture, or turkey buzzard, occupied the same nest for twenty years. In a certain piece of woodland, on a farm now belonging to the writer, is a buzzard's nest, formerly in a hollow tree, but t...
-South Carolina Wild Flowers
Your Wild Flower correspondent in the May number of your magazine, speaks of the facility with which the Blood root (Sanguinaria Canandensis) may be grown in a garden. Three or four years ago we ...
-Acency Of Water In Changing The Character Of Forests
We find that water rather than fire is the most destructive element in obliterating our forests. In a new valley among our mountains, a beaver dam obstructed the flow of a stream and made a large swam...
-Early Birds Which Did Not Find The Worm
Under date of April 13th, a correspondent from Washoe Co., Nevada, says Oar season is peculiar. We thought our spring was come, and the spring birds were of the same opinion. They had scarcely arrive...
-The Botanic Gardens At Melbourne
Victoria is the smallest of the Australian Colonies, but a very progressive one. The beautiful botanic garden at Melbourne is regarded as one of its greatest attractions. It comprises eighty-three acr...
-The Annual Circles Of Wood In A Tree
Among the curious papers read at Cincinnati, was one suggesting that the examination of the transverse sections in a felled tree would show when the seasons in the past were dry seasons, and when wet ...
-Hybrid Orchids
Once there prevailed an impression that orchid seeds never grew. They seem to produce seeds freely enough. If we examine a patch of native orchids, it is rarely that we do not find abundance of capsul...
-The Seasons In America And England
A letter from the County of Kent in England, May 1st, says the Hawthorn was then beautifully in blossom, and the weather was beauti fully fine. Here in Philadelphia we have Eng lish weather, though an...
-Botany In The French Capital
We are sorry to learn from a French correspondent that botany is not as strongly encouraged as it once was. A naturalist was appointed with the French expedition to Mexico to sustain Maximilian, and i...
-American Sights Worth Seeing
A correspondent of the London Garden writes that of all the grand objects he saw in America during his visit to the great Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, those which impressed him the most perm...
-Hard Botanical Names
The wretched names offered us so often as English names, are no worse, to say the least, than some of the very hard words given to us by botanists, and all horticulturists are pleased when a really ...
-Scarlet Flowers From A White Geranium
J. H. C, Strathroy, Ontario, writes : Enclosed you will find a photograph of the geranium White Vesuvius, grown in my greenhouse, giving a sprout from the main stem, and producing a perfect head of...
-Growth Of Wood
A Bay City, Mich., correspondent kindly sends the following interesting scrap from a local paper: There is on exhibition at J. C. Zeigler's jewelry store a rare curiosity and strong proof of the ...
-James Vick
The portrait of this distinguished man has become very familiar of late, but the future will be glad to look upon the features of one to whom it will certainly feel indebted ; for the work of the good...
-Women In Horticulture
This is the subject of a paper by M. Charles Joly, before the French National Society of Horticulture. He does not undervalue the piano education which so many ladies receive, but believes that if p...
-Webster And Papaw
A correspondent suggests that W. G. B. may consult his own authorities to some profit, in this that Webster states that Papaw, or Pawpaw, - either is correct. For our part, as before suggested, we ...
-Watson's Nurseries, Brenham, Texas
It is always a good sign when a man is well spoken of by his neighbors. The Brenham Independent has a good word for these nurseries. The new grounds were waste prairie thirteen years ago. Two hundred ...
-Western Art
So many catalogues are beautiful, it is difficult to signal one more than another for any special excellence. But a rare picture of beauty is on the back page of Richardson's Catalogue of Poses, desig...
-The Redwood
The road wound up from the green meadows through a park-like region, shaded in many places by groups of Redwood, or Sequoia sempervirens, a very elegant Conifer, peculiar to the coast range of Califor...
-Spinach
This vegetable, which belongs to the same family as the beet (Chenopodiacase), appears to have been unknown to the ancients, unless, as some authors think, it might be the Chrysolacanon of Dioscorides...
-Peach Culture
By James Alexander Fulton. New York : Orange Judd Company. New Edition. The first edition appeared but a few years ago, and that a new one should be so soon called for is in itself a tribute to the...
-The Silk Worm
Manual of Instruction. By C. V. Riley. Published by the Department of Agriculture. A very, valuable paper, especially because it is so timely. It seems to be beyond a doubt that the silk worm feeds...
-Detroit Carnations Again
The Messrs. Taber write: We notice in the April number of the Gardener's Monthly, Messrs. Breitmeyer's remarks on the new Carnations offered by us. While we do not care to occupy the valuable column...
-Paper By The Editor
A correspondent, C. H. M., calls attention to the fact that an Essay promised to be prepared by Thomas Meehan, at page 6 of the recently published proceedings of the American Pomological Society, ca...
-Associations Of City Florists
In large cities, like Philadelphia for instance, it is only with great difficulty that societies for the encouragement of general horticulture can be sustained. Brick and mortar push the gardens far i...
-Premiums At Horticultural Societies
It is very hard to keep horticultural societies together under the old system of personal competition. Sooner or later the valuable collection of Jones are withdrawn, because the unfortunate committee...
-The Massachusetts Horticultural Society
The March exhibition was well sustained by exhibits, and the attendance was highly encouraging. Azaleas and Orchids, seem to have been the chief attraction, though Roses, Camellias, Rhododendrons, Pan...
-Germantown, Pa., Horticultural Society
The May meeting was very largely attended. The chief interest centered in the competition for the premiums for Wild Flowers. The ladies of the Botany class of Germantown, exhibited fifty-nine nam...
-Lawrence, Mass. Horticultural Society
At the last meeting the following Resolution was passed: Resolved, That the President, Lawrence Davenport, notify the Gardener's Monthly of an organization known by the name of The Lawrence Cotta...
-Philadelphia Florists' Association
The gardeners and florists of Philadelphia have formed an association called the Philadelphia Florists and Growers' Association. It has for its object the mutual improvement and benefit of its memb...
-American Forestry Association
The meeting in Cincinnati was a great success, viewed either in point of distinguished attendance, value of the papers read, and the influence which the meeting will have in educating the community to...
-July. Number 283. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
What we said last month about the slowness of the world to learn, and the little encouragement the teacher receives as he looks abroad for some impression of his work, is as well illustrated by many o...
-Gardening Experiments, Wise And Otherwise
That the summer of 1881 was a delusion and a snare, everybody knows, and it would be folly to repeat it at this late day. And yet, notwithstanding its general unsatisfactoriness, its cold and wet begi...
-Seeds And Seed Sowing
Every season we hear numerous complaints on the failure of seeds to germinate, etc. We hear that seeds were procured from such and such a firm and not one came up; seeds were gotten from another place...
-Some Southern Evergreens
Prunus Caroliniana, A it, and Ilex Cassine, Walt, are two beautiful evergreens not generally known and rarely seen in arboretums, yet they deserve a place in every collection. The first is not even in...
-Helonias Bullata
Among the native plants of New Jersey, and we have some very fine ones, few if any present better claims than the Helonias. The leaves alone are quite ornamental, and the flowers, with their delicate ...
-The Polyantha Rose
The Roses of this new class exhibit some qualities that must materially change the aspect of the rose business when they become sufficiently circulated. Roses have not been bedding plants; the attr...
-Floral Identities
I have Scarlet Bedder Geranium, which is in every particular the counterpart of the variety General Grant. Are they not one and the same variety ? The origin of Scarlet Bedder would not he difficul...
-A Few Bedding Plants
When a geranium is called pre-eminently beautiful, like the catalogues call Mrs. Charles Pease, what shall we say of Emile De Giradin, which is much like it in color but better in every other respect?...
-A Display Of Colors In Spring
In no other time of the year are flowers more appreciated than in spring. They attract a good deal of attention in winter, either on the ball dress of young, blushing maidens, or in the reception room...
-A Few Desirable Shrubs
Here in Maine, where our winters begin in autumn and project far into spring, - even into May this year, judging from the snow which is falling as I write, - it is desirable to have plants and shrubs ...
-Hypericum Patulum
As this shrub has not bloomed, being bedded out late in June, I will quote from Saul's catalogue : This magnificent hardy evergreen flowering shrub is a grand acquisition to our scanty list of hardy...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Heating By Steam
To William H. B., of Independence, Kansas, it may be said as follows: Any system of warm air-heating operates on such a delicately-balanced principle that the out-of-door winds easily, and usually, ...
-A Marechal Niel Rose
Mr. Thomas Elmitt, gardener here, has a Marechal Niel Rose that will give him the extraordinary yield of not less than five thousand buds this winter; at present there is no less than one thousand on ...
-Glazing And Pipe-Sett Inc
A few weeks before the April number of the Gardener's Monthly arrived with Mr. Greer's short note on glazing, having occasion to put up some sash for a temporary purpose, and not wanting to wait for b...
-Mr. F. L. Ames' Orchids
Great in variety and in lavish profusion were the lovely orchid blossoms 1 saw at Mr. F. L. Ames', at North Easton, the other day. The Dendrobiums were especially gay and included Ainsworthii, a beaut...
-Seedling Azaleas
It does not take so long as it is often supposed to raise flowering plants from seed of Rhododendrons and Azaleas. Col. Wilder, who continues actively his work of hybridizing and crossing flowers, at ...
-July. Greenhouse And House Gardening. New Or Rare Plants. Haemanthus Kalbreyeri
This, we suppose, rendered into English, would be Mr. Kal-breyer's Haemanthus. But it does not mend the matter much. The name seems hard, but after all should Mrs. Kalbreyer happen to be a leader o...
-Fumigating Cones
From T. T. Southwick, Rochester, New York, we have samples of this excellent idea. Tobacco is so arranged as to look like spools of cotton, and are readily ignited, and so prepared as to give out much...
-A Double Catalonian Jasmine
R. L. B., Des Moines, Iowa., writes : I have a Jasminum grandiflorum that shows a tendency to double flowers, having two rows of petals, of a very firm texture and very strong fragrance ; one flowe...
-July. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Last season, during the prevalence of the unusually hot summer weather, the pear trees in the writer's orchard had the upper half of most of the leaves turn brown as if scorched. The diagnosis of the ...
-A New Grape-Vine - The Cochin-Chinese, Tuberous-Rooted Vine
From an article in the Cosmos of April 1st, 1882, I have translated a few extracts which you will find below, and which you are at liberty to print. Of all the grape-vines which, since the appearan...
-Apple As A Stock For Seckel Pear
Perhaps it is not generally known that the apple is good stock on which to work the Seckel Pear. A tree on this place budded in 1860 (twenty-two years ago), three feet from the ground, is healthy, and...
-The Silk Worm Mulberry
The mulberry has male and female flowers in separate flowers on the same plant. But different trees vary in the proportions of each - some trees having wholly male flowers. Morus multicaulis is a vari...
-A Promising Native Grape To Improve
Mr. T. V. Munson says: There is a wild grape growing in the sandy ravines of the Texas Panhandle and elsewhere in the West which produces heavy crops of fair-sized, well-flavored fruit without rot,...
-The Codling Moth
The greatest enemy to apple culture is the Codling Moth. Mr. W. C. Raymond, of Dickinson's Landing, contributes the following useful hint to the Canadian Horticulturist: I set two traps on the 20th o...
-American Vegetables And Fruit
The English papers are, some of them, discussing whether vegetables are more used or more grown in England than America. One of them has a correspondent who writes under the belief that his country do...
-The Newtown Pippin Apple
The Orange Co. (N. Y.) Farmer says: The Gardener's Monthly notes that considerable quantities of the Newtown Pippin apple are yet received in England from this country, and observes that 'Probably th...
-Olive Culture
This tree, grown chiefly for olive oil, is particularly adapted to dry climates. At a meeting in Australia recently, there seemed to be the same varying experience as among their fruit growers - some ...
-Manuring In The West
A New Subscriber in Iowa says : I like the Gardener's Monthly for some things. It is a very peculiar paper, and unlike any that I have seen. I shall probably remain a permanent subscriber, though...
-Eureka Peach
B. Independence, Miss., writes : I send you by mail a specimen of the Eureka Peach, which originated near this place, and came into bearing in 1878, and is said to have ripened on more than one o...
-Aged Trees
We think of the giant Sequoias of California, and their great age, with wonder; but the ages of English trees compare with them. There is a Yew tree at Brabourne, in Kent, which was perhaps a young se...
-A Walnut Grove In Wisconsin
It is announced in a London paper that a farmer in Wisconsin planted a grove of black walnut twenty years ago, and recently sold it (the grove) for $27,000. Can any one give us the details of this t...
-Poor Land For Forests
The daily and other secular papers, which give us alarming and not always intelligent articles on Forestry, tell us that wherever there is land too poor to produce farm crops, it should at once be ...
-Timber In Michigan
The College Speculum says : Dr. Beal read a paper on ' Some of the best trees to grow for timber in Michigan.' Our most valuable forest trees found in abundance were black walnut, white pine, white a...
-The Farnesian Acacia
Important in reference to their value in rural economy are the Acacia Farnesiana, which produce the fragrant flowers so much used in perfumery, and the A. homalophylla, the wood of which is highly pri...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Drone Bees On The Wing-A Great Mystery
How often in boyhood days, and yet still oftener since I have been a man, have I been puzzled when in the woods on hearing a sound like the hum of a swarm of bees ; indeed I was so sure of it I have f...
-Fremontia
As to the Fremontia ripening its seeds at the highest altitude I mentioned, it does so in all probability; otherwise how does it propagate itself? I never looked for seed there, because I could get it...
-Laws Of The Weather
We have occasionally observed that the laws which regulate the weather, are precisely like those which regulate the flow of hot water in a boiler, and there is no more reason why we may not know all a...
-Transpiration Of Plants
Dr. J. M. Anders, of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, who has already contributed some valuable papers on the transpiration of plants, gives some more valuable facts in the January number...
-Selaginella Victoriae
Queen Victoria is botanically honored by having one of the grandest flowers named for her, the famous Water Lily of the Amazon River - Victoria regia. Here we have her name associated with one of the ...
-Abies Concolor And Lowiana
Dr. Masters read before the Royal Horticultural Society the substance of a letter from Dr. Engelmann, relating to these plants, in which the historian of the American Conifers stated, that he had now ...
-The Date Palm
A correspondent of the Gardener's Chronicle says of the Date Palms: They do not thrive in regions where they cannot reach water by means of their long strong roots, or where they cannot be watered. T...
-A Colossal Fern
Recently a huge stump-fern, Todea, writes Baron Von Mueller, was, brought away from its seclusion in the Dande-nong Ranges, near Port Philip. After the removal of its hundreds of fronds, the stump-li...
-Fruiting Of The Gingko
K. W. D. A., Farmdale, Ky., says : You say a Gingko tree in Philadelphia has borne fruit this year, and that ' this is the first time the tree has been known to fruit in America.' We have here at t...
-A "Collector's" Letter
The following letter was not intended for publication, but we cannot resist the temptation to allow our readers a share in a California collector's enthusiasm : I intend yet to give you one more t...
-The Tallow Tree
A California correspondent says : I am shocked to find in your February number that what I wrote as a piece of pure fun, must have been mistaken for earnest, at least I judge that your remarks about ...
-Literature, Travels &Sect; Personal Notes. Communications. John Muir, The California Naturalist
In your paper of October 7th, you published some account of John Muir, the Naturalist. Although this very agreeable and instructive writer has contributed many articles, during the last ten years, to ...
-Wilder's Speech On Agricultural Education
Not long since we took occasion to note the wonderful amount of good Col. Wilder was doing, for one of his years, in the cause of horticulture and agriculture. He seems never to tire. Before us now is...
-Charles Darwin
The whole world has summed up the life of Darwin. No man has departed more sincerely mourned, - no man's life has been more useful, - few men have left the world whom it will be as slow to forget. For...
-Introduction Of The Cedar Of Lebanon
In regard to the romancing narratives connected with the weeping willows, some correspondents wrote recently that it was a pity the editor of the Gardener's Monthly disturbed them, for they were too...
-Professor Edward Morren, Of Leige
Mr. Charles Joly, of Paris, gives in the Journal de la Societe Nationale d' Horticulture for 1882, a charming account of a visit to the celebrated Director of the Botanic Garden at Leige. Professor Mo...
-George A. Stone
The severe loss Rochester, as the Flower City, suffered by the death of James Vick, somewhat overshadowed the still great loss of George A. Stone, who died also of pneumonia a week before. Mr. Stone...
-Flowers And Ferns Of The United States
As already noted, this work came to a standstill by the sudden death of its publisher last autumn. The publisher's estate being found insolvent, the creditors could not agree on any method of carry...
-Entomology ; By Charles D. Zimmerman, Buffalo, New York
Mr. Zimmerman, one of America's best entomologists, has reprinted a paper which appeared originally in the Agricultural Review, under the above title, and which is of an admirable practical character....
-Beaufin, Biffin, Or Beefin Apple
A lady writes as follows: In an article on Biffins in the May number of your magazine (culled from the London Gardener's Magazine), I was surprised to see the word Biffin spelled 'Beefing. Surely thi...
-The European And American Chestnut
F. L. S. asks whether the American and European chestnuts are varieties of the same thing, and in what part of Europe the chestnut is native? We give the answer under our literary column, because t...
-Criticisms On Other Magazines
S. F. sends an article controverting some statements made in another magazine. The paper is well written, and the criticisms are temperate and seem just, but as probably few of our readers have seen...
-Horticultural Societies. Communications. Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Ladies' Reception
An interesting and beautiful feature of the operations of this time-honored institution, now advancing in the second half century of its useful career, is the annual reception given by it's ladies' co...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
With the rebuilding of the Hall by the President, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society is ready to resume its annual exhibitions, for which it has always been so famous. It has just issued its progr...
-Maryland Horticultural Society
This society continues in a prosperous condition, the exhibitors and visitors at the meeting being numerous, and the articles exhibited evidencing high skill. Mr. Robert J. Halliday contributes $100 i...
-Premiums For Seedling Fruits
For varieties originating since 1860, well tried, and which prove in some particular superior to those now in existence, the Massachusetts Horticultural Society offers the following premiums : ...
-August. Number 284. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Editorial life is not favorable to looking much into detail in a large country like ours. It is not often that the editor's easy chair can be left long unoccupied. He may go out for a few days, but ...
-August. Communications. The Adornment Of Small Yards
The limited dimensions of city and town yards frequently deter their owners from thinking them worthy of adornment; yet a judicious use of time, and a small amount of money, would soon make them nook...
-List Of Coniferae, Hardy In The Vicinity Of Boston, Massachusetts
Thuya occidentalis orientalis gigantea (doubtfully) Thuyopsis dolabrata Chamaoyparis sphaeroidea (Retinospora) pisi-fera and vars. obtusa and vars. nutkaensis (doubtfully) J uniperus Chinensis...
-Public Parks Of St. Louis
In the Southern part of the city is another of those medium-sized, breathing places which is a favorite resort for the people living in that section. So popular indeed is this park, that nine out of e...
-Cats In Gardens
A friend of mine once had his flower garden literally torn to pieces by cats. He got a piece of straight deal and cut it into thin strips. Into one end of each strip he inserted, with a pair of bell p...
-Golden Arbor Vitae Grafted On Retinos-Pora
A correspondent of the Garden says at Yokohama he saw large specimens of Thuja aurea, sugar-loaf shaped, as if made to order. A large tree of R pisifera or obtusa is chosen, and in the spring thousand...
-Decadence Of Gardening In Japan
A correspondent of the Garden says : The summer-houses, rustic bridges and gates were falling to pieces. As I sat waiting for Mr. Yatabi I thought what fine taste and pleasures these old daimios mus...
-An Enormous Variety Of Wistaria
A correspondent of the Garden, writing of Japan, says : A fine Pinus koraiensis, trained into the shape of a Japanese junk in full sail, is at one end of the garden, and the priest who was in atte...
-A New Columbine
If last autumn I sent to any of our correspondents in Europe a Columbine marked Aquilegia sp., from Mexico (Dr. Palmer), flowers white and yellow, it is a new species, named by Sereno Watson, A. lon...
-The English Bird Cherry As A Street Tree
Among the interesting things noted at Allen-town was the employment of the English Bird Cherry, Cerasus padus, as a street tree. People from the South often wish they could have the Carolina Cherry (C...
-Forks And Spades
There are innumerable cases in gardening where the spade must be used. It is perhaps the most essential of all garden implements. But there are also innumerable cases where the digging fork could be u...
-Old Fashioned Shrubs
Germantown, settled even before Philadelphia was, though finally swallowed up by her younger sister, still retains in its old-fashioned gardens many grand specimens of old-fashioned flowers, which the...
-A Honeysuckle Ornament
One of the prettiest cheap garden ornaments we saw recently in a ride through Allentown. It was in a very poor person's garden, to judge by surroundings, but worthy of imitation in a place of more pre...
-Early Rhododendrons
There is care required in selecting Rhododendrons as regards hardiness. The garden kinds are hybrids between R. catawbiense, R. maximum and R. ponticum. Those which retain much of the constitution of ...
-Ellwanger's New Seedling Roses
While at Rochester, recently, the editor was very much interested in Mr. H. B. Ellwanger's seedling roses. They were not then quite in bloom. The crosses are between such unlikely things as Teas and H...
-A New Upright Honeysuckle (Lonicera Alberti)
In the December number of Regel's Gartenflora just received is a colored figure and description of a new Honeysuckle, lately discovered by Dr. Regel's son, Albert Regel, in the alpine regions of Eas...
-Some Rose Questions
Miss Mattie W., Quaker Hill, New York, says : I am a very interested reader of the Gardener's Monthly and enthusiastic cultivator of flowers and fruits on a small scale, but I often have sad failures...
-The Hemlock Spruce In England
This is not often seen in English gardens, and the general impression from this is that it will not grow there. But a correspondent says : The hemlock does well in England, but is not so common as...
-Ailantus And The Public Health
H. S. A., Selins Grove, Pa., writes : I am at present very much interested in getting the latest and best information about the qualities of the Ailantus tree. The Town Council of Selins Grove have...
-The Double Sloe
A correspondent says: What is the meaning of the following from the catalogue of Ellwanger & Barry? 'Prunus spi-nosa, var. flore-pleno, - a beautiful small tree or large shrub from Japan, covered in ...
-Raphiolepis Indica
Mrs. S. E. B., Houston, Texas, writes : Please be so kind as to give me the name of the shrub - spray enclosed. I wish to buy one and do not know the name to order. A friend has it here, and so far ...
-Hemlocks And Maple Trees
Dr. C. A. K., Chester, Pa., writes: Will you have the kindness to inform us whether a hemlock hedge would thrive in rather close proximity to maple trees, say one foot from tree, and trees twenty fee...
-Dendrobium Bigibbum
This is one of the handsomest of all the Den-drobes and of easy culture. It does well potted in peat and sphagnum moss, with a liberal quantity of broken crocks and charcoal. It will do either in pot,...
-Makoya Bella
Having purchased a young plant of this last spring, I cut it down and after it started I shook it out and re-potted, giving a liberal shift, using a compost of rich, decomposed, turfy loam, leaf mould...
-Steam Heating
Wm. H. B. asks some questions upon this subject in a recent Monthly. I have just built a greenhouse 108 x 26 feet and put in steam. My experience in the use of steam previously was that I had heated...
-Shy Flowering Plants
B. says: Can you or some of your readers inform me what treatment is required to make Ageratums bloom freely? I have three fine varieties, Blanche, Lady Jane and John Douglas, and they grow very vi...
-On The Culture Of The Cloxinias
To begin with propagation, select strong healthy leaves, cut the strong ribs in several places, lay the leaves flat in a convenient sized pot or seed pan and cover the several cut parts with a little ...
-Bignonia Venusta
The lovely trumpet-flower, Bignonia venusta, is a gorgeous, ornamental, climbing plant belonging to the natural order, Bignoniacese. It is a native of South America, from whence it was introduced in 1...
-Cool Orchids-Laelias
Before taking up the very numerous family of Oncidiums I would like to speak briefly in hearty commendation of this beautiful genus, remarkable both for the loveliness of its flowers, and for the ease...
-Improvements In Floral Designs
The improvement referred to recently by a Boston correspondent seems to be this - that florists can buy letters in immortelles or other small designs, already made for working in with larger work, wit...
-Croton Sinitzianus
The great merits of the Australian crotons as plants adapted to American summer gardening, leads us to welcome every new addition to the list. Our flower gardens are now rich with Coleus, Geraniums an...
-August. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Talk as we like about the proper culture of fruit trees, much more of success depends on geographical location than it usually gets credit for. The Apple will grow almost anywhere, but there are place...
-Strawberries
The Strawberry being such a desirable fruit, that not only the eating thereof stimulates to good nature, but it will also bear much good na-tured talk and correspondence without tiring, in considerati...
-Disease On Pear Limbs
Some time since I received from Frank Erbland Waldo, Florida, a piece of a branch of Le Conte Pear tree, which had been attacked by fungus. As this variety of pear has been supposed to be entirely hea...
-Peach Flowers
There is a large flowered and a small flowered class of peaches. Mr. Raphael Sherfey makes the important discovery that the large flowered kinds get through the early spring frosts better than the sma...
-History Of A Five Cent Paper Of Seed
Did any one ever stop to consider how much a five or ten cent package of seed went through before the purchaser finally committed the contents of the said package to the ground? Perhaps the writer may...
-Mushroom Culture
We should be glad to know from those who have recently taken up the subject of mushroom culture in America, how they have succeeded. The following is the quantity taken from a bed in England, as given...
-The Best Flavored Strawberries
Once on a time there was a great fruit growers' convention, and a great fruit grower gave his opinion that so long as a strawberry was big, and bore abundant crops, the public did not care whether it ...
-Asparagus
Mr. J. B. Moore sends some samples of asparagus in bunches of twelve stalks each, weighing respectively 1 lb. 10 oz., 1 lb. 12 oz., 1 lb. 10 oz., and 1 lb. 8 oz. We may remark for the information of t...
-European Walnuts In Arkansas
Dr. Geo. H. C, Fort Smith, Arkansas, desires to know whether this walnut is grown to any great extent in this country, and what is the probable chance of success in Arkansas. Trees one to two hundr...
-Forestry. Communications. Growth Of Trees At Brenham, Texas
As there is so much talk about forest trees, etc., I thought I would give you some items about the growth of trees on my sand hill. About thirteen years ago I planted a Cunning-hamia sinensis ; it was...
-The Culture And Management Of Our Native Forests
One of the papers read at the National Forestry Congress has been published in pamphlet form, of which a copy is now before us. It is on the Culture and Management of our Native Forests, by H. W. S....
-Timber In Virginia
Black Walnut and Tulip Poplar are mostly exported in logs. Over one thousand of these logs went over a single railroad - Norfolk and Western - during the single month of October, last year. We lear...
-Forestry At Cincinnati
Over one hundred papers were presented to the Forestry Congress which shows the wide-spread interest taken in the subject. There were too many to read and discuss, and, from a list of the titles befor...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Historical Notes On The Arbor-Vitae
[From notes of some verbal remarks made before the Academy of Natural Sciences, of Philadelphia]. Mr. Thomas Meehan gave in detail the reasons given by various authors for the name Arbor-vitas in c...
-Color In The Dabk
If we take a blue Lilac and grow it in the dark, the flower becomes white, at least this is our belief, though we do not know this from personal experience. We should suppose this would be the case wi...
-Rainfall In Utah
A European scientific journal places great stress on the following from a Boston paper : Horticulturists generally take the view that tree planting has a tendency to increase the rainfall, while t...
-Wholesale Coining Of Common Names
In referring to a plea for the manufacture of common names in advance of their becoming common (page 94), we remarked that Dr. Gray was referred to in Mr. Robinson's letter as having furnished an illu...
-English Names
The London Gardener's Chronicle thinks the effort to make English names by translating the Latin ones no great success. Even, it says, should the names do for writing, they would scarcely do for comm...
-Damage By Crickets
A writer in the American Naturalist has noticed a common field-cricket gnawing at a kernel of corn until it devoured the germ, and early in the autumn he has found them in cornfields, eating the crown...
-Glutinous Stigmas In Akebia Quinata
A little boy writes: Father says you like to know about things nobody knows, and he says this is new and you will like it. It is about the flower of the Akebia. In the middle of the flower are five...
-White Herb Robert
T. W., Newark, Wayne Co., N. Y., writes : Enclosed I send you specimen of Geranium Robertianum with pure white flowers. There are a few plants growing on the edge of a moss having the normal color...
-Double Native Columbine
J. T. B., Tonah, Wis., writes : I send by mail a blossom of wild Aquilegia. I sent a blossom to Cam. bridge, to Profs. Goodale and Watson. They write me it is different from anything of the kind t...
-Fruit Of The Paper Mulberry
M. C, Atlanta, Ga., writes: We mail to you a box containing a nondescript a party in Middle Georgia sends us for a mulberry. It is unlike anything we have ever seen. Is it not an abnormal condit...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Bulb Crowing In Holland
Hillegom is our objective point and to reach it we go from quaint old Amsterdam to Haarlem, through a country of wind-mills and ditches - water on every side - ditches, canals, rivers, the divisions b...
-Rochester Nurseries
These suffered severely during the times when business generally was depressed, and it was pleasant to find during a hasty visit to the flower city recently that, though no new firm had ventured into ...
-The Apricot
Pliny, as well as Linnaeus and most modern botanists, includes amongst Plums the Apricot (Prunus Armeniaca), a tree most extensively cultivated, and which sows itself very readily in cultivated ground...
-Gardening By The Monks Of Old
The Garden gives this interesting note on monastic gardening in England Gardening in the middle ages was one of the favorite occupations of those men who, to escape the 'madding crowd's ignoble strif...
-Roman Floral Luxuries
Towards the end of the Republic in Rome, to which already almost the whole of the then known world was subject, luxury was at its height. The riches extorted from the subjugated nations were squandere...
-A Rush
Rushes are found in almost every place in the British Islands, and in both cold and temperate quarters at home and abroad they are plentiful. Before the introduction of tallow candles in this country,...
-History Of The Dahlia
Botanists are now mostly agreed that the florist's Dahlias have originated from two species, D. superflua and D. frustranea, though some unite them under the name of D. variabilis - a very appropriate...
-Origin Of The Name Horse Chestnut
The following curious derivation of the name Horse Chestnut (AEsculus Hippocastanum) as well as the fact giving rise to it, may possibly be as new to the readers of The Garden as it was to me, particu...
-Alan W. Corson
Alan W. Corson, the oldest nurseryman in Pennsylvania, died at his home in Wliitemarsh, on the 21st of June in his 95th year. Like many of the famous botanists of Pennsyl vania, he was self-taught in ...
-Memoir Of Charles Darwin
By Prof. Al-phonse DeCandolle. The publication committee of the Archives de Sciences de la Bibliotheque Uni-verselle have published in their May number, a paper by DeCandolle on Darwin considered ...
-The Horse : How To Buy And Sell, Etc
By Peter Howden, New York, Orange Judd Co. 1882. The less a buyer knows about a horse, the more sure he is to look very wise and knowing, when he is buying one. It is amusing to note how carefully ...
-Typographical Errors
C Dickens Shaks-peare Bryant Jones says: A catalogue of Mr. 'A. W., of Lawrence, Kansas,' has just reached me in which he advertises ' the Gardener's Monthly, assisted by an able corpse of American...
-French Weights And Measures
D. W. A. Waukon, Iowa, writes as follows: On page 176 of the Monthly is an item 'French Fruits in England,' all in English except one word, and that renders the whole item unintelligible to 49,000,...
-American Nurserymen's Association
The seventh annual meeting was held this year in Rochester, under the Presidency of Mr. Wm. C. Barry. Mr. Barry is the youngest man who ever held such a position, and it was very gratifying to his man...
-September. Number 285. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
There is no more frequent question than how to have good lawns under trees. Grass requires food and moisture. Trees take the food and dry the ground. It is a difficult problem how to get grass to grow...
-Among The Elder Bushes
Probably no tree or shrub is better known to the generality of people than the unassuming elder. We look upon it as an intimate sylvan friend, or old woodland acquaintance; and pleasantly remember it ...
-Cuttings From Old Wood
Seeing your correspondent's note on Hydrangea cuttings reminds me of a little bit of my own experience. I had occasion to cut down a large pink Lagerstrcemia, and sawing off the larger branches, set t...
-Yuccas
Reading about propagating Yuccas by a lady of Charleston, S. C, in the Gardener's Monthly of February, I remembered the way some Yuccas are treated in Europe, which may perhaps be of interest to some ...
-Propagating Hydrangea Panicu-Lata
My eye has just met the note of Mr. Abbott in your June number, page 166, on propagating Hydrangea paniculata. My original plant was obtained in this way : A friend commended the plant to me some year...
-Elberon
Elberon, on the New Jersey coast is a quaintly picturesque place. It is a little town on a strip of moorland, as full of sun and all the breezes that blow as if its resting place was by the Firth of F...
-Hardy Herbaceous Plants For General Cultivation
The present system of bedding out with tender plants, has been in vogue for about thirty years and has so nearly superseded the valuable class of hardy herbaceous plants that they are almost unknown t...
-Bermuda Grass
Referring to your note (page 341 Gardeners Monthly) let me say: Early in the summer I received a sod of Bermuda grass about a foot in length by three inches in width from Tennessee. It remained in the...
-Synonyms Of Roses
It appears modern catalogues have many new names for old things. The Journal des Ropes has recently published a very useful list of them, from which we take the following, which refer to kinds well kn...
-Paulownia Imperialis
This magnificent tree has been in bloom abundantly everywhere this season. The large blue, gloxinia like flowers fill the air with a delicate fragrance, as well as attract by their beauty. The flower ...
-The Government Grounds At Ottawa
It is not always that bad grounds are the fault of a gardener in charge - not by any means; but yet great numbers might be brought up to popularity if only an intelligent man, with a love for his prof...
-Japanese Chrysanthemum From Seed
At the annual dinner of the Borough of Hackney Chrysanthemum Society on the 6th inst. one of the members produced a batch of seedling Japanese Chrysanthemums. The seedlings were pretty, and not withou...
-Canna Nepalensis
The various species of Canna form a genus of highly ornamental foliage plants of majestic habit and tropical appearance, remarkable alike for their large and handsome foliage, as well as their beautif...
-Plants Crown In Moss
A collection of plants cultivated by means of the Dumesnil fertilizing moss has created a great sensation here, and will in time revolutionize window gardening. C. J. Power, of Framingham, has underta...
-Glazing Greenhouses
In the July number Mr. Blair, referring to my note in April on glazing, confirms the opinion which I expressed in that note. I think it desirable, after one winter's experience. I found, however, that...
-Plants In Fertilized Moss
C. J. Power, of Framingham, Mass , made a magnificent display at the Massachusetts Horticultural Society's exhibition in Boston on the 80th of June, of plants grown in the Dumesnil moss. We are not in...
-Davallia Fijiensis
One of the most charmingly elegant of all stove ferns, free in growth, firm and durable in texture, evergreen in habit, bright green in color, and the most finely divided of the Davallias. The fronds ...
-Gynura Aurantiaca, Brown
The Illustration horticole for 1881, last part, speaks thus of this beautiful plant: The Gynura aurantiaca is a hardy plant belonging to the Compositae, and is of such an ornamental character as to...
-September. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
At the Rochester Nurserymen's Meeting there was much discussion on the best method of labeling the trees in an orchard. There should always be a book kept with the names of the trees in regular order,...
-New Early Peaches
There was a period when everybody acquainted with peach culture knew which was the earliest, but since Hale's Early has been superseded the question of earliest is undecided, and no doubt will continu...
-Forcing Early Cauliflower
The best kinds of cauliflower for forcing are Early Erfurt and Early Snowball. I sow in boxes in forcing pit from the 10th to the 20th of January. When plants are large enough they are transplanted to...
-Protecting Peach Trees In Cevere Climates
A correspondent of the Western Rural protects peach trees as we recently recommended Figs to be protected : I have also good success raising peaches in a similar manner. Last season, after the hard w...
-Out-Door Mushroom Beds
A correspondent of the Journal of Horticulture gives the experience below in regard to out-door mushroom beds. It should be remembered that these beds are in ridges and kept shaded by straw, and that ...
-Small Fruits In Japan
Mr. Maries continues his highly interesting Travels in Japan, to the Garden. Of wild berries he says: The following day I passed through the same kind of forest I had seen before at Sapporo, and I ...
-Culture Of Raspberries
The Farmer's Home Journal says: Col. Young is an observing and practical horticulturist of no ordinary acquirements. Doubtless the large crops he grows are in a great measure due to his judicious man...
-Flat Chinese Peach
May 18th, there came from Mr. P. J. Berckmans specimens of the Peen-to, or flat Chinese Peach. They are about the size of the Alexander or similar early Peach, but seem as if pressed down and widened ...
-Using Pyrethrum Powder
Prof. Cook, of the Michigan Agricultural College, found that one pound of the powder was effective in two hundred gallons of water when applied for killing cabbage worm. The powder must touch the inse...
-The English Sparrow In Canada
Mr. Doug-all, of Windsor in Canada, was outraged at the attacks of some writers on the English sparrow. They had thronged in his orchard, but never touched a bud or fruit. It was a cold, snowy day and...
-Apple Beauty Of Hants
By the colored plate in the June Florist and Pomologist, this English apple must be one of the most beautiful. It is oblate-conical, four and a half inches wide, and three and a half deep, brownish-re...
-Defective Raspberries
Maryland asks: Are there varieties of the raspberry that are exclusively staminate or pistillate? If not, why should the bushes, from one of which I enclose a twig, always fail to perfect fruit? ...
-Campbell's Triumph Grape
T. V. M. Denison, Texas, writes : I mail you to-day a cluster of Triumph (Campbell's) grape as it grows here with ordinary vineyard culture. The vine is as vigorous and productive as Concord. By th...
-Prolific Raspberries
A correspondent suggests that when a raspberry is spoken of as an abundant bearer, it simply means that there are more berries ripen together than usual. He says that there are never more than t...
-Russian Mulberry, Et Cetera
S. Lincoln, Nebraska, sends us the following extract from some Western publication, and asks if it is a humbug : The Russian mulberry, Russian olive, Russian thornless acacia, were brought to thi...
-Forests Of Maine
We have before us No. 15 of the Census Forestry Bulletin with a map of the State of Maine, showing the distribution of the pine and spruce forests, by Prof. C. S. Sargent. Maine seems to be acting mor...
-Lumber Resources Of The United States
A special bulletin, prepared by Prof. C. S. Sargent, has been issued by the Census Bureau upon the lumber interests of the United States. According to this statement there were in active operation at ...
-Railroads And Forest Fires
M. says: Would it not be better for the Gardener's Monthly to wage a war against those outrageous monopolies, the railroads, than to argue for the clearing out of the brush wood left by log cutters...
-Rainfall And Forests
Meteorologist, Cincinnati, says: You are doing good service by showing the absurdity mixed with the common sense of meteorology in connection with forestry. That Utah illustration of the increase o...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Cicada Septendecim
Paragraphing is not conducive to accurate and careful statement, and I often notice editorial errors in the Gardener's Monthly - fewer, perhaps, than in other magazines of similar character. In the sh...
-Tapping Maple Trees In Spring, Etc
Does the tapping of maple trees in spring do them any injury? The general opinion will be, yes. It has always been mine. But I wish to state a somewhat singular instance to which my attention has been...
-Sexual Characters In Dioecious Trees
I am somewhat surprised seeing your remarks in the August number of the Monthly in regard to the Paper Mulberry - that plants can at times change their sexual character. This tree is as regularly...
-Notes From Arizona
Your invaluable journal follows us down here from our home in Oakland and tempts us to devote an hour from out our busy, tired life to writing an item for your columns. We find here in these very p...
-Theory And Practice
The word theory is much abused. Properly speaking, when we know that there is an undoubted fact, and we want to understand how the fact came to be, we construct a possible explanation of the fact, and...
-Candle Wax Tree
S. writes: On page 23 of the ' Account of the Meeting of the Descendants of Col. Thomas White, of Maryland (the father of Bishop White), held at Sophia's Dairy, on the Bush River, Md., June 7th, 1...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Sketch Of The Life Of The Late Alan W. Corson
Alan W. Corson was the eldest son of Joseph Corson and Hannah (Dickinson) Corson, and was born in Whitemarsh Township, half a mile from Friends' Meeting at Plymouth, and only one mile from his residen...
-Residence Of W. B. Dinsmore, Kingston, N. Y
The most fashionable excursion for the lovers of horticulture in our day is to Locust Grove, the unsurpassed country residence of William B. Dinsmore, Esq., erected on a selected locality on the banks...
-The Philadelphia Academy Of Natural Sciences
The American Naturalist for August has its annual chapter on this institution. Those who do not quite agree with Professor Cope are styled and scientifics, and the estimable President, Dr. Joseph Le...
-Legend Of The Cherokee Rose
The Christian Advocate tells the following story, which we record, as we usually do in such cases, more as a matter of news than as a genuine legend. It is a misfortune that there is no way by which a...
-The American Candle
Among the peculiarities of travel in France is that every morning you find two candles fresh on the mantel-piece of your room, and whether used or not, you find these daily bougies charged in your ...
-The Victoria Regia
In the year 1842 it was my good fortune to behold this wonderful production of nature in the river Rupununi, one of the great tributaries of the Essequibo. After a toilsome struggle of six weeks in as...
-Globba Coccinea
In the old world they use beets in flower-gardening. The aesthetic admires the effect they produce, but when the uncultivated is told what they are, and learns they are beets only, he is apt to exclai...
-The Cost Of Nursery Products
Mr. Barry, in his address to the Nurserymen's Convention at Rochester, believes that the reason so many nurserymen fail, is from a want of perception of the actual cost of raising trees, taken from an...
-The American Nurseryman
In his Rochester address, Mr. R. Barry well remarked: I have a pretty good knowledge of the nursery business in this country, for nearly half a century, and I can say that the nurserymen, on the whol...
-The Naturalists' Leisure Hour And Monthly Bulletin
By Prof. A. E Foote. One of the results of the United States Centennial Exhibition held in Philadelphia, was the establishment of this now celebrated naturalists' agency. Specimens of natural history,...
-Thomas Moore
Every intelligent person knows of the Gardener's Chronicle, so long edited by Dr. Lindley. Dr. L. was such a distinguished botanist and so thoroughly versed in the theory of horticulture, that it was ...
-The Penn Monthly
Published by Edward Stern & Co., Philadelphia. In this excellent magazine the articles are usually such as appeal to general intelligence, and not infrequently are some among them which appeal to that...
-How To Overcome The Potato Disease
By J. L. Jensen, Director of Bureau Ceres, Copenhagen, Denmark. Translated from the Danish to English, and published by John Menzies & Co., Glasgow, Scotland. This is a treatise of sixty-five pages, a...
-Contributions To American Botany
By Asa Gray. Professor Asa Gray, though he must have no very distant views of a threescore and ten, still continues to work as hard as ever, for which the great world he lives but to benefit by his...
-The New Botany
A lecture on the best methods of teaching. By Dr. W. J. Beal, Professor of Botany in the Agricultural College, Lansing, Mich. Neither botany nor horticulture is what it was a half century ago. True...
-Elements Of Foresty
By Franklin B. Hough, Cincinnati. Robert B. Clark & Co. 1882. To review this work in the critical sense would do an injustice to its excellent author. Although it is entitled Elements of Forestry...
-A Peculiar Auriphone
The Farm Journal, of Philadelphia, is the centre of a wonderful set of correspondents, who are very much alarmed about the editor of the Gardener's Monthly. Every once in a while some one writes to it...
-October. Number 286. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
One of the most amazing experiences is the lack of common sense in trifling things so often apparent in gardening affairs. The writer of this is often asked what shall we do? when a dozen or two ca...
-The Ailantus
Thanks for your defence of the Ailantus, one of our most beautiful and useful trees, one that, for the roadside, or for poor soils, when scarcely any other tree will succeed, has no equal. F. J. Scott...
-Evergreen Hedges Under Trees
In a recent number of the Gardener's Monthly, in reply to Dr. C. A. K., Chester, Pennsylvania, in relation to planting evergreen hedges in close proximity to maple trees, planted twenty feet apart, yo...
-The Beauty Of The Dandelion
The yellow of the dandelion flower is certainly as fine a bit of color as can be found in the floral world. This composite flower head is a disk, or button, of clear gold, as bright and handsome as a ...
-Propagating Hydrangeas
A. H. Abbott, Little Blue, Farmington, Maine, says: Last spring I cut off two twigs from Hydrangea paniculata grandiflora and stuck them into the ground for plant stakes. To my surprise they began to...
-The Cypress Family In Texas
The Cupressus Knightiana and horizontalis, are making an almost incredible growth here. One of the latter, now ten years old, is about a foot in diameter at the ground, and thirty feet high. We in Wes...
-Cheap Paint
The past two years I have been experimenting in cheap materials for painting both outside and inside; and find the following gives the most satisfaction where one does not wish to go to the expense of...
-The Siberian Arborvitae
In two publications, not yet a year old, I see the Siberian arborvitae referred to as a native of Siberia, and in one of them it is stated that the oak leaved mountain ash is in reality a variation of...
-Flowering Of The Victoria Regia In The Open Air
Mr. E. D. Sturtevant, the well known grower of aquatics at Bordentown, New Jersey, has flowered this famous water lily of the Amazon in the open air this summer. So far as known this has not been atte...
-Euonymus Radicans
This now well-known evergreen creeping plant is decided by Maxi-mowiez, in a recent paper published in St. Petersburg, to be only a condition of the common Euonymus japonica. This decision is startlin...
-Rosa Minutifolia
Under this name, in the August Bulletin of Torrey Botanical Club, Dr. Engelmann describes a new native rose, found by Dr. Parry and his exploring party in lower California in April last, forming dense...
-October. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
It was feared that the widely spreading taste for cut flowers would militate against the love of cultivating plants. But it does not appear to have done so. Greenhouses and conservatories are just as ...
-Celosia Clarkii
Last year I had the pleasure of sending you some flowers of Celosia Clarkii, calling your attention at the same time to the pretty habit of this plant, suggesting also that it probably might make a ni...
-Fertilizing Moss
I notice in the September number of the Gardener's Monthly that the subject of the French fertilizing moss is again discussed, more claims being made for its utility ; and as my name has again been dr...
-Allamanda
The genus Allamanda embraces some of our most desirable as well as some of our most showy stove plants. Of this splendid genua A. nerifolia is deserving of a prominent place in all collections of stov...
-Glazing Without Lapping
Some one in a recent number of the Monthly advises to glaze without lapping the glass. Before any one acts on that advice, he had best test its soundness by experimenting a little. When rebuilding our...
-Cydonia Japonica - The Coming Hedge Plant. By. Wm. Webster, Rochester, N. Y
One of the problems which have long engaged the attention of horticulturists is that of a suitable plant for both ornamental and useful hedges; one that shall be characterized by its easy growth, stre...
-Fostering A Love For Flowers
A London correspondent says: Window-gardening is fortunately not confined to a class. It is vastly on the increase among the poor, and in many a side street and alley now green leaves and modest flow...
-Moss Culture
The use of moss impregnated with bone dust, or other fertilizing material, for plant growing, which was introduced to our readers a couple of years ago by Mr. Peter Henderson, has proved a great succe...
-Heliconia Aureo Striata
In America such plants as Strelitzias, Marantas, Hedychiums, Bananas, and others which must be preserved in greenhouses most of the year in the old world, make admirable plants for the adornment of ou...
-New Coleus
Mr. A. Thorpe, Washington, D. C, writes : I send you specimens from pot plants of Coleus, Gen. Garfield and Garland. We raised last year five or six hundred seedlings from seed furnished us by Mr. Ne...
-October. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The work of an instructor must of necessity be to a great extent experimental, and he must often lose in experimenting what other cautious people gain. So in Plum culture, the writer has been endeavor...
-Irrigation In Kansas
The art of agriculture by the aid of artificial irrigation, is a very ancient one. The most ancient authors mentioned it in a way that shows it to have been understood and practiced from time immemori...
-Rabbits In Orchards
Having profited by the valuable information contained in the Gardener's Monthly, I feel it my duty to contribute something for the benefit of fruit growers. A few years ago I was greatly annoyed with ...
-Some Desultory Notes About Strawberries
About 1845, H. E. Hooker planted an acre with the Virginia Scarlet. It was considered a very novel venture and an immense strawberry bed. The fruit, the first ever sold in Rochester, was put in round ...
-A Grape For California
Newburg is likely to add one to the list of grapes for the California vineyards. The Welcome, previously noticed here as a promising grape for the greenhouse in the Middle and Eastern States, has b...
-How To Crow Early Cabbage
I sow the seeds of the kinds I wish to grow in February or first of March, in small shallow boxes in forcing pit, hotbed, or if these are not to be had, a sunny window of the house will do. The boxes ...
-Strawberries In Ohio
The following list of varieties exhibited the past season by Mr. G. E. Davis, of Edinburg, Ohio, shows how many old varieties are yet regarded as worth planting: Monarch, Cinderella, Champion, Forest ...
-American Apples In China
A correspondent of the London Journal of Horticulture, writing from Hong Kong, says : Gardening by the natives is only carried on to a very limited extent. They grow different kinds of European veget...
-Premiums For New Fruits
A raiser of new fruit has been pushing his novelty by virtue of an award by a prominent horticultural society. As the fruit is not exactly what is expected of it, it has become necessary to explain ...
-Dormant Bud Peach Planting
At a recent meetingof the California Horticultural Society,an interesting discussion occurred on the judiciousness of planting fruit trees, budded the summer previousand not yet started. Mr. Shinn sai...
-Hansell And Superb Raspberries
Mr. Churchman, Burlington, N. J., writes: I don't mean to growl, nor wish to be considered as growling, but I cannot help feeling a little annoyed at the tenor of a couple of editorial briefs in the ...
-Healthfulness Of Pears Propagated From Plants Growing On Dwarf Stocks
Mr. Wm. Parry writes that he believes the Kieffer pear, and the other varieties of Chinese sand pear race, are not as healthy when propagated from plants grown on quince, as when from plants growing o...
-The Willson Peach
On the first of September Mr. Pierpont Willson, Vineland, N. J., sent specimens of a seedling peach from a tree which came up in the ruins of an old cellar. They weighed, individually, about five and ...
-Degenerate Albany Seedling Strawberries
F. J. U., Eufaula, Ala., writes : I planted a bed of Wilson's Albany strawberries, and took the plants from an old bed - three years old; astonishing to me, these plants grew better and more luxuri...
-White Blackberries
Mr. E. L. Parrish, of Nashville, Ohio, sent us a box of white blackberries, but instead of sending as we always ask friends to do, articles and communications for the editor to Germantown, they wer...
-The Boss Watermelon
Messrs. Landreths write : We send, per express to-day, a sample of our boss watermelon, to which we invite your careful and critical attention. We trust that its merits will justify you in agreeing w...
-Tomato Disease
A. A., Newburgh, N. Y., writes : I send to your address to day, by mail, a small box containing three tomatoes (Acme), which you will see are blighted by something which is beyond our understandin...
-Yucca Fibre For Tying Purposes
Mr. J. B. Garber, Columbia, Pa., says : Your Texas correspondent is right as to the value, as a tying material, of the Yuccas - page 259. For many years I have been using the leaves of the Yucca fil...
-Succession Of Forest Growths
There is a prevailing impression that when a forest is cut or burnt down, it is succeeded by trees of a different character. This is certainly the case in many instances, but the reverse could perhaps...
-Roadside Forestry
Those who think it worth while to encourage street tree-planting as an incident in forestry should at least endeavor to educate the street tree-planter what to choose. The streets in Canadian towns fo...
-Forestry In Canada
The forestry convention which met in Montreal the day before the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, was a remarkably successful meeting. The two bodies were merged, as...
-Forestry Planting
Many directions are given to people who know little about how to plant forests. The best advice is to put the matter in charge of some one who knows what he is doing. Douglas & Sons, of Waukegan, are ...
-Spark Arrestors
Recently, in reply to a correspondent, it was stated that no spark arrestors on railroad engines had been successful. If the sparks were arrested the draft was destroyed. A recent Boston paper, referr...
-Natural History And Science. Communications. Botanical Notes From New Jersey
As the genus Sabbatia is called annual or biennial in our text books, I would say that I have specimens of S. lanceolata with the remains of last year's flower growth, this year's flowers, and crowns ...
-Damson Dye Vs. Damson Pie
Desirous of seeing one of the model farms of England, I secured an introduction to one of the most enterprising farmers in Staffordshire, who, after a brief glance at my credentials, cordially assur...
-Varieties Reproducing Themselves
I find in my box of seedling roses, of last autumn's sowing, a rose so exactly like Laurette that one might suppose they were taken from the same bush. What seems peculiar about this is that, Laurette...
-October. Notes From The West
It is always a mystery to those familiar with the native flora of our fields and forests why so few of our common plants, shrubs, trees, etc, are utilized by the American landscape gardener in his eff...
-Sex Of The Ailantus
A note in the American Agriculturist, probably from the pen of Prof. Thurber, than whom there can be no better authority, calls attention to the fact that there are three kinds of Allantus - the male,...
-Tomato Disease In Kentucky
A correspondent of the Farmers Home Journal notes the presence of a serious disease in the tomato near Louisville. The leaves and stem of the tomato blight and fall from the main vine. They begin at ...
-Tubular-Rayed Rudbeckia
I. H. Slocombe, New Haven, writes : I have sent by mail two flowers of Rudbeckia hirta, as found growing wild. This is the second season it has produced such flowers as sent. I have never seen anyth...
-Poisonous Kalmia
H. writes: I have been looking over some old numbers of the Horticulturist, and been reading up the various articles signed 'Thomas Meehan.' One on page 169, volume for 1856, is only signed T. M.,...
-Cicada Septendecim
C. says: In the last number of the Gardener's Monthly, Prof. Riley takes you to task for erring in the orthography Septem-decim. He says you should have written it Septen decim. I wonder you did no...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Residence Of W. B. Dinsmore, Kingston, N. Y
(Concluded from page 281). From here I went into a long range of houses in the rear of the tropicals to admire the large rose plantations, which showed thrifty, healthy bushes and buds enough to su...
-The Decimal System
Not long ago I asked the Gardener's Monthly Is it necessary for the advancement of science that the measures of fruits as well as the name of flowers should be given in an 'unknown tongue?' In r...
-Mr. Warren H. Manning
In the last issue of the magazine the chapter on. Herbaceous plants was credited to Mr. Wm. Sutherland instead of to Mr. W. H. Manning. Mr. Manning is the son of Mr. Jacob W. Manning of the Reading Nu...
-Nepenthes Rajah
The curious family of pitcher plants known under the name of nepenthes is among the anomalies of the vegetable kingdom. It has no known relations. Some botanists have thought they saw some connection ...
-Professor Joseph L. Barfoot
Lovers of natural history, passing through Salt Lake city, have always been glad to make the acquaintance of Professor Barfoot of the museum of natural history, and will be sorry to learn of his decea...
-Houghton Farm Experiments With Indian Corn
By Manly Miles, Cambridge, 1882. Professor Miles is just the one to look after improved corn. Corn has been with him the hobby of a life time, and the magnificent collection of varieties he had at the...
-Origin Of The Marechal Niel Rose
A correspondent of the Journal des Roses says that in 1862 it was noted by M. Rapin, growing in the garden of M. Chateau at Montauban ; and he was given grafts from it. M. Pradel had sent the plant to...
-Injurious Insects Of The Farm And Garden
By Mrs. Mary Treat. New York: Orange Judd Co. It is amazing how slow knowledge travels. It must be now nearly thirty years since Miss Margaretta Morris wrote: In many potato fields in the neighborhoo...
-American Game-Bird Shooting
By Mr. John Mortimer Murphy. New York: Orange Judd Company. No sportsman need be told that hunting is one of the fine arts - not fine in a particularly aesthetic sense, but an art which requires a fin...
-The American Silk And Fruit Culturist
Philadelphia: Campbell & Pepper, Publishers. Nothing shows better the rapid growth of the silk industry than the establishment of a monthly magazine, expressly in its interest. We hope, as we believe,...
-November. Number 287. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The subject of growing evergreen hedges under the shade of deciduous trees, has been referred to of late in our magazine. Some observers record that they have seen them do very well. We have ourselves...
-Close Trimmed Trees
Clipped and pollarded trees are an offence where the object aimed at is the realization of supposed more attractive forms; yet where the trimming is necessary, where there is a certain useful end in v...
-A Few Flower Notes
The past season has been very unfavorable on account of the protracted drought. There has been no rain storm in this section since July 5th, until September 4th, when there was one of several hours' c...
-Hydrangea Paniculata
Mr. Abbott, in your June number, speaks of propagating Hydrangea paniculata from ripe wood with ease. I have tried, years ago, to grow it from ripe wood cuttings and from root cuttings, but without an...
-Tuberoses
It is well known that the double tuberose will occasionally revert to its original single condition. The single form is not considered as desirable as the double, but it has one great advantage in thi...
-Nandine Tree
D. G., Poughkeepsie, N. Y, says: The Monthly, I suppose, can give us the right name for the plant of which I send you today a branch. We called it 'Nandine,' but are not sure if it is the plant. Li...
-A Chapter On Water Lilies
The recent flowering as already noted in the open air in the United States of the famous Victoria regia, by Mr. Sturtevant, of Bordentown, has turned more than usual attention to the subject of Water ...
-November. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Much of the failure in growing plants in windows comes from choosing plants of too tender a character. Plants which are usually grown in the moist atmosphere of very warm houses are unfit for window c...
-Gloxinia And Its Culture
In my opinion there is no summer flowering plant to surpass a well grown Gloxinia. It ranks second to no other flower for noble form and beauty. Mr. Peter B. Mead and several other good horticulturist...
-Hardenbergia Comptonian A
Hardenbergia (Kennedya) Comptoniana, one of the many beautiful climbers that adorn our conservatories, is an evergreen climbing or twining vine belonging to the Natural Order Legu-minosse, and is a na...
-Natural Hanging Baskets And Epergenes
Those popular floral receptacles of modern times, called Hanging baskets, are at once so unique and beautiful, and have become so universally used, that any suggestions tending to impart new ideas r...
-Lapageria Rosea And Alba
The Lapageria is seldom seen in such condition as it should be, although it is one of the easiest-grown climbers with which we are acquainted. We are about to devote the greater part of the roof of a ...
-Cypripedium Insigne
Owing to the large number of beautiful cypripediums that have been introduced to cultivation within the past decade, there is some risk of this fine old Lady's Slipper being overlooked. It is not perh...
-Pruning Marechal Niel Rose
Considerable diversity of opinion has been expressed from time to time as to the best method of growing this rose, some asserting that it does best on its own roots, others being equally sanguine that...
-Bignonia Magnifica
There are few more beautiful plants than the several greenhouse species of Bignonia or Trumpet vine. Bignonia venusta, for instance, is one of the best known and highly appreciated of all winter-flowe...
-November. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Many like to get fruit trees in the fall, heel them in, and so have them ready for the early spring season. It is an excellent idea in many respects. The wounds granulate, and are ready to make new gr...
-A History Of Some City Peach Trees
[The following memoranda were sent to us, with the excellent peaches to which they refer, and are regarded as of sufficient interest in connection with the history of peach culture to give them a prom...
-Grape Culture Under Class
In my opinion there is no subject in horticulture which has been more thoroughly ventilated than that of grape culture. The most eminent horticulturists, both in Europe and America, gave it profound a...
-Beds Or Borders
For the earliest house there should not be any outside borders. The border inside ought to be raised as for rose beds, but of greater depth, say about twenty inches, with hot water pipes beneath, and ...
-Temperature
About 50 Fahrenheit is enough to begin with at night in the first stage of forcing, and it should not pass 55 morning and night, till all the buds have sprung. This is a point of very great ...
-Insects And Diseases
In the grapery, even with fair attention, we are often troubled with red spider; and there, also, we often find the mealy bug in all his glory. What brings him there? Some enthusiastic gardener who wa...
-New White Grapes
There was a time when the editor welcomed the white grape. There were not many good ones, and it was safe to offer a comparative opinion. Now it is reversed. They are so numerous that he dare not unde...
-Tomato Catsup
There is a wonderful difference among the various articles called Tomato Catsup, from the rich sauce, so thick it will hardly pour, to the thin, watery stuff that would not keep but for the vinegar an...
-Apples From Mecklenburg County, N. C
M. W. C. writes: You will please find a small box of apples by express, prepaid. Not that these are better or finer than any other apple in these days, but that they are very old, of many years sta...
-Pear From Wisconsin
C P., Beaver Dam, writes: As we have been much interested in the notices of new fruits in Gardener' s Monthly, we send you specimens of a seedling 'Pear;' tree, upright, strong grower, and apparent...
-Le Conte Pear
This seems to be very popular in Florida. It is being extensively planted there, and the older plantings producing profitable crops. It seems also to be holding its own in Georgia. Up to July 6th, one...
-Chinese Cling Peaches
Mr. Charles Black, Hightstown, N. J., writes: I see inquiry of 'R. S.' in the Monthly for a white cling. We send you a box containing two of Chinese Cling and one Mammoth Cling. The former is red at ...
-Col. Mcfarland's Late Peach
This peach originated near Harrisburg, Pa., in 1874. being a seedling of Late Crawford. It is of very large size, specimens grown in the drouth of 1881 measuring over eleven inches in circumference, a...
-A New Plum
\V., Cayuga, N. Y., says: I send you today a sample of my new seed ling plum, 'The Shipper's Pride.' This plum has been under my notice for five years, and has borne good crops each year. I would b...
-Kelsey's Japan Plum
H., Oakland, Cal., writes : We forward you by mail a few specimens of the Kelsey's Japan plum, a fruit just coming into notice in this State, and is considered here as of great promise. This plum ...
-Forestry. Communications. Silk Culture In Nebraska
At the present time much is being said and written in regard to silk culture. Indeed it is time for the subject to be agitated in the United States, for if once developed it will furnish lucrative emp...
-Arguments For Tree Planting
It is a great gain to forestry to note that the weak arguments for forestry, which bring the whole subject into disrepute with persons of ordinary understanding, and leave the topic to be handled by v...
-Insect Borers In The Yellow Locust
It seems there is not a portion of the American Continent - at least in the Atlantic portion where the yellow locust is free from the borer. In Canada it seems as bad as further south, judging from a ...
-Caladium Esculentum. Nymphaea Ampla
It is supposed by many that the Caladium e8culentum is a native of South-western Texas, from its abundance in and around the headwaters of the San Antonio, Comal and San Marcos rivers. Lately, when...
-Insects In Pitchers Of Nepenthes
I have just read your article on Nepenthes rajah. My attention has been particularly directed to the statement, But no one appears to have noticed that the Nepenthes catch insects, and Darwin makes n...
-Is The Kalmia Poisonous? By Q. A. Lobingier, Steubenville, Ohio
I have been observing the controversy regarding the poisonous qualities of Kalmia. I confess I cannot understand why chemistry fails to show that it is a most deadly poison. My earliest recollections ...
-Influence Of Pollen In Cross-Fertilizing
It is well known in hybridizing, that the female parent may be exactly reproduced though under the influence of pollen very unlike its own. This was proved especially by the experience of Mr. Franci...
-The Hybrid Cotton
Some months since we made note of a reported variety of cotton raised between the okra and true cotton. This news was thought important enough to be sent to every leading paper through the medium of t...
-Death And Birth Of New Species Of Plants
The Independent says: Those who contend for the continual appearance of new species on the earth derive much aid in their argument from the evident continual disappearance of old ones. It would not b...
-Nepenthes Madagascariensis
In view of the lesson on Nepenthes given in our last, it seems that an illustration of another, to follow it, showing in what respects one species may differ from another, may be very useful. The pres...
-The Giant Tree Of California
As is now tolerably well known, the mammoth tree of California was at first supposed to be a new genus, and named Washingtonia by Dr. Kellogg. Lindley also supposed it to be distinct, and either ignor...
-Origin Of The Treeless Prairies
In an address before the Academy of Natural Sciences, of Philadelphia, a couple of years ago, Mr. Thos Meehan pointed out that there was no known agent but fire which could prevent a border line of f...
-Sheep And Kalmia
A Texas sheep raiser says: I would be willing to waste a sheep on you, 'pizen ' it with kalmia leaves and then ship it to you; but then I can't be certain that you won't declare that, though it's de...
-Use For Yucca Leaves
H. referring probably to Texas, says : I can add another use for yucca leaves. The early settlers, the buffalo hunters and Indians in Northern Texas use it for hanging up their meat to dry; the sh...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. The Romance Of Herbacea
I feel impelled to say how much Mr. Sutherland's remarks - or rather as corrected, Mr. Manning's - in the September Monthly, coincide with my own views regarding Hardy Herbaceous Plants for general c...
-History Of The Peach In America
I have for many years believed the American peach to be indigenous, having seen it growing in the woodlands of Virginia and Maryland, and showing its blossoms in the spring among the ordinary trees at...
-Fruiting Of A Male Tree Of Cepha-Lotaxus Fortunii
I send you by this mail a few fruits of Cepha-lotaxus Fortunii. Although I have grown this species for twenty-five years past, this is the first time during that period of fruit being produced. My ...
-November. Literature. Editorial Notes
Intelligent Correspondents who read, will find the following words to the wise sufficient. Those who run but don't read, will pass the following three pearls unheeded, according to the prover...
-Testimonial To The Kieffer Pear
In a prominent catalogue just issued we read : 'I have eaten fruit of Kleffer's Hybrid that was equal in luscious richness to any pear I ever ate. 1 have never tasted a bad or indifferent pear of ...
-Hiram Sibley
The head of the seed-house of Hiram Sibley & Co , and which is the successor of the former house of Briggs Brothers, is one of the representative men of whom America may well be proud He is an example...
-The Farm Journal
We could not forbear enjoying the little joke which the Farm Journal suggested when referring to a paper by the writer of this to the Germantown Telegraph, that there were some persons who loved to w...
-Express Packages For The Editor
One would suppose that common sense would suggest that when fruit or other matter is sent for an editor's opinion, the packages would be prepaid. It is surprising how many overlook this little piece o...
-Elihu Hall
Botany loses an eminent worker in the death of Elihu Hall, which occurred at his home near Athens, Illinois, on the 24th of September last. He had suffered for a long time from consumption, and his de...
-Joseph Sherfy
To all familiar with the details of the fateful battle of Gettysburg, Sherfy's peach orchard is a familiar name. We have now to record the death of the owner of this sacred spot whereon the earlier st...
-American Journal Of Forestry
A monthly journal of forestry. Edited by Dr. Franklin B. Hough. The October - the first number - has just appeared. As we noted when the American Gardener' s Chronicle, the American Journal of Ho...
-The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
This time-honored institution resumed its annual exhibitions this season, they having been, as our readers know, suspended by the burning of the hall. It was, unfortunately, caught in the formidable e...
-December. Number 288. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
It is usually towards spring that the tenderer trees and shrubs suffer from winter weather. There is yet time to protect them. It is often wind rather than frost which does the injury, or perhaps the ...
-Victoria Rec1a In The Open Air
I see by your Editorial Notes that Mr. Sturte-vant is regarded as the only one who has flowered the Victoria regia in the open air since Caleb Cope did, now over thirty years ago. I grew the Victoria ...
-Fruiting Of The Araucaria Imbricata
I send you by this mail two broken cones of the Araucaria imbricata from a tree on our place which is fifteen years old, 20 to 25 feet high, and in its third year of bearing. I can find no seed in the...
-Notes From California
I send a few notes of fine specimens I saw at Los Angeles: Laurustinus, 5 feet, 7 years old; Camphor tree, 15 feet, 7 years; Monterey cypress, 30 feet high, 15 in. diameter at base, 6 years from seed,...
-Single Dahlias
There are few flowers more beautiful, or which make a more brilliant show in the fall of the year than the highly improved double dahlias. They require some care to cultivate properly, or they degener...
-The Double Carolina Jasmine
I wish to call attention to the free blooming qualities of the Double Carolina Jasmine (Gel-semium nitidum flora pleno) which was partially described in the Gardener's Monthly of June, 1881. My old pl...
-The Government Grounds In Ottawa
When in Montreal the editor found it impossible to go with the party who were invited by the Dominion Government to visit Ottawa; but some friends of his, who went on the trip, reported that among the...
-Double Dwarf German Scabious
Only a Scabious! - a common flower that at one time, not far distant, was scarcely tolerated in gardens, and which is now welcomed as beautiful and useful alike. Thanks to the German florists , they h...
-Clerodendkon Bungei
R. D. G., Reading, Pa., writes : Please tell the name, in the Gardener's Monthly, of this plant which comes up in a neighbor's garden profusely, and the seed of which, she thinks, a bird must have...
-December. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Most coal contains sulphur, and when burning the sulphurous flames injure plants. In like manner there is some sulphur in illuminating gas, and it is given off during burning. Much of what is supposed...
-The Science Of Arranging Cut Flowers
The subject of cut flowers concerns us all, and a few hints as to the arrangement of them may not be out of place. Much of the beauty of these lovely gems is often lost through a want of taste in this...
-The Marechal Niel Rose
I wish to say a few words on the cultivation of the Marechal Niel Rose under glass, and thinking that to enter into all the minute details would take up too much space in your valuable paper, I will...
-Experiments With Caladiums
The following detailed experiment is one of a series in which I have been for some time past engaged, and as the sequel will show has resulted in some remarkable and wholly unlooked-for developments. ...
-Large Cockscombs
It is common in England for lovers of plant culture to try their skill in plant growing on the common cockscomb. At exhibitions there are often large numbers for competition, and much more interest is...
-Arranging Cut Flowers
Tasteful combinations of flowers and foliage that harmonize not only in color, but in form, are our chief aim in this work. Avoid mixtures of gaudy colors: if scarlet is the chief color, use no yellow...
-Destroying Insects Under Glass
The following method, says the Revue Horticole, has given most satisfactory results, and the inventor, M. Boizard, gardener to Baron Rothschild at Paris, assures us that success is infallible - at lea...
-Fumigating Greenhouses
The duty of fumigating greenhouses is such an unpleasant one that it is often neglected to the injury of the plants. A French horticulturist has made a discovery which will render it unnecessary to us...
-Arranging Flowers For A Dinner-Table
A correspondent of the Journal of Horticulture, describing two very successful occasions, says : In the centre a good specimen in a five inch pot of the beautifully drooping golden Croton angusti...
-Dumesnil Fertilizing Moss
Mr. E. A Caswell writes: A recent number of the Gardener's Monthly presented an indictment against the Dumesnil fertilizing moss, made by one high in authority, and we beg to offer a few facts in our...
-A New Decorative Plant
A Philadelphia correspondent says: Do you know of Asperula odorata (Mijsike, fifth order or class) ? As a running vine, growing fifteen to twenty feet high, similar to smilax, having a rough stem edg...
-A New Fern - Adiantum Aneitense
This is the season when fern culture has peculiar charms, and our readers will thank us for introducing them to a pretty novelty recently brought to notice in England. It is a very elegant free-growin...
-Seedling Pear
It would seem, from the great number of apples and pears in cultivation and named in the catalogues, that additions to the list were entirely useless, and yet, occasionally, a variety appears to comma...
-Fruit Crops In Western Pennsylvania
Owing to several severe frosts in the spring, after vegetation had got well under way, the orchards in North-western Pennsylvania show very little fruit. Some young orchard, favorably situated, presen...
-How I Raise Early Celery And Keep It Till Spring
I sow my seed in a hot-bed on the 1st of March. The bed must be in good condition, that the seed may germinate quickly ; for celery seed takes thirty days, generally, in open ground, to germinate Seed...
-The Gros Colman Grape
In the January number of the Gardener's Monthly appears an article by the editor in answer to queries about this grape for culture in a cold grapery. In the April number A Sigler, of Adrian, Michigan,...
-The Best Black Grape
Suitable alike for the amateur, the market grower, or the gentleman's gardener, for early forcing or for mid-season consumption is the Black Hamburg, and the best variety of this Hamburg is that known...
-Barbed-Wire Fences
Much complaint comes from the injury to cattle from the barbs, from the occasional loosening of the wires, from the staples sometimes drawing out, and from rust unle s well galvanized, and more than a...
-Sauer Kraut
A Montgomery county, Pennsylvania correspondent of the Germantown Telegraph says: Last fall and winter an immense quantity of sauer-kraut was imported from Germany, a portion of which found its way t...
-Comparative Weight Of Apples
Some years ago when the daily papers were completely exhausted in exciting topics they took pains to show how the poor denizens of large cities were robbed by heartless farmers who would always take t...
-The Early Fruiting Walnut
In a recent number of the Gardener's Monthly, a correspondent makes some inquiries about the Jug-lans praeparturiens. In a recent issue of Revue Horticole, Mons. Carriere gives au abstract of its hist...
-Fruiting Of A Lemon
Subscriber, Philadelphia, says: Can you tell me through the Gardener's Monthly how to prevent the buds from dropping off of a lemon tree before they open ? I have had one do this for several years,...
-Josephine De Malines Pear
Mr. A. A. Ben-sel says : The best pear to follow Dana's Hovey is Josephine de Malines, commencing to ripen in January and continuing into March. The fruit ripens without any extra care, and like seve...
-Box-Grown Strawberry Plants
When a number of years ago the Gardener's Monthly first called attention to the great advantage of growing strawberry plants by layering them in small pots, it was thought to be an absurd notion, as t...
-Forestry. Communications. Succession Of Forest Crowths
This is an interesting and very important subject, which has occupied my mind for many years. My observations lead me to believe that when forests are cut down by the woodman's axe, and the fires k...
-A Year's Tree Planting In Great Britain
Those who regard with dismay the cutting-down of trees, and believe that the area of woodland in this country is gradually disappearing, may take comfort from some of the figures stated in the return ...
-Mr. E. D. Cope And The Academy Of Natural Sciences Of Philadelphia
On two occasions, recently, the Gardener's Monthly called attention to some misstatements of the American Naturalist in regard to the Academy of Natural Sciences. In the November number of that mag...
-Hybrid Nepenthes
In our former remarks on the curious family of Nepenthes, or Pitcher plants, it was very difficult to account for the many peculiar forms they presented in a state of nature, on any hypothesis of good...
-Flowers In Egyptian Hieroglyphics
Com modore Macauley, of the United States navy, has recently published a Manual for the Use of Students in Egyptology. He gives the ancient signs, as found used in their inscriptions, the modern Egy...
-Potatoes From Tomato Plants
Mr. Barron, of Chiswick, in a paper read recently before a learned society in the Old World, says on the authority of Prof. Beal, of Agricultural College, of Lansing, Michigan, that a potato scion ...
-Herbarium Of The Academy Of Natural Sciences Of Philadelphia
An extremely interesting note on the Herbarium of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia appears in the late number of the Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club. The institution above named w...
-Japan Lacquer
The Museum of Kew has recently been enriched by a very fine collection of Japanese lacquer-work. The collection, which was obtained especially for the Museum by the Acting Consul at Hakodate, under in...
-Summer Migration Of The Robin
Mr. Thos. Meehan remarked that Audubon, Nuttall, Wilson and other eminent ornithologists had suggested that the seasons had evidently not so much to do with the migrations of birds, as the question of...
-Scientific Accuracy
Considering the immense amount of rapid work which has to be done by the American conductors of magazines, it is not to be wondered at that they make mis takes sometimes. Yet it is well known to those...
-Ladies' Traces, Or Tresses
There is no more interesting study than the study of words, and when in connection with floral history the study of words is quite-fascinating. In the early Anglo-Norman times the word trace is use...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. The Old And New, Or "Cod's Acre" Made Beautiful
A judicious observer says: - Churchyards and cemeteries' are scenes not only calculated to improve the morals and tastes, and by the botanical riches to cultivate the intellects, but they serve as h...
-Patrick Barry
In accordance with a plan formed a few years ago, to give to our readers, as a frontispiece to the annual volume, a portrait of some one of our own times who may have been distinguished in horticultur...
-Index To The Gardener's Monthly
The Gardener's Monthly never permits the advertisements to crowd on its reading matter. No matter how large may be its advertising list, the reader always gets the full thirty-two pages. With the i...
-Busts Of Our Early Botanists - A Case For The Public Gratitude
Among the heirlooms of the family of the celebrated McMahon, of Philadelphia, are busts of William Bartram, Muhlenberg the famous botanist of Lancaster, Linnaeus, and McMahon, carved for McMahon's lib...
-Stephen Hoyt Sons
Last April this excellent firm of New Canaan, Conn., had their homestead burned; recently the torch of the incendiary again laid low their magnificent barns, burning up eleven horses and twenty six co...
-Lawsuit On Fruit Trees
A case is on trial in the United States Court, in Michigan, between a citizen of Davisburg and a Geneva firm. We are not fully informed as to the trouble, but it appears the owner of the farm claims t...
-Henry Winthrop Sargent
As we go to press we regret to announce the decease of this munificent patron of gardening. His beautiful country-seat, Wodenethe, on the Hudson, was long regarded as the finest specimen of ...
-Edward Meehan
Died at St. Clare, near Ryde, Isle of Wight, England, on the 26th of October, Mr. Edward Meehan, father of the Editor of the Gardener's Monthly, in his 86th year. He was born in 1798, at Carrick-on-Su...
-Penn Memorial Trees
On the 9th of November, a stone was planted on the spot at Chester where William Penn first set his foot on American soil, and three trees were planted around it by the Historical Society of Pennsylva...
-St. Petersburg Botanic Garden
Prof. Budd, of Iowa, now traveling in Russia, sends the following to the Iowa Homestead: Of the Imperial Garden I can only say at this time that under the able management of Dr. Regel, it has att...
-Smallest Flower In The World
Dr. A. Gattinger, of Nashville, says: A few days ago, while paying some attention to the autumnal flora, I happened to pass by a small pond on Mrs. Spence's place, near the Lebanon pike, and to obser...
-Proceedings Of A Convention Of Agriculturists, Held In The Department Of Agriculture, January, 1881
Published by the Department. We have here the papers read and the discussions thereon ; the latter, however, do not seem very well reported. Members are made to give replies to questions, which, so fa...
-The American
This weekly, of Philadelphia - always interesting, has added to its value by engaging Prof. Angelo Heilprin of the Academy of Natural Sciences, of Philadelphia, to report the proceedings of the differ...
-The New York Independent
It is a well known fact that many of the so-called denominational religious papers seem to think their duty finished when they furnish their readers with denominational news, or with matter bearing on...
-Fungi Injurious To Vegetation
By Dr. Byron D. Halstead. Reprinted from the proceedings of the Connecticut State Board of Agriculture, 1882. Horticulturists and agriculturists are not yet fully awake to the immense amount of inj...
-Transactions Of Societies
There seems a great want of intelligent reporting in some of the published proceedings of societies. In a large number of cases notices of the discussions might be left out entirely for all the good t...
-Convention Of Horticulturists In Brussels, Belgium
President VanGeert writes: In order to give to the representatives of horticultural industry of all countries, the occasion to extend mutually their commercial relations and discuss their common inte...
-The Imperial Society Of Horticulture Of Russia
There will be an international convention of botanists and horticulturists at St. Petersburg, to celebrate the first quarter century of its existence, to extend from the 5th to the 16th (17th to 28th,...
-An Avenue Of Cryptomeria Japoniga - Glout Morceau Pear
An Avenue Of Cryptomeria Japoniga Mr. Maries writes to the Garden, that starting from Nikko, which is two days journey from Yeddo, in Japan, there is an avenue of Cryptomeria Japonica, along the ro...
-Improved Cranberries - A Large White Oak
Improved Cranberries Few fruits have greater commercial importance than the Cranberry. Those who labor for improvement in them deserve credit. Some varieties are better able to resist unfavorable c...
-Calochortus - Horticulture
Calochortus The common name in California is Mariposa Lily. In Colorado, Dr. Newberry says, the two species Calochortus Nuttallii, and C. Gunnisonii are known as Black-eyed Susan. The Indians of ...
-Areca Baueri - New Dwarf Sweet Chestnut
Areca Baueri Seaforthia robusta, is a synonym of Areca Baueri, as no doubt most persons who read the note at p. 380, last month, understood, though the accidental omission of the usual marks ( ) of...
-Hardiness Of Rose Reine Marie Henri-Ette - Mild Weather
Hardiness Of Rose Reine Marie Henri-Ette Mr. Terwilliger, of Saratoga, N. Y., writes: Please state that the rose 'Reine Marie Henriette,' stood outside uncovered during the winter '80 and '81, mer...
-Remedy For Bark Scale - Sparrows In Australia
Remedy For Bark Scale An Iowa City, Iowa, correspondent sends us an article on his manner of applying a wash for scale, but has omitted to state what it is that is to be used as the wash. Se...
-Odor In Butterflies - Sheldon's Dairy Farming
Odor In Butterflies Miss Mary E. Murtfeldt calls attention, in the April number of Psyche, to the fact that she observed, while spreading fresh male specimens of Callidryas eubule, a delicate, viol...
-Paw-Paw, Michigan - Cut Flowers In Paris
Paw-Paw, Michigan E. A. Dodge says : ' In relation to ' Paw-paw,' Michigan, I can say it was named after the Papaw fruit which I have seen growing there very luxuriously. Why it came to be s...
-Stephanotis Floribunda - Bees And Fruit
Stephanotis Floribunda This waxy white, and sweet flower, would be extremely profitable to that florist who could discover how to get it in bloom cheaply and profusely all winter. It seldom flowers...
-Very Hardy Apples - Timber On The Pacific Coast
Very Hardy Apples A large number get injured by Canadian winters. The Canadian Hor-ticidturist reports the following as always hardy there. Tetofsky, Yellow Transparent, Duchess of Oldenburg, Wealt...
-Forestry Meeting - The Chinese Varnish Tree
Forestry Meeting Dr. Warder informs us that a convention will be held in April, in Cincinnati, in behalf of forestry interests, and that the Forestry Association meets there at the same time. ...
-Arctic Coniferae - W. O'Brien
Arctic Coniferae The following are the Pines which Baron Nordenskjold found to the extreme north of the Russian possessions: Larix Sibirica, Pinus Cembra, Pinus Sibirica, sometimes known as R. pich...
-General Index And Supplement To The Nine Reports On The Insects Of Missouri - Birds And The Gardener
General Index And Supplement To The Nine Reports On The Insects Of Missouri By Charles V. Riley. Being Bulletin No. 6 of the United States Entomological Commission. Prof. Riley's work as Entomol...
-Silk Culture - Remedy For The Currant Worm
Silk Culture The Women's Silk Culture Exhibit, held in Philadelphia last month, was a very successful one. Instructions for raising the worm and reeling the silk are sent free to anybody. So far as...
-Value Of Worms - Wright's Sycamore
Value Of Worms Dr. Storer of Harvard University, has entered the list against Darwin's views of the value of the earth worm. He concludes a long paper in the Country Gentleman, by asserting that th...
-Geographical Range Of The Lily - Flowers In Egyptian Tombs
Geographical Range Of The Lily It is remarkable that no species of Lily has been found in Central Asia, so far. Properties Of The Cola Nut In Japan and China the fruit of the Ginko is use...
-Leichardt, The Lost Australian Explorer - Superior Hyacinth
Leichardt, The Lost Australian Explorer The man who professes to have found the relics of this long lost explorer, asks of the English Government $30,000 for what he has found. Under the advice of ...
-Extra Double Isabella Sprunt Rose - New Cestrum
Extra Double Isabella Sprunt Rose H. R. A., Saco, Me., says: I cut a perfectly double rose from I. Sprunt. Is it usual for that to sport ? [No, - but I. Sprunt is itself but a sport, and som...
-Winter Blooming White Flower - Ramie
Winter Blooming White Flower R. L. B. wants a better winter white flower than Stevia or Eupatorium affords. What shall it be ? Poinsetta Pulcherrima W. S. B. asks : Can I grow th...
-Magnesian Limestone - Soil For Peas
Magnesian Limestone Can any reader n-form C. whether there is any kind of soil on which magnesian limestone is better than limestone free of magnesia ? As a general thing, C. has found magnesia...
-Growing Radishes - Nymphlea Tuberosa
Growing Radishes It requires rich ground to grow vegetables well, but the radish beyond all must have it. It is hot work to eat a radish that has not been grown in very rich ground. How To R...
-Is Kalmia Poisonous? - Universal Interest Tables
Is Kalmia Poisonous? A chemical friend at Washington promises to analyze Kalmia leaves, and report what he finds He will certainly not find prussic acid as some conjecture, merely because by some c...
-Kansas City Review Of Science And Industry - Beautiful Orchids
Kansas City Review Of Science And Industry Theo. S. Case, editor. This vigorous scientific monthly, has just completed its fifth year. The editor notes that the circulation is barely sufficient to ...
-Greenhouses Of Patterson Bros., Pittsburg, Pa - Oranges In Europe
Greenhouses Of Patterson Bros., Pittsburg, Pa These comprise over 30,000 feet of glass, and roses and other flowers are forced to their utmost, but all are heated by one steam boiler. The Pittsburg...
-Pear, B.'s. Fox - Forest Growth In America
Pear, B.'s. Fox Fruit of this, tested by Mr. Barry in April, indicates that it will be as grand a winter pear in the East as it proved to be in California, where it originated. Cochin China ...
-Polygonum Amphibium For Tanning - Insects Injurious To Forest And Shade Trees
Polygonum Amphibium For Tanning Some years since we noted that this plant has good tanning properties. The Kansas City Science Review says that gentlemen of that city are prepared to put the discov...
-Book Of Plant Descriptions - Carnation "Beauty"
Book Of Plant Descriptions By Prof. George G. Groff, Lewisburg, Pa. This is a cheap book of blanks, which are arranged as charts for students of botany. The student examines a plant, and fills i...
-Concord Grape South - Premiums For Celery And Onion Essays
Concord Grape South Mr. T. V. Munson says the Concord Grape is useless in the South. It soon withers and dies. Bacteria In Fruit Diseases Mr. T. V. Munson suggests that species of the st...
-Tomatoes To The Acre - Pine Apples
Tomatoes To The Acre In Harford County, Maryland, two hundred bushels of tomatoes is considered a fair yield per acre. Filberts In California Filberts are grown somewhat extensively in Ca...
-Massachusetts Apples - The Hallidays Of Baltimore
Massachusetts Apples The Baldwin, Roxbury Russet and Hubbartson Nonesuch, are among the most profitable Massachusetts Apples. Seckel Pear A correspondent of the London Journal of Horticul...
-Correspondence Botanique ; By Edward Mor-Ren, Liege, Belgium - Improvement Of Small Gardens
Correspondence Botanique ; By Edward Mor-Ren, Liege, Belgium This is a new edition of a work destined, the author tells us, to facilitate the relations between botanists all over the world. It give...
-Solomon's Seal For Decorating - Durability Of Timber
Solomon's Seal For Decorating We were shown recently something new among decorative plants, nothing but a racemed Lily of the Valley. The novelty was in the name, for the plant was the well kno...
-An Enormous Flower - Helianthus Maximiliani
An Enormous Flower There are some flowers which approach the famous Victoria in size. At Kew they have an Aristolochia, A. Goldeana, a sort of Dutchman's Pipe, with a flower which is eighteen inc...
-Morchellia Esculenta - Churchman's Superb Raspberry
Morchellia Esculenta This is the name of the plant sent to us by A. B. C, Lebanon, Pa. It is an edible fungus, and highly prized in some parts of the world. Purple Anemone Nemorosa In bot...
-The Caroline Raspberry - Eucalyptus In California
The Caroline Raspberry We find this amber-colored variety is not of the Rubus occidentalis or Black Cap race, but of the same class as the Philadelphia belongs to. Some botanists believe these t...
-Poverty And Productiveness - Tenth Cincinnati Industrial Exposition Programme Of The Horticultural Department
Poverty And Productiveness A correspondent of the Naturalist quotes Thome as saying,As poverty of the soil leads to abortion so an unusual increase in the development of the axial or foliar organs...
-Randolph County (Ind.) Horticultural Society - Grafting Epiphyllum
Randolph County (Ind.) Horticultural Society This society is following in the good work of Montgomery (Ohio) Horticultural Society, as we judge from a sample of its proceed ings now before us. The ...
-Cattleya Dowiana - Florida Oranges
Cattleya Dowiana C asks : Will some of the readers of the Monthly be so good as to give me some information concerning the treatment and habits of Cattleya Dowiana? Culture Of Clerodendr...
-Planting Seedlings From The Forest - Estate Of The Late Charles Darwin
Planting Seedlings From The Forest Mr. George May Powell makes the very good suggestion, that sprouting acorns or nuts from the forest may be planted with no more trouble than the setting out of ca...
-The Progress Of Refinement - Varieties To Plant
The Progress Of Refinement At a recent convention of undertakers it was resolved that in future their business shall be known as that of Funeral Directors. Mr. Albaugh suggests that nurserymen mu...
-Pruning - Jessica Grape
Pruning I prefer the spur system to any others, and should say the double spur. By this mode we have always young wood which bears fruit but once, and is then cut out and replaced by a shoot of the...
-James Vick Strawberry - Edward J. Hooper
James Vick Strawberry Eminent pomolo-gists in whom we have confidence, praise this new Rochester seedling, remarking especially on its productiveness. This new variety is credited with being an ...
-The Mississippi Valley Horticultural Society - Hot-House Grapes
The Mississippi Valley Horticultural Society The third annual meeting was held in Chicago on September 6th. The meeting being called when everybody is at home at local shows or fruit gathering, was...
-Prentiss Grape - Succession Of Forests
Prentiss Grape Mr. Hubbard sends sample of the Prentiss grape. The bunches and berries are about the size of Clinton, but much more close and compact. The color is amber green. The skin is thick, a...
-Tree Planting In China - The Ailanthus Silk Worm
Tree Planting In China Six hundred acres were to be planted in Hong Kong last year. Pinus sinensis is the species employed. Tree Planting In Kansas The six hundred acres of forests plante...
-The House Fly And Distribution Of Poison Germs - Walter Coles
The House Fly And Distribution Of Poison Germs Dr. Thomas Taylor, of Washington, read a paper before one of the sections of the recent meeting of the American Association at Montreal, in which he s...









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