We do not know whether botanists generally are disposed to admit any substantial difference between Dieffenbachias and Caladiums, but, as they have usually a difference of habit, it is a convenience to plant cultivators to keep them separate. A great variety of beautiful foliage is found among the Dieffenbachias, and they are among the handsomest of this class of warm greenhouse plants. They were both introduced by Mr. Wm, Bull, of Chelsea, London, from South America, a few years ago, and proved very acceptable to English plant lovers. D. Carderi is described as having oblong-ovate leaves, spreading or becoming somewhat deflexed, of a rich dark green, strikingly blotched and variegated. Owing to the ground color and the variegation being about equally distributed, the plant is exceedingly striking and attractive. D. Leopoldii is a plant of resplendent beauty. The leaves are oblong-ovate, of a rich deep lustrous satiny green, traversed by a broad and stout ivory-white rib, which is bordered on each side through its entire length with a whitish band, and shows in strong contrast to the color of the leaf surface, producing a marvellously fine pictorial effect.

Dieffenbachia Carderi.

Dieffenbachia Carderi.

It is one of the most handsome of the Dieffenbachias yet introduced, and was one of the twelve new plants with which Mr. W. B. gained the first prize at the Royal Horticultural Society's show, held at Preston in 1878, and the first prize at the International Horticultural Exhibition, held at Ghent in 1878.

Dieffenbachia Leopoldii.

Dieffenbachia Leopoldii.