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The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V25 | by Thomas Meehan



Asking a friend, who had a beautiful rural residence, why she did not plant vines, or creepers as the English would say, over the walls, she replied by referring to a mutual acquaintance who had done so with the result of making the walls so damp that the vines had to be cut away. It so happened that we knew all about the affair. The vines were allowed to cover the eaves, over the gutters and push their way in under the shingles of the roof. Thus obstructed, the water made its way down into the wall, from the top under the roof, and of course the wall was wet. Vines should always be kept cut down below the roof...

TitleThe Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V25
AuthorThomas Meehan
PublisherCharles H. Marot
Year1883
Copyright1883, Charles H. Marot
AmazonFour-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long

Devoted To Horticulture, Arboriculture And Rural Affairs.

Edited By Thomas Meehan, Formerly Head Gardener to Caleb Cope, Esq., at Springbrook, and at the Bart-ram Botanic Garden near Philadelphia; Graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, (London,) England,. Member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Author of "American Hand-Book of Ornamental Trees." etc.

-January, 1883. Number 289. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Asking a friend, who had a beautiful rural residence, why she did not plant vines, or creepers as the English would say, over the walls, she replied by referring to a mutual acquaintance who had done ...
-Notes From Torrington
To most readers of the Gardeners' Monthly, the name Torrington will in no way be associated with horticultural pursuits. The rugged hills and frowning rocks of western Connecticut imply but little in ...
-Gardening Notes From New Orleans
Having a few spare moments I thought a few notes might be interesting to some portion of your readers. Owing to the example of some people of taste, gardening has assumed very respectable proportions...
-Roads And Traveling Comforts In China
Mr. Maries continues in the London Garden his remarkably instructive sketches of Chinese travel. Of the roads he says : I went by steamer to Kui-kiang and was favored with the use of a nice bungalow ...
-White Tigridia
Everybody knows the pretty summer flowering bulb, the Tigridia or Tiger flower. We have the red Tigridia pavonia, and the yellow conchiflora. The white, according to Revue Horticole was raised and rec...
-Transplanting Seasons
R. O., Philadelphia, writes: Will you be kind enough to inform me which season you consider best for transplanting trees - spring or fall? It is held by some that fall is the best time, while other...
-January, 1883. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The temperature of the greenhouse at this season should be maintained at about 500, allowing it to rise 10 or 150 under the full sun, and sink 100 or so in the night. Though many of our practical...
-Bouvardias
I would like to recommend to all lovers of beautiful fragrant flowers the Bouvardias Humboldtii and candidissima. They are such clean handsome-looking plants and their fragrance will perfume a room. A...
-Improvement In Acroclinium
I have taken the liberty to forward to your address, by to-day's parcel post, a bunch of Acroclin-iumroseum, and roseum flore pleno (J. C. Schmidt), the latter being a novelty which I succeeded in rai...
-Pharbitis Learii
Pharbitis Learii, or as it is more generally known and cultivated under the name of Ipomoea Learii, is a splendid evergreen climbing or twining plant, belonging to the natural order Convolvulacae. It ...
-Chrysanthemums At Fairmount Park, Philadelphia
The collection at Fairmount Park deserves more than the passing notice of the daily papers. On a recent visit we found them to comprise probably the grandest collection in America. We believe it embra...
-Diamond Tuberose
Our readers will remember that it was charged by Mr. Thorpe and Mr. Henderson in our columns, that they had good reason for believing that the Diamond was nothing but the Pearl under a new name. A...
-Potting Plants
This is an operation which every beginner considers himself skilled in, but which is, nevertheless, often badly performed even by practical gardeners. The first point to be noticed is properly drainin...
-Beautiful Leaf Plants - Dieffenbachia Carderi, Dieffenbachia Leopoldii
We do not know whether botanists generally are disposed to admit any substantial difference between Dieffenbachias and Caladiums, but, as they have usually a difference of habit, it is a convenience t...
-The Double Bouvardia
R. L. Templin, Cal-la, O., writes: A few days ago, while visiting a neighbor florist, I was shown a very fine bed of A. Neuner Double Bouvardias, containing 150 or 200 plants, that were propagated fr...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Celery Culture
I notice at page 366, of the December number of the Monthly, an article on celery growing by Mr. A. D. Mylius, of Detroit, Michigan, in which he says that he sows the seed in a hot-bed the 1st of Marc...
-Beet Wine
All the world knows of the ravages which the Phylloxera has made on the European grape for some years past. The depredations of this terrible pest have been in no ways exaggerated. Ingredient on ingre...
-Some Reminiscences Of The Caladium Esculentum
On my arrival in Charleston, S. C, more than forty years ago, Tanyas, Caladium esculentum were commonly sold in the Charleston market as a vegetable; and among other things sent by a friend as gifts...
-A New "Yellows" Disease In The Peach
English journals have a good deal to say about a new disease which has recently broken out among peaches, and which they call the yellows. As it has always been stated that what Americans call the ...
-Peach Yellows Law Of Michigan
Mr. T. T. Lyon supplies the following piece of history : A previous Legislature had enacted a 'Yellows Law' applicable only to the counties of Van Buren, Allegan and Ottawa; and difficulty arising fr...
-Japan Persimmon In The South
It is now some six or seven years since the Japan Persimmon was first introduced into Mobile by distributions made by the United States Commissioner of Agriculture-. It has fruited three or four years...
-American Peaches In Europe
We reprint from the London Garden the following letter of a French correspondent, which we are sure will be read with much interest by American peach growers: M. Raymond Aurrau, the proprietor of th...
-The Latest New Strawberries
A correspondent sends the following account of the latest remarkable new seedling strawberries to a New York paper. It is to be remarked that the descriptions sent are wholly in the public interest, a...
-Juglans Praeparturiens, Or Early Fritting Walnut
The California papers have been intelligently discussing this variety of walnut. It has been thought to be a dwarf - probably because small or young trees are full of fruit. Mr. Felix Gillett sums in ...
-Forestry In America
It is rather surprising that while you may find a hundred men who will write and talk that something should be done to increase our forest area, scarcely one looks at the matter practically, to see...
-Mahogany In San Domingo
In consequence of the demand for mahogany of late, it has been feared lest the supplies should fall short; we are assured, however, in a report of the Vice-Consul at Puerto Plato, San Domingo, that th...
-Can Wheat Be Cross-Fertilized? By A. Ve1tch, New Haven, Conn
In the Monthly for November, 1882, Mr. Carman writes: During two seasons past, I have spent much time in crossing wheats. I have been very careful to remove the anthers from each flower while yet the...
-The Fertilization Of Calopogon Pulchellus
This plant though not as grotesque as some of the orchids, is not one that will lack admirers. The lover of flowers is charmed by its beautiful appearance, both the single specimen and the general eff...
-On The Annual Growth Of Wood
A few months ago we were called on to notice Dr. Hough's Elements of Forestry, and we stated that cuts made to illustrate one point, did not always represent the whole case accurately. Reference was m...
-Male And Female Flowers. Begonia Socotrana
The especial purposes for which the division of all living things into separate sexes was designed, has been stated by the writer of this in former writings and discourses, to be evidently as part of ...
-Tubers From Grafted Tomatoes
We have recently noted that the statement that Dr. Beal was authority for the production of tubers from a stem of potato on which a potato had been grafted, was scarcely accurate. From a note in the G...
-The Hybrid Cotton Plant
We were not among those who ridiculed the idea that two distinct genera, like the okra and the cotton would hybridize. Unlikely as we think such a circumstance to occur, we like to hold ourselves open...
-Origin Of The Treeless Prairies
The origin of treeless prairies seems to be referable to annual prairie fires, by the growing consent of those who patiently investigate the matter, and thus one of the great philosophical questions o...
-Temperature And Hardiness
We have often called our readers' attention to the fact that the hardiness of plants does not depend on temperature alone. An evergreen will endure a much lower temperature in England than it will in ...
-Colored Flowers In The Carrot
At a recent meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Mr. Thomas Meehan remarked that the umbellule of colored flowers in the center of the umbel of the carrot, was represented as us...
-Progress Of Plant Knowledge
Hippocrates described 234 species, Theophrastus followed with 500. Pliny knew, as well as can be made out now, 800. Tonmefort, at the beginning of the last century, described 10,146. Many of these had...
-On Beauty In Birds' Nests
At a recent meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Mr. Meehan exhibited a nest of the wood pewee, and remarked that, contrary to the statement of most authors, it was evident that no glutinous ma...
-Lawsonia Inermis
J. W., Houston, Texas, writes: I enclose a small branch of a plant I found in a garden here, said to have come from Havana. Will you please name it through the Gardeners' Monthly. The plant is not ...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Letter From M. Maurice Vilmorin, Paris, France
It was my brother Henry who has received a long deserved distinction by his recent promotion to the Legion d' honneur, of which your most devoted servant is not a member, and will not be for a good ma...
-Acrostic Epitome Of Horticulture
In Celebration of this Magazine's Twenty-fifth Year of Usefulness. The rosy-tinted morning has dispell'd the shades of night; His quick'ning beams the warm sun threw , in golden rays so bright; Early...
-Swindling Agents
Our readers will remember that the publisher of the Gardeners' Monthly put himself to the trouble and expense of capturing and prosecuting a fellow who took money from people under pretence of collect...
-The Late Mr. Edward Meehan
The writer of the brief sketch in the last number, was not without some fear that it might be considered partial, as being dictated as much by affection as public merit. He has therefore thought it mi...
-Dr. Asa Gray
The following sketch of this estimable man is from Bowditclis American Florist, and will probably be new to most of our readers. In regard to the criticism on School Botany - or F. F. and G. Botany...
-The Tanyah And Abo
Wm. Bartram, in his Travels published in 1791, notes that on the plantation of Jonathan Bryan, eight miles up the Savannah River, he observed the Abo, or Arum esculentum in a low, wet place in th...
-The Eglantine
The writer of this was brought up among people who ought to know what they meant when they spoke of the Eglantine. This plant certainly was the Dog Rose, or Rosa canina. American authors insist that t...
-White Grapes
Propriety writes: Why will horticultural papers continue the absurdity of calling green grapes 'white.' It is many years ago since I first called attention to the absurdity, but still the farce goe...
-Legend Of The Rose
According to mythology, the Rose was originally white, and some of the prettiest ideas of ancient poetry are in connection with the origin of the red rose. The blood of Venus, the blood of Adonis, and...
-Napoleon Weeping Willow
An erroneous impression prevails that the Napoleon Weeping Willow is something distinct from the Babylonian or common weeping willow. It is simply the common weeping willow raised from the tree which ...
-History Of The Lombardy Poplar
Names are often misleading. People have often endeavored to trace some relationship between the curious variety of poplar and some European species, on account of its name. But the Lombardy Poplar is ...
-Travels Of The Indian Corn Or Maize
The Gardeners Chronicle notes that it is not surprising, therefore, that this prolific grain should have accompanied the colonists of various nations over the whole of America from Chili to the chain...
-Industrial Schools
In a recent address in Philadelphia, the Hon. Richard Vaux said : The time will come when the people will demand that appropriations shall be made for the establishment and maintenance of mechanical ...
-Free Railroads And Canals
It may be well worth considering when we suffer whether the remedy is not worse than the disease. There are few people who suffer more from what appears to them unjust railroad discriminations, than f...
-Miller & Hunt, Of Chicago
Mr. E. Sanders says in Prairie Farmer: Miller & Hunt, on Halsted street, in Lake View, have acres under glass, including eleven new houses erected this year in Terre Haute, Ind., on purpose to get in...
-The Floral Cabinet
Published by the Ladies' Floral Cabinet Company, of New York. We noted some time since that Mr. C. L. Allen had accepted the editorship of this magazine, now in its ninth volume, and that this fact pr...
-Pennsylvania State Horticultural Association, 1882
From E. B. Engle, Secretary, Chambersburg, Penn'a. This is one of the best reports which come to our table, chiefly because the secretary happens to be one who seems to have the rare knack of catching...
-Transactions Of Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 1882. Part I
From Robert Manning, Secretary. We learn from that excellent report that rose culture seems to be growing in popular estimation in Massachusetts. $3,050 was the sum appropriated for premiums for the s...
-Fertilizing Moss
Mr. E. A. Caswell writes: Permit me to thank you for inserting my reply to Mr. Henderson. Although the foot-note seemed to you requisite, it seemed to me quite to warp my meaning. The word impartia...
-Advertisements
Charles E. Parnell writes : Since the publication of the paper on single dahlias in the December Monthly, I have received many inquiries as to where they can be obtained. I did not write the paper i...
-Discriminative Premiums
Over and over again we have suggested a reform of the manner in which premiums are given at horticultural societies. They lose half their value to the receiver because no one knows why they receive th...
-Penn. State Horticultural Society
The annual meeting will be held at Harrisburg, Jan. 17th and 18th, 1883, and there is every indication of an unusually full and interesting meeting. Excursion rates over the Pennsylvania, N. Central, ...
-February, 1883. Number 290. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Just now we note much being said against the use of knife or shears on ornamental trees and shrubs. There are some who would not cut a tree under any circumstances. Everything should be natural. There...
-The Government Grounds, Dominion Of Canada
Those grounds, from their natural position, elevated as they are over three hundred feet above the Ottawa River, make a grand impression on all who have visited them. A finer view is seldom seen. Look...
-The American Banner Rose
I see in your Editorial Notes, in the December number of the Monthly, page 357, you state that the American Banner Rose, like all other sports of this character, is liable to take self color at times...
-The Philadelphia Public Squares
The filthy condition in which the several little parks or squares with which the city of Philadelphia is studded, has long been a surprise, not to say disgust, to intelligent visitors to this city, an...
-Notes From Staunton, Virginia
By an accident for which we are sorry, the following chapter of good hints has been in the wrong box, for several months, till recently discovered : Thanks for the ' Seasonable Hints ' that opene...
-The Spring Beauty Of Coniferous Trees
Some one having stated in the Gardeners' Chronicle that coniferous trees were monotonous, Mr. D. T. Fish comes to their defence, and says: Monotony of color indeed ! It is all very well to bring this...
-The Sack Or Bag Worm
The time is coming when that fearful enemy to the Arborvitae especially will make its appearance. Though we have kept a continual warning against suffering it to eat on, without molestation, it will d...
-A New Hawthorn - Crataegus Brachyacan-Tha
In 1832, Drummond collected in the Red River region, a hawthorn which has never been properly made out. Mohr and Sargent also collected imperfect specimens, and recently the fruit has been collected b...
-Canna Ehemanni
There are few things more beautiful in American decorative gardening than the various forms of cannas, and good service is done by those who endeavor to improve them. Mr. H. A. Dreer sends us the foll...
-February, 1883. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
This is the season when many things will require re-potting. Many have a set time and season to do this; but some things require re-potting at various seasons. The best time is just before they are ab...
-Large Coxcomb
During the past summer my attention was drawn to some Celosias growing in the garden of an amateur in this city. There were only two that grew to any size. The largest measured 30X18 inches. The pla...
-Carnation - James A. Garfield
The best colored carnation I have at present is President James A. Carfield, a seedling raised by Messrs. Breitmeyer & Sons, of Detroit. The plant is very robust, and proves to be the best for winter ...
-The Mealy Bug On Coleus
The mealy bug has got among the Coleus family, and done damage the past three years, threatening to drive them out of culture. Propagators, by whose carelessness the bug spreads in this way, will be t...
-Electric Light In Plant Growing
Some time ago the newspapers were full of the wonderful accounts from England that plants could be made to grow all night by using the electric light, and this would be a great aid in forcing fruits a...
-Soil For Fuchsias
Gardening Illustrated says : Fuchsias like a rich soil freely drained consisting of turfy loam, old thoroughly decayed manure or leaf-mould in about equal portions, with a good sprinkling of charcoal ...
-An Indoor Frame
A lady furnished a detailed account to the Gardeners' Chronicle of her contrivance for starting seedlings in early spring in place of a hot-bed, the substance of which is as follows : A stout wooden b...
-Prize Orchids
The following is a list of the Orchids in Mr. J. T. Peacock's group at the great Summer Show, Kensington, recently, for which a silver-gilt medal was awarded: - Brassia verrucosa, Burlingtonia venusta...
-A Good Rose
Referring to the florists' establishment of Miller & Hunt, of Chicago, Mr. E. Sanders remarks, in the Prairie Farmer: A fine' little rose for bedding and cemetery work, pure white and always in flowe...
-A Good List Of Greenhouse Ferns
The following is the list of Mr. F. Roenbeck, of Ba-yonne, N. J., which obtained the first premium at the October exhibition of the New York Horticultural Society : Adiantum Haysii, Adiantum Mun-dulum...
-The Diamond Tuberose
Our readers will remember that on the appearance of the Diamond tuberose last year, evidence was offered us tending to show that it was the Pearl under a new name. As the introducers withdrew, in ...
-Odontoglossum Vexillarium
The increasing taste for orchid culture in America will render the following representation of a very beautiful species particularly acceptable to a great number of our readers, and even those who nev...
-Camellias And Roses
Since the taste for winter roses grew so wonderfully, the Camellia has been undeservedly left far in the background. There are few more beautiful sights than a well-grown and well-formed Camellia. It ...
-Raising Fine Seeds
A correspondent from Sarnia, Ontario, writes: I find a good plan to sow small seeds like Begonia, etc, on a very soft brick, dug out enough to hold say one-quarter of an inch of soil. Place the brick...
-Fir Tree Oil
Mr. Robertson, of the Government grounds, Ottawa, Canada, writes: I have also tested the Soluble Fir Tree Oil Insecticide, and think that its merits cannot be too well known. I have used it on the m...
-Seedling Carnations
J. S., Louisville, Ky., says: I send you this morning a sample of a Seedling Carnation that I raised two years ago. I have tried it out of doors and in the greenhouse, and find it to bloom better i...
-February, 1883. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
When fruit trees are grown with root or other crops, it is well known that such root crops will not do without manure. In this operation the trees steal a little intended for the root crops. Hence tre...
-The Lord Nelson Apple
While there is no dearth in the varieties of apples now before the public, I have thought there was room for the Lord Nelson, of which the cut given herewith represents an average specimen. Though wel...
-Improvement Of The Persimmon
I have sent to-day by mail samples of persimmons for your inspection. They are not ripe, and of course not edible, though they will house-ripen, like pears. A ripe persimmon is not suited for shipment...
-Bad Seeds
It is an old story that a bad workman is the first to quarrel with his tools. If a tree does not grow or a seed come up, it is not uncommon to remember that the tree had poor roots, and to feel sure t...
-Phylloxera In France
Reports as to whether the French are finding any positive relief from the phylloxera are contradictory. The following extract from a French report partly explains the contradiction: In the departmen...
-Texan Prosperity
The wonderful growth of some Western towns may be fairly rivalled by others in Texas. In 1873, the writer visited Deni-son, which was then limited to about a score of newly erected buildings. Now we s...
-Autumn-Bearing Raspberries
The literature of fruit culture has become so thoroughly occupied by the market growers, that we are apt to forget that there are other delicious things in the world besides those which have good carr...
-The Waste Bones Of A Large City
At a recent meeting of the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Baugh & Sons presented the Institute with samples of products from animal bones made at the Delaware River Chemical Works. They stated th...
-Substitute For Cotton
Mr. Thomas Christy, Fellow of the Linnaean Society, kindly sends us an account of some new commercial drugs and plants, which have achieved some note in England - the account printed on some very beau...
-Dandelion Rum
As is generally known the product of fermented sugar is rum. By mixing sugar with chips, old leather, potatoes, parsnips, currants, rhubarb, cabbage, the rum is flavored, and we get as many varieties ...
-Good Peas
In a discussion on peas before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Mr. Ware said : Among peas, the American Wonder, which originated in Canada, is rightly named. The vines are very small indeed...
-The Cabbage Butterfly
A correspondent of Gardening Illustrated says: Wash the cabbages well with strong soot and water, and on the first dry day dust the ground about the cabbages with quicklime, and pick as many of the c...
-Tricolored Celeriac
Sentiment seems to be a necessity of existence. That which we eat and that which we admire, can only center in the same individual with violence to human feelings. Yet there are some who can eat witho...
-Improved Cucumbers
The following extract gives an idea of how these improvements are carefully studied out: I received this new frame cucumber from a man who is known as one of the most skillful and successful vegeta...
-Poison In Mushrooms
An article in a late number of the London Medical Times, asserts that all mushrooms are more or less poisonous, and that the washings which they usually undergo in cleansing them, and the subsequent c...
-Good Keeping Plums
An Abingdon, Va., correspondent writes, under date of November 25th, 1882 : I send you by mail a small box containing one-half dozen plums. They have been gathered more than a month - picked up on t...
-Seedless Persimmon
H. F. Hillenmeyer, Lexington, Ky., says : I send by mail to-day sample of seedless persimmon. The tree is some forty years old, and has always borne such fruit - not one in a hundred having seed. The...
-Seedling Pears From California
We received in the fall a box of pears from Mr. A. Broeck, of Santa Clara, most of them russetty, some very large, and all of them of delicious quality. It is, however, extremely difficult to distingu...
-Woods And Forests Of South Australia
Annual Report of J. Ednie Brown, Conservator of Forests. The expenses during the year, 5,787. and the receipts ,5,581, showing that the department has been nearly self-supporting. 189,710 trees were...
-Forestry Laws
We have a circular protesting against a duty on foreign lumber from Mr. M. C. Read, of Hudson, Ohio. In it he says : In the Dominion of Canada are millions of acres of land which, from the nature o...
-Duties On Mahogany And Rosewood
A Canadian correspondent sends the following : Can anything be less in accord with the spirit of the age, which is supposed to favor the reduction of taxes as much as possible on articles affecting t...
-Spark Arrestors
The intimate connection which sparks from locomotives have with forest fires renders every attempt at improvement of interest to the forester. We recently noted the praiseworthy efforts of a Boston ra...
-Habits Of The Aspen
Mr. Douglas notes the curious and very interesting fact that in the Rocky Mountains the aspen only seems to make one in forest succession after the forest fire has been over the ground. The following ...
-Osage Orange For Silk Worms
Col. M. B. Hillyard, who, perhaps, more than any living man has devotedly given time and money in building up Southern industries, says: But I warn every one against hoping for any success in a busin...
-Cross-Breeding Wheat
Mr. Veitch, replying to my remarks regarding the cross-breeding of wheat, says that the cause of failure is owing to the fact that wheat is cleisto-gamous, and that necessarily fertilization takes ...
-Spiral Growth
Vegetation, as is well known, grows in a spiral direction. Speaking of animals, and in relation to the development of different forms, in a recent lecture in the hall of the Academy of Natural Science...
-Evaporation From Dead Branches
The New York Tribune is reported as giving its readers the novel discovery of Professor Bessey, who has demonstrated that the evaporation from a moist piece of dead wood was exactly like that from a ...
-Double Tropaeolum, Hermine Grosshoff
Mr. Henry A. Dreer sends us specimens of a new double Tropaeolum of which we give the following illustration. The old double Nasturtium or Tropaeolum, was of a light red color; this is border-ing on...
-Defence In Birds' Nests
T., Wilmington, Delaware, says : Noticing your remarks on the nest of the wood pewee, I would ask if you have seen that of the great green-crested fly-catcher? The former decorates with lichens, th...
-American Habits Of Earth-Worms
At a recent meeting of the Academy of Natural Sci-ences of Philadelphia, Mr. Meehan commented upon a collection of leaves inserted by earth-worms in their burrows in the manner described by Darwin, wh...
-Xeranthemum Annum Superbissimum
Referring to Acroclinium in our last, it was noted that in a composite or aster-like flower, there were many method's by which the flower became, in popular language, double. We give here a case whe...
-Variation In Cotton Plants
A writer in the Dixie Farmer, says there is as much trouble in keeping a breed of cotton pure, as a breed of corn or melons. There is a constant tendency to vary from the type. He believes it to be ca...
-Absorption Of Water By Roots
Prof. Goodall in a recent lecture, says: Aquatic plants absorb water through the surface of all submerged parts. Plants fixed in the soil absorb water through the superficial tissues of the youngest ...
-Heliotropism In Sun-Flowers
Mr. Thomas Meehan exhibited flowers of Helianthus mollis, and remarked on the popular fallacy of sun-flowers turning with the sun. The original sunflower connected with the Ovidian stories of Clyde ...
-Crossed Asparagus
We see it stated that the Gardeners' Monthly is opposed to the idea that asparagus can be crossed. Nothing is further from the fact. The Gardeners' Monthly was really the first to show, even many year...
-Oil From Pine
An important industry, according to La Nature, has sprung up within the last few years in the French department of Landes, It consists in extraction and applications of oils from pine. These oils are ...
-Fertilization Of Flowers By Insect Agency
Nehemiah Grew, in 1682, first suggested fertilization as the use of pollen by flowers. Camerarius in 1694, and Vaillant in 1717, completed Grew's observations, but the doctrine was not universally adm...
-Honey Dew
We give place to the following from a correspondent of the London Garden, in order to call attention to a question we regard as by no means settled : Bee-keepers will rejoice greatly at what they re...
-The Lacquer Tree Of Japan
The precise tree. which produces the gum used to make the peculiar lacquer work of Japan, is now ascertained to be from the Stagmaria verniciflua, a tree genus closely allied to the Rhus or poison vin...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Notice Of The Late James Haggerty, Of Poughkeepsif
Sunday afternoon, December 17th, 1882, fames Haggerty, the celebrated rose grower and florist of Poughkeepsie, New York, departed this life. Fifteen years ago he began to complain, and during that who...
-Under The Hawthorns - No. II
It is doubtful if any writer of prose or poetry ever had the graphic power to vivify rural scenery with a reality so true to nature as had the gifted Burns, and his happiest efforts are often manifest...
-Gardening And Business
We have occasionally heard malicious remarks when some amateur horticulturist failed in business, that gardening would ruin any man. It is often forgotten that hundreds will spend on one evening par...
-Giant Horse Tails
When some geologists tell us some sorts of coal may have been formed in times when there was little wind by the falling on the ground of the spores (the analogue of pollen in flowering plants) of cryp...
-Varied Tastes In Food
A reporter of the Philadelphia Press called on Mr. Murrey, the chief cook of the Continental Hotel of this city, and gives us the following sketch of taste in cookery: Mr. Murrey is an enthusiast i...
-Mss. Typographical Errors
Annoying as they must always be to the author, are not always without a show of excuse on the part of the compositor. Had can be written so as to be perfectly made, and yet have the appearance of ...
-Early History Of Garden Flowers
The Florist and Pomologist, in a kindly notice of the late Edward Meehan, remarks: He was one of the earlier improvers of the fuchsia and other garden flowers. His son, Professor Thomas Meehan, is Pr...
-Sir Hugh Allan
The death of the principal owner of the Allan line of steamers reminds us that horticulture, as well as business enterprise, loses a zealous patron. His residence at Montreal was one of the beauty spo...
-Joseph E. Johnson
The Salt Lake papers note the death of Joseph E. Johnson, who is well known to horticulturists and botanists for the interest he took in developing the floral knowledge of Utah Territory. In complimen...
-The Regulative Action Of Birds On Insect Oscillation
By S. A. Forbes. In the Bulletin of the Illinois State Laboratory of Natural History, December, 1882, is a scientific paper of great practical utility in regard to the influence of birds in keeping d...
-Pores In The Annual Layer Of Wood
A correspondent says : Will the editor of the Gardeners' Monthly, please help a reader who somehow cannot make out what he means to say on page 20 of the January number. A cut used in Dr. Houghs' El...
-Premiums At Horticultural Exhibitions
The Georgia Horticultural Society has adopted a by-law which provides that no medal, diploma or money shall be awarded by this society as a testimonial of excellence for any fruit, plant, flower or ve...
-Hall Of The New York Horticultural Society
This flourishing society has purchased the Church of the Disciples near Broadway, which is to be converted into a horticultural hall. This building, costing $100,000, has been purchased solely by t...
-March, 1883. Number 291. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In our last we gave a design for a set of flower beds, with some remarks favorable to the bedding system of flower gardening, as forming a pleasing contrast to other methods of ornamenting gardens and...
-Victoria Regia In The Open Air
In response to your request for an account of my manner of flowering the Victoria regia in the open air, I will say first that I have never claimed that I started the plant otherwise than in heat unde...
-Summer Rose Culture
In the Gardeners' Monthly for August, 1882, page 231, Miss M. W. says: I have some fifty roses, many of them choice varieties, mostly monthlies, and I would like to so manage them as not to lose one,...
-Summer Flowering Vines
Noticing an article by Mr. Parnell on Ipomaea Learii being valuable as an out-door summer flowering climber, I thought that mentioning a few others which like Ipomoea Learii are grown in England, as s...
-Single Dahlias
The new race of Single Dahlias, which is commanding so much attention in Europe, has not yet made its appearance to any extent in our country, but Mr. Wm. Falconer writes to the American Garden for No...
-Notes On Flower Gardening
Several of your correspondents protest against the present system of bedding out tender exotic plants, etc, in several recent numbers of the Gardener's Monthly; also in Harper's Magazine of March, pag...
-Clearing Weeds From Walks
Salt is sometimes applied to gravel walks and roads in a liquid state, or in the form of strong brine used quite hot, or as near the boiling point as possible. This is said to be very effectual in pre...
-The Derby Arboretum
This beautiful plot of eleven acres, given some forty years ago to the city as a public park, by a citizen named Strutt, and laid out in arboretum style by J. C. Loudon, the distinguished landscape ga...
-Hedges Of Conifers
In America we have learned that any kind of coniferous plant makes a good evergreen hedge if trained in a coniferous style. Hedges of Scotch pine, white pine, Norway spruce, hemlock spruce, red cedar ...
-Flowers In North Windows
How do you manage to keep your north windows full of flowers all winter? was asked of the writer not long since. While claiming nothing original or unusual in the management - for there is a certain...
-Pharbitis Lean
Seeds cost about one cent each and you can get them from our leading seedsmen. They germinate readily and the plants grow vigorously, indeed there is nothing delicate about them beyond their being ten...
-Chrysanthemums
You refer, page 10, to the fine show of chrysanthemums in the Fairmount Park. So far as individual blossoms are concerned, I have seen nothing in this country to equal some that I saw in England last ...
-Seedling Chrysanthemums
In addition to the seedlings raised and bloomed in 1881 by my neighbor Dr. Walcott, he raised and bloomed a great many more last year (1882), and from seeds saved by himself from his own plants in 188...
-Marechal Niel Roses Under Glass
We have here a house 16x75 feet, which is used as a Marechal Niel rose-house. This house is span-roofed, and contains five plants, two of which will have to come out in the spring, as they are getting...
-Heating A Small Plant House
I see by the January number that Miss W., of Quaker Hill, N. V., makes inquiries about heating a small plant room or greenhouse. I have a greenhouse 11x24, that I have kept warm all winter so far, wit...
-Cultivation Of Strelitzia Regina
In the Gardeners' Monthly for May, 1882, page 141, H. G. C. asks for information concerning the Strelitzia regina. In reply I would say that the Strelitzia regina belongs to the natural order Musacea...
-Aiding The Draft Of Flues
I am just a beginner in the florist's work and have many things to learn yet. I may stumble on something that may be of use to others and it is no more than right I should make it known. During the l...
-A Productive Rose
The following are the number of roses I have cut from one Marechal Niel rose-bush in one year: Oct. 28..... ... 137 ... 337 6..... ... 50 11..... ...
-Heating By Coal Oil Lamps
Having had a short but very satisfactory experience in the use of coal oil stoves for heating small conservatories, I would have no hesitation in recommending them. I use mine at present more as an au...
-Notes On Hot Water Heating
Get the water into an expansion tank at the highest point as quickly as possible and let all the pipes descend from that tank through their whole length until they re-enter the boiler. This is the ...
-Dieffenbachia Amoena
This is one of the Arum-like family, now becoming so popular among leaf plants. It is thus described by Mr. W. Bull, the introducer: An effective variety of this showy race of Arads, obtained from th...
-Growing Carnations
The following letter to a distinguished botanist has been handed to us with the suggestion that the writer would perhaps find a reply in our pages. We shall have much pleasure in replying to any furth...
-March, 1883. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
However much some may regard the cause of fire blight in the pear a mystery, there is no doubt about its being far less serious than it was a few years ago. The leaf blight and other blights are still...
-Celery Culture
I wish to endorse what Peter Henderson says in the January number about Celery sowing. At least one-third of the sowings of the 1st of March with me goes to seed. But still there is profit for me, at ...
-Experience With Phylloxera
On the west shore of Canandaigua Lake, Vine Valley and Naples, are to be found extensive vineyards, where are grown hundreds of tons of grapes annually. On visiting the owner of one of these vineyards...
-The Codling Moth
In the July number of the Monthly, page 208, is an extract from the Canadian Horticulturist, referring to the codling moth, which says : I set two traps on the 20th of last August, and caught over o...
-Culture Of The Hardy Grape
It might be considered almost superfluous to say anything on this subject, as so much has been already said by others in articles and published in book form, giving the various opinions and differing ...
-Destructive Insects
There are four specially destructive I have noticed within a few years back, and as I have prevented their ravages I will relate my experience for the benefit of others. The first is a smooth, pale-gr...
-Vegetables
I want no more of the Acme tomato; they rot badly. Tielden and Trophy are good for all seasons. I have a nice lot of the Perfect Gem squash. They are small but prolific and the best I have had, keepin...
-Culture Of Fruit Trees
The Country Gentleman advises to try good and poor cultivation on alternate trees in long rows, so as to make a satisfactory test as to the best methods of treatment. Would it not be better to decide ...
-Farming In New England
Mr. J. W. Chee-ver - excellent authority - in a report to the State Board of Agriculture of Massachusetts, says: What New England soil most needs is men who have faith to cultivate it; and there is p...
-The Japan Persimmon
Last fall Mr. Nelson, gardener to Mrs. Chandler, in Germantown, Philadelphia, fruited and exhibited before the Germantown Horticultural Society noble specimens of the Japan Persimmon. They were like s...
-The Advantage Of Bringing Peaches Early To Market
During an address to the North Texas Horticultural Society, Mr. H. Tone said that the man who brings the first peaches to market sells them readily for $4. The next day he comes with five bushels an...
-Sugar In America
The Boston Journal thinks it useless, after so many years, trying to protect the effort to make sugar in America. Mr. J. J. Gregory, of Marblehead, takes up the Journal, and shows that there has been ...
-Good Potatoes
Referring to potatoes, Mr. Benj. P. Ware, in a recent address before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, remarked.: As to potatoes, since the Early Rose was raised and sold for three dollars a p...
-Green Corn
Mr. B. P. Ware believes that the early varieties formerly raised were not sweet, but now we can have sweet corn from the earliest ripening to frost. The Marblehead is earlier than any other - even the...
-Squashes
At the December meeting of the Mass. Horticultural Society, Mr. B. P. Ware, told what he knew of squashes, naming first the Butman, of American origin, a beautiful variety, with fine colored flesh and...
-Campbell Plum
Mr. L. B. Case remarks : I am anxious to see a point more thoroughly made known to the horticultural world in regard to the Campbell Plum, page 49, Gardeners' Monthly, but of course that can only be...
-Kieffer's Hybrid Pear
Mr. Edwin Satter-thwaite said at the recent meeting of the State Horticultural Association at Harrisburg, January 16th, 1883: I have fruited the Kieffer three years, and had last year more than one h...
-Practical Forestry
There is an immense amount of practical knowledge yet to be evolved before forestry culture can be made a great success in our country; but the rapidity with which Americans learn when they set themse...
-The "Hardy" Catalpa
We have often objected to this name, because it implies that the Eastern species is tender, while everybody knows that there are large timber trees in the East over a hundred years old, many of whi...
-Amount Of Tannin In The Bark Of Some Of The Trees In The United States
United States Forestry Bulletin, No. 24, C. S. Sargent, Special Agent in charge, gives the following: BOTANICAL NAME. COMMON NAME. REGION. Percentage of Tannin. Percentage o...
-On The Fertilization Of Wheat
I have no reason to doubt the correctness of Mr. Carman's statement that in his experiments with wheat some of the offspring differed slightly from the parents. But it is an open question whether thos...
-The Habitats Of Plants
The adaptation of plants to different climates is an interesting subject for observation, and some curious facts are brought to light in botanizing in different sections. Some plants seem to do equal...
-The Forking Of Ferns
Botanical periodicals often have notes from correspondents about the forking of fronds in ferns, a feature not found in the normal condition. There are very few species which do not at some time or an...
-Bowiea Volubilis
Some years ago our friends of the Cambridge Botanic Garden, gave the editor a specimen of this singular plant, which he keeps and treasures not only for its graceful character as a garden ornament, bu...
-Kalmia And Sheep
Dr. Thomas F. Wood, the distinguished physician of Wilmington, North Carolina, tried to kill a young sheep by feeding it Kalmia angustifolia, but failed. It would not eat it, though hunger was an aid ...
-The American Crab Apple
J. A. C, Dayton, Ohio, writes : Will you kindly tell me, as well as other readers, through the columns of the Gardeners' Monthly, what are the particular distinctive characters that separate the nat...
-Various Inquiries
Chautauqua, Proctor, N. Y., says: Is the grapevine cleistogamous: i. e., is the stigma fertilized by its own pollen before the cap falls off? Volume 23, page 308, Berckman's grape; does it ripen ...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Letter From Italy
Being here in Italy for the last five months, I reproach myself for not offering, as far as my abilities go, a few remarks of interest to your readers concerning this country, in return for the many h...
-The Chinese National Flower
I have never seen in print the story or legend the Chinese have about their national flower, Twe dan Fa, a variety of Polyanthus Narcissus, which blooms at their New Year, in February. A man died an...
-What Is A Garden
It is a great comfort to find once in a while a judge deciding by the rules of common sense, instead of higgling over the meaning of words. Before us is a report of a trial in England. A lady willed t...
-John Ellis
Mr. Ellis died recently in California, as we see by a note in the Rural Press. He must have been beyond sixty years of age. He was one of the most intelligent horticulturists in the Union, though with...
-Mr. John W. Slater
Among recent deaths is that of this well-known florist of Alexandria, Virginia, in his seventy-second year. He was one of the many model men of whom horticulture in America has such good reason to be ...
-A Sound Mind In A Sound Body
Dr. M'Carthy, of Dayton, Ohio, remarks that of all occupations there is none which requires so close a union of mental activity with physical energy as the various pursuits of gardening, which therefo...
-The Hill Cumorah
A very pretty hill is Cumorah, between Palmyra and Canandaigua, New York. Besides its beauty, it has interest from being the place where Joseph Smith reported he found the plates from which he wrote t...
-Annual Report Of The Director Of The Arnold Arboretum, 1881-82
From Prof. E. S. Sargent, Director. Annual Report of the Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew, 1881, from Dr. J. D. Hooker, Director. We are glad of the opportunity to notice together the annual repor...
-The Virginias
Among the many magazines issued, the bulk are passed over with a momentary satisfaction, and that is all. Those which are of a permanently interesting character are few and far between. The Virginias ...
-Hawthorns
E. says: The racy sketch of hawthorns in your February number, by your intellectual correspondent, W. T. Harding, of Mount Holly, N. J., will kindle a glow of pleasing remembrance of youthful days ...
-Improvement In Young Gardeners
Chip sends the following pleasant note: The first requirements of successful gardening is close and always prompt attention. It is so in every business; but irregularity in gardening is from the fi...
-The Gardeners' Monthly For 1883
It is not unusual to receive numerous compliments from subscribers when renewing their subscriptions, but this year they seem more numerous and cordial than usual. Many thanks to all for their good wi...
-April, 1883. Number 292. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Communications. A Retrospect Of Summer
In pursuing this terrestrial journey of existence, amid the many turns and vicissitudes that too frequently befall the uncertain destiny of man, it is at all times cheering to learn of the progress of...
-Canna Ehmanni
Being familiar with the nature of this strikingly new Canna, we wish to give a few hints to your readers about the treatment of tubers after frost has killed the leaves. Unlike other varieties of Cann...
-Flower-Beds
The beauty of a design is to have it brought out so that any one can tell what is meant, without being told, as is the case in many instances. To show a distinct pattern with flowering plants, require...
-Hope For City Trees
A drug store on upper Broadway, N. Y., between the squares - possibly it is directly opposite the Union - may now be seen of evenings brilliantly illuminated with electricity. The light is not furnish...
-Rose Niphetos
This is a French variety raised by Bougere-Breton, and sent out in 1843. It is getting to be an old Rose now, though its merits as a winter forcer for cut flowers, have only recently been recognized t...
-Fine Old Judas Tree
In the garden of Mr. E. Harcourt, at St. Clare, in the Isle of Wight, there is just now a Judas tree, Cercis siliquastrum, in blossom which is worth a pilgrimage to see. It would hold its own even in ...
-The Ash As A Street Tree
Dr. John A. Warder says : In this prairie country one of the very best trees for street planting is the green ash. The size is just right, the growth when young is rapid, the form is easily controll...
-Hardy Cyclamens Under Trees
This little sketch of Cyclamens was from a group allowed to run wild among the grass under some trees in a garden at Tooting. Right bravely for years they had held their way among the grass and weeds ...
-Raising Seeds Of Herbaceous Plants
N. B. C, of Bucyrus, Ohio, says: For the last four or five years I have planted, and given to two or three friends, seeds of the following plants: Aconitum nap. (Monkshood), Belladonna atrop. (Nig...
-Hot Water And Steam Heating
In reply to the inquiries of your correspondent, E. Holley, I may state: 1st. The number of radiating [pipes required to heat his plant-house 100x20 feet will depend on its situation, the workmanship ...
-A Few Remarks On Steam Heating
In reply to Mr. E. Holley's inquiry as to steam heating I will give my experience with steam heating for greenhouse purposes. In rebuilding our greenhouses last summer, that had been before heated wit...
-More About Steam Heating Of Greenhouses
Two years ago I was prevailed upon to give an account of my practical experience in the use of steam-heating of greenhouses, partly urged by-some of my fellow florists, and partly feeling annoyed, to ...
-Blistered Leaves In Greenhouse Plants
It seems that most florists and gardeners do not know how plants get burnt through the sun. Mr. Peter Henderson, even, advises in his pamphlet, Greenhouse Structures, to throw away all glass having ...
-Insects On Flowers
Says a correspondent of the Garden: The best insecticide, and the safest I have ever met with, is nicotine soap, which, from containing the active properties of tobacco with other ingredients, is fat...
-New Inventions
It is remarkable how long the world will be near a first-class invention without actually stumbling over it. The writer remembers, when examining the first sewing machine which came before him, how pu...
-Croton Leaves In Flower Glasses
Anyone who has a number of flower glasses to keep supplied with cut flowers during the winter and spring months, often finds it more difficult to obtain a supply of fresh fern fronds than flowers, esp...
-Popular Cut Flowers In France
We note by a French paper that it is reckoned that the daily sale of natural flowers in Paris realizes about $20,000. The flowers most in fashion at present are the gardenia, which sells at five franc...
-New Or Rare Plants. Crinodendron Hookerianum
Messrs; Veitch say of this plant that it is one of the most beautiful hard-wooded greenhouse plants of recent introduction. It is a dwarf evergreen shrub, native of Southern Chili, where it is quite r...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. A Visit To A Peach Orchard In Oyster Bay, Queens Co., L. I
Last autumn I accepted an invitation to visit a peach orchard. The proprietor had tried an experiment which was so successful that he was pleased to have his fruit-loving friends examine and admire it...
-To Destroy Cabbage And Other Worms
Your February number quotes an English paper as advising to pick off the cabbage worm or cater, pillar by hand - a good piece of work at high wages! I will give a better way to get rid of any caterpil...
-Strawberry Runners
Many of the small fruit catalogues contain items of information to growers which may prove of importance. Instance the following, which I venture to say has seldom been the subject of thought. I take ...
-The Schumaker Peach
It is acknowledged to be the leading peach in this section, and earlier than any other by ten days, and has not failed to bear since beginning, in 1877, every year. Young trees last season had from fi...
-Pear-Tree "Blight"
This subject has probably been before you at every meeting since the organization of the society, and in looking over the proceedings we feel very much like a member who said at a meeting as long ago ...
-Mycrococus Amylovorus, Burrill
Cells oval, single, or united in pairs, rarely in fours, never in elongated chains; imbedded in an abundant mucilage, which is very soluble in water; movements oscillatory; length of a separate cell, ...
-Mouse Traps
There are many ingenious contrivances for trapping vermin, the following from the Gardening Illustrated will add one more to the useful list: Take two common bricks, place them on their narrowest...
-Planting Dwarf Pears Below The Graft
Mr. B. O. Curtis says: Twenty-five and thirty years ago, guided by what seemed to be a general opinion among tree planters that the dwarf should not be planted deep lest the pear strike its roots int...
-Schoolmaster Apple
When we consider how numerous is the American list of good apples, and how difficult it is to choose between the large number of superior kinds pressing themselves on our attention, it is surprising t...
-Fruiting The Kieffer Pear
The Rural New Yorker has taken pains to get the views of a large number of prominent men who have tested the Kieffer Pear during the past season. It is worthy of note that none of them consider the fl...
-Cherry Trees In Japan
Among the flowers of spring it is to the cherry bloom that the Japanese pay most attention. Among the sombre old Cryp-tomerias and pines of Uyeno, its delicate white, or white gently tipped with pink,...
-Strong Asparagus Plants
Since the writer of this first called attention to the fact, now many years ago, in the Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, that asparagus was bi-sexual, much attention has...
-Good Vegetables
At a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Hon. James J. H. Gregory was called on to say something about vegetables. He said that market gardeners could afford to plant only such ...
-Profit In Cabbage
Joseph Harris tells the American Farmer that: It would not have been a difficult matter to grow 5,000 good heads of cabbage per acre, which could readily have been sold at ten cents per head. The pla...
-Elevations For Peach Growing
It may be remembered that when altitude is spoken of in peach growing, mere height above the sea is not intended - any elevated spot which will admit of the fogs falling into the lower ground is the i...
-Grafting The Apple On The Pear
R. Y., Austin, Texas, says: I have suffered year after year from the depredations of the borer, to such an extent in my apple orchard, as to dishearten me. I find the apple is more reliable here th...
-Raising Seedling Fruits
Querist. It is not necessary to cross or hybridize fruits in order to get new varieties. There is every reason to believe that though a flower was fertilized by its own pollen, there would be some v...
-Grafting Pears On The Hawthorn
W. B. Brandt, Ohio, says: We hear now and then of pears being grafted into the Crataegus. There are pears grafted into limbs of large trees in this section. What variety would likely be best for that...
-Inquiry Concerning Canker-Worms
Prof. C. V. Riley, of U. S. Dept. Agriculture, says : In preparing a bulletin on the subject of canker-worms, to be issued from this department, I find that much of our present information is of litt...
-Forestry. Communications. Forests Succeeding Fires
I am glad to learn from the February Monthly that some one in Europe has noted the fact that the aspen sprung up on the burnt lands in Russia, as this will bring it to the notice of American writers o...
-The Future Of The Wood Supply
In an argument for the general introduction of wood fibre for paper making, Mr. Thomas Christy says: The supply of wood is practically inexhaustible. During 1881, five million tons of wood for paper ...
-Legislative Forestry
The most remarkable incident of the popular forestry excitement is that legislative bodies, moved to act under this excitement, take no counsel with those who could wisely advise them, but follow the ...
-Natural History And Science. Communications
Observations on the Fertilization of Yucca, and on Structural and Anatomical Peculiarities in Pro-nuba and Prodoxus.*. This paper records some recent experiments and observations which establish, ful...
-Origin Of The Prairies
Reflections after reading the extract from the Independent in the January number of Gardeners' Monthly. If the companions and successors of the doughty Cortez, who penetrated to the interior of Mexic...
-Caladium Esculentum, Alias Tanyah, Alias Eddoes
Although we are informed the Caladium escu-lentum was first introduced from tropical America in 1739, there nevertheless seems to be some uncertainty as to whether that part of the world is, in realit...
-Double Flowers
In order to obtain double flowers, it has been thought advisable to make use of the pollen from double flowers, where it is possible to obtain it, and to apply it to the stigma of single flowers from ...
-Bottling Fruit
A pretty surprise can often be prepared for children - even some children of considerable growth - by introducing a fruit in early life into a bottle, and then letting it finish its growth there. The ...
-Hardy Cactuses
Few people have any idea of the great pleasure to be derived from the culture of the hardy and half-hardy species of cactuses, of which there are numbers of marked forms in the southwest and Mexico. M...
-Nympaea Flava
B. J. says: I see that the yellow water lily of Florida is regarded as something new. I believe I have seen it in years past, and supposed every observing person had noticed them. How is it that it...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Desultory Notes On The Dog Rose
It is difficult to determine with any certainty, at this late time, what plant Milton had in view when he said: In spite of sorrow At my window bid good morrow, Through the sweetbriar, or the vine, ...
-History Of The Potato
The common potato was unknown to the inhabitants of the eastern continent till after the discovery of America by Columbus. The potato known to the ancients, and that is spoken of by Shakspeare and oth...
-Dangers Of Plant Collectors
When admiring the great beauty of some rare plant, we seldom think of the dangers and sufferings which those often have to undergo who go forth into the wilds in distant parts of the world to gather t...
-Pleasures Of Camping Life
According to the Contributor, of Salt Lake City, the pleasures of camping out are very varied. It was six years ago, and in the beautiful month of July. A party of us, all young men, were passing t...
-Arthur Bryant
Horticulture - especially Western horticulture - mourns the loss of this distinguished pioneer, although he had passed the allotted term of human life. His death occurred at his home at Princeton, Ill...
-"The Diamond Tuberose" Reply
Nanz & Neuner, Louisville, Ky., write: In answer to that covered attack in your February number about our new seedling tuberose, ' Diamond,' we pronounce the same false in every particular. . I. O...
-A Grammatical Query
Young Gardener says: I notice that the Gardeners' Monthly interests itself in a wide range of intelligent topics. I therefore make no apology for inquiring whether a recent writer who used ' two wa...
-Mistakes
Correspondents of American magazines look sharp after the errors they detect, and if even a letter is misplaced the editor is sure to hear of it. It has come to be considered as a sign of a very accur...
-Fertilizing Moss - The New York Horticultural Society
The subject of the cultivation of plants in fertilized moss having created considerable interest during the past year, and with a view to determine, if possible, the relative value of soil as a medium...
-May, 1883. Number 293. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Communications. Random Jottings
I have made a great discovery, and a somewhat disheartening one, and this is it : It isn't quite safe to believe everything those very fascinating and altogether delightful creatures, the flower cat-l...
-Staphylea Bumalda
This handsome shrub belongs to the natural order Sapindaceae. It is a native of Japan. Although it was introduced several years ago, it is yet seldom met with; but there is no collection complete with...
-The True Egyptian Lotus Hardy
Following Mr. Pollock's communication in the December number of the Monthly, you state that Mr. Cope flowered the real Egyptian lotus, Nelumbium speciosum, in the open air, by first starting the plant...
-Shade Trees
It is admitted that thrifty, well-formed trees of any class are objects of beauty, but there is a wide difference in the kinds of trees that fulfill this requisite. Among these pretty trees I think th...
-Notes
Several years ago a friend who was born in England and grew some forty varieties of roses, etc, gave me what he called a buckthorn. It did not do well, and died in a few years. But meantime I had graf...
-Hunting The Balloon Tree
I suppose botanists, some at least, hardly know what a balloon tree is. But I must preface with a word about my guide. While I know but little of botany - only read a book or two on it - my guide neve...
-Grafting Roses
From Toulon to Genoa, and in the greatest part of Italy, roses are grafted on Indica-major, a very vigorous rose, but which would be very much exposed to frost at Lyons, Paris, etc. You generally gra...
-Roses By Seed
The object in raising roses from seed is to obtain new varieties. Although somewhat uncertain as to the result, it is, nevertheless, a very pleasant and interesting occupation. There has long been an ...
-Clematises As Isolated Specimens
Clematises as specimens on the lawn are very beautiful when well trained and attended to. At Holme Lacy, Hereford, such specimens may be seen, and during the months of August and September they are pi...
-Roses In Autumn
A Philadelphia Lady writes : It has been written that gardeners name their flowers for what they would like to have them, rather than for what they are. We may some day look for a rose named 'amet...
-Lawns And Evergreens
J. B., Fayette-ville, Ark., says: Knowing your kindness in giving the troubles and perplexities of other people considerate attention at your editorial table, it occurred to me that possibly you m...
-Rooting Carnations In April
I do not strike my carnation cuttings so early as is customary. I find April struck plants answer all purposes as well as those rooted earlier. I arrange a cutting bed by putting a layer of good potti...
-A Warning To Florists
About the 20th of January last, during a period of the coldest weather we ever fired through, the gas pipes on our street were broken, and as the ground was frozen hard at the time, so that the gas co...
-Deutzia Gracilis For Pot Culture
The graceful Deutzia gracilis, one of our most beautiful hardy deciduous shrubs, is a native of Japan, from whence it was introduced by Dr. Von Siebold. It belongs to the natural order Sax-frageae, an...
-Roses In Winter
I take it for granted that the majority of your readers will agree with me when I state that there is no portion of the business of a gardener - be he professional or amateur - of greater importance, ...
-Early Blooming Of Seedling Azaleas
Many persons hesitate to try improvements on azaleas, camellias and other plants because of an impression that it takes a number of years for the seedlings to flower. Col. Wilder has always maintained...
-Begonia Davisi
As a general rule the low-growing Begonias are desirable for peculiarities of foliage rather than for an abundance of flowers, but one here illustrated, introduced by Messrs. Begonia Davisi. Haag...
-Greenhouses Of Cornell University
A correspondent says : None should visit the campus without inspecting the university conservatories, as they are full of vigorous plant life, and are interesting and beautiful. The houses are perfe...
-Culture Of Winter Flowering Begonias
Early propagation is indispensable. The cutting should be taken off by March or April, inserted singly in small pots, shifted on as required, keeping them well to the light, pinching back the most pro...
-Origin Of Safrano Rose
Journal des Roses says this was raised by a passionate rose-lover, Mons. de Beauregard, of Angers, France, a retired officer and chevalier of the Legion of Honor. It was raised from the old yellow tea...
-Rules For Burning Coke
A recent report on coke and its value, concludes as follows : First, the size of coke used should be a size smaller than that of anthracite for the same purpose. Second, fires should be made deep and ...
-Fruiting Of A Lemon Tree
Subscriber says: You suggest, in the December number, that I describe the treatment my lemon tree has received. The tree is in a box, the soil rather porous, perhaps too much so, as the water runs ...
-The Growth Of Trees In Catalogues
The Rev. Henry Ward Beecher thus letteth himself out on something in some fat catalogues: Nobody has the tree I want except in their catalogue, and then, when I send for it it dodges out of that. D...
-Panax Plumatum
A very elegant small-growing 'plant, introduced by Mr. Wm. Bull from the South Sea Islands. The leaves form a crispy head of foliage, and are very elegantly divided, the leaflets long-stalked and more...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Progress Of Northern Sugar Making
On page 83 of the last number of the Gardeners' Monthly there is a paragraph from the Ag-riculttirist relative to sugar making in the country, which does not include any reference to a large and succe...
-Introducing New Fruits
New fruits, that excel all others in all important points, are now so frequently offered that it seems to me a matter of great importance to the horticultural world that all claimants should, by the f...
-The Need Of California
My exchanges and letters from horticultural friends on the Pacific Coast write in warning of danger ahead. The planting of fruit trees has gone on with an energy never before equaled on the American...
-Rambling Notes Of Fruits And Trees
I find in turning over the leaves in memory's pages there are a few things that may be worthy of preservation; for he that loves to ramble in Flora's kingdom will find objects of interest and admirati...
-When Shall We Break Land In The Spring? By Rusticus
In considering this subject there are two methods that I take to convey my impressions. One is that of a neighbor who is the most inveterate plower of wet land that I ever knew. His practice is most o...
-Pistillate Strawberries
There was a time when little value was placed on the sexual differences in the strawberry flower, even where they were recognized. Nicholas Longworth, of Cincinnati, did inestimable service in making ...
-Strawberries In Europe
Prof. Budd is writing some interesting European letters to the Iowa Homestead. Of strawberries in England he says: The strawberry here exceeds my expectation. The crops are as bountiful and the fruit...
-Raising New Strawberries
Few persons have given more attention to the careful production of the new varieties of strawberries than Col. Wilder, and the results of his extensive experience must be of great value to beginners i...
-Garden Culture Of The Strawberry
Col. Wilder is of opinion that for garden culture planting in rows three feet apart and one foot apart in the rows, allowing each to make from two to four shoulder runners, and no more for the first s...
-Degeneracy Of Strawberries
Col. Wilder believes that the degeneracy or wearing out of varieties may often be traced to the exhaustion of proper elements in the soil, and to the bad manipulation of the plants. In the rage for no...
-Free Lumber
According to what we gather from the Chicago Tribune, the interests involved in the free lumber question lately before Congress are chiefly of pretence only, the real object being the final destru...
-Canadian Lumber
Our excellent New York neighbor, the American Agriculturist, has the following in its March number: Those who have looked into the subject most carefully, are confident that the interests of our cou...
-The Locust Borer In Ohio
At a recent meeting of the Summit County (Ohio) Horticultural Society, Mr. M. C. Read, of Hudson, noted that the history of the Clytus, a beautiful beetle, whose larvae bores the body and limbs of th...
-Are All Mushrooms More Or Less Poisonous? By H. W. Ravanel, Aiken, South Carolina
I note your comments on the statement of the London Medical Times, that all mushrooms are more or less poisonous. The term mushroom is rather vague, but it seems to be intended here to apply to al...
-Crataegus Brachyacantha
I have just finished reading the February number of the Monthly, and am not quite satisfied with the information I got from a few paragraphs. First, in regard to Crataegus brachyacantha. We are all fa...
-The Law Of Variability
It is admitted by nearly all who have studied the laws which govern the vegetable and animal kingdom that variability is the universal rule. If I say nearly, it is because a very eminent horticultural...
-The New Botanic Apartments At Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y
For some time building operations have been going on back of Sage College which doubtless have attracted far less attention than they would have received had they been carried on at a more prominent p...
-On The Absence Of Trees From The Prairies
Your notes from a man who has never lived on the prairies, brings to my mind discussions of ten years ago, when a good friend of mine, an excellent man, stated in an essay that the willow, the cottonw...
-Food Of The Indians
As an indication of the domestic economy of the Indians in utilizing various articles of food, not for sustenance only, but to gratify the palate as well, the following will be of interest. Father Fr...
-On The Larvae Of The Codling Moth
The Rev. N. Coleman, of Berlin, Conn., notes in the New England Zoological Quarterly the following : As is well known, the early brood of the Codling moth, Carpocapsa pomonella, pass through all th...
-New Hybrid Silk Moth
Mr. Alfred Wailly, whose reports on silk-producing and other Bom-byces reared by him have been published in this Journal, has submitted to the Council specimens of cocoons and moths of a new silkworm,...
-Rosa Minutifolia
We have before us a dried specimen in bud of this beautiful little thing, recently discovered by Dr. C. C. Parry, in Lower California. We suppose the ladies will exclaim, Isn't it cute ! when they ...
-The Name Arborvitae
Why Thuja occiden-talis came to be known as Arborvitae has long been a puzzle to the botanists. In the proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, just issued, there is a note sh...
-Pteris Tremula
It may be remembered that a Cambridge correspondent last year took exception to the statement of another that this fern was wild in Connecticut. The latter has made another examination this year and n...
-Geography Of Some American Plants
In the preparation of the series issued of the Flowers and Ferns of the United States, the author gave the geographical ranges and other facts so far as the information then at command would permit...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Under The Willows At St. Helena
It seems as difficult to disabuse the minds of the unbelieving Thomases of to-day, as it was of old; if once their opinions are formed, no matter how erroneous, they will persistently cling to them. A...
-Real Estate Titles
Owners of real estate in the country are very apt to leave their deeds unrecorded for weeks, and sometimes for a much longer time, without thought of the possible dangers which are connected with such...
-Damages
In one of the Eastern States a case was recently tried in which damages were claimed for the burning of some ash lumber owned by the plaintiff. Upon the trial it appeared that the lumber was birch i...
-Improvement Of Young Gardeners
In the March number of the Monthly Chip has a pleasant note containing very good advice to young gardeners. The hints he throws out are well-timed and very appropriate. Many young gardeners believe...
-Rhus Toxicodendron, Versus Ampe-Lopsis Japonica
We learn from the February Monthly that our common poison vine, Rhus toxicodendron, is being cultivated in Europe under the name of Am-pelopsis japonica, which seems wond'rous strange to those wh...
-Exaggerated Introductions Of New Fruits
A communication by Mr. Bassett in this month's number is very suggestive in its general application. Another correspondent writes in the same strain, though we understand the letter is not intended fo...
-Influence Of The Gardeners' Monthly
A few years ago, straying into a florists' establishment, the writer saw a copy of the Gardeners' Monthly on the table. Remarking that the magazine seemed to be a regular visitor, the reply was given ...
-Caragana
As before noted, the plant which we can buy under this name in many nurseries for twenty-five cents, we may also buy for seventy-five cents, under the name of Russian Thornless Acacia, in others. Th...
-Old Fashioned Roses
Those who are approaching the autumn of life, and wandering in their earlier years among the ruins of old gardens, or in those old gardens which it was the pride of their owners to preserve, as in th...
-Daniel B. Smith
If not to let the left hand know what the right hand doeth represents the highest type of manhood, we have surely a good illustration of it in the life of Daniel B. Smith, who died in Germantown on th...
-Bulletin Of The Buffalo Naturalists' Field Club
Published by W. H. Hicks, Buffalo, N. Y. It is worthy of note that while scientific serials continue to disappear in the Old World, they are continually increasing and seem fairly well supported here....
-The American Nurserymen's Association
Our readers must not forget that the annual meeting of this admirable association will be held this season at St. Louis, on the 20th of June. The meetings of the body have been annually growing in int...
-Points Of A Good Rose
During a discussion on roses before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Mr. Moore advised the judging of roses at exhibitions by points, and the entering of the points on the prize cards, so that...
-Tree-Planting And Fountain Society Of Brooklyn
According to a circular before us this is an association for the promotion of planting and protection of trees; the erection of drinking fountains, and otherwise to suggest and carry out measures to r...
-Limiting The Size Of Pots In Competition
We read in a Boston paper that the prizes for the best six Indian azaleas, the best two, the first and second prizes for four plants in not exceeding ten-inch pots, and the first and second prizes for...
-Horticultural Societies
Mrs. S., Highlands, N. C, writes: The ladies here have formed themselves into a society, having for its object the laying out and decoration of some grounds which shall be held for public use - plant...
-Texas Horticultural Society
A correspondent says : March 3d, our North Texas Horticultural Society held its annual election of officers. The election resulted as follows: For President, T. V. Munson; Vice President, Edward Per...
-Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Among The Flowers
I desire to make a few remarks relating to horticulture in the first part of this century in Germany. The love for flowers is as old as history. Each nationality or class had and has its peculiar pref...
-Improved Polyantha Roses
I send you by to-day's mail a few blooms of the new Polyantha rose Mignonette, also two small plants of the same variety. I considered it last winter the finest novelty we had in new roses. The habit ...
-Notes From Virginia
Have had what may be called an open winter, the thermometer never marking lower than 10 F. above zero. Occasional snows and sleets but no snow-storm leaving above three inches on the ground, and ...
-Climbing Plants - Ampelopsis
There is no out-of-door decoration upon which the eye rests with more gratification than the graceful climbing plants, and where beauty of foliage is combined with elegance of bloom the effect is grea...
-City Squares For Philadelphia
The city of Philadelphia, with its 130 square miles, has one large park of 3,000 acres on its west boundary, of which it is justly proud. In small squares for the poor and for children who cannot take...
-Cercts Japomca
This proves to be one of the most desirable of very hardy shrubs. It will probably become common as the Japan Judas tree. Azalea Mollis, introduced from Japan, might have been called new here half...
-Roses Grafted On The Manetti Stock
Over a quarter of a century ago, no nurseryman in America could get enough Manetti stock to supply the demand, but they have long been wholly abandoned. The American florist of today hardly knows what...
-White Pyrus Japonica
The white Pyrus japonica of American gardens has a tinge of pink in it. By the following from the Garden, a pure white has appeared in England : A new white variety of Cedonia japonica now in full b...
-Forsythia Suspensa
This is the F. Fortuni of English catalogues, as the leaves are both simple and trifoliate on the same plant. It is a far more graceful plant than the old Golden Bell, Forsythia viridissima, and flowe...
-Paris Green On Large Trees
At a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Mr. J. W. Manning, after speaking of the universal prevalence of destructive insects, one following another through the season, said tha...
-Laurel Oak
A St. Louis correspondent says : I do not think there is under culture the true laurel leaved oak, L. imbricaria I suppose. This oak grows quite abundantly here in certain soils, or rather situation...
-Disappearance Of The Nelumbium
A St. Louis correspondent says : I have often thought of those former articles in your paper concerning the discrepancy among observers as to the native habitat or former localities of the noble aqu...
-Variegated Celery
T. S. S., West Troy, N. Y., writes: I have mailed you two leaves of a variegated celery. The plant is now one year old, and every leaf is as nicely variegated as the samples I send you. It is now ...
-Cypripediums
During twenty years experience in gardening I do not remember having seen or heard of any one growing Cypripediums on blocks, and until last year did not think of such idea. Having a very sickly plan...
-Heating Plant-Houses
I have some experience in heating greenhouses by flues, hot water and steam, and I suppose all have some advantages over the other, but were I to heat more houses I think I should prefer steam to all ...
-Heating By Steam
Seeing the call in the February number for Practical knowledge of hothouse heating, I herewith submit to you my knowledge of the same. Before I ever thought of horticulture I went to work in a mach...
-Hot Water To Kill Insects
In the first volume of the Gardeners' Monthly, probably one of the most valuable papers published was one on the use of hot water in destroying plant lice. Many have thanked us since for giving them s...
-Leea Amabilis
Leaf plants, or those which are valuable chiefly on account of beautiful foliage, are still popular, and we have here one of the most beautiful additions that have been made for a long time. It was in...
-Pedigree Roses
Mr. Bennett believes in the natural variation in races; others depend on crossing or hybridizing. Mr. Bennett has been and continues to be successful with his method. An English paper recently says: ...
-Hot Water For Sickly Plants
A correspondent calls our attention to the following from the Garden, and inquires whether there is anything in it: The Florist asks has any one tried hot water as a restorative for sickly plants?...
-Rose Catharine Mermet
Anxious I. asks: How is this rose pronounced? Some say it is Mermet, others Mermay. These French names are puzzling to us innocents. [Anxious Innocent need not be agonized about it. There is no ...
-Carnation Albani
P. McK., Montreal, Can., writes: I enclose a bloom of carnation. It is a seedling of last spring. It has been admired here and christened Albani. Please let me know through the columns of the Month...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. French Chestnuts
There are few trees more beautiful or desirable for ornamental planting in parks or large lawns, or about farm yards than the French chestnut. It has been pretty satisfactorily proven by experiments i...
-Influence Of Stock On Graft And Of Graft On Stock
Some people dispute this influence; still lately my friend Alphonse Karr has cited an example; that of hybrid perpetual roses flowering better by being grafted on the common China rose, than if grafte...
-Manures
Sir Humphrey Davy writes: Some inquirers, adopting that sublime generalization of the ancient philosophers, that matter is the same in essence, and that the different substances considered as element...
-Degeneracy In Strawberries
In our country it is pretty clear varieties of strawberries do not last long. We have to continually replace old with new varieties. We have contended that there is no reason in nature why a variety s...
-Soil And Quality In Strawberries
Referring to this important consideration, in an address at New Orleans, Mr. McKay observed that while it is true that berries grown on a sandy loam are often as large and apparently as firm and well ...
-Deterioration Of The Wilson Strawberry
At the meeting of the Mississippi Valley Horticultural Association, Mr. Galusha stated that the Wilson plant was not so robust as many other varieties of the strawberry, such as the Crescent, Piper, C...
-Overbearing Pears
The recent discussion on the quality of the Kieffer pear raises the question, how many varieties of pear have been pronounced worthless because they have been permitted to overbear, that might have be...
-Melons Not An Exhaustive Crop
At a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Hon. Marshall P. Wilder said that he had grown melons on the same land for ten years; the ground has a south aspect. He prepares a com...
-The Prentiss Grape
We have from time to time expressed the favorable impression this grape has made on the editor, in so far as he could judge from specimens of the fruit before him. We now note that Vick's Magazine exp...
-Thinning Fruit
Though we have so often reminded the pear grower that trees overburdened with fruit give us pears almost unfit to eat, recent discussions show the wisdom of continually repeating this caution. We are ...
-Plums In Russia
Prof. Budd says: No varieties of the plum are grown except of an Asiatic race, which seems perfectly hardy. The fruit is superior to our best wild plums in solidity of flesh but not in flavor. The no...
-Peaches In Illinois
Mr. Parker Earle says : In the East it is probable that the production of peaches has kept up with the growth of markets, and possibly has got ahead, but in the West the absolute production of peach...
-Improved Blackberries
Though we have had the luxury of blackberries for a quarter of a century, our improved kinds seem unknown to any extent in Europe. A correspondent of the Garden has recently visited America, and thus ...
-Vegetable Growing In The South
It is said that there are upwards of 2,000 acres devoted to vegetable culture around Mobile, and this does not embrace any melon grounds. This space is equal to 4,000 acres North, as two or three crop...
-Market Gardening Near New Orleans
Market gardening is conducted in many parts of the South in the same systematic and profitable manner in which it is often conducted at the North. Near New Orleans, Major Rountree bought a place in 18...
-Quality Of The Kieffer Pear
A correspondent writes that he bought one of the Kieffer pears offered by Mr. Satterthwaite for sale at his stand in the Philadelphia market, paying him twenty-five cents for the specimen. That it had...
-Early Bearing Pear Trees
L. J., Cincinnati, Ohio, writes: I have a small garden from which we sell considerable vegetables and small fruits, and which, being left a widow with a young family, has helped to support me pret...
-Spare The Forests
The Michigan Farmer presents the following excellent bit of common sense in regard to the common newspaper cry of, Spare the Forests: Of what use is a forest if you do not utilize it? It produces ...
-Floods And Forests
The great number of marked papers and essays sent us on forestry shows the widespread interest in it. Before us is a Boston paper with a two-column article, suggested by the late floods in the Ohio an...
-Destruction Of Forests In Mississippi
The town of Wesson, in Mississippi, was struck by a cyclone on the 23d of April, and the pine forests in the vicinity utterly uprooted, as well as the houses destroyed. Wesson is to be sympathized wit...
-A Great Planter Of Trees
The Duke of Athole is one of the most extensive tree-planters in the world. There are already vast woods and plantations in Athole and Dunkeld, and as, of course, they exist for use as well as ornamen...
-Tree-Planting In Kansas
A Crawford county correspondent of the Tribune says: In this neighborhood there are two plantations which seem to prove that under intelligent management success is reasonably certain. The plantatio...
-Box Forests
An exchange says : The best boxwood is brought from the shores of the Black Sea in Turkey, inferior varieties being obtained in Persia, in Spain and Portugal, and in the Balearic Isles. It is said t...
-Pine Lands In North Carolina
It will not be long before it will be found profitable to plant trees in even the old Pine Tree State. The successful manufacture in Philadelphia of lubricating oil from rosin, has given a new value t...
-Timber On The Prairies
Once on a time it was fashionable to believe that there was something in the climate or the soil of the prairies which accounted for the absence of arborescent growth. No one would plant trees because...
-Scraps And Queries. Russian Mulberry
An Arlington, Kansas, correspondent says: Are you sufficiently acquainted with the so-called Russian mulberry which was introduced into the United States a few years ago by the German Russian Mennoni...
-Grafting The Grapevine On The L' Eglantier (Dog Rose)
We read in the Journal du Loiret of Dec. 13, 1882, as follows: We described in our number for November 10th last, an important discovery made by Mons. Etienne Savary, gardener at Muids, namely, tha...
-Hybridizing Araceous Plants
In the article published in the December number, allusion was made incidentally to the facility with which Caladiums can be successfully crossed. I now present some additional facts on the subject in ...
-The Motion Of Roots
It has long been known that many parts of plants possessed the power of spontaneous motion to a greater or less extent. The late Charles Darwin made some very interesting experiments on this subject. ...
-Hybrids
Just what is a species no one can answer. Botanists have some idea what they mean by the term, but no one can define it to another's satisfaction. Neither genus nor species seem to have any place in n...
-Glucose
The immense use of corn in glucose manufacture is exciting some interest in the corn markets of Europe. A London daily paper says: The exportation of maize from the United States will receive a sever...
-A New Fungus On The Pea
In a recent address Mr. Wm. Saunders, of London, Ontario, says: Examples of what appears to be a new disease on the pea have lately been brought to my notice from several localities, under the impres...
-A Moving Mountain
The Government engineers engaged upon the ship-canal around the rapids where the Columbia river cuts through the Cascade Mountains, and the engineers of the Oregon Railway and Navigation Company, whos...
-Scraps And Queries. Hardiness Of Evergreens
Mr. Charles E. Parnell, of Queen's, Long Island, says: In this vicinity March proved very severe on the more tender evergreens. Euonymus japoni-cus and all its varieties are killed to the ground, a...
-The Force Of Habit
Scientific men tell us that in nature results continue long after the causes which brought them about cease to exist. Edward Munger, in speaking of the time when he was a boy, says it was the custom o...
-Origin Of The Purple Birch
The Journal of Horticulture says this pretty plant was raised in America. This we take to be a slip of the pen for France. The plants in America originally came from France, and, indeed, the Journa...
-Origin Of The Manetti Rose
The origin of this famous rose is obscure. In a letter to the Revue Horticole M. Bertin, Sr., says he sowed some seeds of unknown Bourbon roses in 1832. Among plants from these he found one very vigor...
-Cats In A Bombarded City
A correspondent of the Salt Lake Contributor thus describes the suffering of the cats in the bombardment of Alexandria : But one feature of the scene (so it seemed to me) that ought to have struck ...
-The Origin Of Cultivated Plants
A work on this subject from the pen of M. de Candolle has recently appeared. It treats of 247 species. The author has utilized evidence from Swiss lake dwellings, from ancient Egyptian monuments, and ...
-Bacteria
By T. J. Burrill, Ph. D., Springfield, Illinois, 1882. This is a monograph reprinted from the report of the Illinois Industrial University, and to those who have compound microscopes will be found esp...
-Reports On Experiments, Chiefly With Kerosene, On The Orange And Cotton Plant Insects
By C. V. Riley. Published by the Department of Agriculture. Kerosene, or coal oil, swims on the top of water, and hence cannot be well used with a syringe as an insecticide, unless the operator is sk...
-Truck Farming In The South
By Dr. A. Ormler. New York: Orange Judd Company. 1883. Truck-farming is a word not found in Worcester or Webster, nor in any authorized version. We had supposed it was a slang term, confined to Phi...
-Some Microscopic Distinctions Between Good And Bad Timber Of The Same Species
By Dr. J. T. Rothrock, of the University of Pennsylvania. This paper has been issued from the regular proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. One of the most important facts here deduced i...
-John Sherwood
Mr. Sherwood was one of the grand race of gardeners of the generation now passing away, whose thorough love of their profession, and the intelligence they brought to bear on it made Philadelphia famou...
-Adolph Strauch
Probably not since the death of A. J. Downing has landscape gardening in America met with a greater loss than by the death of Mr. Adolph Strauch. He was a native of Prussia, born in 1822, 30th of Augu...
-New York Horticultural Society
This Society seems to be prospering beyond all anticipation. It has now over five hundred members, and numbers are continually being added. It is a pleasure to observe that the reports are now made de...
-Orchids
For the best six specimens, $10 and $5. First to Geo. E. Bennett, gardener to William White. In this lot the Masdevallia Lindenii, with four of its brilliant magenta-winged flowers, being very conspic...
-Mississippi Valley Horticultural Society
Of the recent meeting at New Orleans a correspondent says : \Ye had a splendid and valuable meeting of the Mississippi Valley Horticultural Society in New Orleans. February 21-24. Not the poorest fe...
-Growing Hedges
To grow a hedge successfully, a few matters of importance should receive careful attention. First, make choice of good plants, as uniform in size as may be, cutting off the tip of the tap-root, and th...
-Lawns
It is an old but a very true saying, that a smooth, closely-shaven lawn is the simplest and the loveliest element we can use in the adornment of our grounds. We may procure the choicest flowering plan...
-Raising Gladioli From Seed
It is no more trouble to raise Gladioli from seed than to raise the most common vegetable; with the simplest garden culture there is an almost absolute certainty of success. Prepare your bed in spring...
-Trapping Insects
Referring to insects which crawl up or down the trunks of trees, Mr. J. W. Manning tells the Mass. Horticultural Society: For tall elm trees, which cannot be reached with a syringe, printer's ink on ...
-New Crested Ferns
Those who keep a lookout for new varieties of native plants often find them in the woods. At a recent meeting of the German-town Horticultural Society an exhibitor had present a distinct variety of As...
-Andromeda Japonica
Flowering so early in the year as this shrub does, it is particularly welcome, and its flowers combine a delicacy of color with elegance of habit seen in no other Andromeda. In this country it usually...
-Magnolia Stellata
There are few hardy shrubs more beautiful than the present species, which was exhibited in beautiful condition by Messrs. Veitch two or three years ago. From a specimen furnished by that firm the figu...
-Rhododendrons Not Blooming
Greenhorn writes: I have a bed of six or seven Rhododendrons planted in a space of about 3 feet by 8 feet. They came from a nursery, in March of 1882. They bloomed magnificently last May and early...
-Spiraea Venusta
In Mr.Burgevin's paper reference is made to this spiraea, and a suggestion made that it is related to the well-known Queen of the Prairie Spiraea lobata. The writer was favored with a plant, through...
-Salvia Farinacea
Mr. Charles E. Parnell writes: Would you be so kind as to inform me, through the Monthly, if there is any difference between Salvia amabilis and S. farinacea? I purchased them as distinct varieties, ...
-Asphalt Walks
In answer to an inquiry about these, the following is appropriate: The Central-blatt der Bauverwaltung describes a patented composition made at a factory in Stargard, Pome-rania, which has for some y...
-Facts About Steam Heating
A great deal has been said in your columns about steam heating, and its advantages in all respects in heating greenhouses, over all methods. I thought I would give my own experience, it being more pra...
-Steam Heating
The numerous letters which reach us show the intense interest the subject has for those who have greenhouses to warm. Most of the objections to it made in the past are being removed. One of these obje...
-Greenhouse Decorations
This is a subject that we hear very little about, but one of very great importance to the appearance of a greenhouse. In what state do we generally find them? Plants put on the benches, apparently mor...
-Gloxinia Seed
To obtain strong plants for flowering early in the summer you must sow the seed near the end of January, or early in February. Sow in five or six inch pots, filled almost level with the rim with a mix...
-Camellia C. M. Hovey
This new variety fully sustains the high opinion which its American raisers had formed of it before it crossed the Atlantic. It is now pronounced by competent authorities to be without exception the f...
-Aphelandra Punctata
A pretty South American plant, in which is combined variegated J foliage and ornamental flowers. The erect stems I bear opposite elliptic acuminate leaves. The green mid-rib is conspicuous in the midd...
-Rose William Allan Richardson
We have already recorded the introduction of this rose in Europe, named in honor of Mr. W. Allan Richardson, the well-known horticulturist of Louisville, Kentucky. Mr. Schultheis tells the London Jour...
-Yellow Winter Blooming Carnation
The following card comes from a correspondent at Lancaster, Ohio. I send you per mail this day two blooms of a yellow carnation which originated with me from seed brought over from Germany two years...
-Seedling Geraniums
A. C, Baltimore, Md., writes: Please give me your opinion of two seedling geraniums which were raised by me from seed. The pink one was raised from Master Christine, and which 1 named Don Pedro. B...
-Heating A Small Plant Room Or Greenhouse
Mrs. S. K. D. M., Buffalo, N. Y., writes the following list of queries, to which we have already replied in a private letter; but insert here in the hope that correspondents will also give their vie...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Tomatoes
I quite agree with Mr. Hicks (page 82) in his remarks as to the value of the Acme tomato, and do not think that I shall cultivate it another season. I have from time to time cultivated most if ...
-Odorous Hedges For Fruit Gardens
And now comes Pyrus coronaria, better known as the sweet-scented crab, as a candidate for hedge favors. With every confidence in its sterling hedge-worthiness, I cheerfully recommend it, feeling satis...
-Poisons As Insect Remedies In Vegetables
In the April number of the Monthly, I notice a gentleman from Connecticut recommends hellebore as a certain remedy for the destruction of the caterpillar or slug on any plant; and seems to imply also ...
-Fruit Culture In Southern California
Physical Features The most strongly marked feature in the physical geography of the State of California are the chains of mountains that run parallel with the coast for hundreds of miles. There are t...
-Oranges
Oranges are hardier than lemons, and lemons are hardier than limes. They will all stand a good deal of frost, when at full bearing age, but cold weather causes a thick rind and a lack of juice, and in...
-Grapes
Vineyards are perhaps the most important form of fruit culture, and have the advantage of bearing sooner after planting than any other fruit. The red granite soil of California, and the hot cloudless ...
-Olives
Olives have the advantage over all other fruits in being longer lived, and an orchard once possessed is possessed for all time. Trees are now in full vigor which were planted many centuries ago. Those...
-Apricots
The apricot is one of the most profitable and reliable of fruits in California. In its culture there is this advantage, it is a practical monopoly of Middle and Southern California, for it does not su...
-Destroying The' Cabbage Caterpillar
There are plenty of methods of destroying the cabbage caterpillar, but most of them cost more than the cabbages are worth. A friend of ours employed a boy last year to kill them with a penknife, and t...
-Mr. Yeoman's Pear Orchard
The celebrated eight acres of dwarf pears at Walworth, New York, noticed in our pages years ago, still constitute a triumph in dwarf pear culture. According to a recent visit of a correspondent of the...
-Figs In The Old World
Mr. W. B. West, of Stockton, gives the following account to the Pacific Rural Press : The Smyrna fig remains upon the tree until it falls off of its own accord, which occurs when nearly cured. To c...
-Fruit In Mexico
Mr. John E. Russell, in an address before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, remarked that he did not think apples could be grown in Mexico, even on the Highlands. Peaches can be grown; he saw t...
-To Get Rid Of Rats
I shall be glad to give Plague a hint how to banish his rats. I lived twenty years in an old country house, and on three separate occasions I had an invasion of rats - not a single rat, but a colo...
-The Earliest Peaches South
Mr. William Watson writes: We had our first ripe peaches to-day, Alexander in the lead. Saunders, Wilder, Downing, Ey. Canada and other sorts, claimed to be earlier than Alexander, will not be in for...
-Ridding Gardens Of Moles
A lady whose garden is very much disturbed by moles, and who has not found traps a success for the destruction of the animals, wishes to know what can be done to abate the nuisance. Where traps fail, ...
-July, 1883. Forestry. Communications. Forest Fires
The necessity of devising methods for preventing the spread of forest fires cannot, with the growing demands of a larger population upon our forests, be longer safely neglected. The forest question ha...
-Forest Destruction In China
Writing to the London Garden, Mr. Maries says: Many grand trees and shrubs must have been completely lost by the unmerciful cutting and burning of all vegetation on the hills in China; none but the t...
-Lower California Botany
Dr. C. C. Parry is doing a good deal too, in the way of exploration of the Pacific coast. In the Spring of 1882, he made a journey into the peninsula of Lower California. Starting from San Diego, last...
-The Annual Insect Crop
It is worthy of note that on the first appearance of an insect in any locality, they seem to increase in great numbers from year to year; but after this the numbers every year seem about the same. Mr....
-Creeping Arums. Pothos Aurea
In our country we know plants of the Arum family chiefly from the Indian Turnip of our woods, or from the Richardia AEthiopica or calla lily of our greenhouses. In tropical countries they send out roo...
-A New Kentucky Coffee
One of the most interesting botanical facts is the close relationship of the Flora of the Eastern United States with that of Asia, a fact first brought prominently to notice by Dr. Asa Gray, and which...
-Bees And Honey
Mr. Thomas Meehan, in a note in the Bulletin, of the Torry Botanical Club, says : I find that the behavior of bees is governed by circumstances. When flowers are abundant they visit those only which...
-The Discoverer Of Beet Sugar
On the 7th of last August a century had elapsed since the death of Andreas Sigismund Marggraf, the discoverer of beet root sugar. He was born March 3, 1709, in Berlin, and died August 7, 1782. At that...
-The Art Which Produces A Cabbage
At a November meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences, of Philadelphia, Mr. Meehan exhibited a specimen of a cabbage which had, before blossoming, grown to the unusual height of three feet, the spi...
-Sunken Forests
In Neltnor's Grower, Mr. M. S. Hubbell states that Professor Teas, of Missouri, gives us an account of his visit to the sunken lands in Eastern Missouri. Hundreds of thousands of acres of dense forest...
-Concerning Figs
There are very many strange and inexplicable things in nature, and man is led by instinct or observation to do many acts which appear also to be strange and contradictory. This thought occurs upon rea...
-Our Tulip Tree In China
Mr. Maries says in the Garden: I continued on down the other side of the mountain into the valley to a large dilapidated temple, and with great difficulty obtained permission to live in it. The prie...
-Uses Of Structures
Much attention has been given of late to noting the behavior of plants and seeds in connection with what seems to be their own immediate good; and a free rein has been given to the imagination in purs...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Gardening In Kansas
I received your welcome Monthly for March, and found it full of interesting news. I gather from it that gardening in the East is advancing very much. Out here we are getting along nicely too, and alth...
-Character Of Nurserymen
An editorial on the death of a Rochester nurseryman, in the American Rural Home, has the following : As he was but a man he was liable to mistakes, but we do not believe that he ever intentionally d...
-Horticulture In Spain
Mr. Charles Joly continues his essays on horticulture, as at present, in different parts of the globe. Since his essays on the horticulture of England and of the United States, one on that of Spain ha...
-A Raid On The Silver Maple
In a recent address Dr. Warder says: And now in condemning the next tree and banishing it from the streets, another set of our good people will feel oppressed. The Nurseryman says : * * * ' The water...
-Enormous Fruit
There are pictures of a raspberry going the rounds which gives the fruit of an astounding size. It represents seven fruits, covering not merely the palm of the hand, but extending up to the upper join...
-Hot Water Circulation In The Olden Time
During a visit of the writer of this to the Isle of Wight, in 1877, the remains of an old Roman villa were being exhumed, near Newport. It had been covered by the gravitation of the soil during near t...
-The History Of The Amaryllis
In the Botanical Magazine it was an Amaryllis for a period of about thirty-five years. Then it became a Hippeastrum for a period of forty-five years. But in describing a splendid species, discovered i...
-History Of The Grape
In a review of Mr. Barron's recent book on the grape, the Gardeners' Chronicle says: In the first chapter we have an historical sketch, which we should prefer to have dispensed with. It would be rath...
-Cinchonas In The Cape De Verd Islands
Professor Henriquez, alluding to M. Van Gorkom's recently published treatise on Cinchonas (see p.84), informs us that in the Cape de Verd Islands, especially at St. Antao, and at St. Thome, where ther...
-Commencement Of Cultivation
The Gardeners' Chronicle says : Of the actual commencement of cultivation on a large scale little or nothing is known. A Fig is represented in the pyramids of Ghizeh, which have an antiquity estimat...
-W. G. Burk
Death has been busy of late among the correspondents of the Gardeners' Monthly. We have still another loss to deplore. Under the signature of B. or W. G. B., we have had many an interesting sketch fro...
-Systematic Census Of Australian Plants
By Baron Ferdinand Von .Mueller. Part 1st, Vasculares. Issued by the Government of Victoria at Melbourne. Bentham's Flora of Australia, is now the stand-dard work on Australian plants. But as in so m...
-Insects Injurious To Fruits
By Wm. Saunders, of London, Ontario. Philadelphia, published by J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1883. It was with much pleasure that we announced the preparation of this work some months ago, because from th...
-The Bee-Keepers' Manual
By Professor A. J. Cook, Lansing, Mich. Published by the author. A little boy remarked to the writer of this not long ago, that he thought the poor bee had a hard time of it, working from daylight to...
-Forestry
The Journal of Forestry has changed its title to simply Forestry, a commendable reform. Long names are abominable, especially to the hard worked editor, who is always anxious to give full credit to an...
-Frauds
Mr. A. Dohles, Waterloo, New York, writes: This morning I was visited by a man who represented himself to be a writer for the Gardeners' Monthly. He sat down in my room, wrote a lengthy article on my...
-Horticultural Societies. Communications. A Convention Of California Grape Growers
A few weeks ago three hundred viticulturists of Napa County, California, met in Napa city, and held a convention that seems to have been highly interesting. They first discussed preparation of the gro...
-August, 1883. Number 296. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Communications. Tropaeolum Canariensis
Your contributor who writes so interestingly Among the Flowers, refers to the above plant, better known as the Canary Bird flower. I am surprised to find him saying, I have not seen one of them in...
-The Eglantine Rose
The Eglantine Rose, so often mentioned in our American botanical works, appears to be different from what I remember it in England and France over forty years ago. The Eglantine, L'Eglantinier, has...
-Unworthy Novelties
It is very fortunate that our tastes differ, otherwise in horticulture our gardens would all be alike. We should all plant Kieffer Pears, and not have such poor sorts as Bartlett occupying valuable ro...
-The Perils Of Bee-Keeping
I am led sometimes to doubt whether the poetical parson, Dr. Watts, knew as much as he might have done about entomology, or as much as he ought about botany, when he exclaimed, How doth the little bu...
-Rose Sidonie
The French Journal des Roses does not wholly devote itself to new roses. In the October number it gives a colored plate of the beautiful old hybrid perpetual Sidonie, which to day is not surpassed by...
-Japan Maples
A report of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society says: Mr. Strong mentioned first the Japanese maples of the polymorphum type, which may be properly classed as shrubs. There can be but one opinio...
-Improved Hepaticas
We have occasionally referred to these as among the most desirable of our spring flowers, and they bear cultivation very well. There are several shades of color, and some with double flowers, mostly f...
-Pansies For Bedding
My neighbor, Mr. Beard, an enthusiastic horticulturist, grows the finest pansies that I have ever seen. A few months ago the Massachusetts Horticultural Society awarded him a silver medal for his pans...
-A White Daphne Gwenka
In regard to the discovery of the white variety of this in China, Mr. Maries tells the Garden: As I left Kuikiang and rambled along amongst the old graves and bushes on the roadside I noticed severa...
-Cultivating The Japan Lily
It is well known that of thousands of Japan lilies planted in this country annually few survive. The true reason has not been discovered. It has been thought that there was some delicacy of constituti...
-Clematis For Bedding
A. L. Siler, Hillsdale, Utah, writes: You may say to your Canadian correspondent that Clematis montana is the plant that he wants for a bedding plant; it is not a climber but a trailing plant, with ...
-Seedling Clematis
D. Smith, Newburgh, N. Y., writes: By post I this day send you a few flowers of my seedling Clematis, Mary, which I raised three years ago, and which I consider a decided acquisition. Plant, perfectl...
-Cercis Canadensis
I. S. C, New Jersey, writes: Inclosed I send you a twig of a tree that is on my grounds and which I do not know the name of. The tree is about fifteen years old, and is about twenty feet high. It is...
-Hot Water Better Than Steam Heating
Being deeply interested in anything that appertains to the heating or management of greenhouses, I have read closely and studied carefully the different articles submitted by your numerous corresponde...
-Remarks On Steam Heating
I have used steam for two winters in my greenhouses, in place of the hot-water system, which had furnished the heat for the previous twelve years; and if my experience will be a help to those who stil...
-The Manetti Rose
I know that the Gardeners' Monthly would never with intention mislead its readers; permit me, therefore, to make some corrections of the statements in your June number on the Manetti rose. Since the ...
-Heating Greenhouses
This is a subject of considerable interest to florists and greenhousemen. I have had a life experience with all kinds of heaters - from a forty-horse power, high pressure, steam boiler, down to a one ...
-Origin Of Modern Fashionable Floral Decorations
The English Court Journal says: To trace the advent of these elaborate decorations we must go back some fourteen years, when Sir Edward Scott had the first grand floral ball at his mansion in Grosven...
-Popular Love Of Flowers
A London paper says that any one who can remember the homes of the poor in London fifteen or twenty years ago in our back streets and slums will bear us out in saying that scarcely a flower-pot was ...
-Dipladenia Carissima
It is gratifying to note that amidst the rage for foliage plants those with handsome flowers are not forgotten. The tribe of Apocynaceae gives us many beautiful plants, usually with sweet, waxy flower...
-Begonia Weltoniensis
This is a plant eminently suited to the wants of amateurs, as it is of such easy culture and such excellent habit of growth that failure is well nigh impossible. And it is one of the very best of wind...
-Early Peaches Unsatisfactory
I am the owner of a small assortment of fruit trees, some peach trees among the rest, and I wish to relate how disappointed I have been with such early sorts as Alexander, for instance. 1 have a tree ...
-Hellebore For Destroying Insects
In the May number Reader, Berwyn, Pa., asks if hellebore is not dangerous to use on cabbages. In answer to that I say no; it gets only on the outer leaves and the next rain washes it off. I have use...
-An Economical Insecticide
I am using at the present time a decoction for the destruction of green and black aphides, thrips, and mealy bug on vines, which I find answers the end in view capitally, costs really nothing, and is ...
-Disease In Peach Trees In California
A correspondent from Chico, California, sends sample of diseased peach branches, unlike anything known in the East, and asks for information. It so happens that the editor has himself recently visited...
-Popular Strawberries
The display of strawberries at the June meeting of the Germantown Horticultural Society was an unusually large one. There were exhibited dishes of such sorts as Downer's Kentucky, Colfax, Kirkwood, Cu...
-The Currant Of Commerce
Most people who have given the matter a thought know that the currant of the grocer is a kind of grape, which grows in Greece, and differs from the ordinary grape in the fact that the berries are very...
-Hardy Raspberries
Every once in a while some variety is introduced, with the caution not to get that other variety over the way if you want something that is entirely hardy. The Turner was at one time the only genuine ...
-Preserving And Drying Fruits
Air. Charles Joly, of Paris, is doing inestimable service to the French people, by keeping them informed of what the rest of the world is doing, and by which they may profit. An address of his on the ...
-Fig Culture In California
At a recent meeting of the California Horticultural Society Mr. Rixford remarked that the Smyrna, he had heard, produces more than one crop, but it is only one crop (the second) which is used for dryi...
-Cucumbers In The Old World
We, in America, where vegetables of so many kinds can be had from nature for little more than the asking, can have no idea how much labor and skill has to be exercised before much can be had in any pa...
-The Sunflower As An Industrial Plant
It may not be generally known that the sunflower (Helianthus annuus), which has lately been brought into such notoriety by the aesthetic school, has considerable claims to attention from an industri...
-Quality Of Pears
The Revue Horticole intimates that the quality of a good pear depends in a great measure on the quality of the person who has charge of it. A fruit, worthless in one man's hands, may be first-rate in ...
-Bloomsdale Pearl Onion
D. Landreth & Sons, Philadelphia, write: We send you for examination three bulbs of Bloomsdale pearl onions grown in Mississippi from sets furnished by us. The sets were planted November 5th, and the ...
-Location And Quality In Timber
We noted recently that location had much to do with quality in the same species of timber tree. A correspondent of the London Garden writes of an English-grown American black walnut: You will note th...
-Fuel In China
A correspondent of the Gardeners' C/ironicle writing from the West River, in China, says that there are no natural woods left, except far up in the country, from whence enormous logs of China Fir a...
-A Large Water-Pitch Tree
The Lancaster Farmer says: A friend has handed us a description of a mammoth water-pitch tree, which stands in front of the dwelling of Mr. Jacob Sener, near this city, which may be designated as th...
-Value Of Locations In Timber Planting
It has been stated in an English paper that black walnut timber grown in the United States is worth four shillings {$I), and Canadian black walnut $1.25 per foot (cubic?) in Bristol, England, where th...
-Perfume From Acacia
As Acacia Farnesi-ana thrives very well in the Gulf States, the following floating newspaper paragraph may have some value to our readers there: Important in reference to their value in rural economy...
-Figures In Forestry Planting
More than anything else we need just now exact figures of the income from forestry planting, and we have much pleasure in giving from the pen of Mr. J. T. Allen to the Country Gentleman the following ...
-Timber On The Pacific Coast
Fir, pine, oak and cedar of unsurpassed quality and practically unlimited in quantity clothe the mountains, overhang the rivers, and shadow the plains of the Puget Sound district, Washington Ter. On a...
-Clearing Ground Of Stumps
We cut down trees, and then spend a great deal in blowing out or tearing out the stumps. A machine for taking down the trees, stumps and all, has been invented in Australia. Perhaps it would cost less...
-Relations Of Plants To National Prosperity. Abstract Of Lecture By Professor Roth-Rock, Fairmount Park
The lecturer began by a statement of the complications which arose in Virginia over the proportion of land to be devoted to corn and tobacco. This commenced before there was a Pilgrim on Massachusetts...
-On The Relations Of Heat To The Sexes Of Flowers
At the meeting of the Botanical section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, of Philadelphia, on April 9th, Mr. Thomas Meehan referred to his past communications to the Academy showing that in monaecio...
-Removing Tendrils From Grape Vines
It has from time immemorial been considered excellent practice to remove the tendrils from growing grape vines. It seems scarcely credible that a practice so universal with the best grape growers, and...
-An Interesting Arad. Anthurium
In our last we gave a sketch of a plant of the Arum family which climbed trees and walls. We now give, in contrast, one which does not climb at all - one from Central America, introduced by Mr. Wm. Bu...
-Favored Climates
We often hear of the cold inhospitable northern regions, and favored southern climates, where Nature does everything, and all man has to do is to lie on his back and let the generous harvest drop into...
-Variation Of Plants
The innate tendency of plants to vary, irrespective of any external influences, and of which so much has been made by those who look on this tendency to vary as the primary law in the evolution of new...
-Scraps And Queries. Biennial Flowering Of Native Orchids
J. M. writes: Will you allow me to inquire of the readers of the Monthly if any of them have observed a tendency in our native orchids to bloom profusely but every other year? Several years ago I w...
-Literature. Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Editorial Letter
Chinese Camp, Merced County, Cal., June 20. 1883. Editors are supposed to know everything - and, indeed, if they are sharp, they may learn much, and get into fair habits of imparting what they know. I...
-How I Spent An Hour At Lorillard's Rural Retreat
Although the season was far advanced, yet the blushing, sweet face of bonnie May was still smiling upon the vernal scene, made beautiful by her flowery presence in forest, field and garden. Momentary ...
-Champagne. Gathering The Champagne Grapes
The very interesting chapter on the grapes from which champagne is made, is given from the London Daily Telegraph : Within an easy distance of the town of Rheims, and connected with it by a convenien...
-To Intelligent Correspondents
The English Sparrow - Crow-foot. - What is the latest conclusion in regard to the English sparrow? Is it a grain eater, or an insectivorous bird? As a few of them have appeared in our vicinity, I am...
-The American Pomological Society
This body meets only biennially. The next session will be held in Philadelphia on the 12th, 13th and 14th of September, 1883. President Wilder is working hard to make this meeting one long to be reme...
-Denison, Texas, Horticultural Society
From the report of the spring meeting of the above named Society we extract the following useful information concerning grapes and peaches: To illustrate the comparative effects of rot upon differe...
-Michigan Horticultural Society - Twelfth Annual Report
T. H. Forster, Librarian, sends us the annual report for 1882. It is as full of information as it is possible for a work of this kind to be. There are reports of intelligent discussions on almost ever...
-Georgia State Horticultural Society - Eighth Annual Session
The Eighth Annual Session of this Society will be held in the City of Barnesville, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, August 1st, 2d and 3d, 1883. It is earnestly hoped that there will be a full attenda...
-September, 1883. Number 297. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Communications. A Few Rare Plants And Shrubs
It is interesting to watch the growth and development of new and rare plants, and every year I add some of these to my collection. In an article published July 1882, I mentioned two hardy shrubs that...
-Carpenteria Californica
This is an extremely rare shrub, even in its native habitat. It is a handsome shrub, the flowers being large, pure white, with yellow tipped stamens. The leaves are broadly lance-shaped, of thick text...
-Sietzia Brasiliensis
Sietzia Brasiliensis - this belongs to the ges-neriaceous class of plants, and is a very curious new plant with blue flowers beautifully spotted. A very attractive trailing plant, lovely for basket, w...
-Some July Blooming Perennials
Passing through my garden to-day, I was struck with the beauty of several yellow flowered perennials in bloom, and it occurred to me that much of the interest of our borders, in the month of July, com...
-Cornus Alternifolia
Possibly what I am about to say may not be news to the majority of your readers. I wish to say, what a beautiful ornamental shrub is the Cornus alternifolia, often called blue dogwood. The flowers are...
-Memorials
I think the conceit of planting memorial trees, a very pretty one. Would it not be still more interesting should the initial of the name of the tree correspond with the initial letter of the person's ...
-Clematis Coccinea
The scarlet flowering Clematis, Clematis coc-cinea, is a very handsome hardy herbaceous perennial climbing plant, belonging to the natural order Ranunculaceae. As the plant is a herbaceous one, the st...
-Culture Of The English Ivy
This famous classical plant thrives remarkably well in Virginia. The writer has seen churches and other old buildings in that State as beautifully covered as in the old world. Further south it is ofte...
-Improvement Of American Violets
The sweet-scented violet of Europe, Viola odorata, is far superior to any we have, in fragrance. Indeed, the few species like V. blanda, which have some fragrance, are not at all showy. In size and co...
-The Hackberry As A Street Tree
We are glad to encourage the planting of other trees than the common Silver Maple for street trees. It is the most unfit of all trees. It does very well for a half dozen years or so, but is too spraw...
-Winter Treatment Of Roses
Mr. J. B. Moore of Concord, is a famous Massachusetts Rose grower. He plants in rows, four feet apart, and tries to keep the ground clean and free from weeds, and in the fall to bank up the plants abo...
-Chinese Cemeteries
Mr. Maries tells us, in the Garden: I have told you elsewhere, about how the Chinese dispose of their dead at Shanghai. They are little better here at Kuikiang. Go where you will there are graveyards...
-The Best Time For Planting
At a recent meeting of the Germantown (Pa.) Horticultural Society, Joseph Meehan, in speaking of The Best Time to Transplant Trees,said in substance: This is not an easy question to answer. We may ...
-Garry A Elliptica
Very few of the beautiful plants of California thrive in the Eastern States, but there would probably be no difficulty in getting them to succeed further south. As gardening is now in a comparatively ...
-Bilbergia Thyrsoidea
The thyrse flowering Bilbergia (Bilbergia thyrs-oidea) is a very singular and attractive stove, or hot-house plant, belonging to the natural order, Bromeliaceae. Its native country is Brazil, where, i...
-The Draft Of Flues
I saw in the March number of the Monthly that trouble in starting fires in greenhouses with flues is not over yet. I had my share of it, too; but by the way I have my flues arranged now, trouble is no...
-Hints On New And Rare Plants, Etc
Besides new plants there are others which may be called rare because they are not frequently seen in collections, although, perhaps, introduced for several years, - because they have not been brought ...
-Merveille De Lyon Rose
We hear much about the rose Merveille de Lyon as a white Baroness Rothschild and I fear some misconception of its characteristics will result. Early in the spring I saw at one of our florists' very pe...
-How To Clean A Common Flue
While it is to me very interesting to read the pros and cons in favor of steam or hot water heating, I venture to give my How to Clean a Common Flue. In one house I heat with a flue. It is made in ...
-Adiantum Tetraphyllum Gracile
This beautiful Maiden-hair fern was sent by one of the collectors of Mr. Wm. Bull from the United States of Colombia. It is of moderate stature, and remarkable for the beautiful reddish tint assumed b...
-Todeas At Glasnevin
The house devoted to Filmy Ferns is in a well shaded position. It is not usually open to the public, as the delicate leaves would be easily injured, and cold draughts of air are especially hurtful to ...
-A High-Priced Rose Coming To Philadelphia
In a late number of the Gardeners' Chronicle is the following reference to a purchase of a new rose by a Philadelphia florist. We presume Mr. Evans, of Rowlandville, Phila., to be the purchaser referr...
-Insects
Dr. H. P. Walcott tells the Massachusetts Horticultural Society : The insect enemies of the chrysanthemum are the green aphis through the season, the black aphis later, the grasshopper and a root lous...
-Seedling Coleus
W. S. Johnston, Greenville, Pa., writes: I send you a sample of seedling coleus raised here. They are all good bedders. What do you think of them? I also enclose a bloom of a double Bouvardia. It is ...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. New Early Peaches
In September number of Gardeners' Monthly of 1882, I gave the result of my experience with new early peaches. From the crop this season I see no reason to change my views of the same, and therefore fe...
-Two Good Apples
The apple crop is a partial failure over this part of country, except the Krauser and Water apples. The Water apple is a great favorite here on account of its wonderful bearing qualities, and the beau...
-Philadelphia Market-Gardening And Seed Growing
Philadelphia is the Metropolitan City of a grand old State, one which not only furnishes all the anthracite coal and the best of iron to the sisterhood of States, but, according to the United States C...
-Success In Business
There can be no doubt but much of the failures in making fruit growing profitable, as well as in making profitable the various departments of the farm and garden, arises from the indifference to excel...
-The Californian Walnut
Attempts to cultivate this at Philadelphia have proved futile. It lives through some mild winters, but dies under the severer ones. Some grafted on the black walnut did better, but finally succumbed t...
-Variations In Pears
The Mt. Vernon pear was brought out by the Gardeners' Monthly. There could not possibly be fruit of superior quality than those submitted to the editor at that time. Yet there was the same experienc...
-Apples As Food
In a recent lecture, Dr. Nichols gave some results of analysis of apples, with a view to ascertain their great value as food, from which it appears that in a bushel of ripe Hubbardston Nonsuch there i...
-Crossing Pears
The probable crossing, by accident, of the common pear with the Chinese Sand Pear, which has given us the Le Conte and the Kieffer, only shows what may be done when we go deliberately to work to impro...
-York Imperial Apple
When a fruit once becomes widely scattered, it achieves popular favor, simply because people know no better. In the olden time, it was the fashion to take votes at Pomological meetings as to the best ...
-Ensilage In Mexico
The drawing of Mexico and the United States closer together than ever, by means of that iron bond of universal friendship, the railroad, renders everything our neighbors do of more than old-time inter...
-Brice's Early Peach
Chas. Black, Hights-town, writes: I send you a box of peaches - Brice's Early. They were picked from trees set two years ago the past spring, and had on about one-half bushel each; although they are...
-Black Birch
The Toronto Globe says: Black birch, which is rapidly coming in favor, is a close-grained and very handsome wood, and can be easily stained to resemble walnut exactly. It is just as easy to work, and...
-Fire Proof Paint
This is said to be prepared as follows : Twenty parts of finely pulverized glass, twenty parts of finely pulverized porcelain, twenty parts of any sort of stone in powder, ten parts of calcined lime, ...
-The White Pine
Respecting the white pine Professor Sargent says: The entire supply grow ing in the United States and ready for the axe, does not to-day greatly, if at all, exceed 80,000,-000,000 feet, and this est...
-Value Of Crooked Timber
When it is convenient to convey timber to places where ships are built, crooked timber is even more valuable than any other. But there are many uses for natural crooks on the farm. A bent timber a...
-The American Plane Or Sycamore Tree
At the Montreal Forestry Congress, Mr. Caldwell, of Cincinnati, said: The monarch of our forests is the sycamore tree. It is a rapid grower and not destroyed by insects. I am indebted to 'Zadok Cram...
-The Maple Sugar Crop
In reply to your correspondent's queries I would say: Yes, there is always sap in the trees, but certain conditions are necessary to make it flow. The principal requisites are freezing and thawing, bu...
-Effects Of Cross-Fertilization On Fruit
An opinion seems to be gaining converts among some careful observers of facts, which seems at first view to have a very narrow basis to rest upon, and indeed, quite at variance with all of our preconc...
-How The Young Plant Starts Into Life. Abstract Of Lecture By Prof. J. T. Rothrock, Fairmount Park
There are two kinds of young plants - those which are produced from a seed containing an embryo, and those which come from a spore which has no embryo. Young plants start in life from various position...
-Possible Impossibilities
It is interesting to note how many things once thought by intelligent people to be impossible, have nevertheless come to pass. It was once demonstrated to the entire satisfaction of mechanical enginee...
-Practical Diffusion Of Agricultural Science
An intelligent correspondent of the St. Louis Rural World remarks, that most farmers know that the persistent defoliation of a weed or a tree will result in death. Did they not so believe they would ...
-Camass1a Esculenta Var. Leichtlinii
Our Western Quamash, a pretty prairie bulb, has presented us with a new variety from the Pacific coast, of which the Botanical Magazine, after figuring, says: It was discovered by Mr. John Jeffrey ...
-Bad Setting Grapes
Self-fertilization is common, but it is not universal; for any one examining the flowers of vines will find that when the cap of petals falls off in the way described in books and the pollen is disper...
-Adaptation In Nature. Croton Cronstadtii
Of late years it has been the fashion among a class of ingenious minds, to see in every variety of form in nature, some reason derived from an innate necessity, why the form should be just so. It has...
-A Disease From Reeds
A curious affection has been occasionally met with in certain parts of France, especially in Provence, among reed workers, chiefly those who manipulate the stems of Arundo donax. A case at Frontignan ...
-Crossing Aquilegias
As Mr. Douglas has so far been successful in crossing Aquilegias can he not go a step farther and endeavour to cross the single white garden variety upon a chrysantha, in the hope of obtaining eventua...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Editorial Letters
At Ska, Pacific Ocean, July 3d, 1883. Water is one of the essentials of Horticulture. Wherever I have been in my travels, water has been the great question. If we only get rain enough - if too much ra...
-Under The Sashes And Under The Sod
Those who are supposed to know best about such matters as the writer frequently discusses in these pages are apt to dissuade lovers of floriculture, with less zeal than prompts your correspondent, fro...
-New Facts Wanted
It is often tiresome to wait for the ending of controversies, in horticultural papers. There is often so much written that it becomes confusing to decide which writer's views to take. The Monthly has ...
-Landscape Gardening Applied To Cemeteries
I have read, with deep regret, of the death of Mr. Adolph Strauch, of Cincinnati Garden, and Superintendent of the Spring Grove Cemetery since 1854, and to whose excellent taste and ski 1 its beauty, ...
-The Editor's Journey
The trip of the Editor to the west and north-west embracing in geographical lines some 12,000 miles, was a particularly delightful and instructive one, rendered still more pleasant by the kind attenti...
-Dr. John A. Warder
We were pained to learn on the return of the Editor from the West, of the death of Dr. John A. Warder, which occurred at his beautiful home at North Bend on the 15th of August. He was in his seventy-s...
-Astragalus Canariensis
Mr. Valentine Burgevin writes: It was probably through my own oversight that you substituted 'Tropaeolum canariensis' for 'Astragalus canariensis' in my essay 'Amongst the Flowers' which you were so...
-Rewarding Inventors
It is a great pity that only those who invent in mechanical affairs, can profit by a patent right. There are numerous valuable ideas that the world gets hold of, that are just as worthy of recognition...
-Select Plants For Industrial Culture
By Baron F. Von Mueller. We noted recently, that this very valuable work had been translated into German, in the old world. It is a pleasure to note that our own countrymen are not to be outdone by th...
-Nurserymen's Convention
The annual meeting of the Nurserymen's Convention was held at St. Louis this year. We were compelled to forego the pleasure of attending. From reports of the proceedings published in the papers, we ga...
-American Pomological Society - Nineteenth Session
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society having invited the American Pomological Society to hold its next meeting at Philadelphia, the undersigned give notice that the nineteenth session of this Nationa...
-A Visit To The National Soldiers' Home, Dayton, Ohio
In my visits to this most delightful and beautiful place, I have often wondered if there had been a description given of it in the Monthly; and have had it on my mind to write a short sketch for it, a...
-Planting In Suitable Positions
The formation of the root determines the nature of the material in which it will best grow. Nature has constructed roots in such a variety of ways, adapting one to firm substances, another to soft, so...
-The Pearl Tuberose
Ever since the Pearl Tuberose was introduced it has been spoken of in catalogues as superior in every respect to the old variety, and we readily admit that for flowering under glass, too much has not ...
-Notes On The September Number
Is Gynura aurantiaca really a hardy plant? I had supposed it to be something like the Coleus, in this respect. What a wonderful effect these violet hairs produce. The stem and leaves remind me strongl...
-Prunus Triloba
This pretty double pink dwarf plum was introduced by Mr. Robert Fortune from China in 1856, and named by Dr. Lindley in the Gardeners' Chronicle, Prunus triloba. It is now common in cultivation, but i...
-Azalea Mollis
Very fine varieties of this useful flowering shrub are now in bloom at Gras-mere, and amongst them I would single out Isa-belle Van Houtte, the flowers of which are very large, of a deep cream color, ...
-Large Sunflowers
W. C. B., West Philadelphia, says : Enclosed you will find a clipping from the Examiner of New York, describing a sunflower, the dimensions of which the paper seems to doubt. We have three large ...
-Hydrangea Paniculata Grandiflora
J. M., Philadelphia, writes: Besides the animals at the Philadelphia Zoological Garden the trees and shrubs are well worthy the attention of visitors. It has not been the case that common trees hav...
-Trees For Pleached Walks
S. W. N., Philadelphia, writes : Please inform me through your journal what kind of trees are most suitable in this country for a pleached walk, also any necessary information concerning the plant...
-Allantus Glandulosus
J. W., South Natick, Mass., writes: Will you please give me' the name of this tree? I send you leaves and fruit. The general appearance is that of Sumach. It is a very handsome tree at present. [...
-Preserving Roses During Winter
H. S. W., Cayuga, N. Y., writes : How can I successfully care for a lot of choice tea roses during winter? Have no greenhouse to transfer them to. Have had no success in protection by tying up. C...
-The Elm Beetle
An Elizabeth, N. J., correspondent says : I write you in a state of despair as to what I am to do to save from destruction a beautiful elm tree which we have in our garden. Every year regularly it h...
-Alsophila Australis
This plant, commonly called Australian Tree Fern, is deserving of special attention and care by cultivators. Good specimens of these ferns when well grown have a beautiful appearance. Their noble habi...
-Discussions On Steam Heating
As a partial response to Mr. Breitmeyer's article on Steam Heating, I would submit for your perusal a few extracts from a letter written by John Taylor, Esq., of Bayside, L. I., whose glass covers an ...
-Culture Of Perpetual Carnations In France
Their propagation is very easy. Young cuttings strike rapidly in a hot-house, on bottom heat during winter. When rooted and hardened for a short time in a pit, or a green-house, they can, in April or ...
-Eucharis
Alfred Ray, Esq., of this city, has dozens of large pots of the above lily in bloom; the most vigorous and healthy I ever saw. His moist heat and careful cultivation otherwise by Mr. Tait, gardener, h...
-Limiting The Sizes Of Flower Pots At Exhibitions
In your May number some remarks were made on the above topic. Thirty years ago in Scotland, the limiting of the sizes was practised and considered the best means of bringing out and testing the abilit...
-Stephanotis Floribunda
A well flowered specimen of Stephanotis is a sight well worth seeing, and still, how seldom do we see a really good specimen flowered as it should be? Its pure white waxy, sweet-scented flowers are al...
-Dracaena Goldieana
This magnificent ornamental foliage plant is one of the very finest of its genus. It is a native of western tropical Africa. Figured in the Gardener's Monthly, October, 1881, page 300. This remarkable...
-Notes From New Orleans
Herewith I send you some flowers of Hydrangea Otaxa, to see how they compare with those in Philadelphia; also two pieces of Bignonia, the names of which have been lost. The one in bloom is covered wit...
-Streptosolon Jamesoni
I wrote to you on the 5th and 10th of March, and to-day send you the drawing of a shrub,Streptosolon Jamesoni, recently introduced by Edward Andre from South America and propagated by Victor Lemoine, ...
-Schismatoglottis Longispatha
Leaf plants, continue to enjoy great popularity. The arum family has furnished a goodly number for the most fashionable lists. Here is another addition, with a new name for cultivators, though its rel...
-Gynura Aurantiaca
Gynura Aurantiaca - a hardy plant of such ornamental character as to allow of one's saying that it is not surpassed by any other plant of the same class. The stem and leaves are clothed their entire l...
-Trouble With A Tall Palm
G. G. A., Geneva, N. Y., writes: A friend has in his grounds an elegant palm (Seaforthea elegans) 14 to 16 feet high and thirteen or fourteen years old. The trunk is about six feet high above the ...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Apples In Mexico And Texas
In a recent number of the Gardeners' Monthly it is stated on the authority of some one that apples will not grow in Mexico. I have seen apples, and good apples, growing at El Paso, in Mexico, and hav...
-Random Notes
In a former communication to your excellent magazine I recommended as the proper application of manure, surface and plowed under. My reason for this was that vegetation might feed on it with the two s...
-Our Best Tomatoes
I have for several years been growing the best and newer varieties of tomatoes. I grow for market, and therefore have a good chance of knowing the most profitable and best selling kinds. The earliest ...
-Covering Strawberries In Winter
The strawberry is hardy. The roots will live through the severest winter, but it is generally believed that if the leaves are preserved through the season green until spring it is better for the crop ...
-Orange Culture In Florida
Budded Orange trees will begin to bear six years from transplanting and a Seedling in eight, but the trees do not arrive at full bearing under twenty years, yet they are profitable at ten. From fifty...
-American Blackberries In England
I see you say at page 520, last volume, that these do very well in this country, but I am inclined to think that the instances of their successful culture are few and far between. My experience of the...
-Packing Apples For Export
The London Garden says: In speaking to Mr. Walter Draper, of Covent Garden, the other day of the state of the packing of the enormous number of apples coming to us from America during the past seaso...
-How To Destroy The Cabbage Worm
A correspondent of the Fruit Recorder writing from Port Huron, Michigan, says that he commenced a series of experiments for the purpose of discovering something that would kill the worms and yet not b...
-The Vegetable Garden At Frogmore
We get very good vegetables and fruits in our markets, but these seldom compare with those raised by the deep culture of the spade or digging fork in an amateur's garden. We have thought it would be o...
-Growing Water-Cresses
Gardening Illustrated says : Watercress is a much valued herb, and, although it can hardly be said to be improved by cultivation - for the produce of a clear brook of spring water can hardly be exce...
-Red Pepper In Texas
Texas Siftings says : Almost every article of food used by the Mexicans has red pepper in it in some shape; and, not only Mexicans, but Americans use pepper freely, either in its ground form, sprink...
-Fruits In Kansas
A correspondent, under date of August 6th, from Chanute, Kan., writes, I have been in Kansas five years, three years where I now am, and have in that time raised five good crops of strawberries and g...
-A Prolific Grape Vine
Under date of Aug. 22d, Mr. Lorin Blodget, Philadelphia, writes: I have a remarkable grape vine, a Lindley, or Rogers' Hybrid, No. 9, planted in 1866. Grapes are now ripening on it a distance of thir...
-Cabbage Worm
B., Colora, Md., writes: My attention has been called this season to a grub of very small proportions infesting the young cabbage plants, or ground where the seed have been planted, and destroying...
-Precocity Of Peaches
Mr. Lorin Blodget, Philadelphia, says: My peaches are likely to fail in a year or two. They are ripening in August, when not due until late in September. The delicious 'Miss Percival' is very fine, b...
-Purple Peach
B., Colora, Md., writes : I send you a few lines on two subjects that may be of interest; if not, they need not be noticed. One is a Seedling Purple Peach - so I take it - growing by a roadside. Th...
-A Large Silver Fir
The following, says Mr. Robert Coupar in the Journal of Forestry, are the dimensions of a gigantic specimen of the Silver Fir which is growing within four hundred yards of Kinnaird Castle, Forfarshire...
-Forestry At St. Paul
In his address at St. Paul, Dr. Loring observed that in the East the natural condition of neglected farm land was to revert to forest growth, and the acreage of woodland increased under these conditio...
-Scraps And Queries. Duration Of Railroad Ties
An esteemed Western correspondent says: I picked up an arrow head in the nursery and that reminded me that I sent you one from Kansas that did not reach you, so I send this in place of it. If I recol...
-Fresh-Water Sponges
One purpose of this chapter is to give to the uninitiated some idea of the appearance of freshwater sponges; to suggest where they should be looked for and when it is best to collect them. It seems t...
-Explanation Of Cut
The accompanying figures are drawn from nature by the aid of the camera lucida and represent the relative sizes and shapes of like parts of several sponges. The statosphere is magnified about 35 times...
-The Study Of Sponges
We take pleasure in reproducing in this number the text and illustrative plate of a circular entitled Fresh-water Sponges, recently issued by Mr. Edward Potts, an active member of the Academy of Na...
-The Banded Rush
Mr. Nicholson finds this is not a rush (Juncus) at all, but a member of the Sedge family, Scirpus Tabernaemontani, the green form of which is indigenous to Britain as well as to Japan. The leaves are ...
-A Double Lilium Auratum
Mrs. M. D. Wellcome, of Yarmouth, Me., has a lily which has come double two successive seasons, and will no doubt prove to be a constant variety. Lilium auratum. A Monstrous Lilium Auratum Mr. L...
-Mysteries Of Evolution
Principal Dawson, in his Minneapolis address, makes a temperate, but powerful protest against modern views of evolution. He goes to the beginning and comes toward us, while those whom he antagonizes s...
-Pulpit Horticulture And Botany
Those who take a deep interest in Horticulture and the Natural Sciences, must have often smiled at pulpit efforts to illustrate remarks by references to such studies. The whole sermon is rendered ridi...
-Geographical Range Of The Bird's-Foot Violet
Mr. Samuel N. Watson, Red Wing, Minn., says : I notice a slight inaccuracy in your book 'Wayside Flowers,' and as I have so much enjoyed your delicate thoughts, I venture to acquaint you with a fact ...
-Flowers Out Of Season
L. B. C, Richmond, Ind., writes: In my yard stands an old dying cherry tree that has produced a few flowers during the past two weeks. I have often seen fruit-trees bloom in the fall, but in the mi...
-Tubers On Potato Plants
P. N. Mcl., Bookton, Ontario, writes: I send you, by mail to-day, the top of a potato plant in which part of the stem has become tubers or potatoes. As this is not a usual thing, a notice and descr...
-The Botany Of Texas
J. W., Houston, Texas, says: Can you recommend any work for the south-western flora of Texas? Mrs. Young's so-called ' Botany of Texas,' is absolutely worthless. Mrs. Young's book served a good p...
-Literature. Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Editorial Letters
Astoria, Oregon, July 31st, 1883. I was very much surprised at Alaska. In common with many other people in the East, I had come to look on the seven millions or so which the United States paid Russia...
-H. B. Ellwanger
While our readers had before them Mr. Ellwanger's paper on the Manetti rose, which appeared in our last issue, its talented young author was then on his death-bed. He had been down for some weeks with...
-Nomenclature Of Botany
Prof. A de Can-dolle, of Geneva, has published some new remarks on the Nomenclature of Botany. He was editor of the laws of Botanical Nomenclature adopted by the botanical Congress, International, o...
-University Gardens At Berkeley, California
There is much talk of government experimental grounds - but if our agricultural colleges had sufficient encouragement, the State colleges would answer every purpose desired. The State University at Be...
-Pomological Honors
Our friend, J. E. Mitchell, has reason to congratulate himself on receiving special honors at the late Pomological Convention in Philadelphia. In a circular issued, every man on the list is charged wi...
-Report Of Fruit-Growers Association Of Ontario For 1882
Printed by order of the Legislative Assembly. This body has no less than 1,839 members, which shows a wonderful interest in fruit-growing and the kindred arts and sciences in the Province of Ontario. ...
-The Naturalist's Field Club Bulletin Of Buffalo
No. 4 is before us, and seems to promise for the work a long and useful life. Botany has especial attention. There is an extended note on Aquilegia chrysantha, the yellow aquile-gia, showing that Gran...
-The Hand Book Of Tennessee
By A. W. Hawkins, Commissioner of Agriculture, published at Nashville, 1882. Tennessee has a Commissioner of Agriculture, and we suppose this very valuable work is issued at the expense of the State, ...
-Barry's Fruit Garden
By P. Barry. A new edition, revised and brought down to date, by the author. New York: Orange Judd Company. 1883. The march of knowledge about fruit, and especially in fruit culture, has been very gre...
-Sportsman's Gazetteer And General Guide
By Charles Hallock. New York: Orange Judd Co., publishers, 1883. We have received a copy of the above from Messrs. J. B. Lippincott & Co., and find it a handy reference to all things pertaining to leg...
-Dr. C. C. Parry
The demand for the beautiful new species of rose, Rosa minutifolia, has been so great in Europe that Dr. C. C. Parry has been induced to make another botanical excursion into Lower California, chiefly...
-The Germantown Telegraph
On the 1st of October this well-known Agricultural weekly passes from the ownership of Major P. R. Freas, to Henry W. Raymond, son of H. J. Raymond in years past editor of the New York Times. The Tele...
-President Wilder's Address. Rules Of Pomology
Gentlemen and Friends of the American Pomological Society: I still live, but I deeply regret a recent disability from which I may not recover in season to be present on this occasion. Yet ...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. In Memoriam
We this day enter on the duties of another biennial term, and while I most heartily congratulate you upon the growth and prosperity of our Society in its beneficent influence - on what it has accompli...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
In view of the meeting of the American Pomoldgical Society in Philadelphia this coming September, the horticulturists are making unusual efforts to render the visits of the pomologists profitable and ...
-American Pomological Society And The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
The Fifty-fourth Annual Exhibition will be held at Horticultural Hall, Broad Street, above Spruce, in connection with the nineteenth biennial session of the American Pomological Society, to open on Tu...
-November, 1883. Number 299. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
From now until spring, in various parts of the country, planting will be in order, and the best time to plant will hardly be a question any more this season. In southern latitudes spring has nearly ...
-Tropaeolum Canariensis
I see by recent issues of the Monthly that considerable has been said of late relative to the merits of Tropaeolum canadensis as a climbing plant, and as it is one that has been so often cultivated, w...
-Notes On Yuccas
I enclose a portion of a flowering branch of Hesperaloe yuccaefolia, which I have had to bloom every year since 1881. You may have seen it; if so it will not be new to you; but if you have not you sho...
-Clematis Disease
Clematises often suffer to such an extent, from granulated roots, that it is next to impossible to keep them living long. The appearance is exactly similar to that produced on the grape by the Phyllox...
-The Mist Tree
It is not generally known that the Mist tree, Rhus Cotinus, is to a great extent, a dioecious plant, and that it is the female only which has the beard, for which chiefly the plant is valued. Of late ...
-Grounds Of The Agricultural Department At Washington
Mr. W. F. Massey contributes an interesting sketch of these grounds, under the charge of Mr. Wm. Saunders, to the American Farmer, from which we learn that the glass structures were in their usual cle...
-The Creeping Hydrangea
This proves to be a very desirable addition of creeping plants - the number of which that will adhere to walls by creeping rootlets is not large. We have but the English ivy, Ampelopsis, Trumpet vine,...
-Acer Volxemi
If there were only enough of it what a grand tree for avenue planting or for town streets would be this maple. It is of robust habit and rapid growth. The foliage is like that of the Plane, but larger...
-Dahlia Queries
William F. Bassett, Ham-monton, N. J., says: If any of the readers of the Monthly have Dahlias Little Prince or Frank Smith, I would like to be informed of it. Little Prince is described as 'currant...
-Queries About Tree Management
S. N., New Jersey, wants to know; What time is best for trimming large limbs from white pines and fir trees to avoid bleeding them and injuring them? ' Can pines and first thirty feet hig...
-Daubentonia Tripetiana
Mr. Berckmans says: By this mail I send you a branch and flowers of Daubentonia Tripetiana, a hardy shrub which blooms here as early as June, from seed sown in March; and continues to give a profusio...
-Improving Lawns
W. H. W., Maiden, Mass., writes : Can you tell me how to eradicate from my lawn the coarse grasses? Last spring I had the lawn dug up, and eighteen inches of good soil put on it. It was then plent...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
There has been a great deal said about steam heating in our columns of late. It might seem, on the first thought, that this was only of interest to commercial florists who desire to erect houses on a ...
-Some Good Pot Plants
Rhododendron Fosterianum is one of the most magnificent of the genus I have seen. The flower measures about six inches across, beautiful clear white, with a dash of yellow on the upper petal, and very...
-Portlandia Grandiflora
Named in honor of the late Duchess of Portland, who was a great patron of gardening. This is a noble stove plant, with large, deep green foliage, and fine, pure white flowers, agreeably perfumed. They...
-Good Orchids In September
At the September meeting of the New York Horticultural Society the committee reported that the Orchids were extremly meritorious for the season, especially the Odontoglossum vexillarium, 2 spikes, 16 ...
-Orchids Of Easy Culture
Many hesitate to grow the beautiful tropical orchids, under the belief that they require expensive houses, and expensive skill to manage. This may be so of many kinds, but there are numbers which will...
-Panicum Plicatum
For those who are not overstocked with small palms, and wish for a plant with handsome and graceful foliage, I would recommend Panicum plicatum. It is a grass of the easiest culture, the usefulness of...
-Packing Cut Fowers
During a year I receive some hundreds of boxes of flowers from all parts of Europe, and in seven cases out of ten these flowers are completely ruined by being packed in dry cotton wool. Of all packing...
-Cattleya Mossae
A friend, who has just been making a little tour in Ireland, tells me of a remarkable specimen of this grand old orchid - a good variety, also, now bearing thirty-nine fully-expanded flowers, in one o...
-New Or Rare Plants. Croton Elegantissimus
Croton elegantissimus - We had about concluded that the work of introducing new Crotons would soon be perfect; there are already so many good ones. But the exhibition of the Pennsylvania Horticultural...
-Scraps And Queries. Names Of Plants
F. W. & Co., New Albany, Ind., write: We send by mail to-day a package, containing sample leaves of the following plants, of which we should be much pleased to have your opinion, through the Garden...
-November, 1883. Fruit And Vegetabie Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Among the numerous varieties of new fruits continually coming into market, it must puzzle the novice which to select. The raiser of novelties - as in the case of a grape introducer - whose card is bef...
-Destruction Of Insects
I have noticed of late, in your invaluable journal, there has been a good deal said about the destruction of animals and insects most annoying to the garden and farm, and having been, the greater part...
-An Inquiry Concerning Pear Blight
I recently saw an April number, 1878, of the Fruit Recorder, in which there is a quotation from the Gardeners' Monthly concerning the good as well as the destructive action of linseed oil upon pear tr...
-Good Strawberries
The strawberry correspondents of the various agricultural papers are out in full force with their observations during the past season. As a general rule, the favorites of the past two or three seasons...
-Cinchona
We have seen it stated that the government ought to take it in hand to encourage the cultivation of cinchona bark for quinine in our country, because they have been successfully grown in California....
-Grape Vines In City Yards
We give with this an illustration of a city yard grape vine, as grown by Mr. Lorin Blodget. We append the note of a friend who paid a recent visit to the vine : My visit to Mr. Blod-get's remarkable ...
-The Best Food For Dyspeptics
In the recently-published memoirs of General Dix, is an account of his visit- to Dr. Abernethy for advice on dyspepsia. The queer old doctor said to him : Sir, you are pretty far gone, and the wonder...
-Improved Horse-Shoes
Good hard roads are desirable to every pedestrian except horses. The softer it is, the better for the pedes of horses, unless it is too soft to bear the horse's weight. How to get good, hard roads...
-Root Disease In The Peach In California
A California correspondent writes : Although a stranger to you, I take the liberty to ask your assistance to determine the disease or malady affecting the peach roots, samples of which I send you. Th...
-Peach Trees In City Yards
For small city yards there are no more satisfactory fruits than peaches and grapes. We have occasionally noted the great success of Mr. Blodget, in a city yard in Philadelphia; especially in connectio...
-Vegetables In England And America
B.says: I notice in Gardeners' Monthly of August last, a brief review of the history of market gardening and seed growing, etc. in Philadelphia. I also saw in Gardener's Monthly, about a year ago, ...
-Seedling From Marie Louise Pear
Mr. D. W. Lathrop sends us a pear marked No. 1, raised from Marie Louise, which we cannot compliment more than by saying it has all the excellence of that variety when in its best condition. It is thi...
-Forestry. Communications. Beech Forests
I never saw land apparently better adapted to the growth of beech and chestnut trees than the bluffs along the western shore of Lake Michigan, from the Wisconsin line to within ten or fifteen miles of...
-Eucalyptus As A Febrifuge
The ease with which mere notions come to be regarded as true scientific deductions is the source of much trouble to those who desire to advance no further than solid facts warrant. The reputation the ...
-Yellow Pine
In this country it has come about that no one knows what he is reading about when yellow pine is referred to. A number of very different species are called yellow pine. White pine has, however, hi...
-Willows
In the discussions on forest culture, little is said of the willow, which forms a very interesting department. The white willow, Salix Candida, is often used for coarse work. S. Vinnu-natis and S. Rus...
-The Blue Gum In Florida
R. E. P., Jacksonville, Florida, writes: I notice in the Monthly for August you say, 'The Blue gum seems at home in Florida,' and add that one at Leesburg is ' twenty feet high, with trunks eighte...
-The White Spruce
W. U. K., Abingdcn, Va., writes: I send you by mail to-day a box containing cones and branches of an evergreen I find growing on the top of White Top Mountain, 5700 feet above sea-level; also a bal...
-Pinus Koraiensis Sieb. & Zucc
Through the kindness of Chief Engineer G. W. Melville, U. S. N., I have enjoyed an opportunity of studying some excellent specimens of this interesting species of pine, collected by him during the lat...
-Common Names Of Plants
The English magazines continue to discuss this subject, evidently misunderstanding the essential point of the question. For instance, in a recent issue of the Garden a correspondent triumphantly inqui...
-Hogs And Health
A curious lawsuit recently occurred in England. Some one wanted the hogpens of the poor removed, and the usual certificates of the doctors were to hand that hog-pens were very unhealthy. Legal advice ...
-Ravens In Alaska
While collecting plants on Wrangel Island, the Editor was surprised at the tameness of the shore ravens of that part of the world. They would sit on stumps and enjoy their meals of stale fish entirely...
-The Linnaea
Possibly no plant could more worthily commemorate the great Botanist than this modest little flower. Up to the time of Linnaeus it was supposed to be a campanula, but on his tour through Sweden, when ...
-Ferns Of The United States
Mr. Geo. E. Davenport has recently issued a table showing the distribution of ferns in the United States. The number of species so far described is 155. In distribution New York is the banner State, ...
-The Vanilla Bean In The United States
Few things give a better idea of the immense extent of the United States, than the fact that almost any vegetable product of the world will grow in some part of it. It now appears that we have the van...
-The Dwarf Almond
Mr. L. B. Case, Richmond, Ind., writes: During the past year or two I have often mused over the too-common (?) forms of double-flowering dwarf almonds in common cultivation; viz., the rose-colored an...
-Twining Of Vines
Constant Reader, Shoemakertown, Pa., asks: Would you be kind enough to give the reason why the Lima bean and the hop vine climb the pole in opposite directions? No doubt it would be interesting to ...
-Colors Of Flowers
The enclosed is clipped from an English paper, Public Opinion, of June 2, 1883, and D. W. thinks it may be used in your Gardeners' Monthly: 'Mr. Grant Allen, in his recently published work under ...
-Literature. Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Prohibition Of American Trees In Europe
By one of the last foreign mails our German correspondent sends us clippings from German papers, which we forwarded at once to the State Department in Washington, giving the Berne Convention (July ...
-Qualifications Of Gardeners
I read with much interest and satisfaction, in the August Monthly, page 232, Mr. H. B. Ell-wanger's remarks on the Manetti Rose. I have known of considerable use being made of the Manetti, in London n...
-A Visit To The Grounds Of C. L. Allen & Co
It was on the afternoon of a bright and pleasant summer day in the early part of August, that I found myself in the lovely little park that surrounds the railroad station at Garden City. A few days pr...
-Our Trip East
We started from - well, it would not interest the horticultural world to know where, so we will allow that to remain unknown. Our first stop was at Allegheny City, Pa., where we visited the Allegheny ...
-A School Of Horticulture At The West
Concluding his address at the Horticultural banquet in Philadelphia, Mr. Oliver Gibb, Jr., of Minnesota, said: One word more, Mr. President, and now I want the attention of the millionaires, as I see...
-The Discovery Of The Potato In Arizona
This is the title of a very pleasant paper in the Overland Monthly for May, by Mr. J. G. Lem-mon. Mr. and Mrs. Lemmon collected a quantity of the tubers of the native Solanum Fendleri and Solanum Jame...
-The Profits Of Misfortune
A funny paper gives the following : Miss Gushington (to young widow whose husband has left a large fortune) : That is the fourteenth mourning costume I have seen you wear in three days, and each l...
-Portrait Of J. J. Thomas
It always seemed to us scarcely fair that our most useful men should not know while living how much the rest of the world felt indebted to them. On this ground, we decided to give as an annual frontis...
-A Remarkable Post Office Law
Some time ago we received a large Public Document which, on opening, contained the stunning announcement that some dunderhead had sent us a letter without sufficient postage, and that if we sent the U...
-Mean Tricks In Trade
A lady receives a box of flowers which she ordered from a nurseryman, and finds therein a card telling her that though the flowers are very nice, she would have done better if she had gone to---------...
-Scratching For Worms
A jolly correspondent in the West writes: I am glad to see that your magazine, while teaching those who have made a little money how to get the most enjoyment out of horticulture for their spare cash...
-Colonel M. P. Wilder
Through temporary ailment, Col. Wilder was not able to preside at the recent meeting of the Pomological Society in Philadelphia, but his numerous friends will be glad to learn that he seems as active ...
-James Little Of Montreal
On the 2d of October, American Forestry lost an able friend, in James Little, who died at his residence near Montreal, in his 80th year. Mr. L. was born at Londonderry, in Ireland, but came to Canada ...
-Production Of New Fruits
It is now more than thirty years since I first called the attention of this Society to the great importance of producing fruit from seed, in order to originate and obtain such varieties as might be ad...
-Importance Of The Society
With the establishment of the American Pomological Society, a new era dawned on the science of fruit culture on this continent. The spirit that animated Van Mons, Knight, Noisette, Esperen, Bivort, an...
-December, 1883. Number 300. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
It is now twenty-six years ago since the Editor took pen in hand to prepare the first number of the Gardeners' Monthly. It has been a long term of very hard but very pleasant work. Large numbers of th...
-Carpet-Bedding At W. J. Gordon's, Glenville Park, Cleveland, O
There has appeared from time to time in the various horticultural journals a considerable share of adverse criticism with regard to the good taste of what is known as carpet or patchwork bedding. ...
-The Duthie Park, Aberdeen, Scotland
I send you an extract from the Evening Gazette, Aberdeen, Scotland, my native city, about the opening of a public park presented to that city by Miss Duthie, which it would be needless to say anythin...
-Hardy Aquatics
The grand show made at Fairmount Park and particularly the exquisite display made by E. D. Sturtevant at Horticultural Hall at the meeting in September, have shown people how much pleasure these beaut...
-City Forester In Boston
We do not know why Boston should be ashamed of the term gardener, but then even in ancient Athens, the people delighted to run after some new thing. However, in modern Athens the city gardener is call...
-Hovenia Dulcis
Though with a Linden-like leaf, and vigorous habit of growth, this is of the Buckthorn or Rhamnaceous family. It comes from Japan, and proves perfectly hardy. Mr. Brackenridge says of it: Rare, beau...
-Propagation Of Clematis
M. S. B., Portland, Oregon. A great many clematises seed very freely, and are then easily propagated. The seeds are sown as soon as ripe, if one has a greenhouse or cool pit, using a shallow box or...
-Hollies And Their Berries
S. M. C, Olney, 111., writes: Growing on my lawn are three American Hollies, one of which is fifteen feet high, also half a dozen Ilex verticillata; all of which bloom annually, the blossoms drop, ...
-December, 1883. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Some time since a good lady, fond of plants, and a good gardener besides, called the writer into her very successful little greenhouse, and somewhat in this wise did she lecture him : I don't know t...
-Window Gardening
The requirements for the successful management of window plants are neither numerous nor difficult; yet, as a rule, more disappointments and failures result than in any other branch of amateur gardeni...
-Dyeing Fresh Flowers
A London paper tells us that a bouquet recently carried by the Princess of Wales was remarkable. It was composed entirely of large lilies, tinted with the most delicate blue and pink hues by the absor...
-Swanley White Violet
This is a sport, having originated in Italy from the very popular and well-known Marie Louise. Hallock, Son & Thorpe have grown this for nearly two years, and say that it is in every way equal to its ...
-A Destructive Grub
E. Walker, New Albany, Ind., contributes the following interesting note: The past season I have noticed thrifty plants among our stock geraniums and verbenas in the open ground suddenly appear to bec...
-December, 1883. Fruit And Vegetarle Gardening. Seasonable Hints
For those who have time to do it, nothing pays better than an annual washing of the stems of fruit trees. It helps to keep the tree clear of dead bark, and that is an advantage in itself, and then it ...
-Caterpillars On Grape Vines
The article in the November number of your excellent monthly, headed Grape Vines in City Yards, reminded me of something that may be of interest to many of your readers, namely, How to get rid of t...
-A Good Summer Pear
I am often asked, which is the best early pear for amateur cultivation. I think the Doyenne d' Ete is. For a variety to succeed this, I would name Manning's Elizabeth, a variety which, in this vicinit...
-Grubs In Cauliflower Roots
I, perhaps, can throw a little light on the subject that B., of Colora, Md., writes about, and of which you say it is worthy of further investigation. Last summer I was losing some fine cauliflower...
-Salads
It has been suggested that early lettuce should be very carefully washed before eating. It is often forced in frames and watered with liquid manure, which is liable to get in among the leaves and rema...
-Best Apples In Eastern Penna
No experience from any one cultivator will tell the best apples for any one locality. Each one tells only of that which he knows. Others may know more. Still, these individual opinions are often a fai...
-The New Tuberous-Rooted Grape
This singular species has fruited in Italy, and the Bul-letino dello, R. S. Di Orticultura, gives a wood cut of the bunch and berry. The berries are nearly as large as the Clinton, and the bunch is fo...
-Wonderful Fruits
We have before us a circular describing Fay's Prolific currant, and giving a drawing thereof. The bunch is given as six inches long, the berries which show on one side of the bunch are 23, and, to be ...
-A Good Californian Pear
A Chico correspondent says : I send specimens of a promising seedling pear I discovered growing upon Rancho Chico this summer. It is evidently a seedling from Winter Nelis. The tree having the same i...
-A New Plum
The Gardeners' Chronicle says : Prunus Pissardi is certainly one of the most remarkably hardy shrubs in cultivation. We know of none which can in any way vie with it in the splendor of its intense re...
-Over-Bearing Kieffer Pears
Mr. William Parry writes: I saw in the Gardeners' Monthly a notice that, 'At the recent exhibition in Philadelphia, two, three and four year old trees were exhibited, on which had grown nearly a hal...
-Forcing Tomatoes
J. S. F., Wilmington, Delaware, writes: Would you please write an article in your Gardeners' Monthly on the culture of tomatoes in this latitude, under glass in winter season. There does not seem t...
-Forestry. Communications. American Forestry
Abstract of Lecture at Fairmount Park, Philadelphia. All things considered, the best timber the English Kingdom furnished was from the English oak. Its strength and durability had passed into proverb,...
-An American Forester Abroad
It is related in English journals that during his recent visit to Europe, Mr. Wm. Little, of Montreal, found himself on an excursion with the Scottish Arbori-cultural Society. It was desirable to clim...
-Beauty Of Yellow Pine
The Northwest Lumberman says: Yellow pine, hard finished in oil, is the rival in beauty of any wood that grows, not excepting the costliest hardwoods. It is susceptible of receiving and maintaining a...
-The Pepper Tree
The Schinus Molle, a Peruvian tree, thrives admirably in California. The editor saw trees as large as an average oak would grow in many parts of California. A very fine line of them along the public r...
-Longevity Of Trees
At the meeting of the Botanical Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences, of Philadelphia, Mr. Thomas Meehan remarked that there was nothing phenomenal in the great age of the mammoth Sequoias, as o...
-Suber-Cell
This is a technical term indicating the origin of the corky growths of vegetation. In the paper on Arizona potatoes, in the November number the compositor made it read tuber-cell, and though correct...
-Is Kalmia Poisonous?
Revue Horticole of August 16 gives a case where a mass of grass was mown and thrown out for goats, which ate thereof. Soon after the animals were taken by violent contractions of the stomach and vomit...
-The Leaves Of Marantas
On the upper part of the leaf-stalk of Maranta there is an articulation, and at this point the leaves rise and fall at stated periods in its daily life. This gives the genus a particular interest to t...
-Dead Wood On Trees
The editor of this magazine, stated in these columns some years ago that a dead branch on a tree makes almost as great a strain on the main plant for moisture as does a living one, and many of the pra...
-Epicures Among Birds
Birds and beasts have their epicurean tastes and will go through a good deal of labor for the sake of a very little titbit. In Australia there is a species of pigeon (Carpophaga spilorhoa) which feeds...
-Sheep-Killing Kalmia
It now having been clearly demonstrated by chemical analysis, as published in the Gardeners' Monthly, that there is no poison in the leaves of Kalmia, some other theory has to be guessed at, and a cor...
-Variety In Nature
Some attention is just now being paid in Europe to the singular circum-cumstance of almost identical variations from normal specific forms appearing simultaneously in widely separated localities. This...
-Battles Between Ants
Horticulturists have excellent opportunities to observe natural phenomena, denied to many others. Studies in ants are especially interesting. They fight like human beings, seeming to have their genera...
-Poisonous Kalmia
Now it is Dr. Zabriskie mentions to the editor of the Rural New Yorker a case in which a young lady ate a few leaves of the Kalmia latifolia (mountain laurel or calico bush) as she was passing through...
-The Holy Grass
Amongst the curiosities in Mr. Barlow's garden at Stakehill are some tufts of the rare holy grass (Hierochloe borealis), which may be considered a native of Britain, though only met with in a few stat...
-The Curl In The Peach Leaf
Most of the readers of the Gardeners' Monthly know that the curl in the peach leaf is caused by a fungus, what that fungus is, how it operates and how very injurious to the peach tree is its operation...
-Notes On The November Number
A. G., Cambridge, Massachusetts, says: Gardeners' Monthly, page 322. There is no Tropaeolum Canariensis, and the contradiction of terms between 'Canariensis,' which in English is ' of the Canaries,...
-Dog-Tooth Grass
Dr. Gerard writes : On page 340 of Gardeners' Monthly you remark that you would venture a guess that even our good friends of the Garden do not know what M. De-launay means by ' dog-tooth grass.' ...
-Distribution Of The White Spruce
A. M., Pittsburg, Pa., says : Referring to the letter of 'W. D. K.,' in your November number, permit me to add that I found magnificent specimens of the White (sometimes called Blue) Spruce on the...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. The $3750 Rose : Wm. Francis Bennett
I suppose that most of the readers of The Monthly have heard the story of Mr. Evans, of Philadelphia, having paid this large amount to Mr. Henry Bennett, of London, probably the largest amount that wa...
-The London Flower Seller
If the editor of the Gardeners' Monthly deems the enclosed - cut from an English newspaper - worthy a corner in his work, it may be to some reader a pleasing retrospect. Although it is over fifty year...
-The European Embargo On American Plants And Roots
In your remarks on this subject in the November Monthly you seem to deprecate the idea of retaliation. That seems to me to be the only way to bring the idiots who swayed the Berne Convention of July 4...
-John J. Thomas
(See frontispiece to the annual volume). In our botanical works we read of the corky white elm, Ulmus suberosa of Thomas, who first discovered, described and named it. This botanist was David Thomas, ...
-Government Officials
It seems very unfortunate that our government employs no one but ignoramuses or inefficients - at least in the opinion of those who succeed in following those gone before. For instance, in a governmen...
-Progress Of The Nursery Business
In spite of the serious depression in the nursery business a few years ago, caused by an immense overproduction and sales at low figures, which produced wide-spread bankruptcy, there has been a gradua...
-History Of The Camellia In America
With a colored plate of the beautiful crimson-scarlet variety, C. M. Hovey, the London Garden gives from the pen of Mr. Hovey the following reminiscences of the improvement of the camellia in America....
-Apple Butter
In almost every part of the world Schimmel is known in connection with apple butter and fruit preserving generally. This enormous business, like so many of great magnitude, began in a small way; a f...
-Vegetables At Wholesale And Retail
A correspondent sends us the following with the remark that it was sent to a Philadelphia paper, but no response came to his inquiry : I live in the country, over in New Jersey. I moved there to se...
-William Lobb
It is stated in horticultural biography that after collecting seeds in California he disappeared and no one knew what became of him. Dr. C. C. Parry has contributed a very interesting paper to the Ove...
-Charles F. Parker
The advantages which America offers over the old world, in the way of education, is in no way better shown than by the great interest manifested in the old world, when some poor man succeeds in doing ...
-Frederick Vervaene
The name of Ver-vaene is connected with so many well-known flowers under cultivation that the following note, which we find in a New York paper, will be interesting to many readers : One of the most...
-Montreal Horticultural Society - Eighth Annual Report
It is interesting to note by horticultural reports from different points of our great cosmopolitan parish, how different is the idea of horticulture in different parts thereof. In some parts the numbe...
-An Italian Exchange
Every country is having its especial Horticultural Magazine, either as an individual enterprise, or as the emanation of some public body. Before us we have the Bttlle-tino della R. Societa Toscana di ...
-Nuts Of Pinus Edulis
In Nevada these are a very desirable article of Indian food. Once in two years the nut crop is abundant, and in early days was the main reliance of the Indians for winter supplies. The work of gatheri...
-An Index Versus A Table Of Contents
Last year our publisher gave the Index free to the subscriber, instead of infringing on the usual thirty-two pages of reading matter. We have before us a letter from An Old Compiler, in praise of t...
-Addressed Envelopes
It is with the best intentions that persons send envelopes, stamped and addressed, when an answer may be expected. But it is a great bore to a busy man, who has scores of letters with every mail, and ...
-Chrysanthemum Shows
These are becoming popular autumn attractions. There was a fine one in Philadelphia during the first week in November. Those which obtained the premiums were sold to a leading clothing house, the pric...
-Philadelphia Fairmount Park - Azalea Miss Buist
Philadelphia Fairmount Park Philadel-phians cannot boast of the high condition of many of her public works, but they take comfort in considering that they get more for their money than people get els...
-Earliest Peaches In Texas - Oranges And The Weather In Florida
Earliest Peaches In Texas T. V. Munson says Musser and Ashby are the earliest. These are followed by Baker and Alexander, Wilder and Excelsior following. Hardy Apples In Ohio Judge Cheney, of Win...
-Portrait Of Mr. Barry - Our Present System Of Competing For Prizes
Portrait Of Mr. Barry A distinguished Western horticulturist writes: The portrait of friend Barry is excellent. He is certainly worthy of the honor you confer upon him. To him I owe my first lesson ...
-Rapid Growing Street Trees - A New Water Lily
Rapid Growing Street Trees It is a great mistake to choose the Silver Maple and different Poplars for street trees, merely because they grow fast. In a few years they are objectionable because they a...
-New Chinese Primula - Pocklington
New Chinese Primula The new Primula which Mr. Maries collected for Messrs. Veitch, at Tchang, will probably be useful for hybridizing purposes on account of its distinct habit; no other cultivated Pr...
-American Apples In England - Handsome Birds' Nests
American Apples In England The Garden says : The prospects were never more favorable for shipments from America to England than they are this year. The American apple trade, formerly monopolized by ...
-Pine From The Arctic Region - Euonymns Radicans
Pine From The Arctic Region Among the interesting souvenirs of the De Long Arctic Expedition, are some pine cones, which do not seem to be of the known American species. They have been placed in the ...
-The Lime Kiln System Of Heating - Budded Apple Stocks
The Lime Kiln System Of Heating Yes, just think of it to-day and what it was ten years ago ! We remember that system at the Marquis of Salisbury's, at Hatfield, and at the Glasgow nurseries, and else...
-Pines Of Mount Desert Island - Charles Crucknell
Pines Of Mount Desert Island A lady kindly sends us cones of the pines growing in that part of the country. They prove to be the common white pine, and the yellow or spruce pine, Pinus mitis. ...
-Inquiries From Correspondents - A Long Island Gingko Tree
Inquiries From Correspondents It is not unusual for correspondents to apologize for troubling the editor. The editor cannot write private letters to inquiries, except as a matter of personal busine...
-Bedding Clematis - Curcuma Roscoeana
Bedding Clematis A Canadian correspondent says : Those who have tried the clematis as a bedding plant, trained on the ground, will oblige me and many others if they will report their success through...
-Carnation From "L. W. E.," Poughkebpsie, N. Y - Lombardian Mulberry Trees
Carnation From L. W. E., Poughkebpsie, N. Y A seedling, said to be distinct in shade from all colors under cultivation, was sent to us, but packed in dry cotton, and so shrivelled that we could not...
-Valuable Seeds - Poplar Trees
Valuable Seeds Seeds of the most valuable varieties of Cinchona bring $1,000 per ounce in Ceylon. There are nearly 100,000 seeds in an ounce. Plants Of The Catskill Mountains Mr. Bicknell states ...
-Richardia Hastata - Profits Of Vegetable Culture In Texas
Richardia Hastata C. asks: Can you inform me of what country the yellow Calla Richardia hastata is a native of, and when and by whom introduced? [South Africa. - Ed. G. M.] A Striped Agrippina...
-The Largest American Trees - Acacia Filicina (Frilled)
The Largest American Trees The largest specimens of wood so far received by the New York Museum is a section of the white ash, which is forty-six inches in diameter and one hundred and eighty-two yea...
-Aescuius Parviflora - Objectionable Names For Fruits
Aescuius Parviflora This pretty species of Buckeye had not been reported as growing in Kansas until I found it in this county, where it is not uncommon. It is kept for sale in the eastern nurseries, ...
-Walter Elder - Rose Madam Gabriel Luizet
Walter Elder This well-known Philadelphia gardener and horticultural writer died on the 15th of March, somewhat unexpectedly, though advanced in years. He was a native of Scotland, and an enthusiasti...
-Rose Etoile De Lyon - The Cherry And La Versaillaise Currants
Rose Etoile De Lyon Specimens from Nanz & Neuner indicate that this beautiful yellow tea rose is fully the equal of Marechal Niel in beauty. A good tea of this character, but without the rampant and ...
-Barbed Wire Fences - Worcester County (Mass.) Horticultural Society - Transactions For 1883
Barbed Wire Fences These are known in England as steel wire hedges. Fruits And Vegetables At Charleston Charleston has engaged profitably in truck farming, a pursuit which was virtually unknown...
-The Scientific Angler - Double Abutilon
The Scientific Angler By the late David Foster. Edited by W. C. Harris. New York:-Orange Judd Company, 1883. Foster was the most celebrated of English fishers, and this work was originally the compi...
-Double Heliotrope - Expedition To Cape Horn
Double Heliotrope An Altoona, Pa., correspondent wants to know whether a double heliotrope which he has will be desirable. If truly double and as fragrant as the common we should regard it as a very ...
-Destruction Of Rare Native Plants - Plants For Names
Destruction Of Rare Native Plants Since travelling is so fashionable, and people can get to the most inaccessible spots of former times, rare plants are being everywhere destroyed. Societies for the ...
-Rose Triomphe D'Angers - Destroying Cabbage Worms
Rose Triomphe D'Angers At a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society Mr. Strong said that there is no rose so free flowering as the Triomphe d'Angers, or that would be so satisfactor...
-The Eucalyptus In Florida - Peaches In California
The Eucalyptus In Florida The Blue Gum seems at home in Florida. Trees at Leesburg are 20 feet high, with trunks 18 inches round, four years from the seed. Pity such a fast growing tree should give s...
-La Fameuse Apples - Value Of The Mesquite
La Fameuse Apples Though also with another French name, Pomme de Neige, is an American seedling. It is becoming as popular in the north of Europe as of America. Hardy Apples It is not frost merel...
-The Value Of Timber - Rosa Lucida Flore-Pleno
The Value Of Timber The Florida News pertinently asks and answers : What is timber worth? Nothing, unless your are near a saw-mill. The timber here is very fine, but thousands of acres are being cu...
-Picea Cephalonica - Amelia Peach
Picea Cephalonica This beautiful and comparatively hardy silver fir is a native of Cephal-onia, which is the largest of the Ionian Islands, some forty miles long by an average of fifteen wide. It is ...
-Martin's Amber Wheat - Mahogany
Martin's Amber Wheat J. L. D., Blooms-burg, Pa., sends a head of this wheat, which contained fifty-one very full and plump grains. English Gooseberries From Seed A correspondent inquires whethe...
-Echinocactus Sileri - Fine Tuberoses
Echinocactus Sileri Just before leaving home we had a cactus from A. L. Siler, which though with long mammae was evidently an Echinocactus, and which we could not identify with any described species....
-A Japan Quince - Heliotrope Roi Des Noirs
A Japan Quince Pyrus Japonica - picked on the ground of the writer was three inches long, eight and three-quarter inches in circumference, and weighed nearly seven ounces. It is not often that they a...
-The Curculio On The Pacific Coast - Tree Planting In The Isle Of Man
The Curculio On The Pacific Coast The Editor looked closely but could see no signs of the curculio anywhere on the other side of the Rocky Mountains. They seem to be marching westward, however. On so...
-Russian Mulberry - Trees By Mail
Russian Mulberry We have inquiries about this coming in once in a while, though we have several times told all we know of it. It is a variety of the morus alba, the common white or silk-worm Mulberry...
-Work Of Committees - The American Journal Of Forestry
Work Of Committees Very few people know of the vast amount of work which falls on the members of local committees, whenever any one or two bodies meet together. At the recent meeting of the American ...
-Aesculus Sinensis, Bunge - Kieffer Pears
Aesculus Sinensis, Bunge M. Lavallee recently showed specimens of this tree before the Central Horticultural Society of France, from China and from Japan. The tree is hardier than the common Horse Ch...
-Souhegan Raspberry - Podophyllum In Formosa
Souhegan Raspberry This is earlier than the Doolittle, and is a very good Black Cap. It has no gray bloom, as some have, and looks well to the eye. The Currant Borer This pest of the cultivator o...









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