books



previous page: The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V25 | by Thomas Meehan
  
page up: Gardening and Horticulture Books
  
next page: The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V27 | by Thomas Meehan

The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V26 | by Thomas Meehan



When is the best time to prune my overgrown bushes? asks a correspondent. The worst time to prune is just after the new growth has pushed for the season. It has been said, prune whenever the knife is sharp, but even this generally true remark does not hold good when a tree is covered with a mass of immature foliage. Nothing weakens a plant more than to be shorn at that time. In some parts of the country, vegetation will have pushed by the time this has reached our readers, but if pruning has been neglected, a thinning out of the branches, to induce a good shape, may be resorted to, if indeed such trimming may not be called a form of pruning...

TitleThe Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V26
AuthorThomas Meehan
PublisherCharles H. Marot
Year1884
Copyright1884, Charles H. Marot
AmazonFour-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long

Devoted To Horticulture, Arboriculture And Rural Affairs.

Edited By Thomas Meehan, Formerly Head Gardener to Caleb Cope, Esq., at Springbrook, and at the Bart-ram Botanic Garden near Philadelphia; Graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, (London,) England,. Member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Author of "American Hand-Book of Ornamental Trees." etc.

-The Gardeners' Monthly And Horticulturist. January, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 301. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
When is the best time to prune my overgrown bushes? asks a correspondent. The worst time to prune is just after the new growth has pushed for the season. It has been said, prune whenever the knife is ...
-Communications. Glimpses Of The Amazon, Nile And Other Rivers
When the botanist informs us that the number of Phaenogamous, or flowering plants, in the world is estimated at 95,620 species, we naturally feel amazed at the fact. And when the many thousands of Cry...
-Philadelphia Suburbs
In any attempt to give a description of the scenery in localities where it has been my pleasure to pass through, I know I should come far, very far, short in making the impressions that many writers h...
-January, 1884. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Editorial Notes
The Cotton Caterpillar - of Philadel-phians, which took the place of the measuring-worm on the trees of the public squares, after the introduction of the English sparrow, is the name given to the ca...
-Mosaic Flower-Beds
Wherever these can be looked down on from an elevation they have a beautiful effect in gardening, and it will long be before they get unpopular. The Italian Bulletin of Horticulture gives a sketch of ...
-A Paradise Of Gardening
What a grand place the South is for ornamental gardening. Among broad-leaved, hardy evergreens there are many which in the North are hot-house plants. Imagine what beauty there must be in a garden whi...
-New Hybrid Perpetual Rose - Marshall P. Wilder
This is one of the new roses of the late Mr. Ellwanger from seed of General Jacqueminot. According to Messrs. Ellwanger & Barry, it is of vigorous growth, with healthy foliage; flowers large, semi-glo...
-Statice Suworowi
Messrs. Haage & Schmidt, of Erfurt, send us a colored plate of a beautiful rosy-pink species, of which the following cut will show the habit. We have found the species generally to do remarkably well ...
-Andre Schwartz Rose
The rose, Andre Schwartz, so beautiful in colored plate, does not yet seem to equal Gen'l Jacqueminot nor to supersede it. I have yet to learn of a place where it has been at all a success, in gro...
-January, 1884. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
It was feared that the great taste for cut flowers which has developed of late years would materially interfere with plant cultivation by amateurs; but this has not been found the fact. It is now rare...
-Communications. Notes On Orchids
Seeing from time to time a few notes on the above in the Gardeners' Monthly I contribute a few additional. Oncidium ornithorhynchum has flowered here bearing four hundred of its rosy-lilac flowers. It...
-Skillful Culture Of The Chrysanthemum
The exhibition of Chrysanthemums at Horticultural Hall, Philadelphia, on the fifth and sixth of September seemed to have been a success. I was surprised to see so many plants there with flowers of eve...
-Cattleya Labiata Perceviliana
Any one who has read the English Floral Magazines for the last year or so, must have noticed the varied comments on this new species or variety of Cattleya. Some have described it in the most glowing ...
-Hand Bouquets
What size should a ladies' hand-bouquet be? is a question often asked, but never satisfactorily answered. It would not be difficult to reply to if simple taste alone decided the point, but it is one o...
-Mourning Flowers
Curious indeed is the part which flowers are made to play in our ceremonialism; but if they have been held essential to the proper observance of the marriage rites, when joy is supposed to reign trium...
-Nepenthes Northiana
Still come new additions to the singularly curious and beautiful family of East Indian Pitcher plants. We gave last year an illustration of a remarkable one sent out by Messrs. Veitch & Sons, of Chels...
-New Tea Rose - Rosalie
Ellwanger & Barry say this was raised by them from seed of the Marie Van Houtte, and has been tested in their houses for some time. It is of slender yet healthy growth; foliage small, dark green; flow...
-Keeping Window Plants Clear Ok Insects
M. A. B. well remarks: I believe that most of the trouble with insects on window plants comes from neglecting the great motto of the good housekeeper that a stitch in time saves nine.' It should be...
-Order Of Ripening Of 35 Varieties Of Grapes At Dennison, Texas
I find that the Champion is three to five days the earliest of any variety yet tested, little rot, very vigorous and productive, black, poor quality, about like Hartford, but sells, bringing from fift...
-Water-Cress In Winter
Some remarks of the Editor on a quotation from an English paper on the growth of cress induces me to offer a few remarks on the same subject. Water-cress, as a salad, is not as much appreciated as it ...
-The Need Of Popular Knowledge
Your remarks in September number upon, rewarding inventors, ought to give rise to some serious thoughts. A man invents a machine, takes out a patent for it, sells it, and is rewarded according to i...
-Bacteria And Pear Blight
It was an agreeable surprise to find my inquiry concerning the application of linseed oil upon pear trees in the Gardeners' Monthly of October turn out so encouragingly, and undoubtedly many of your r...
-Late Cherries
Several years ago when enquiring at a nursery for a couple of Early Richmond or pie cherry trees to plant, I was asked by the foreman why I did not plant the English Morello in preference to the other...
-Growing One's Own Vegetables
It is often urged that it does not pay the owner of a small garden to grow vegetables or most kinds of fruits, because the large market growers can grow them cheaply. They cost less in the market than...
-Tomatoes To Stakes
At this season when trimming trees, remember that peas and tomatoes will thank you to remember them. Twice the crop can be obtained from peas on stakes than from peas which trail on the ground, or fro...
-Menocher's Coreless Apple
This apple produces no seeds, in fact is without core. It was fully described in our volume for 1874. It has been introduced into France and is now exciting great interest there. It is distributed as ...
-The European Bird Cherry As A Stock
Professor Budd says in a recent issue of the Bulletin of the Iowa Agricultural College, that Cerasus Padus is the universally used cherry stock for the northern steppes where grafting is practised, ...
-The Sha-Lee Pear
The statement started recklessly in some paper that the Keiffer is only the Sha-lee or Chinese Sand pear of old, it seems too silly to contradict. If such contradiction were neccessary a recent letter...
-Japan Persimmons
Mr. P. J. Berckmans, Augusta, Ga., writes: By express, to-day, I send you a box containing four varieties of Diospyros Kaki. Some may be ripe on arrival; if not, they will be in eating order shortly....
-Forestry. Natural Soil For Plants
From observation of the growth of many of our native trees and plants I am inclined to sustain the opinion expressed by R. D. in his notes on the Beech Forests of Illinois. We find many forest trees,...
-Choice Of Soil By Trees
I believe your correspondent R. D. is quite right in his conclusion that beech and chestnut will not grow - at least to any advantage - upon limestone soils. In this part of Pennsylvania (Centre Co...
-The Eucalyptus As Fire-Wood
There are conflicting views of the value of this wood. It has been stated in these columns that it is not even fit for fuel; but we like to give all sides of every question as long as there is any unc...
-Trees Of An Age To Bear Seeds
Ed. G. M.: A nursery of hard wood trees is always on hand ready for use, and the cones, or burrs of the Scotch fir tree, which there takes the place of our pine, are gathered, and the seed extracted...
-Natural History And Science. Notes From Prof. J. G. Lemmon
Many thanks for the pleasant allusion in the Monthly for November, to my Academy article on the Arizona Potato, and more especially for the kind yet just reproof following it. In all my search, which ...
-Vegetable Cells
One of the most important discoveries and generalizations of modern times, is the fact that all organic beings, in all their parts, are composed of small, and in many cases, of infinitessimal vesicles...
-A New Potato - Solanum Ohrondtt
While Mr. and Mrs. Lemraon are so successfully introducing the tuberous-rooted species of potato of Arizona to culture, the French have fallen on what appears to be an entirely new species, which M. C...
-Bees Eating Grapes
It has been clearly demonstrated by Australian experience that the honey bee can open flowers from outside as well as the humble-bee in this country. We have never had any doubt ourselves that they do...
-Exacum Affine
Most Americans know the Fringed Gentian, familiar to them as botanists, or as lovers of Bryant's charming poetry. This will give a good idea of the family of gentianaceae. That has a regular tubular f...
-Tropaeolum Peregrinum
A. G., Cambridge, Mass., writes: I find no evidence that the Tropasolum, cultivated under the name of Canary Bird flower, was first received into the English gardens from the Canary Islands. The e...
-Stellaria Aquatica
William Frederick, Jenkintown, Pa., writes: There is a weed on my lawn I do not know how to get rid of. It is impossible to weed it, as it grows the same as chickweed, and has a white flower and flow...
-Literature. Travels And Personal Notes. Communications
From an old Magazine. ines on the Ulex Europaeus, More Generally Known as the Furze. EXTRACTED BY W. T. HARDING. Let Burns and old Chauser write The praise of the daisy to sing - Let Wordsworth of ...
-Landscape Gardening Applied To Cemeteries
The September number of the Gardeners' Monthly contained a short article upon the merits of Adolph Strauch's claim to be regarded as the originator of the landscape lawn system for cemeteries in Ameri...
-Contributions To American Botany To May 1883
Pleasant enough is the discovery of a new species to the ardent collector, but it must be an aggravation to the systematic botanist who would like to arrange the full Flora of a country while he is ab...
-The Phylloxera Confederation
The German horticultural journals are beginning to growl loudly about the Berne confederation. Sieboldia says no one can understand the terms of agreement. The Belgian papers style the affair a very s...
-Currants
The currant of the grocers is a grape known as the Corinth, from which the name currant is derived. It has no seeds. If it had seeds the berries would probably be double the size. At least in our ordi...
-Scented Or Rose Geraniums
Three species at least are in popular cultivation under this name, viz.: P. graveolens, P. quercifolium, and P. capita-turn. The first of these is the one most frequently met with; it has long-stalked...
-Alexander Mcintosh Of Cleveland
With this gentleman passes away another of the older race of American nurserymen whose useful lives honored the profession. He pitched his tent in Cleveland nearly half a century ago, and grew up with...
-The Southern Cultivator
The Southern States have not many agricultural magazines, perhaps because the few admirable ones like the Southern Cultivator cover all the ground. It is now published by J. R. Harrison & Co., Atlanta...
-Catalogue Of Orchids
We often have requests to notice catalogues, but on account of the immense number of excellent ones which come to our table we have, for want of space, to limit ourselves to cases where some special p...
-Floral Designs At The New York Horticultural Society's December Meeting
A premium was offered for an original design of cut flowers, and it was awarded to Mr. A. LeMouet. It represented a flower garden, with a balloon arising therefrom, with the words off on a tour upon...
-American Pomological Society
At the re-1 cent meeting held in Philadelphia, Mr. J. B. Rogers, of New Jersey, made the following motion which was unanimously adopted: That the Secretary of this Society be instructed, at an early ...
-February, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 302. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In those parts of the Union where frost is over, February is the great planting month, but do not plant immediately after the frost leaves the soil; wait till it dries a little, when you can tread the...
-Communications. Ipomcea Noctiphiton
This is one of the most remarkable and interesting climbing plants that ever came under my notice. It has the honor, if honor it be, of bearing two or three names, and certainly isdeserving of them m...
-Troubles With Roses
In reply to my complaint about roses, you very finely imply that it was not so much the fault of the roses, probably, as of the cultivator, that one-third at least, of each lot, died. Now, when I set ...
-Tuberous-Rooted Begonias
I was almost discouraged last spring from trying the tuberous-rooted Begonias by the accounts I had of the poor success prominent professional gardeners had in flowering them, but remembering my own a...
-On Pruning Coniferous Trees
I have often thought of writing a short article on pruning coniferous trees, seeing that you answer questions as how to treat old trees, and how to tie up the leaders so as to get the trees again symm...
-Plants, Beds And Borders
A gardener when he first enters his profession docs so with the full intention of making himself conversant with his trade in all its branches, but after a short time his attention gets attached to ce...
-Barbed Wire In Live Hedges
We are pleased to note that the suggestion made in times past to plant something with barbed wire hedges so as to hold the wires when the posts rot away, thus combining barbed wire and live fencing, r...
-Exhibition Roses
The recent exhibition of the National Rose Society, held at South Kensington, England, was said to be a grand feast of roses, upwards of six thousand blooms being shown. In the nurserymen's class for ...
-Destruction Of The Mole
Mr. T. Bennett, of Trenton, N. J., who by his sensible papers on the destruction of vermin, shows that he has given close attention to, and thoroughly understands his subject, tells us that he has dis...
-Seedling Mimulus
E. Hippard, Youngstown, Ohio, writes: I have two Mimulus moschatus seedlings. One is identical with tigrinus, flower and foliage; a very strong musky odor and stands the sun very well, much better th...
-Verbena Imperatrice Eugenie
V. asks: Do you know whether or not Verbena Imperatrice Eugenie is in cultivation at the present time, and if so, where can it be procured? [This refers to the small creeping form of Verbena inci...
-February, 1884. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
If plants in pots have not had the soil soured by over-watering, under bad drainage, or otherwise become sickly, say through attacks of insects or very bad treatment, they may be kept in pots for year...
-Communications. Tea Rose Etoile De Lyon
One of my New York correspondents wrote to me some time ago, The much vaunted Tea Etoile de Lyon in now pronounced by all the best American florists as worthless or at least very inferior in all resp...
-The Richardia From Seed
It may interest some of the readers of the Gardeners' Monthly to know how readily the Rich-ardia alba maculata can be grown from seed. Last summer I allowed one bloom of the Rich-ardia to remain, for...
-Cattleyas And Laelias
In looking over a diary that I have kept for some years, in which I have noted the time of blooming and length of time that the blooms of various orchids lasted, my attention was drawn to the wonderfu...
-Scented Geraniums By E. S. Miller
Please inform V in answer to his inquiry in the January number of Monthly, that Verbena Imperatrice Eugenie is still in cultivation, and if he will send me his address I will send him a plant. I was...
-Franciscea
The excellent Franciscea, Franciscea exima, is a very beautiful evergreen stove or warm greenhouse shrub belonging to the natural order Scroph-ulariacaea. It is a native of Brazil, where it was found ...
-Barkerii Skinnerii Superbum
This orchid has seven spikes of bloom with me now, December 20th, the largest of which has nineteen flowers and the head of bloom is about seven inches in length. The color is a beautiful dark, rosy p...
-Mahonia Aquifolia
A couple of years ago a Cincinnati correspondent called attention in the Gardeners' Monthly to the great value of the leaves of Mahonia for floral decoration. Very little use seems to have been made o...
-Attending Fires In Cold Weather
We have from time to time called attention to the value of thought and careful observation in the management of furnaces. Not long since we saw a case where a gardener thought his hot water pipes had ...
-Begonia Florida Incomparabilis
According to Messrs. Haage & Schmidt, its introducers, this is a cross between B. semperflorens rosea and B. Schmidti, combining the good qualities of both parents. On account of its great profusion o...
-Dieffenbachia Splendens
A striking plant of great beauty, remarkable for the lustre of its coloring. The stem is faintly mottled with dark and light green. The leaves have a thick ivorywhite mid-rib, and the ground color is ...
-Roses And Bedding Plants
Mrs. J. G. M., Buffalo, N. Y., writes: Your valuable magazine is a most welcome visitor in our household. I do not know what we should do without it. The only trouble with it is, that it offers so...
-Flowering Of Young Century Plants
Mr. Jacob Hoffner tells a Cincinnati paper: Last year (1881) I saw in St. Augustine, Florida, several century plants which had flowered during the summer, and some of the flower stalks (while young a...
-A Beautiful Variegated Begonia
Some variegated plants are beautiful, but on the whole there is a good deal of sameness among them, and it is a pleasure to note any departure from this monotony. One of the most beautiful of these de...
-February, 1884. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Pruning of fruit trees, when required, should be proceeded with at favorable opportunities. We write when required - for in our climate, more injury is done by the knife than by the neglect to use i...
-Communications. To Kill Grubs At The Roots Of Cabbage Or Cauliflower
I am happy to say that through the result of my former investigations I am enabled to throw a little more light on the subject inquired after by two or three of your correspondents, namely - grub-worm...
-Pyrethrums In California
Just now the culture of the Pyrethrums is attracting considerable attention here, not so much as an article of export, but to supply the home demand. Owing to the difficulty experienced in procuring s...
-Strawberries In New Hampshire
For many years the Wilson Albany has been the ' leading market berry in our state, but of late other varieties have been introduced and are gradually taking the place of that old standard. If I were a...
-Wearing Out Of Varieties
Mr. B. Perley Poore says in American Cultivator of the wearing out of varieties: I will not undertake to dispute it. I never dispute anything when I can help it, and often swallow assertions which I...
-Pears As Cattle Feed
The editor of the Country Gentlemen says: The Buffum is the finest and most symmetrical grower of all the pears, and is exceedingly productive, but the best return which the writer of these remarks h...
-The Coming Potato
In the old world they are raging on improved potatoes. There, as here, they are fond of getting for speakers on great occasions some great man, whose chief claim as an orator for the occasion is the g...
-To Destroy Cabbage Worms
Mr. E. L. Stur-tevant director of the experimental farm at Geneva, New York, says that an emulsion composed of one ounce of common yellow hard soap, one pint of kerosene oil, and one and one-half gall...
-Praising New Fruits
A correspondent protests against our endeavors to injure a new fruit, because we objected to extravagant praise of it. We do not repeat the name of the fruit in question, because the answer will ap...
-Names Of Pears
A. B. Baker, Poughkeepsie, New York, sent us last September, a box of pears for name, desiring answer through the Gardeners' Monthly. As the replies would scarcely be of interest to any one but our co...
-Forestry. Beech Wood By L. C. Diedrichsen
Seeing that in the November number of your valuable and always welcome Monthly one of your correspondents complains of his want of success with the cultivation of the beech tree, I hope it will not be...
-Wood Of Salix Cordata, Variety Vestita
I send you by this mail, a small bit of wood, Salix cordata, var. vestita, showing its durable characteristic. In spring, 1867, I put out a line of Osage hedge. I cut some green willow poles, of small...
-Range Of The White Spruce
Your comments on the Beech Tree do not help me out of my dilemma at all, and do not seem to have been understood. The trees will grow here, for awhile, but grow poorly, and soon die out; but no matter...
-Forestry In Dakota
While the Editor was passing across the continent last year he visited the much talked of forest plantations of the Northern Pacific Railroad, and was amazed at what he saw. It was evidently the same ...
-Queries About Nut Trees
S. A. W., New York, writes: I notice that a discussion on nuts is being carried on in some of the weekly agricultural papers. Thus far, however, little real light has been shed upon some moot point...
-Natural History And Science. In Search Of Cactuses
In the following paper I will try and give the readers of the Gardeners' Monthly a short history of the wandering of a cactus collector in the spring of 1883. Crossing the rim of the great basin on th...
-The Jewish Citron
In looking over the last number of the Gardeners' Monthly, and from among the many interesting subjects my attention was called to the remarks on the Jewish Citron, in which I could not fail to reco...
-Hybrid Sarracenias
There was a time when naturalists believed that hybrids were sterile, and therefore hybridity had no influence in any question connected with the origin of species. When it was found that they were by...
-Rainfall Of The Last Ten Years In The Atlantic Portion Of The United States
A paper on the average rainfall of the last ten years has appeared from the Signal Service Department at Washington. Our rains come from the vapor which rises under the warm suns over the Gulf of Mexi...
-Dosoris - Residence Of C. A. Dana, Near Glen Cove, Long Island
This remarkable place can be reached from Hunter's Point by the Long Island Railroad in about 1)4 hours. \)4 hours by railroad to Glen Cove, and 1 1/2 hours by horse power to Dosoris. It is a small is...
-Horticultural Impostors
Every year the country is canvassed by agents selling trees; some no doubt are honest, but a great many are first-class frauds, not only charging enormous prices for their something extraordinary, but...
-Recollections Of A Ramble To Sudbury Park, Derbyshire, Eng., 1881
A delightful ramble of some six miles from Barton, through the winding green lanes, among scattered clumps of furze, whin, or gorse, Ulex Europasus, and the wiry-looking green broom, Genista scoparius...
-Introduction Of American Plants To Europe
We learn from a New York correspondent that a German nobleman of considerable influence undertook to get from America a large collection of American ornamental trees, and took all the precautions desi...
-The Honey Locust
Boston has and deserves the credit of never forgetting the credit due to those who serve her. But this good trait sometimes leads to curious results. A recent discussion on hedges before the Mass. Hor...
-Life: Its Duration In Plants
Plant-life may be considered under three general denominations. Some species are annual, or rather semiannual, living from spring only to the close of the autumn of the same year; others are biennial,...
-Introduction Of The Peen-To Peach Into The United States
The Florida Dispatch referring to the first tree of the Peen-to peach grown in the United States, says: The tree was raised from seed obtained from Australia by P. J. Berckmans, of Augusta, Ga.; but...
-Proceedings Of The Georgia State Horticultural Society
Eighth annual meeting at Barnesville. This publication contains, among other valuable chapters, a list of fruits which are adapted to the climate and soil of the state, on the plan of that adopted by ...
-A New Desk Tool
Did any one ever stop to consider how much the world owes to those who invent little things ? What is so nice as a ruler on one's desk ? But the old round ruler was always rolling when it should be at...
-Chrysanthemums At Philadelphia And New York
It is a pleasure to me to be able to furnish you with some particulars about the chrysanthemums as shown in New York the past season; also to supplement the remarks of Mr. Wooding, relating to growing...
-Horticultural Societies
There has been considerable discussion in England over horticultural societies, their management, and the judgment given by the judges at them. A few remarks about our own on this side of the ocean ma...
-Chrysanthemums
Apropos of the remarks on these, page 8: Wal-cott, Woods, Atkinson, and other champion exhibitors use young plants, that is, those under one year old, and the above named at any rate, plants that had ...
-Editorial Notes. Fertilizing Moss
E. A. Caswell, New York City, writes Jan. 9th: Answering your enquiry concerning the competitive trial between moss-grown and earth plants, permit me to say that two premiums were offered by the N. Y...
-March, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 303. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In preparing hints for the month, we have found more difficulty about March than about any other month in the year. We never forget that our readers extend from the St. Lawrence to the Gulf of Mexico,...
-Experimental Notes
The advent of the spring catalogues has jogged my memory. We are on the eve of another battle and I have never reported the last engagement. And, although it may look suspiciously like a last-year's b...
-Cemetery Flowers
For a few years I have grown some Desmodiums in the cemetery and at my home. I find them to be entirely hardy; and, as good bloomers, they have few equals. The D. Japonicum is white, and its branches ...
-Garden Beauty
Something new occasionally is needed to keep up high public favor in plants and flowers; but old favorites continue in every summer garden, and, in windows in winter, we see many of the more old fashi...
-The Maple Borer
Mr. Wm. Saunders, of London, who has recentiy been re-elected president of the Entomological Society of Ontario, says, that the Maple Egerian, known also as the legged maple borer,AEgeria acerni, ha...
-Rheum Collinianum
We think of the rhubarb as a coarse plant and not much adapted to ornamentation, but some of the species are remarkably attractive, and such we presume will be a new one under this name introduced by ...
-Violet, New York
Under this name they have a violet in England which is thus described by the Journal of Horticulture: New York is freer in growth than Maria Louise. The plant forms a more compact tuft, does not for...
-Orchids In February
The lengthening days of February will put the orchid grower again in activity, as every care must be taken and plants watched that are starting to grow. Most of the Dendrobiums will be breaking freely...
-Cementing Plant Benches
When I rebuilt a portion of my greenhouses five years ago, experience had taught me the ne- j cessity of providing something more permanent than ordinary boarding for the benches, as it is well-known ...
-Dracaena Goldieana In Flower
It may be interesting to many of the readers of the Gardeners' Monthly, to know that this plant has flowered with D. Fergusson & Sons. We have never seen or heard of its flowering before. The plant co...
-Budding Roses For Winter Blooming
Many slow growing roses may be made to grow vigorously and bloom well by budding them on strong stocks. Such sorts as Niphetos, Perle des Jardins, and Marechal Niel do best on the Bank-siana. It must ...
-Vriesia Speciosa
The showy Vriesia speciosa is a very singular stove or warm greenhouse plant belonging to the natural order Bromeliaceae. It is a plant having the general appearance of a Bilbergia, which it strikingl...
-Excelsior Fumigator
Most florists know how necessary, and yet how annoying, is the fumigating department. But there has been a great advance during the few past years. In the writer's time, the operator had to rush into ...
-Orchid Blocks And Pans
Some of the fascination attendant on orchid growing comes from the fact of their being air plants. Their growth on blocks and in baskets is so different from other plants that they attract by their ve...
-Tea Rose, Sunset
A committee of the New York Horticultural Society says of this: Ten roses of this new variety were shown in fair condition, going to prove it must at once take a foremost position as one of the very ...
-Growing Violets
J. D., New York, writes: I am about to attempt raising violets on a large scale, and I hardly know what way to raise them. Some tell me to use nothing but cold frames, as there is little expense wi...
-Propagation Of Ferns
Subscriber, Philadelphia, writes: I like the article in December number on ' Propagating Clematis,' I think if you would treat other plants the same it would be of interest to a great many. I shoul...
-Treatment Of Chinese Hibiscus
Wm. M., Philadelphia, writes: As a subscriber to your magazine, I write for information in regard to the care and treatment of greenhouse varieties of Hibiscus. I have a few large plants.both singl...
-Glazing Greenhouses
F. B. Smith, Danville, 111., asks: Which is the best way to glaze a greenhouse? Should the glass be butted up, or should it be lapped? [ Some attempts have been made to glaze by butting the edge of...
-March, 1884. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
No matter how carefully one may proceed in the selection of varieties of fruit trees, there is always an element of chance which no forethought can overcome. Location, soil or other circumstances have...
-Communications. Mushrooms
The mushroom is a very scarce vegetable in our markets, except for a very short season, and it is a great pity for it is a great luxury. Few people seem to have acquired a taste for it, perhaps from ...
-Water Cresses
I don't think Mr. Balderston need regard as so mysterious the growing of water cresses. Water cress is grown by us Montrealers without the aid of spring water or running brook. We simply stick it in i...
-Growing The Japan Persimmon In Tubs
I can hardly write so as to be read, from failure of sight and nervousness, but I wish to inform you of the success of growing the Japan persimmon in tubs, as many people grow orange trees. My small s...
-Note On An Experiment With Native Potatoes
Within the past year, tubers, collected in Arizona in the fall of 1882, have been sent out to various applicants by Mr. J. G. Lemmon, of Oakland, California. We planted seven of these little potatoes ...
-Lengthy And Harsh Names For Fruits
Among all the sinners against propriety the French are perhaps the greatest. Mr. Barry in his recent Presidential address remarked: Quite recently I had some correspondence with the editor of a leadi...
-Peach Trees In Sod
A Maryland correspondent says he has a peach tree on a lawn which is kept closely mown, which is perfectly healthy and bears large crops of fruit annually, while all his orchard trees have long since ...
-Forestry. Chestnut On Limestone
I have just been reading an article in the Gardeners' Monthly, written by Prof. Buckhout, which has rather surprised me a little. It relates to the choice of soil by trees, and states that chestnuts w...
-Chestnut Trees In Limestone Soils
I think your correspondent in a recent issue is in error in the assumption that beech and chestnut thrive only on soils of other than limestone formation. The fertility and recuperative capacity of th...
-Chestnut And Beech On Limestone
The discussion of the Choice of soil by trees is of interest to me, and as facts are desired, I would state that here in Rush county, Ind., the soil is strong limestone, and the water is hard. Th...
-Forestry In Scotland
Were all the facts known regarding the raising of forest trees in Scotland, it would appear that in no country is the subject better understood, and nowhere is greater interest manifested in all that ...
-The Value Of Timber Planting
Mr. Isaac Collins communicates the following to the Hay-ward Journal: The very large yield of fuel material from twenty acres of Stratton's Eucalyptus grove in Castro Valley may be of some use to Ca...
-Natural History And Science. About The Arizona Potatoes
Whew ! A new potato from South America! Identical, perhaps, with one which turns up among the tubers we brought from Arizona. Prof. E. G. Mumford writes from Portlandville, N. Y., November 26th, 1883 ...
-Pear Blight And Peach Yellows Studied In A Remedial Way Upon A Bacterial Basis
From the outline given in my previous paper on Bacteria it will not be necessary to recapitulate, beyond reminding your readers that it is a well-established fact that Bacteria pervades the universe; ...
-The Potato Fungus And Its Allies
Prof. Farlow continues his useful labors among fungi destructive to vegetation. He has contributed to the Botanical Gazette a. list of all the fungi allied to the Perenospora infestans.the well-known ...
-Wilbrandia Drastica
When the young student of natural history sees a cucumber or a cantaloupe, he gets a fair idea of what the natural order of cucurbitaceae is like. But there are cases where general aspect would fail t...
-Apparent Waste In Nature
In his Montreal address Mr. Meehan says: We discover nothing in the behavior of plants to indicate that they are actuated by individual good further than may be necessary to enable them to fall in w...
-Favorable Conditions For The Migration Of Weeds
It has recently been noted by a correspondent of the Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club that a large proportion of introduced or common weeds are distasteful to cattle, and that their wide distribu...
-Change Of Sex In Strawberry Plants
At a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society Mr. J. B. Moore reported that the Wilder strawberry inherits from the Hovey the tendency to produce sterile plants. He went through his b...
-Honeysuckle Apple
Jonathan Primrose wants to know the botanical name of the shrub that produces the fruit which is known throughout New England as Honeysuckle apple. It ripens I think in June, is very sweet and delici...
-Varieties Of Mahogany
N. C. B., West Philadelphia, asks: Are the Mahoganies, Sweit-enia, popularly known as Cuban, San Domingo, Brazilian, Tabasco, and Honduras, different species or local names of the same species? I h...
-The Season In England
A correspondent writing from Kent, England, under date of January 21 st, says: Our winter is very different from yours. We have had no frost yet Mignonette and stocks are still in bloom. Wallflowers,...
-Poison Kalmia
Inquirer wants to know why, in spite of well known and recorded facts, we still insist that the Kalmia is not poisonous. It is singular that what we have written about this plant should provoke so m...
-Artemisia Stelleriana
Mr. David Gindra, Poughkeepsie, N, Y., sends the following correction, which we are glad to have: I am sure the Gardeners' Monthly does not want to make a mistake in the nomenclature of plants, but t...
-The Snow Plant Of The Sierras
A lady living in Washoe Valley, Nevada, who is an excellent observer of nature and has communicated to the Editor many original observations, has been watching the Sarcodes sanguinea for some years, a...
-Some Persian Fruits
I have copied the enclosed notice of Persian fruits from a recent work on Persia,* by Mr. C. J. Wills, an English surgeon who spent some time in that country and who has given an agreeable and instruc...
-Exaggerating New Things
I have several times lately had occasion to recall and pass round a reminiscence of some twenty or more years back, which has been again recalled by your remarks upon page 48 of the Gardeners' Monthly...
-Editorial Letter From Harrisburg
Summer travel has its advocates and friends, but to our mind few experiences are more enjoyable than a long ride on a genuine winter's day. It was a great pleasure to meet with friends at the recent m...
-Census Reports
A census if reliable would be very desirable, but it is the reverse with one which is found worthless. It is extremely likely that after the immense amount of money spent by the United States on this ...
-Dr. Geo. Engelmann
Only a few days ago the writer has a line from this eminent botanist, in which he said, I am not as well as I was on the ocean - but better than I was at Cambridge, so I ought not to complain. Send ...
-The English Flower Garden
By Wm. Robinson, Editor of the Garden, & c., London: John Murray; New York: Scribner & Welford. The indefatigable Mr. Robinson has issued many beautiful and useful works, but probably and one which w...
-First Appearance Of The Yellows In The Peach
A correspondent inquires when the yellows made its first appearance in this country and where? We cannot answer him. No doubt it was in existence long before public attention was called to it, and bef...
-The Chrysanthemums At The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society Exhibition
In the January number of the Gardeners' Monthly I notice an article on the skilful culture of the chrysanthemum by Mr. John Wooding. I was certainly very much surprised to see that Mr. Wooding had mad...
-Chrysanthemum Shows In Boston
In your January number, page 8, referring to the culture of the chrysanthemum, you say: It is reported that at the New York show they had a plant five feet in circumference. It would interest many o...
-An International Exhibition Of Fruits
The first Monday in December 1884 an exhibition, to continue six months, will be opened in New Orleans, and it is proposed to make pomology an especial object of interest in the exhibition. Mr. Parker...
-Pennsylvania State Horticultural Society
The annual meeting of the State Society will be held at Harrisburg on the third Wednesday in January (16th and 17th). Orders for excursion tickets can be had on application to E. B. Engle, Chambersbur...
-Mr. Wilder On Nomenclature
Boston says: 'I notice that Mr. Wilder in his last address before the American Pomological Society, has deprecated the use of long and vulgar names for new fruits and plants, and instances, among o...
-April, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 304. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
When King James undertook to write a book against the use of tobacco, no doubt many loyal people thought smoking would soon be a habit of the past, but still people smoke and chew to a degree which mu...
-Communications. Rose Culture
Since reading of Mr. Beecher's troubles with roses it has occured to me that, despite the apparent tramping of the ground, the trouble might arise from its not having properly settled. It takes dirt s...
-Enemies Of Cultivated Aquatic Plants
The conditions which I recommend for successfully growing tropical aquatics (i. e., still, warm water, and a rich compost) favor the growth of a low form of vegetable life called confervae, or green s...
-Hardy Roses
In answer to Mrs. J. G. M., of Buffalo, for fifteen hardy roses, I would name the following: Hybrid Perpetuals: Alfred Colomb, Antonie Mou-ton, Auguste Mie, Beauty of Waltham, Caroline de Sansal, Ge...
-Preparation Of Soil And Planting
If well rotted manure is spaded in on good soil it is all that is necessary; but if there is no objection to the expense, the method given on page 34 by the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher can hardly be impro...
-The Culture Of Roses
Having cultivated roses in the open air, and under glass, for more than thirty years, I note with some interest Mr. Beecher's trouble. My own experience has shown me that roses are peculiar, in respon...
-Artistic Use Of A Weeping Beech
People are so accustomed to the little stumpy plants of weeping trees, as they are grafted on a few feet height of stems, fit for packing in a dealer's box, that they have no conception of what pretty...
-A Rare Immortelle, Gnaphalium Decurrens
Among perennial herbaceous plants those which will furnish ornaments for parlor vases during the winter season, in the shape of Immortelles, are very desirable. We give here a sketch of one introduced...
-Caryopterus Mastacanthus
A good blue-flowered, hardy shrub is very desirable. The Garden has a wood-cut of this plant, with the following account: It is a native of China and has been recently introduced to this country by M...
-Roses For Buffalo, N. Y
Mrs. M. notes: I did not want fifteen climbers, but five climbers and fifteen of other sorts. The climbers I have had experience with at my seashore home in Massachusetts were, Baltimore Belle and...
-The Confederate Rose
E. J. W., Rat Portage, Manitoba, Can., writes: I clip the following from the Toronto (Can.) Globe of Feb. 16: 'The ' Confederate rose ' is the name of a new flower which is white in the morning ...
-Rose, Etoile De Lyon
Mr. A Wintzer, West Grove, Pa., writes: I send you by this morning's mail two blooms of the rose, Etoile de Lyon. I am afraid they may be out of condition, as they have been in bloom the past two da...
-April, 1884. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
What to do with pot plants in the summer is often a question. The great majority of plants do much better in the open air than under glass. It is found by experience that many do much better when take...
-Communications. The Wm. Francis Bennett Rose
This was produced by Mr. Henry Bennett, the successful pedigree rose grower at his nurseries at Shepperton, Walton-on-the-Thames, London, England. Mr. Bennett hybridizes roses on strictly scientific...
-Setting Glass
The time will come all too soon when the unhappy florist, forced by approaching winter, begins to busy himself with working in his glass. Last winter the writer had occasion to glaze a greenhouse duri...
-Cool-House Orchids
There is no other class of plants deserving of so much comment in a popular periodical as that of the cool-house orchids; because there are many species of this class that deserve a much wider cultiva...
-Seedling Begonia
I noticed last summer a number of Begonia seedlings which I planted, as they were crosses between semperflorens rosea and Schmidti. I have it now in bloom with a white flower slightly tinged pink,...
-The Floral Embellishments Of A State Dinner
A Washington paper says: The state dinner given Feb. 14th by the President was named for half-past seven, but it was not until eight o'clock that the party left the East room, where they were receive...
-Phalaenopsis Schilleriana
Of the February meeting of the New York Horticultural Society, its Secretary says: We shall not attempt to enumerate the many notable exhibits, a full list of which will be found in the report of our...
-Nepenthes Mastersiana
We gave in our Natural History column for February, some account of one of the curious East Indian pitcher plants, both as a matter of interest to all lovers of flowers, as well as of interest to thos...
-Azalea, Miss Buist
One of the last of the many beautiful new plants raised or introduced by the late Robert Buist, was this azalea, named by him for his daughter Miss Helen. The stock was disposed of to an English flori...
-Bouvardia Scabra
This novelty is an exceedingly attractive and pretty species, and one of the handsomest of the genus. It is a valuable acquisition as a decorative plant at this season of the year - the flowers, which...
-The January Temperature At Saratoga, N. Y
Mr. Terwilliger says: From observations made at the Terwilliger South street greenhouses during the month of January, 1884, the following interesting table has been compiled: Jan..... 1 ...
-April, 1884. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Why the sap ascends in trees is yet a mystery. All attempts to solve it by mechanical or chemical laws have failed. At one time we think we have it when some good man talks to us about what he calls ...
-Notes On Nut Trees
I noticed in February number of the Monthly some interesting queries and notes on nut trees, and I wish to add one more in regard to the English walnut, and more especially the Praepar-turiens. I have...
-Peaches Under Glass
If you think the following mode of growing and forcing standard peach trees under glass worthy of publication you are welcome to it. It may be of interest to some of your amateur readers. It was new w...
-Cultivation Of Osiers
In Onondaga county, Central New York, the basket willow is cultivated and manufactured on a large scale, and is, in fact, a leading industry. The cultivation is increasing very rapidly, and is a great...
-Apple Notes From Montreal
As I have seen from time to time several valuable hints from your pen, you would confer a favor on me and a number of my neighbors if you would prescribe a cure for the spot (mildew) on our Fameuse ap...
-Fraudulent Packing In Apples
Not long since we copied from the Garden a statement that while the Canadians did honest packing, American apples came with the best fruit only on top of the barrel. It appears now that the Canadians ...
-Heights Of Peas
We think, as a general rule, those peas which are tall enough to require stakes yield the most, and on the whole are the best for small gardens. But stakes can not always be easily had, and then dwarf...
-White Doyenne Pear In Ohio
At a recent meeting of the Montgomery county (Ohio), Society, Mr. Albaugh said that the old favorite, the White Doyenne, was again showing its pristine excellence, being quite free from all imperfecti...
-Henderson's White Plume Celery
I am unable to say whether this and one used in Paris is the same or not, but the description of both is identical in every respect. So much is it valued there that no other finds a ready sale in thei...
-Budded Peach Trees
Burt desires to know if we regard budded peach trees as less hardy than trees which have been suffered to grow up from the stone without budding. As in the case of his asparagus question, we have t...
-Root Pruning Grapes
Subscriber, Sharon, Pa., writes: I have been advised to cut the roots around the grape-vines in a grapery, at a distance of two feet from the vine, to make them bear more grapes. Have I been right...
-Improved Asparagus
Burt, says: In a conversation with another gardener lately who was talking about varieties of asparagus,. I contended that there could be no improved variety of asparagus, because the sexes being o...
-Forestry. Tree Planting In Dakota
On page twenty, January number, editorial notes, there appears an article under the head of Forestry in Dakota, criticising the manner in which the tree planting along the line of the Northern Pacif...
-White And Black Spruces
In the February number of the Monthly you say, We are a little uncertain what is meant by white spruce. The white spruce of nurseries is the black spruce of botanists, and the white spruce of botani...
-Pecans In The North
I notice at this late date a query as to pecan nuts: Can it be fruited at latitude 410 or 420? I have a pecan on my place, about forty years old, two feet diameter at the ground, a fine stately tree, ...
-Profitable Eucalyptus Growing
It appears the Eucalyptus, or Australian gum tree, at last, after having been highly extolled by some, and sadly disparaged by others, according to the different views each entertained of its characte...
-Chinquapin
What a pity it is that this delicious little nut should be so attractive to the worms. The common chestnut is very liable to be wormy, but it is very rare that a single chinquapin escapes - at least...
-Why Timber Decays
Intelligent people who follow what is written about the durability of timber must often feel puzzled, not only at what they read, but at what they see. For instance, the writer of this split up an oak...
-Natural History And Science. History Of Honey-Dew
A stray ray, reflected from the Academy Natural Sciences, in Friends' Intelligencer, brings the remark, That, so far as he (Thomas Meehan) knew, Dr. Hoffman, who in 1876 published a paper on the subj...
-Is Agriculture A Science Or An Art
Much that is said and written on this subject now, is ambiguous and misleading, I think. Are we to define agriculture an art, and not a science; strictly a science, or made up of both? This pertinent ...
-Botanical Collecting In Large Cities
The following plants, mostly herbaceous, are to be found growing on our streets, in fence corners and ditches, and on the open lots in and just on the edge of the town : Stellaria media, Calendrinia ...
-Remarkable Vitality Of Willow Twigs
There is no story more abundantly substantiated, than that the first weeping willow tree in England, was raised from a sprout which had come from an old basket in which some figs had been packed fro...
-Zygophyllum Sedeni. A Hybrid Orchid
Looking over some letters of the late Dr. Engel-mann, referring to a peculiar variation, and his belief that it was a hybrid, he remarks - moreover it is sterile as a well behaved hybrid ought to be....
-The Berne People And The Phylloxera
Mr. Krelage sends us the report of a scientific examination, signed by Dr. J. H. Wakker as secretary, showing by an actual examination of the facts, what everybody of sense already knows, that the who...
-Transportation Of Cut Flowers
Some years ago we noted in these columns the receipt of some flowers from Mr. Skinner, of Troy, Ohio, which came in the shell of a scooped out potato. We have now, some weeks since, some from Mr. Hend...
-Catalpa Speciosa
We note that some writers are contending that there is no material difference between the two species of catalpa. This is the natural reaction against the extravagant detraction of the older known kin...
-Rainfall In The West
Is it a fact that the rainless region west of the Mississippi is gradually growing less in extent? says a Pennsylvania correspondent. [We do not know that it is a fact. We have not seen any figure...
-Rose Within A Rose
Mr. Peter Henderson says: I send you to-day a monstrosity from the rose, Gen'l Jaqueminot, which freak is entirely new to me, but probably with your greater experience in such matters you may have se...
-Distribution Of Weeds
A correspondent referring to the item under this head in our last, that a great proportion of weeds have been able to gain a footing and spread rapidly because they are distasteiul to cattle, calls at...
-Phylloxera Law In Holland
Holland has entered the convention. When all the world agrees, there will be no use for the Berne convention, and, like the poet's baby when it is dead so early we may wonder why it was ever born. Whe...
-Professor S. B. Buckley
It is only at this late date, March 13th, our magazine being on the press, that we learn of the death of this well known botanist, which occurred at his home in Austin, Texas, suddenly, on the 18th of...
-The Native Flowers And Ferns Of The United States
By Thomas Meehan. L. Prang & Co., Boston, Mass. A Missouri correspondent sends us the following translation from the German of a notice of this work: It is a real joy and delight for the lover of go...
-Florida, And Game Water Birds
By Robert Barnwell Roosevelt: New York, Orange Judd Company. Florida, the land of the orange and flowers - the land of health and rest for the sick and the weary - but Florida as a sporting country, ...
-Legible Signatures
Mr. Robertson says: As I am daily in receipt of communications from parties asking information on different subjects, mostly prefacing their inquiries by observing that they have seen my articles in ...
-A Good Book On The Rose
Lonsdale, Germantown, notes: In reply to Mrs. J. G. M., Buffalo, N. Y., on page forty-three, February Monthly, I can with confidence recommend for her guidance in the matter of roses, 'The Rose,' wri...
-Rules For Plant Names
G. L., Allegheny City, Pa., writes: I noticed in a catalogue, trees named thus; Cupressus Lawsoniana, Cerasus Vir-giniana. The four last letters, 'iana,' which are added or connected, are they nam...
-New York Horticultural Society
The last monthly meeting of this society was held in Horticultural Hall, on Tuesday, March 4th, and although many of the choicest exhibits were withheld on account of the severe weather, the exhibitio...
-"Pot Grown" Chrysanthemums
I notice that several of the Horticultural Societies make it a condition that Chrysanthemums for exhibition must be pot grown, and that a question arises where plants are exhibited in pots, whether th...
-Notes On Chrysanthemums
The Chrysanthemum question seems as if it might bear a little more discussion. Mr. Henderson will surely not regard a plant grown in the open ground, as a good specimen of pot culture. I think a good ...
-Mississippi Valley Horticultural Society
Publishes a Business Directory which consists of a two-line advertisement, giving room for individual or firm name and address, with twelve to fifteen words of special interest, to be published under ...
-May, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 305. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The best time of the year to transplant evergreens depends on the kind of winters and summers that we are likely to have. Any where south of the Potomac autumn planting would be unquestionably the bes...
-Communications. Night Blooming Ipomcea
In the February number of the Gardeners' Monthly there is a sketch of anlpomoea.which recalls to my mind the history of the plant as we first knew it. A few large, black seeds were given me in the spr...
-Ipomcea Grandiflora. Calonyction
Dr. Asa Gray queries: Do you know Ipomcea grandiflora as a distinct species from I. Bona-nox (which your correspondent calls noctiphyton, mixing Latin and Greek), and as any more perennial than that ...
-About Roses
Hardy roses that are kept dormant over winter often fail to grow, though they may appear to have good roots and strong stems. The causes of failure are various. But the principal cause is generally fr...
-Three New Plants
I have been looking at the work of propagating them to-day, and the spirit moves mightily to write out a description of three new applicants for positions in our gardens; and I Inow I shall earn the t...
-Evening Glory
For several years I have grown the plant noticed in Monthly for February, Ipomcea nocti-phyton, and have had many opportunities to see it equal in attractiveness to anything yet said in its behalf. M...
-Rare Water Lilies
The effort of Mr. Stur-tevant, of Bordentown, New Jersey, to introduce the culture of water lilies and aquatic plants generally, deserves all the encouragement any of us can give. Few but those who ha...
-Opening Public Gardens On Sunday
The public gardens at Fairmount Park, the Zoological Society, and other places in Philadelphia, are open on Sunday without objection from the most fastidious observer of the Sabbath so far as we know;...
-Picea Omorika
Under this name the Gardener s Chronicle figures and describes a new spruce, named as above by Dr. Panac, from the mountains of Servia, - Omorika, the native name, having been retained for the species...
-Red-Berried Ivy
The English ivy has black berries, but there are numerous varieties, some even with yellow fruit. Now, we have a colored plate in Revue Horticole of a variety with red berries, like those of holly, on...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Dendrobium Pierardi
This is one of the easiest of all the Dendrobes to grow, and will do well either on a block or in a basket; but a basket is the best, as it requires less attention. It is very graceful in habit, with ...
-Seedling Begonias
I have a lot of a hundred or more hybridized seedling begonias. They are more than a year old, and some of them are five feet high. The majority of them have been pinched back, and are from two feet u...
-May, 1884. Ferns
Who does not like this beautiful class of plants? Or what could be more interesting to botanists than to study the curious structure of their reproductive organs; or to a gardener or amateur to see si...
-Hot-Water Heating
Few persons are aware of the capacity of water for heating if properly applied, especially when more or less pressure, as with steam, is applied. On that principle, no boiler is required, plain coils ...
-Notes On Geraniums
If we except Begonia rubra there is nothing scarcely so continuously in bloom as the geranium. They are always with us, and cheap, while orchids are dear, and only bloom a few weeks. We had Calanthe v...
-The Effect Of Dull Weather On The Opening Of Flowers
The recent dull weather has been rather trying on both gardeners and florists, and whether flowers were grown for pleasure or profit, it was hard in either case to get anything like a satisfactory ret...
-Orchids In April
By this time most of the potting and re-surfacing of orchids will be done, and where this is not the case, no time should be lost, and in proportion as the plants push up their growths, they should be...
-Benches For Greenhouses
A friend called my attention to your article on benches for greenhouses. I have tried Peter Henderson's plan. It is good, but expensive. I have since adopted a plan just as good and less than half of ...
-Hot Water For Destroying Insects
Hot water at a temperature of about 1200 I find the most effective remedy I have ever tried for destroying insects on plants in the greenhouse. The plants may be either immersed in it, or the hot wate...
-Adornment Of A Lady's Hat
In a recent Monthly you mention Mahonia aquifolia leaves as becoming very fashionable in Europe. It seems we Americans cannot start a fashion, even if we are first to see the beauty and propriety of a...
-The Scarlet Geraniums
Garden terms are often useful, though they may not always be scientifically correct. We all knew one time what we meant by Scarlet geraniums, though many of them had gone on to other colors besides sc...
-May, 1884. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Handsome forms are as desirable in fruit as in ornamental trees. No winter pruning will do this exclusively. It may furnish the skeleton - but it is Summer pinching which clothes the bones with beauty...
-Prunus Padus As A Stock For The Cherry
I notice your comment on my remark that Pru-nus Padus was used in North East Europe for a cherry stock. Possibly I was wrong, yet north of the Carpathians the P. Padus and P. Mahaleb run together in a...
-Reform In Names
It is pleasant to note that the suggestion of Col. Wilder, supported by the American Pomological Society, regarding reform in names of fruits, is taking root everywhere. We are not likely any more to ...
-Irrigation In The East
Col. Wilson tells the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, as we have often told the readers of the Gardeners' Monthly, that even here in the east, where we may depend fairly well on rain, it would of...
-Fruit And Its Markets
The first thought of fruit growers is to look after cheap land. The distance from market is left to railroad companies to settle. Of late years growers have been learning other lessons. It is the labo...
-Another Hyrbid Pear
A. D. B., writes: I to-day send you by express six pears, seedlings from a tree sixteen years old, and never known to blight. Supposed to be crossed with the Sand pear and Bartlett? at least the t...
-Forestry. Chestnut Trees On Limestone Soil
In a late number of your journal, the above matter was mentioned. Chestnut trees do not grow on limestone soil in this valley - the Buffalo. I have asked some very intelligent persons who have lived h...
-Hardy Mulberries By Geo. G. Atwood
I send you by this mail the tips of scions just cut from two trees of New American and Down-ing's Improved mulberry, which stand in an exposed position on the ridge near our office. The pith of these ...
-Soils And Forests
The communications in the forestry section of the Gardeners' Monthly for November, 1883, and January and March of the current year, relative to the growth of chestnut upon limestone soils, suggest the...
-Some Notably Large Trees
Observing that the Forestry Department of Gardeners' Monthly is open for the entry of big trees, I would like to have permanently preserved there this record of one - or, rather, the remaining lower...
-Sexes Of Chestnut Trees
From the editor's remarks on my article, in the last Monthly, in regard to chestnut and beech on limestone, I observe that I unwittingly blundered on another question of interest, viz.: Whether an iso...
-Trees On The Prairies
It is remarkable how, when a paragraph gets a start on the rounds of exchanges, it finally changes to a shape in which its own parent does not know it. Just now we meet with the following: Mr. Thoma...
-Arbor Day
Our Western friends rarely send us notices of what is to be, time enough for us to be of any service to them. From Mr. J. T.Allan, of Omaha, we had, on April 1st, notice that Arbor Day in Nebraska wou...
-Forestry Literature
Picking up a Sunday school book recently, a picture was noted of Moses on his return from Mount Sinai. Each hand held a tombstone, evidently weighing about 150 pounds or more with the ten commandments...
-The Black Walnut In Georgia
Black Walnut timber is worth, in Georgia, $100 per 1,000 feet, inch plank, and trees ten years from the root, are now known ten inches in diameter. This shows the annual thickness of wood to be half a...
-On The Wood Of Quercus Lobata
C. S. Sargent, writes: A correspondent in California, sent me the following interesting and important note upon the durability of the wood of Quercus lobata. The specimen is still perfectly sound. I...
-Natural History And Science. Insects As Conveyers Of The Bacterian Contagion
As a concluding paper we now reach insect life and influence in a bacterian point of view, and ask, Is it possible that the light tread of a simple fly, mosquito or ant can communicate the bacterian c...
-Wonderful Tenacity Of Life
A few months ago one of my students brought me a fine specimen of our common fresh-water leech. Not wishing to throw it alive into the alcohol, I placed it in a beaker containing a little water, and a...
-Climate Of Alaska
In some of his letters to the Philadelphia daily papers from the Pacific coast, Mr. Thomas Meehan stated that, for some reason or other even the reports of government officials had given the people an...
-The Academy Of Natural Sciences Of Philadelphia
It is well known that the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia is the recipient of important collections under its present organization. The Vaux collection of minerals which came to it last ye...
-Lavatera Arborea Variegata
At one time the florist and the botanist, if not avowed enemies, regarded each other with suspicion. The Botanist, at any rate, complained of the love of the Florist for monstrosities, and for the hyb...
-What Is A Poison?
A. J. M.says: Appearances are often deceptive. Educated sense is not always common sense, as it is generally special, rather than general. Hardly two will define poison alike. Poison has some speci...
-Dead Limb Evaporation
A. J. M. writes: While a dead limb may be injurious, I do not believe it transpires moisture as fast as a green one in leaf, and if the moisture was excessive, its evaporation would be beneficial. ...
-Freezing Of Sap In Apple Trees
A. J. M., Berlin Heights, Ohio, says: I see by the Country Gentleman, March 13, Prof. Burrill, of Illinois, says the sap of the apple tree does not freeze till 120 degrees below zero! I have seen t...
-Average Temperatures
It is generally believed that however high or low may be portions of seasons, the mean average of the whole will be about the same. From the following note from L., a Germantown, Philadelphia, corre...
-Freezing Of Sap In Trees
A correspondent inquires whether the sap freezes in winter in trees or not. We have been so often over this topic before, that it seems superfluous to go over again. But there are so many new readers ...
-Public Parks In Philadelphia
With the many demands on his time, it was no easy matter to get Mr. Meehan to accept the honor offered him of a seat in the City Councils of Philadelphia. But one of the leading motives which finally ...
-A Gardener Wanted By The Police
One Charles Huber appeared in our office in search of a gardener's situation. His references were James Vick, and other well-known names. Inquiry a few days afterward, at his boarding-house, developed...
-Prof. S. B. Buckley
This well-known botanist, whose death we briefly recorded in our last, was born in Torrey, Yates Co., New York, in 1809. His father was Major Robert Buckley, who was an officer in a New York regiment ...
-Transactions Of The Worcester County (Mass.) Horticultural Society For 1884
From Ed. W. Lincoln, Secretary, Worcester, Mass. It is always a pleasure to receive this annual volume. The secretary's report especially being replete with valuable suggestions. Noting the meeting o...
-Les Clematites A Grandes Fleurs
By Alphonse Lavallee, Paris, published by J. B. Bail-liere et Fils, 1884. This beautiful work is issued to give a full account, with illustrations, of all the more beautiful species of Clematis which...
-Horses: Their Feed And Their Feet
By Dr. C. E. Page, New York. Fowler & Wells. This is a treatise, of 150 octavo pages, and, in spite of its alliterative title, more suggestive of a sensational heading in a daily paper than of a soli...
-Michaux Garden At Charleston
A correspondent writes: Ramsey's history of South Carolina tell us that Michaux's garden was situated about ten miles from Charleston, but whether on the Ashley or Cooper rivers it does not say. Rams...
-Criticising The Editor
While sending you the enclosed communication,says L. G., I feel like criticising the editor in his view that tree trunks do not elongate, but 1 know the rule in editorial work that correspondent...
-Delayed Communications
F. The reason your communication did not appear sooner was, what often happens to others besides yours, and the explanation may do for all. The paper had a great deal of good, practical common sense...
-Illegal Plants' Names
A San Jose, California, correspondent, says: A man here gets fruits and vines, etc., from France, and also from the States, and then changes their name in adding his to the known name. Is there not a...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society
The azalea and rose exhibition held at the Boston Horticultural Hall, March 20 and 21, was a great success, not only showing the advancement of horticulture, but also that the taste for flowers and pl...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society have had no monthly meetings for some years, but made an essay in the first week of April to try one, to see what support a resumption might receive from horticu...
-World's Fair At New Orleans Next December
We have from Parker Este, of Cobden, Ills., the premium lists of this great affair. As we have said before, the exhibition will be one no progressive horticulturist can afford to ignore. The Mexican g...
-The Massachusetts Horticultural Society
The March exhibition, judging by a Boston paper, was a great success. Messrs. Woolson, of Passaic, N. J., had no varieties of daffodils; one of them, the John Nelson, is described as having a beautifu...
-New Orleans Exhibition
The premium list of the Department of Horticulture has just been issued. The most extensive arrangements have been made. Parker Earle, Cobden, Illinois; P. J. Berkmans, Augusta, Georgia, and C. W. Gar...
-June, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 306. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Hybrid perpetual roses are classed among the ever-blooming ones, but whether they bloom freely in autumn or not, depends much on treatment. The flowers at this season should be cut off at once as they...
-Communications. Wire And Hedge
It has been alarming and amusing to watch your progress towards putting together an idea that originated with the junior member of our firm, J. B. McKee, during the summer of 1881, and for which we or...
-Roses And Climbers
Seeing the request of Mrs. M., on page 43, February number, I give some points on roses; as I made them my hobby for many years. I have experimented, and noted down all I found worthy, being, moreover...
-Notes On Mistletoes
I cannot let the opportunity pass without sending you the following notes on mistletoes. I am prompted to do so on reading an extract from your reference to Phorasendron at a recent meeting of the Aca...
-On The Care And Culture Of Roses
Thanking you for your very kind request, Mr. Editor, I will endeavor to write something of my experience on the above subject. But first, if you will allow me, I desire to very mildly suggest that I t...
-Texan Blue Grass
This is Poa arachnoidea, and promises to be one of the very best grasses for lawn purposes for Southern use. While it is so sensitive to heat that it will start into growth at a very low temperature, ...
-Hazeltine's Hand Weeder
This is a steel tool about an inch wide, chisel pointed, then bent at nearly right angles for about four inches, and again bent towards the handle, so that the three lines form three sides of a square...
-Hardy Evergreens
It has been often shown in these columns that the term hardy is a very misleading one, especially when applied to evergreens. These are naturally gregarious, that is to say, they grow up in coloni...
-New Or Rare Plants. Osmunda Japonica Corymbifera
Osmunda Japonica corymbifera (see illustration) - Almost all lovers of hardy ferns are familiar with the beautiful cinnamon fern of the woods, Osmundia cinnamomea, and the Royal fern, Osmunda regalis;...
-Picea Ajanensis
The Botanical Magazine gives a colored plate of this beautiful spruce; one of the most beautiful perhaps of the whole family. The young flower buds or cones are crimson as are those of the larch, and ...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. New And Beautiful Crotons
Crotons constitute a genus of remarkably handsome Euphorbiaceous plants. Of late years they have become indispensable plants for ornamenting the stove and warm conservatory. They are also exceedingly ...
-Ferns. Adiantum
In attempting to describe some of the most showy of this large class of plants, I think the genus Adiantum, can with every right be placed at the head, being the most beautiful one; and surely there i...
-Orchids In Flower At The Botanic Gardens, Cambridge, Mass
Cypripedium Hirsutissimum A fine species, with long, green foliage; flowers produced singly on stalks eight to ten inches long, are very large, measuring five to six inches across; petals are purple,...
-New Or Rare Plants. Impatiens Sultani
Everybody knows and admires the common, annual lady slipper, or balsam, of our gardens, but there are peren-nial species which make extremely handsome pot plants, when under warm greenhouse, or s...
-June, 1884. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Flower gardening has its charms, and that class of gardening which deals with landscape effects is delightful. But it is doubtful whether these give more pleasure than a well ordered fruit and vegetab...
-Communications. A Few Words About Tea
Perhaps the question of tea culture may be considered exhausted in our region (near Summer-ville, S. C), when we see the failure of the government tea farm, which, for awhile, promised such favorable ...
-Grafted Grape-Vines
It is strange that the French, after having lost so much through the Phylloxera, should be so slow to see the use of the American grape to graft their varieties of Vitis vinifera on. We know that Tayl...
-Plum Culture
At a recent meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society a member said that Ellwanger & Barry, of Rochester, N. Y., have a plum orchard of half an acre or more, and from the time'of flowering un...
-Soil For Raspberries
Says Mr. N. Ohmer: To grow raspberries successfully, you must select good soil, well underdrained; let it be clay loam or sandy soil, but prefer upland clay loam. I have known them to do admirably in...
-Paris Green For The Codling Moth
President Saunders remarks: Within the past two or three years Paris green mixed with water in the proportion of a teaspoonful to a pailful of water has been recommended as a remedy for the codling m...
-Culture Of The Dandelion
By the following remarks before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society by Mr. Wm. D. Philbriek, it appears that dandelion as a salad is growing in popularity in America: When the cultivation of the...
-Gathering Raspberries For Market
This is the secret as told in confidence to the Montgomery Co. (Ohio) Horticultural Society by Mr. Ohmer: I have often been asked how I manage the many hands necessary to pick my berries, to have th...
-Stable Manure
Notwithstanding the teachings of many excellent persons that stable manure is the most costly of all fertilizers, it is to-day the most popular of all. Possibly it is one of those cases in which incid...
-Coal Tar
O. E., Philadelphia, says: At a recent meeting of the Montgomery county, O., Society, Mr. H. C. Smith stated that pitch tar was found to be more dangerous than coal tar to keep insects from injur...
-Potash For Peaches With Yellows
Burt wants to know if he understands the Gardeners' Monthly to teach that it is because of the exhaustion of potash in the soil, that peaches have the disease known as the yellows? We do not know ho...
-The Brightwater Apple
J. B. G., Spring-dale, Arkansas, March 8th, writes: I send you by to-day's mail two 'Brightwater' apples, a new seedling from Benton county, this State. They are not up to the average in either si...
-Forestry. Timber On The Prairies
In the Evening Star (Philadelphia) of this date, you are quoted under the heading of The Treeless Prairies, as accounting for this condition. Having resided a number of years in the far West, I woul...
-Hickories, Chestnuts And Maderia Nuts
There is no reason why these trees should not be made a profitable enterprise for an enterprising man. True, as far as the hickory is concerned, it would require a large souled man, as it would be dou...
-The Spanish Chestnut
In a recent issue of the Monthly, I notice a few notes relative to the Spanish chestnut, and it occurred to me that a few notes giving my experience would prove to be of interest to many. At this plac...
-The English Oak As An American Timber Tree
It takes a long while for a good idea to take root. In 1871, when passing through the then young settlement of Greely, Colorado, the Editor of this magazine was called on to address the settlers on th...
-Sugar From The Yellow-Wood
The Rural New Yorker says: For the third year we have gathered the sap of the Yellow-wood (the Clad-rastis tinctoria, or Virgilia lutea of botanies) and boiled it down to sugar. The sap will flow ear...
-Fate Of A Famous Honey Locust Tree
The Garden says: The most famous tree in Paris is about to disappear - viz., the Fevrier or Gledit-schia of the National Library. It is believed to have been planted as a tree of liberty in 1789, and...
-Natural History And Science. Botanical Notes From Chew's Landing, N. J
On April 19th I made a trip to Chew's Landing, Camden County, N. J., which is about seven miles from Camden. In company with Mr. P. H., I took a walk to Pine Creek, which flows through that section...
-Habits Of Birds
A few months ago, I noticed some observations on the tameness of wild birds in the West. The following facts came under my notice in 1872, in Minnesota and Dakota. In the vicinity of St. Paul, prairie...
-New Species In Caryophyllaceie Tribe
The celebrated Carl Vogt, in one of his public lectures, as president of the National Institute of Geneva, in 1869, said: No one, in Europe at least, dares to affirm the independent and spontaneous c...
-Floral Monstrosities
Last winter I observed an uncommon oddity, or floral monstrosity, in the form of a calla lily, with two separate blooms on one stalk. We have read accounts of double callas, or calla in a calla, b...
-Bees And Clover
Though the humble-bee has not been introduced to New Zealand, Mr. Armstrong, of the Christ Church Botanical Garden, asserts that the red clover seeds freely in many cases. The honey-bee's tongue is to...
-Michaux
J. W., Jr., Sewickley, Pa., says: Your Charleston correspondent (page 157, May number) may be interested to know these items gathered from Michaux's Travels to the Westward of the Allegany Mounta...
-A Twin Fuchsia
Williams Brothers, Sharon, Pa., write: We send you to-day a flower of the old fuchsia, Mrs. Marshall, which is double, thinking it might interest you. This is the first thing of the kind that has com...
-Absence Of Timber On The Prairies
N. D., Philadelphia, sends a paper on the cause of the absence of trees from our grassy prairies; but there is no need of a further discussion of this subject, as the reason has been amply demonstrate...
-Recollections Of Other Days
Some five and twenty years ago, when looking over Rosedale Nursery, the late Mr. Robert Buist thus addressed the writer: Did you ever see this plant, Brownea grandiceps, in bloom? And there is anothe...
-A Visit To The Greenhouses Of Chas. F. Evans
It will surprise those who have paid a visit to the greenhouses of Mr. Evans, to learn that Mr. Bennett removes the plants of the Bennett rose from the greenhouse,in the spring, to frames in the open ...
-Jerusalem Artichoke
Canon Ellacomb, very good authority, says the prevalent idea that Jerusalem Artichoke is from the Italian Girasole turning with the sun . Sunflower, is nothing more than a clever guess. He says th...
-Happy As An Owl In An Ivy Bush
Travelers to Europe from America go into ecstacies over the ivy-covered walls of English homes, and many would give a good deal would the ivy cover houses as well here as there. But Dr. Bromfield, a g...
-The Poet And The Birch Tree
The Lady of the Woods is the appropriate name McWhirter gives to a birch tree, which forms the leading feature in the foreground of a well-known landscape painting, and which has had much to do with h...
-Nurseries Of John Reading, At Salt Lake City
It has been impossible to work up all the notes we made of our hurried trip to the Far West last summer, or a few days spent at Salt Lake City would have had a chapter ere this. The gardening of this ...
-Old-Time Gardeners
Some gardeners in the old world remain a long time in a situation. Mr. Mathison, who recently died, was gardener at Bowhill, one of the seats of the Duke of Buc-cleugh, for about sixty years. He was s...
-Report Of The Secretary Of The Michigan State Horticultural Society
From Charles W. Garfield, Secretary, Grand Rapids. It is said that fruit growing as a business, and gardening as an art and matter of taste, are progressing faster in Michigan than in any other State,...
-Yellowstone National Park
Mr. Charles Joly has issued, for the benefit of the French people, an illustrated tract on the Yellowstone Park. He fully describes its wonders, and pays handsome compliments not only to American scen...
-Forestry Bulletin
This appears to be published in New York city, though no place of publication is given. Our esteemed friend and distinguished free-trader, is the title given to one of its leading correspondents, an...
-Popular Names
If those friends in the old world who find comfort in popular names of plants had a whole continent to deal with, as we have, we believe they would soon tire of popular names, pleasing as they may be ...
-Cypripedium For Name
A Memphis, Tenh., correspondent, under date of May 2d, writes: I send you by to-day's mail two blooms of Cypripedium. The bloom is yellow, growing wild around here in the woods. I hope they will reac...
-Gobo Or Burdock Roots
A correspondent of the Garden says: In a recent number of the journal of the French National Horticultural Society M. Dyboursk communicates the result of experiments made with Gobo, a species of Bur...
-World's Exposition At New Orleans
Our readers must not forget that the horticultural department of this great exposition will be one of the finest ever seen on this Continent, and all interested in horticulture will be sorry if they f...
-July, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 307. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Communications. How To Get Rid Of Moles
The ground mole has been for a long time a constant source of annoyance to gardeners and farmers, and the question has often been asked, Is there no way of getting rid of this pest without the tedio...
-Propagating Plants
Is there any more bewitching occupation that reasonable mortals can engage in than the propagation of new and rare hardy trees and shrubs? To see springing up around you the thrifty rows of little bea...
-Ipomcea Noctiphyton
Several correspondents have followed me in communicating what they know about this plant, but I fancy there must be several kinds mixed under one name. My plant has not convolvulus-shaped flowers, as ...
-A Word About Moles
I have seen from time to time in the Gardeners' Monthly, papers on the destruction of the mole. Some time since I noticed an article on this topic in the Indiana Farmer, which I cut out, as seeming to...
-Fastening Climbing Plants To Walls And Fences
The double pointed tack now used for holding carpets, matting, etc,, in place, is probably the best contrivance made for affixing rose bushes and such climbing plants as the white jessamine, English i...
-Japanese Maples
Shelter both in summer and winter has much to do with their successful cultivation. They will thrive on sandy or loamy soils. Most of the finer and more delicately colored varieties are generally incr...
-Wire In Hedges
We find the suggestion we made some years ago, that a wire, barbed or otherwise, through an Osage or Honey Locust fence, is all that is needed to make an impervious hedge, is at length progressing rap...
-Single Paeonies
Single Dahlias having struck a popular vein, there is now a movement in the direction of improving single Paeonies, and with some success. We heard a lady say of some not long since that they were ju...
-Rose, Queen Of Queens
When a correspondent recently wondered that the Rose Editor did not keep well read up in the proper orthography of the queer French and other names given to Roses, he surely did not know of the imme...
-Protective Hedges
Some time since a correspondent who complained loudly of the damage from dogs, through his hedge affording no protection, was advised by the editor to plant the hedge with strands of barbed wire throu...
-About Dwarf Almonds
L. B. Case, Richmond, Ind., writes: In the November, 1884, number of the Monthly you published a note from me in regard to the Dwarf Almond, which is still an interesting subject to me, particularly a...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Steam Heating
Just a few words in reference to Mr. Zirngeibel's article on water heating in your May issue. The principle there resorted to is very old, and, I believe, is described in Loudon's Encyclopedia of Gard...
-Of Tabernaemontana
The double flowering garland,Tabernasmontana, Tabernaemontana coronria fl. pl. is a very handsome evergreen stove shrub belonging to the natural order Apocynaceas. It is a stove shrub attaining a heig...
-Roses, "The Duke," Bennett, And Sunset
It was asked in a recent number of the Monthly, what had become of the Duke; had he returned to England? In reply, Messrs. Craig & Bro., who have their greenhouses on Market street, West Philadelphi...
-Wm. Francis Bennett Rose
The Florist and Pomologist says: Mr. Bennett's Pedigree Roses, if not appreciated at their full worth in this country, appear to be so elsewhere. It is stated that an enterprising Philadelphia plant m...
-Rose Forcing In America
The bright light of American winters is so favorable to flowers, that it is a matter of surprise to Europeans that we have such an abundance and grow them, especially roses, to such an enormous extent...
-Propagation Of Lilies
E. W., New Albany, Ind., says: With this mail I send you a box containing a bulb of Lilium candidum with flower-stem bearing a good sized bulb at the top, and also a piece of stem from another bulb...
-Greenhouse Flues And Greenhouse Plans
G. B. D., Yonkers, N. Y., says: Will you please inform me if a flue 100 feet long will work? I have been told it will not. And would you please state if there are any books published with nothing b...
-Winter Blooming Greenhouse Plants
A correspondent recently expressed a hope that those lovely winter and spring bloomers known as New Holland plants might yet again come into vogue. In the hope that our correspondent's suggestion may ...
-Tame Toads
The common garden toad (Bufo Americana) is an animal easily domesticated, and a most interesting pet. For several years my mother allowed one to enter her kitchen, where it fed with great zeal upon th...
-Prodigious Strawberries
We have had brought to our attention this season an extraordinary number of new seedlings, each claiming to be the best ever raised, but when we get them we fail to see any difference from scores of o...
-Large English Peaches
There is a prevalent impression that under the artificial conditions of England, peaches can be raised larger and better than we can in our hap-hazard way in the open air, but we seldom get at the exa...
-Gooseberry Jelly
One would think that in those countries where the gooseberry is at home, and as plenty as blackberries, there would be no occasion to palm off other things as a substitute. But M. Girard, Director of ...
-English Gooseberries
These very fine fruits succeed fairly well near Boston. Mr. Benj. G. Smith grows them very finely. They are more inclined to mildew than the native kinds. It is a pity. Their fine size and delicious f...
-Hardy Apples
The influence of evaporation, on hardiness has often been shown in the Gardeners' Monthly. Frost kills trees which are usually hardy, mainly by its influence on drying the tissue, and not on actual ce...
-Stonewall Jackson Apples
The Canadian Horticulturist, says, that the Stonewall Jackson was found growing in a stone wall on the farm of Silas Jackson, in Clarence, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia. The tree is said to be a stron...
-Introduction Of The Cabbage Caterpillar
Mr. Wm. Saunders of London, Ontario, in the proceedings of the Royal Society of Canada, tells us that the cabbage butterfly (Pieris rapae), which has proved such a pest to the market gardener, made it...
-Paris Green
W. S.: We believe you are mistaken. The use of Paris green for preserving potatoes from the Colorado beetle was first discovered or at least announced by a correspondent of the Gardeners' Monthly - ...
-Almonds In California
There is no part of the world in which some trouble does not follow the fruit raiser. The almond has been a profitable crop in California, and always will be, but some obstacle will always arise needi...
-Graft Hybrids
We have often expressed surprise that persons will sit down and write an article for an hour to show that two halves of a bud cannot be united and made to grow by budding or grafting, rather than spen...
-The Peach Tree
Prof. Groff says: I have observed that the peach tree frequently does remarkably well on the north sides of hills and mountains, where the cold lingers longest in spring. I have seen it cultivated on...
-The Curl In The Peach
We had supposed that this disease which takes the form of blistered and succulent blotches on the leaves, with a white mildewy substance beneath, was everywhere and generally familiar to peach cultiva...
-A Fine Keeping Pear
On May 17th we received a basket of excellent pears from Dr. G. W. Russell, of Hartford, Conn., with the following note: I leave a basket of seedling pears, seedlings from the B. d'Arenberg, which I ...
-Forestry. Relation Of Soil To Trees
I am very much interested in the subject of variability of soils, as adapted to different forest trees. Chestnuts do need light porous soil, and grow on such limestone in Chester county. But on soil, ...
-The Locust Tree In The Canary Islands
Some years ago the Hon. Eli Slifer, ex-Treasurer of Pennsylvania, was visiting a fine park in the Canary Islands. After viewing many beautiful, and to him, unknown trees, the guide said, There still ...
-Cause And Prevention Of Forest Fires
Mr. Wm. Little, of Montreal, takes the same ground in a letter to London Forestry that we have so long taken in this magazine, that forest fires could not occur if dead brush and dead timber were no...
-Worrying Over Forests
It appears by the records that so early as 1696, the French government were worrying over the near prospect of the total destruction of Canadian forests, and engaged in devising measures for their pro...
-Tree Planting In The West
Mr. F. P. Baker, of Kansas, in an essay before the Washington Convention of 1882, the proceedings of which have just been issued by the U. S. Agricultural Department, shows that though much of the tre...
-Mulberry For Silk Culture
There is much to be done yet to make silk culture a practical success. Thanks to the efforts of the Women's Silk Culture Association of Philadelphia, we now know that the silk worm can be raised, and ...
-Rapid Growth Of The Southern Yellow Pine
We have always maintained that the newspaper dread of a timber famine comes from ignorance of American forest trees, and from a study only of English forest literature. In that country trees grow slow...
-Forestry Fires
These have again been serious. We are fully satisfied that the only plan to avoid them is to keep them clear of dead brush, and decaying undergrowth. All who keep these fire traps should be made respo...
-The Blue Spruce
European tree lovers seem to have lately given the name Blue Spruce to the Abies pungens of the Rocky Mountains. This tree is unfortunate in its names. At first it was supposed to be Abies Menziesii. ...
-Grand Old Trees
The Gardeners' Chronicle truly remarks that we hear and know comparatively little about historical trees beyond the circumstance that they are said to be very old (not unfrequently twice the age they ...
-Sumac
This business, which received its first impulse in this country through the writings of Dr. J. H. Houghton in the Gardeners' Monthly, has, especially at Petersburg, in Virginia, reached large proporti...
-Longevity Of Trees
A table recently given by the Revue de I'Horticulture Beige, as to the age of trees when their timber is of the most value, gives us also an idea of the different periods at which trees mature in the ...
-West Virginia Forests
During last September and October Col. Geo. W. Shutt, of the U. S. Geological Survey, examined the southern and eastern portions of West Virginia, with especial reference to the distribution of timber...
-Alaska And Its Forest Products
A friend sends us a government document, and marks a passage with a query. Alaska is the great reserve timber region of the United States. It is only a question of a few years when the forests of M...
-Rejuvenating An Old Wood
A Delaware county, Pa., correspondent says: In the Monthly you have an interesting department of Forestry, and I would thank you to ask under that head for counsel, from those who have had experien...
-The Horse-Chestnut
A correspondent sends us the following from the West Chester Local News, and asks our opinion: The extract of horse-chestnut taken internally and in sufficient quantity, produces on the healthy orga...
-Natural History And Science. Caltha Palustris
Perhaps the reason why this plant does not spread more near Philadelphia may be found in the soil or climate. It is extremely abundant in some localities in western Massachusetts, and seemed to flouri...
-The Philadelphia Rose Rot
Mention was made in the Gardeners' Monthly for March (p. 74) of a disease that has proved very destructive during the past winter to the leaves and young shoots of greenhouse roses. Some specimens sen...
-Caltha Palustris
In the June number of the GARDENERS' MONTHLY, this plant is said to be rare around Philadelphia. I have found it quite abundant in restricted areas in Chester county. In some of the central regions of...
-Destructives At Harrisburg, Pa
Harris-burg seems to be an unlucky place, if a treatise on insects from that quarter, which is now before us, is to be fully credited. The people there do not seem to do as they ought to do, the wr...
-Origin Of The Word Fox-Glove
An English author terms the man a miscreant who changed the word fox-glove from its original folks-glove - meaning a glove for the fingers of fairies. The original inventor of such a name would be...
-Rhododendrons
The most superficial observer believes he can tell a Rhododendron from an Azalea, but he judges from appearances, and appearances are often deceitful. The botanist can draw no line. The Azalea was onc...
-Freaks Of Nature
Wm. Bassett, Hammon-ton, N. J., says; I have several times observed a secondary flower stem growing from another, on geranium Dr. Lindley. These were always smaller than the original cluster, but pr...
-Queries About Roses
L. B. C, Richmond, Indiana, says: Have you ever had any satisfactory experience in growing the seed of the Moss rose? Do they come true with any degree of certainty? or do they produce seedlings sim...
-Condition And Prospects Of American Gardeners
When we review the different countries, in which modern gardening is practiced, comparing the chances and the social position of gardeners with what they have to expect here in the land of the free, t...
-Sending Plants To Europe
A correspondent from Massachusetts writes of a box of plants being sent to Europe, and which were returned to New York with the statement that they were not permitted to land, and inquires, what new ...
-A Swindler Caught
A sharper who represented himself to be Harry Nugent, formerly with Stone & Co., and now a nurseryman near Media, has been victimizing the seedmen and florists of Philadelphia by buying goods to the...
-Ozone And Vegetation
Ozone is now conceded to be the great purifier of the atmosphere, and plants are known to produce ozone. One of the greatest discoveries of the day, is that of Dr. Anders of Philadelphia, who finds th...
-Robin Adair
On the grounds of Glencormac, a beautiful estate near Wicklow, in Ireland, are some grand old yew trees, under which the Gardener's Chronicle narrates that, it is said, many years ago, the well-known ...
-The Peach
Amygdalus Persica - is, according to the common opinion, of Persian origin. Dio-dorus Siculus says that it was carried from Persia into Egypt during the time that Cambyses ruled over that country. It ...
-Historical Jottings On Vegetables
The aboriginal inhabitants of Britain appear to have done little or nothing in the way of plant-culture with any object. It was after the arrival of the Romans that the subjugated Britons began eventu...
-Bast, Or Russia Mats
The lime abounds in some forests in Russia. By means of maceration in water the fibrous portion of the bark is separated, and divides easily into thin layers. These are used for making ropes, cordage,...
-The Late Dr. Engelmann
It is a pleasure to note that Europe expresses its sense of the loss to science by the death of this distinguished man, as America does. Numerous sketches of him appear in different serials, one of th...
-A. J. Downing And Charles Downing
The Revue de I'Horticulture Beige has an article in its April number to so honor Downing, for the services he has rendered the horticulture of his country by his Designs for Cottage Residences,' Tr...
-Wilson Flagg
Among , the deaths of the month is notably that of Wilson Flagg, who for a quarter of a century or so was a well-known writer on rural topics, and whose productions always found appreciative readers. ...
-Transactions Of The Illinois State Horticultural Society For 1883
From A. C. Hammond, Secretary. This is a volume of 398 pages, beautifully printed and elegantly bound, with a very large number of essays of great value to western horticulturists. Most of these were ...
-Vacation Cruising
By Prof. J. T. Rothrock, Philadelphia. J. B. Lippincott & Co., publishers. Books of travel are too often by those the least fitted to write them. A man or woman may be pleasant writers, and yet not h...
-Garden And Farm Topics
By Peter Henderson. For a quarter of a century Mr. Henderson has been one of the busiest of our horticultural writers, and few among them all are more esteemed. It is enough that Peter Henderson says ...
-Catalogue Of The Native And Naturalized Plants Of Buffalo And Vicinity
By David F. Day, of the Society of Natural History. This is probably the first local catalogue ever issued, which gives mosses, lichens, algae, and fungi, and is really a complete list of the members ...
-Godey's Lady's Book
J. H. Haulenbeek & Co., publishers, Phila. The Gardeners' Monthly has an interest in every branch of cultural progress, and necessarily in the success of those magazines devoted to this good cause. Go...
-Reports Of Horticultural Societies on Pears
We have over and over again had to express our regret that reports sent us by secretaries and reporters at Horticultural Societies are so absolutely worthless to the general reader that we cannot wast...
-Pennsylvania State College
It is a well-known fact that when legislatures undertake special subjects connected with practical affairs they are seldom successes. When they do succeed the success is generally due to some streak o...
-August, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 308. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Communications. A Tropical Garden
The peculiar attraction of a tropical forest is not a little hightened by that air of mystery which prevails over the impenetrable chaos. Though there be the gigantic trunks of the fathers of the fore...
-Delphinium Formosum
Among hardy herbaceous plants that seem to meet with increased favor year by year, is the purplish blue larkspur, Delphinium formosum. It is a plant that quickly responds to good treatment. It is not ...
-Improved Public Squares
The public attention called to the filthy public squares in the city of Philadelphia, by the Gardeners' Monthly, led to an attempt to improve them, instead of keeping them clean. They have been so...
-Rosa Rugosa
The Rural New Yorker says: Speaking of Rosa rugosa, we forgot to mention one of its chief attractions, viz.: the showy, large, red fruits which succeed the flowers, and last a long time. There is a p...
-Kalmias
Now that it is found, by a little adaptation of the soil to the roots, that the Rhododendron can be grown as easily as a cabbage in our gardens, the Kalmia is also making its appearance as a garden pl...
-The Glory Peas
We believe this name is tolerably well adopted as the name of the Clian-thus, of which there are two species somewhat well known. One, C. Dampieri, is a rather dwarf perennial plant, though it does fa...
-Concrete Walks
Take out the soil four inches wider than the intended walk and three inches deep, preserving the bottom highest in the center, as the walk will be when finished. Next lay along each edge drain-pipes t...
-Note On Central Park, N. Y
S.M. says: There is Halesia tetraptera in bloom in the Park, a most beautiful shrub. Why are such beautiful things so rare in our gardens? Mr. Roosevelt, our young assemblyman, carries bills throug...
-Powdered Tobacco As A Remedy For Aphis
G. G., Brooklyn, N. Y., writes: I have been informed that tobacco stems dried and powdered, and the powder sprinkled over aphis will destroy them. I can get plenty of stems, as we use them for smok...
-Variation In Feverfew
E. W., New Albany, Ind., writes: Last summer we had planted near together in the same bed the double-white Feverfew, Matricaria exima fl. pl., and the Golden Feather Pyrethrum, Parthenium aureum, b...
-Weeds On A Lawn
Last winter W. F., of Jenkintown, Pa., sent some weeds which had infested his lawn, desiring to know something about them. All we could say was that they appeared to belong to some kind of chickweed...
-Hydrangea Scandens
Mr. C. E. Parnell says: Will you please inform me through the Monthly whether Hydrangea scandens is identical with Schizophragma hydrangeoides or not? If distinct, will some one please give a descrip...
-Cultivating Pitcher Plants
A lady living near Charleston, S. C, writes: I planted last winter a quantity of Sarracenia roots in a long box made purposely, and fitted to the edge of our piazza, where it gets the heavy drip from...
-Mice In Osage Fences
T. W. B., writes: My Osage hedge was ruined last year, so this spring I replanted it; already the moles are at it in force. I enclose two of the hedge plants to show how ferociously they mutilate t...
-Disease In Lilies
C. P. P., Albany, Whiteside county, Illinois, writes: Enclosed please find three leaves of Lilium superbum, affected by some disease which finally ruins the plants. I have a bed of about a thousand...
-The Clustered Flowered Habro-Thamnus
Habrothamnus is a very beautiful greenhouse evergreen shrub, belonging to the natural order Solanaceae. It is a plant of free, vigorous growth, with liberal cultivation attaining a height of from five...
-Naphthaline As An Insecticide, Etc
About eleven years ago I had occasion to use large quantities of the dead oil of tar for commercial purposes. On removing the dead oil from the barrels I usually found a large quantity of solid matter...
-Hot Water Heating Again
I suppose Mr. Fowler's remarks about my mode of heating call for some explanation. The way of heating in the May number of Gardeners' Monthly is simply a modification of Parkinson's high pressure hot ...
-Epiphyllum Truncatum
The taste for cut flowers has [somewhat militated against good pot plant culture, on which our elders prided themselves. Sometimes however we cross specimens which make us wish the good old times woul...
-A Vegetable Bouquet
Says the London Gardeners' Chronicle: Quite a novelty in the way of a bouquet was produced by Mr. Aldous, florist, of South Kensington, a few days since. A lady was desirous of presenting a gentleman...
-Flowers In America
We notice that travellers in America are beginning to be surprised at the growing taste for flowers. A correspondent of the Journal des Roses, says that no one would doubt that Alcibiades, Anacreon, ...
-A Fine Show Of Thenight Blooming Cereus
Quite an interesting event was the flowering of Night Blooming Cereuses on the grounds of Mr. E. S. Nixon, of Germantown, on the evening of June 21 st, sixty flowers being open at one time. Friends fr...
-Propagating Bouvardia
S. P., Belvidere, Illinois, writes: Please answer through the Gardeners' Monthly the best mode of culture of the Bouvardia and Carnation. Greenhouse in winter and the border in spring. Please note ...
-New Or Rare Plants. Alsophila Rebeccae
An elegant tree fern introduced from Queensland, by William Bull, of Chelsea, London. The stem is very slender; the the fronds are elliptic, bipinnate, the larger pinnae bearing on each side numerous ...
-A Supplementary Paper Upon Antiseptics, Germicides And Bacteriacides
The object of this additional paper is to keep the mind directed to the bacterian hypothesis of disease, as previously suggested in the Gardeners' Monthly, and linked with pear blight and peach yellow...
-Oxalis Deppei
In an article on the Oxalidae in Chambers' Encyclopedia,I find the following: O. Deppei is a Mexican species, with a root somewhat like a small parsnip - quite free from acidity. It is much cultiva...
-Two Good Strawberries - Manchester And Cumberland Triumph
For private use in this section, and in fact in most all sections and on all soils, the above strawberries are excellent. They grow under adverse circumstances, and generally produce a good, fair crop...
-Useful Weeds At Santa Cruz
Two small areas in my yard covered with Ero-dium moschatum, the musky Filaria (or Fil-a-ree) of the natives, are now being cut by the scythe-man. The yield is heavy, when the fact is considered that u...
-Cultivation Of The Soil
Cultivators of the soil are getting more and more convinced that thorough cultivation is indispensable in securing good results, whether he be a farmer raising cereals and other field crops, or garden...
-Cornelia Strawberry
Some unknown friend, from an unknown locality, sends us by express a basket marked as above, and with the note that they were gathered on the 23d. They are fully equal to the best at this date, seen i...
-Killing The Canker Worm On Apple Trees
A correspondent inquires whether the canker worm could not be destroyed by burning sulphur under the trees? No doubt it could be, but possibly the leaves would be destroyed at the same time. Yet the q...
-Cochin China Grapes
R. M. S., Columbia, S. C, writes: In the month of February we received a small package of grape seed, of the variety named above, from Senator Butler, to whom they were sent by General Haldeman, U...
-Fruit Prospects Near San Francisco
Mr. Hussman writes: The grape and fruit crops promise to be very abundant this season, especially the first; the vines show unusual vigor, and there have been no frosts. If nothing happens I should n...
-Forestry. American Forests
Before taking up the subject the lecturer gave a short biographical sketch of Francois AndreMich-aux, by whose bequest these lectures were sustained. He was the distinguished son of a distinguished ...
-Growth Of Trees In The West, And Cost Of Planting Trees
The following actual measurements of tree growths, of known ages, are made, showing circumference in inches, two feet above ground : Years old. Inches. White Elm*....................
-Timber Of Pinus Edulis
In our note on this pine it was stated that the timber was worthless even for wood. This must be understood in the regular forestry sense. It would not pay to grow it for wood it is too slow and too s...
-The Good Economy Of The Chinese
From the San Francisco Chronicle I take the following paragraph, one of several which make up a short communication thereto, entitled Chinese scavengers: A great quantity of orange peels are gathe...
-Flowering Of Agave Heteracantha
I send you by mail some specimens of bloom in different stages; seed vessels, and leaves of Agave heteracantha, contributed by Dr. G. Engelmann to our gardens, which he received from Mexico, May, 1882...
-Clover And Bees
After reading your article in May number of the Gardeners' Monthly, I am inclined to say that I have never seen a head of red clover without seed since 1838, either first or second crop, and that the ...
-The Nature Of Fasciated Branches Or "Crow's Nests." By Thomas Meehan
At the meeting of the Botanical Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, on the 12th of May, Mr. Thomas Meehan called attention to a paper contributed by him to the Proceedings of...
-Botanical Notes
The Eschscholtzia Californica is of low growth. An ambitious specimen has clambered up within a privet hedge growing on my lot, and, after sending out a number of its golden flowers to decorate the he...
-The Lily And The Amaryllis
While exhibiting a pretty Amaryllis to a person fond of flowers, and with some desire to know about them, though too modest to permit one to say she had botanical tendencies, the writer was asked: Yo...
-Clover In New Zealand
In the American Naturalist for June we learn that, 1st, no clover does produce its seeds in this colony (New Zealand); and 2dly, some varieties are more fertile than others. How any variety can b...
-Fox-Glove
A. G., writes: Folks-glove is no doubt as much of a misfit as fox-glove. The editorial suggestion that 'there may have been an ancient name sounding like glove, which signified 'bell,' is confirme...
-Poisonous Plants
A Texas correspondent says, in reference to the poisonous experience of a much afflicted West Chester man: It is very curious what notions people have about plants in different parts of the country. ...
-Malformation In A Rose
Mr. Peter Henderson remarks: I mail you to-day a malformation - a flower shoot of Rose Magna Charta. I have never seen anything exactly similar. You will notice that the wood shoot that has run thro...
-Loss Of Leaves By Evergreens
E. W., New Albany, Ind., says: I notice large trees of Magnolia grandiflora, that, owing to the severity of last winter, when the thermometer fell 220 below zero, had shed their winter-browned leav...
-The Tube In Iris Cristata
A. G., Botanic Garden, Cambridge, Mass., writes: On page 197, referring to Iris cristata, with its 'very long tube to the flower', you remark that 'possibly those versed in botanical philosophy may...
-Travels And Personal Notes. Gardeners And Employers
I cannot at all join in S.B.Fairsquare's lamentation, p. 2[6. I believe it to be the bounden duty of every hired gardener to apply himself practically and mentally to dress and keep his employer's ...
-Proceedings Of The American Pomological Society
While such documents as these are usually a long time a coming, it is a pleasure to note the appearance of one the most valuable appearing so soon after the event, thereby largely enhancing its value....
-Fruiting Of The Carob Or St. John's Bread Tree In California
On the arid portions of the Old World the Ceratonia siliqua is one of the greatest blessings. It thrives in desert places where nothing else will grow. It has a pod somewhat similar to the Honey Locus...
-Horticulture In Homer's Time
At a recent meeting of the Montgomery county (Ohio) Horticultural Society, Mr. Robert W. Steele gave the following literal translation from Homer's Odyssey, to show that they had some good things and ...
-A Monastery Garden In England
Describing the English monastery of St. Bernard in Lancashire, a correspondent of the Gardeners' Chronicle says: Charnwood Forest reminds one in its ancient desolation, its granite tors, its bleak mo...
-Geo. Such's Nursery
By a circular we learn that the whole of the rare collection of plants for which the firm of Geo. Such is so justly famous was to be sold at public sale on the 11th of the past month, in order to se...
-A Rare Botanical Library
The scientific books of a deceased botanist, for the benefit of his widow, will be sold at private sale by the botanists of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, during August and September ne...
-The Library Of The Late W. R. Prince
It has been decided to sell the library of the Princes of Flushing, the collection of three generations of horticulturists. Those who know how difficult it is to get many valuable works long out of pr...
-Mrs. A. Lincoln Phelps
This lady died on the 14th of July in her ninety-first year. She is best known to our readers as the author of Mrs. Lincoln's Botany, which went through a number of editions and did very useful work ...
-Augustus Fendler
Flower lovers will regret to hear of the death of Mr. Fendler, whose name is-attached to so many interesting plants. According to a note by Dr. Gray, in the Botanical Gazette, this occurred on the 27t...
-The Scientific Angler
By the late David Foster, edited by Wm. C. Harris. All published by Orange Judd Company, New York. When in Alaska last summer the Editor and party found the abundance of food which came down with the...
-Eucalyptographia
The ninth decade of Dr. F. Von Mueller's treatise on the Gum Trees of Australia is on our table. The kinds figured this time are cornuta, exima, Foelscheana, Howittiana, patens, Salmonophloia, salub...
-The Diet Question - By Dr. Susanna W
Dodds. New York: Fowler & Wells Co., 1884. It has always seemed to us that there was a great deal of unnecessary worry over what we should or should not eat. The misfortune seems to be that the major...
-Pansies
We have from a correspondent a mass of paper and string appearing like a dishcloth which had been wrung out previously to being put up to dry. Among the debris we found pieces of what appeared to have...
-Society Of American Florists
At one time a horticultural firm would advertise that it was nurserymen, seedsmen and florists, - and, though the combination still exists in some instances, the businesses have become so divergent,...
-Association Of American Nurserymen, Florists And Seedsmen
The ninth annual meeting was held at Chicago the second week in June, under the Presidency of Mr. M. A. Hunt, and D. Wilmot Scott as Secretary. The attendance was greater than at any former meeting, a...
-Roses At Boston
The rose and strawberry show brought out a number of competitors, amongst whom were W. H. Spooner, William Gray, John L. Gardiner, F. B. Hayes, C. M. Hovey, J. S. Richards, B. G. Smith, and James Cowl...
-Hardy Flowers At Boston
At the meeting of June 21 st, the leading attraction of the exhibition was a tastefully arranged collection of water lilies from C. H. Hovey, comprising, besides our beautiful native species, Nymphsea...
-Rhododendrons At Boston
A correspondent says of the exhibition on June 14th: Considering that this was not a prize day, the display of flowers was remarkably fine. Most prominent was the collection of rhododendrons from Hon...
-September, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 309. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
No one should object to the so-called carpet bedding, mosaic beds or beds of Moses as an intelligent lady was made to say in our columns recently, for they certainly make the grounds very gorgeous a...
-Communications. Seedling Moss Roses
I find everything relating to roses interesting, so I hope my experience may interest your correspondent who wishes to know about seedling moss roses. I have two kinds which seed freely - a pink and a...
-Pruning And Management Of Trees
E. S. W., Beverly, N. J., writes: I have been from home for two years, and on my return home I scarcely knew my surroundings, through the work of the tree butchers. I am disgusted with the stupidity ...
-The Crested Iris
We had the opportunity of seeing this year, for the first time in American gardens, Iris cristata, a native of the woods of North Carolina. It was figured in the Botanical Magazine in the early part o...
-Japan Snowball
One might say that anything is as much alike as two snowballs, as to put it in the more common form, as like two peas, but the Japan Snowball is very unlike the common one, and is withal very beauti...
-Flowering Of The Climbing Hydrangea
For the first time in this country I believe the climbing Hydrangea has flowered. I have sent on a sample of it to-day to Mr.Blanc, the engraver, and he will hand it over to you as soon as he is throu...
-Ipomcea Bona-Nox
In addition to the notes published on page 195, of the July Monthly, relative to the Ipomcea noctiphyton, I would say that I obtained a plant from Mr. Henderson last season. It was planted out early i...
-On The Mole
Did the.Editor ever see a mole? If yes, did you ever see one that could by any possibility eat a bean (castor or otherwise) or nibble a grain of corn? Should such a one put in an appearance, I would b...
-Garden Troubles In Victoria, B. C
I send a few lines on the insect pests of Vancouver Island. When I arrived here nearly five years ago, my attention was attracted to a leafless apple orchard. I asked the farmer I was riding with what...
-Weigela Floribunda
Some botanists have failed to find any distinction between Weigela and Diervilla, and hence we often find in catalogues our Weigela rosea, as Diervilla rosea; but Dr. Asa Gray has pointed out in his B...
-Street Trees
C. S., St. Louis, Mo., writes: Will you, or some of your Eastern readers who are posted on the matter, have the kindness to inform me and others interested here as to the value of the Carolina popl...
-September, 1884. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Eggs and larvae of small insects get protection in the wood work of greenhouses and conservatories, and the best gardeners give all a thorough cleansing once a year. Where neatness is a feature of a p...
-Communications. Cattleya Gaskelliana
Some time last fall in an article I wrote on Cat-tleyas I asked if any one had bloomed the above Cattleya. I had bought quite a number, seeing that it was highly spoken of in some of the English journ...
-Naphtha And White Lead For Greenhouse Shade
The extremely warm weather a few weeks ago made it necessary to shade some of the greenhouses. We had a faint recollection of having read a brief note in an old Gardeners' Monthly entitled Naphtha an...
-Low Pressure Steam Heating In Hot Water Pipe
The question of steam heating has been so thoroughly discussed in the Monthly that it seems like going over old ground to say anything more; but, under the heading of heating with common hot water pip...
-Stephanotis Floribunda
How seldom do we see this beautiful stove climber in cultivation. The waxy white flowers are well adapted for cut flower work. Not only beautiful in itself but associated with other flowers it is very...
-Aechmea Discolor
The variegated AEchmea, AE. discolor, is a very showy and attractive stove plant belonging to the natural order Bromeliaceae. It is a plant to be found in a very few collections only, but as it is a v...
-Xylinacantha Macrantha
For the past eighteen months I have been very carefully watching (what appears to me) a very strange freak of an Agave, we believe to be Xylin-acantha macrantha. At that time, while carefully looking ...
-New Or Rare Plants. Croton Illustris
Recently we had a note from a correspondent in praise of this charming novelty. We have now the opportunity, through the kindness of Mr. Wm. Bull, of giving a sketch of the plant. It is a singularly g...
-September, 1884. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
There would seem to be little new in the way of practical hints from year to year; what is found true once should be true for all time. But fruit growing is a complicated affair. Things are only relat...
-Communications. The English Gooseberry
As the English gooseberry is again receiving some notice, I will state that I have had five sorts of them in cultivation for the past twenty-five years - have always had a crop and never a mildewed be...
-Notes On The English Walnut
We have often had accounts of large and otherwise remarkable trees, and other objects of interest; but I do not know whether my walnut tree, Juglans regia, has received the respectful notice it deserv...
-Production Of Strawberries
Having an opportunity this summer of making a test of the comparative productiveness of six varieties, I embraced it, and herewith furnish you the result. The ground occupied by the plants measured 39...
-Preserving Grapes
The following slip, cut from an English scientific paper, and translated from a German one, will answer query on p. 241 of Gardeners' Monthly. The use of salicylic acid for this purpose is not new: ...
-Peach Root Aphis
You were right in pronouncing the attacking insect an Aphis. It is a species J am unacquainted with. I have given no special study to this particular group, and without it they are hard to determine, ...
-Sulpho-Carbonates
M. Dumas, the permanent Secretary of the French Academy des Sciences, recommends for the arrest of the Phyxollerae the use of the alkaline sulpho-carbonates of potassium and sodium, and of barium. Th...
-Blackberry, Wilson Junior
Editors often have to comment on the difference between a drawing of a new fruit, and the fruit itself when it comes before them. Before us just now is a drawing of Wilson Junior Blackberry, and real ...
-Aphis On Peach Tree Roots
Mr. Lorin Blodget sends with a sample the following note: I send herewith the stem of a seedling peach tree just withering, from the effects of a new scourge, a root Aphis, I think, which clustered ...
-A Robin-Proof Cherry
A correspondent near Philadelphia writes: You may safely recommend to your readers the Late Duke as a cherry the Robins will not touch. I have over a dozen varieties of cherries in my orchard, but do...
-An Insect Depredator On The Apricot
L. B. C, Richmond, Ind., says: With this I mail you a little paper box containing two small worms that I find feeding on the foliage of my Russian Apricot. They are very voracious feeders even if t...
-Burning Curled Peach Leaves
Querist writes: I notice in a book on peach culture before me that 1 am to collect the leaves of peaches stricken with the curl and burn them - what is the idea in this? [Truly the idea is not of...
-Grape Culture
L. B. C, Richmond, Ind., says: I have often read that one of the best methods for insuring a good crop of grapes, was to lay the vines down on the ground at the approach of winter, and if not conve...
-Forestry. On Catalpa
Has the Catalpa controversy ended or simply quieted down for a season? I am prompted to ask this question from observing the charming effect produced by them, when planted as an ornamental tree, by th...
-The Larch In The West
A few years ago there was much interest taken in the Larch as a timber tree in the West. Of late years we have not heard much. Can any of our readers tell as to its final success? Here in the East the...
-Common Names Of Rocky Mountain Coniferae
In your last number you refer to European planters calling what is commonly known as Silver Spruce, Blue Spruce. This is an unfortunate mistake as the Engelmann and sub-alpina present the same beautif...
-Natural History And Science. Hybrids Between Wheat And Rye
Last year I removed the anthers from a head of Armstrong (beardless) wheat while they were quite immature (green and small), applied pollen from rye, bound the head and so left it for two days. The bi...
-Botanical Notes By M. D
A thistle - Cnicus occidentalis - a native of this State and Nevada, has a beautiful flower-head, :he mass of its disk flowers, of a maroon or purple lake color, being enclosed in a nearly spherical, ...
-The Loco Weeds
I have read your note in the last Monthly on the '* Loco weed, that makes horses crazy, in which you say, As some half dozen plants go under the suspicion, a splendid chance to tell just what the p...
-Microscopic Fungi As Originators Of Disease
In an elaborate discussion on disease in the peach Professor Penhallow says: Fungi do not penetrate normal cellular structure, but remain confined to the dead tissues, or those of low vitality. Furt...
-Scientific Editing
When we look at some scientific serials, and note the stuff which passes without comment we wonder what the Editor is for; no matter how absurd or unscientific, it seems that everything that comes to ...
-Blue Mountain Tea
Large numbers of articles have been tried as substitutes for Chinese tea, but they soon fall into disuse. This is not the case with the sweet-scented golden rod - Solidago odora. Its use commenced amo...
-Hybrid Orchids
The question of hybrids among species of plants is one which continues to be of considerable interest with scientific men. Some time since M. Naudin, of the plant garden at Paris made extended experim...
-Fish-Catching Plants
The newspapers are having a high old time over some English accounts of the discovery that the bladders of a small water plant, Utricularia, will catch small insects, and is therefore dangerous to fis...
-Vanilla Beans
These are the fruits of an orchid, - Vanilla planifolia, a native of Mexico, but which extends north to the borders of the United States. Though the writer has seen it under culture for nearly half a ...
-Rose Galls
Mr. Shriver, of Wytheville, Virginia, sends us some very pretty galls from a rose bush. They are about the size of small marbles, thickly studded with slender spines like rose thorns. We sent the lett...
-Names Of Plants
Jonathan Primrose: No.2. Jasminum nudiflorum, the extra early Japan Jasmine, and not the Carolina Jasmine, which is Gelsemium nitidum. No. 1. Genista Canadensis, a very beautiful winter flowering ...
-Self-Fertilization In Composites
A distinguished botanist sends us the following: In August number of Gardeners' Monthly, p. 229, you say 'composite plants are unfavorable to cross-fertilization.' Please explain, for it is the gener...
-Imperfect Clover Flowers
J..Montgomery county, Pa., writes: Enclosed are some specimens of clover heads, which you will find to have produced without flowers, just as the violet does, and which the scientific call cleistog...
-The Sanguinary Lophospermum
The art of coining a common name out of a botanical, is as yet by no means a fine art. One of the most sedulous of our English friends gives us the sanguinary Lophospermum as the result of his hard ...
-The Science Of Advertising
The Philadelphia Times pays a compliment to Mr. Peter Henderson: One of the best practical essays on advertising that has appeared in print was read before the late Chicago Convention of Nurserymen ...
-Wm. L. Schaffer
As we go to press, we have to announce the death of the well-known President of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, Mr. Wm. L. Schaffer, on the 16th of August, at his city residence in Philadelphi...
-Transactions Of The Minnesota Horticultural Society
From Oliver Gibbs, Jr., Lake City, Minn., we have pleasure in acknowledging the receipt of this, the tenth annual report, we believe. It shows a more than usually intelligent interest in horticulture ...
-Transactions Of The Illinois Horticultural Society: Twenty-Eighth Report
The reports of this body are always welcome, as for some reason they impress one as possessing an inellectual character, rare among reports of this:lass. In this one there is a paper by Prof. Bur-'ill...
-Practical Forestry
By Andrew S. Fuller, New York, Orange Judd Company. Possibly no branch of culture has had so many worthless treatises published about it as forestry. We take up a new one with repugnance, feeling that...
-The Orchids Of New England
A Popular Monograph. By Henry Baldwin. New York: John Wiley Sons. This is one of that class of books that it is a pleasure to welcome. Most existing books on botany are said to be dry and hard to stud...
-Mr. Lorin Blodgett
Our readers will remember the illustration we gave last autumn of a remarkable grape vine, growing on the grounds of Mr. Lorin Blodgett. We have the following note from Mr. Blodgett: My giant grape v...
-Specimens For Name
In sending anything for name, plants should either be sent so as to preserve them entirely in a fresh state, - or else perfectly pressed and dry, - and they should be complete in flower and foliage. F...
-Gardening And Gardeners
We have a number of letters in regard to this topic, but as they all cover much the same ground already occupied in our columns, it is hardly necessary to do more than re-state the whole case, and the...
-Gardeners And Their Employers
A correspondent says: I think Mr. Falconer has been fortunate in escaping the unpleasant experiences that have fallen to the lot of most of his fellow gardeners. He thinks on the whole that Fairsq...
-Labarax Solution
In regard to these expressions in the paper by Dr. Thomas Taylor, in our last, W. R. G. writes: Saxifax and Sassafax are not uncommon corruptions of sassafras, but I believe labarax for Labarraq...
-Horticultural Societies. Communication. Massachusetts Horticultural Society
The Rose and Strawberry Show of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, which was held on the 24th and 25th of June - two days instead of one as in previous years, was the finest show of the kind eve...
-Hardy Flowers Blooming In July
As showing what good things may be in flower art this period of the year the following list of herbaceous plants, shown by J. W. Manning, Reading, Mass., at the Mass. Hort. Society's meeting, July 19,...
-October, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 310. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Landscape gardening is one of the most delightful pursuits of country life, and those who wish to get as much pleasure as possible from their gardens, cannot study it too much. Not only the many acres...
-Communications. Geranium Heterantha
Some eight or ten years ago, a semi-double Geranium was imported from England under the name of Heterantha which in this locality has given the utmost satisfaction, being a vigorous grower, and produc...
-Hardiness Of Japan Maples
There seems to be much discussion pro and con, as to the hardiness of the new Japanese Maples for this climate. As is usually the case, both sides are positive, and draw their conclusions largely from...
-Summer Notes
The season in Massachusetts has been so propitious that the freshness and verdure of June crowns these last days of August right royally. Frequent rains and absence of scorching suns, has developed a ...
-The Public Squares Of Philadelphia
In the old city of Philadelphia, some half a dozen plots of ground of six or eight acres each were set apart for the health and recreation of the people forever. Money enough to keep them decent ha...
-Ancient Gardening In America
The South American Indians were in a measure agriculturists, and had many things under culture of which the origin is unknown. The potato was so cultivated, and was common in Indian gardens from Chili...
-One Who Likes Moles
This is what an Indiana man says: Last year I put twelve moles in my strawberry patch of five acres, to catch the grubs, and they did the work. I never had a dozen plants injured during the summer, ...
-Management Of Public Works
In the Kensington Gardens, near London, it is reported that over 300 trees died within the past year, and it appears the earth was filled in two or three feet all over them. This smothering of the fee...
-Bad Effects Of Lawn Mowers
It is now some years since the Gardeners' Monthly pointed out that the close cutting which came into use with improved lawn mowers, was the ruination of good lawns, and when complaint has been made ab...
-Painting Wounds In Trees
R. V. P., Cincinnati O., asks: Is there not often a great deal of unnecessary work in gardening, recommended under the idea of doing things properly? For instance I read 'always put a coating of she...
-October, 1884. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
If one wants to grow house plants well, the best lessons can often be had from some cottage window. It is surprising how well they often do. Some say it is because their owners love them; but love, wi...
-Communications. Recollections Of Beautiful Australian Plants
Wherever progressive man has settled at the antipodes, happily most of the trees, shrubs, and flowering plants, still remain, much as nature left them; simply, because the cruel creature said to have ...
-The W. F. Bennett Rose
Your correspondent, Edwin Lonsdale, in the July number, in noticing the Tea Rose Duke of Connaught, states: ' There are few roses will pay as well as the Duke. Will the ' William Francis Bennett?' ...
-A Dahlia For Florists' Work
I enclose two blooms of a Dahlia which I find a very useful flower in our cut flower work. It may be old, but I think it originated in our grounds about four years ago. I have never seen it anywhere e...
-Culture Of Amaryllis
I have been very successful in the culture of Amaryllis, and offer my experience for the benefit of the readers of the Gardeners' Monthly. I have some almost always in bloom through the whole Summer m...
-Dwarf Oranges
In the land of the orange, dwarfs have a standing as well as in the land of the apple and the pear. As in the North with the quince for the pear, a slow grower is selected to graft the stronger kind o...
-Pampas Grass Plumes
In California, Florida, and other places South, there is a large business done in growing Pampas Grass for the sake of the plumes. The Florida Dispatch gives the following method of preparing them in ...
-Spontaneous Combustion
During the present summer a stable in Philadelphia burned down, undoubtedly from heat generated by manure piled against it. Those interested in gardening do not understand, as clearly as they should d...
-The Cayenne Cherry Tree: Eugenia Mich-Elli
Mr. Gurney, Gardener to Mr. Henry Shaw, at the Missouri Botanic Gardens, kindly sends us fruit of this, which we have never seen before. It is of the form and appearance of a turban squash, though but...
-Crossandra Infundibuliformis
The tropical Acanthacese of which the Justicia and Libo-nia are familiar types, are among our most valuable winter blooming plants, and those who are familiar with their beauty and ease of culture, we...
-A Sure Remedy For Destroying Moles
I have lived on a place that was almost overrun with moles, and have tried many remedies to destroy them, but failed until I procured one of Hale's patent mole traps. I got the trap in the fall of 188...
-The Hornet Raspberry
Why has this once favorite variety so nearly disappeared from cultivation and from the catalogues of our leading nurserymen? It was introduced to American fruit-growers some twenty-five or more years...
-Pear Blight
Among the numerous experiments, relating to the diseases of plants, which have been performed at the Station, those on pear blight have excited the most interest. The first case of blight noticed in t...
-Western Fruit Notes
When N. C. Meeker of the N. Y. Tribune established the Greely Colony on a high, barren, gravelly plain in Colorado, as much of an enthusiast as he was known to be, he could not have imagined that from...
-Immediate Effect Of Crossing On Fruit
This subject has often been discussed in the Gardeners' Monthly, the evidence favoring the belief that there is some influence of the male parent on the fruit, as well as on the progeny, after cross-f...
-What Is Good Tree Planting?
It is not uncommon to hear people say, though we had the trees planted with every care and attention the trees died. The fact is that what people often call very good planting, is very bad planting....
-Fruit Growing In Oregon
Those who saw at the Centennial in Philadelphia, the magnificent fruit continually coming from Oregon, need not be told that that is an excellent fruit growing State. The opening of direct railroad co...
-A Cure For The Yellows
We think there has been no doubt in the minds of the greater portion of intelligent Horticulturists, who have followed what has appeared in our pages for some years past, that the disease in the Peach...
-A New Curculio Remedy
C. W. Westbrook, son of a well-known ante-bellum nurseryman of North Carolina, and, we believe, Professor of Agriculture and Horticulture in a North Carolina college, claims to have discovered a certa...
-Preserving Grapes In Winter
A few years ago a discovery was made that hothouse grapes could be preserved all through winter by cutting the bunch with a piece of stem and putting the stem in a bottle of water. Since then large fr...
-Rancocas Raspberry
This new variety is recommended as, among other good qualities, standing high, and thus offering good facilities to the fruit picker. In our last we had a brief paragraph referring to a good point in...
-A Large Potato Crop
In a letter to the Editor Mr. J. Paget, gardener to Senator Cameron, Harrisburg, Pa., says: I want to tell you of what I call a good potato crop. On the loth or 12th of April, 1884, I planted 1630 (s...
-Reed's Early Golden Peach
Mr. Charles Black, Hightstown, N. J., writes: I send you by express, to-day, a box of what is called Reed's Early Golden Peach. My attention was called to it about one year ago, and not being satisfi...
-A Forest Planting Company
A circular tells us that it is one of the most incomprehensible things of this world, that a forestry company was not started long ago. We believe certainly that if a few intelligent men were to go ...
-Canadian Forestry
Much surprise was manifested at the recent International Forestry Exhibition in Edinburg, that Canada made no response of any consequence. The idea was that Canada, of all parts of the world, would ha...
-Tanning Material In California
Prof. Hilgard furnishes the following figures: Name. Moisture lost in air-drying - per cent.. Moisture remaining in air-dried material-per cent*___ Per cent, of tannin in ...
-Natural History And Science. Peculiar Variations In Nature
In your Monthly I have frequently read notices of peculiar growths and malformations, which, besides a passing interest, have a botanical value, and hence worthy of record. I have observed a blossom ...
-Microscopic Parasites
The great number of microscopic growths known as parasitic fungi, many of which kill or seriously impede the growth of vegetable productions, demand earnest study by the gardener and farmer, as well a...
-Food Instincts Of Animals
Ecclesiasticus is mistaken in saying, as he does in September Monthly, that no animal in a state of nature will eat any natural substance to its own destruction or great injury, for we know that i...
-Calodendron Capense
There are few things more interesting in plant studies, than the effort to get at the reason for things. The idea that what exists is not the result of blind accident, but is deliberately and wisely p...
-Popular Science
A prominent scientific magazine recently expressed its regret that scientific men should send valuable matter to the miserable agricultural and horticultural magazines, instead of to leading serials, ...
-The Shell Mounds Of Florida
The most remarkable feature of this marshy labyrinth which constitutes the northeastern corner of Florida, to which the sea asserts its superior title twice each day, the feature which may rank as one...
-The Loco Weed In Texas
In many parts of the world when some epidemic or some other demic runs through a herd of cattle, it is the fashion to try to put the trouble on some plant which the cattle are supposed to have last ea...
-Primula Obconica
To Primrose growers, one of the most interesting plants now in blossom in the College Gardens, Dublin, is the new Primula obconica, a Chinese species from the Tchang Valley. The flower, which is almos...
-Variations In Nature
An address on Variations in Nature,read by Mr. Meehan before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Montreal, has been published, and contains many interesting facts in reference t...
-The Tuckahoe, Or Indian Bread
Prof. J. Howard Gore contributes to the recently issued Smithsonian Report, an exhaustive paper on the Tuckahoe, or Indian Bread. This is a large , tuber, growing wholly underground, of a fungous ...
-Do Tree Trunks Elongate?
Every once in a while there seems an eruption of some silly debate which goes on for months and months, writers taking hours on hours to write their opinions, and readers days and days to study them, ...
-Sugar From The Oregon Maple
The Vindicator, an Oregon paper, says that a Mr. William Smith, in Nehalem Valley, twenty-eight miles from Forest Grove, makes sugar exactly like the Vermont article, from trees in that vicinity, and ...
-The Hydrangea As A Tea Plant
The Gardeners' Chronicle says that a Japanese shrub, Hydrangea Thunbergia of Siebold, and called by the Japanese Amatsji, or Tea of Heaven, is found on the mountains of Aivaand Souaki, where the lea...
-Poor Man's Plaster
In his Botanical rambles in Florida, Mr. A. H. Curtis says: Leaving this inhospitable isle, we soon reach another called 'Possum Island which is similar to the first one except in vegetation. The cha...
-Evaporation From Trees In Winter Time
R. V. P., Cincinnati, O.: The juices of a tree are drying out through the bark, and especially through the most recent bark, all through the winter. The more severe the winter the greater the draft....
-The May Beetle
C. W. T., Hulmeville, Bucks co., Pa., says: What has become of the May beetle, June bug of some? For the last thirty years or more they have existed in myriads in my neighborhood, but this year the...
-Effect Of The Stock On Apple Graft
L. H. Bailey, Jr., Cambridge, Mass., inquires: Have any readers of the Monthly had experience to prove that the keeping qualities of winter apples are essened by being top-grafted on fall stock? Hav...
-Fairmount Park, Philadelphia
A recent visit to this beautiful public resort was among the pleasures of the past month. As our readers mostly know, it comprises nearly 3000 acres, including the part of the Schuylkill river which f...
-To Make Attar Of Roses
Fill a large glazed earthen jar with rose leaves, carefully separated from the cups; pour upon them spring water just sufficient to cover them, and set the jar, with its contents, in the sun for two o...
-The Botanical Club Of The American Association For The Advancement Of Science
The extraordinary number of botanists that were held together in connection with the American Association's meeting in Philadelphia, was a matter of great surprise to the members of the British Associ...
-Meissonier As A Horticultural Joker
The following story in connection with the painter Meissonier, reminds one of the joke of Congressman Walsh, in planting a real rat for a specimen of the rat-tail Cactus, now many years ago. In his em...
-John Williamson
We find by a note in the Botanical Gazette, that the author of the very interesting book, The Ferns of Kentucky died recently in the mountains of West Virginia, where he had gone to endeavor to repa...
-Ignatius Sargent
Among the deaths for August we are sorry to have to chronicle that of Mr. Ignatius Sargent, which occurred on the 18th of that month, he being then in his 85th year. He belonged to a family, of which ...
-In Memoriam
Mr. Ignatius Sargent, an old-time Boston merchant, died very suddenly at his home in Brook-line on Monday, in the eighty-fifth year of his age. When found he was sitting in his chair, with a book rest...
-Augustus Faul
Landscape gardening in America, cannot afford to lose many of its devotees. They are all too few. Those we have are overburdened, and when we look around for some one to aid in their excellent labors,...
-Fallacies In Progress And Poverty By William Hanson. New York: Fowler & Wells Co
This is a review of McLeod's Economies, and while it shows how illogical are many of the principles presented by that writer, it seems to us that the same destruction must follow with many of his own....
-Drugs And Medicines Of North America
This comes to our exchange table, as a new candidate for popular favor. It is a quarterly, issued by Messrs. Lloyd, of Cincinnati, and deserves success. The medicinal plants of our country are figured...
-Favors To Correspondents
A New York correspondent writes: I sent you a paper, referring to one already published, and asked as a personal favor that it appear in the following number. No notice was taken of my request. Is t...
-The Government And Market Produce
Mr. John R. Lomas, New Haven, Conn., sends us a communication in regard to the produce wasted on farms and gardens because it will not pay to send it to market, and then regards the immense number of ...
-Night-Blooming Cereus
If the Night-blooming Cereus, says Mr. Falconer (see p. 279), ' flowers to a day, at the same date in many greenhouses,' what is the Cereus referred to? In greenhouses Cereus grandiflorus is common...
-November, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 311. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Whittier somewhere has some beautiful thoughts which we cannot now recall in the original verse, warning us against the belief that all that is grand has gone before. The glory of Sinai and the great ...
-Communications. Our Friend, The Mole
Until Ecclesiasticus told us so, I never knew the mole was our friend; but this is the endearing manner in which he speaks of them: They do not eat roots - they only throw up the ground! We will let t...
-Golden Matricaria
Since sending the brief note (page 229, Aug. G. M.) on Variation in Feverfew, or cross-fertilization, as I regarded it, but which the Editor seemed to think quite impossible, I find among the seedli...
-Sedges For Lawn Grass
I intend to make trial of Carex novae-anglse and of other of the more grass-like of the upland carices and sedges in place of lawn grass. On our light South Jersey sands the merest touch of drought pl...
-New French Roses
It has occurred to me that your readers might like to know what new roses will be offered by French growers the coming fall, and I have collected all accounts about them and append herewith. As a comp...
-Roses At Auburn
For the past three weeks we have had very hot, dry weather, which has been particularly hard on Hybrid Perpetual Roses, causing less bloom than usual at this season. Those which have given the most la...
-A Boy-Power Pump
Just now every thought is turned towards utilizing waste power. Doggy has been set to churn butter, and there is some talk about putting Niagara Falls to some useful task. The Germans have thought of ...
-Smoke And Plant Culture
In the West-where bituminous coal is used, gardening has to get out of the way, except so far as relates to a limited number of plants. In Cincinnati numbers of species of evergreens, once hardy enoug...
-The Oleander Poisonous
That the Oleander is a very poisonous plant is certain. It was the Rhododendron of the ancients, and most likely much of the poisonous character reported to be possessed by the modern Rhododendron, ha...
-Protecting Roses
R., of Pennsylvania, says: I have quite a lot of young Hybrid Perpetual Roses that were planted out in the open ground in July last, and, owing to the very dry summer, they have not made very much ...
-Shade Trees For Florida
Y. C. P. writes: I wish to ask a question about shade trees below 29th parallel latitude. What would be most suitable for shade trees? Would you recommend the Water Oak, Pecan Nut, Tulip, Sweet Gu...
-Garden Of Mr. H. H. Hunnewell, At Boston
An American gentleman, a rare lover of gardening, and who has traveled extensively in Europe, pays these gardens the following compliment: I have no words to express my admiration of Mr. Hunnewell's ...
-November, 1884. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
How often shall I water my plants? asks the purchaser of a small bill at the nursery. In window gardening the water question is also one of the anxious ones - and even in the regular operations of g...
-Communications. Flowering Of The Night-Blooming Cereus
In reply to a hint on page 279, of September Monthly, in regard to flowering of Night-blooming Cereus, I send the following: On the evening of July 20th a friend of mine in this place had a fine one i...
-Phalaenopsis Esmeralda
About this time last year I bought at one of Young & Elliott's sales about a half dozen of the above named orchid without much information about it. They were small plants with three or four leaves ea...
-Ardisia Crenulata
The crenulate-leaved Ardisia, Ardisia crenulata, is a very handsome evergreen stove or warm greenhouse plant, growing from two to six feet in height, and belonging to the natural order Myrsin-aceae. I...
-Orchid Notes
The question has often been asked me, Are orchids difficult to cultivate ? With over a dozen years' experience my answer has been, that as far as manual labor was concerned the cultivation was easy,...
-Growing Plants In Moss
Dumesnil tells a French magazine that his moss is so powerful it must not come in contact with the roots at first, but some less powerful material must go between the roots and the moss when potted. A...
-Roses In Winter
A correspondent of the N. Y. Evening Post, says of rose culture near New York: The hybrid perpetuals or' French fancy roses,' as they are sometimes termed, require a somewhat different treatment to '...
-Anthiiriam Rothschildianum. Anthurium Ferrierense
This beautiful hybrid is also one of M. Bergman's acquisitions; it is the result of crossing a fine red-spathed variety of A. Scherzerianum with the white-spathed variety, A. Scherzerianum album. The...
-Flowering Of A Night Blooming Cereus
F. C. G., Verona, N. J., says: In Sept. No. of Gardeners Monthly, I read of Night Blooming Cereus blooming June 21st, etc. I have two plants, three and four years old, that bloomed Sept. 1st and ...
-The Vanilla Plant
The item in the September number of the Gardeners' Monthly, page 281, on Vanilla Beans, suggests an interesting subject for inquiry and experiment. The Vanilla being, as stated, a native of Mexico, bu...
-Apples On Hawthorn
In October number of Gardeners' Monthly you ask if any have experimented with grafting apples or pears on Crab-apple or Hawthorn. I would say that about twenty or twenty-five years ago I transplanted ...
-Hardy Grapes In Eastern Massachusetts
So far as my observation has extended (which I must confess is not very far) this has been an exceptionally unfavorable year for out-door grapes. We have had so much rain and so much cool weather for ...
-Curculio And The Plum
It need not be a grey-headed person to tell of the almost total absence of plums in our time. It is, indeed, but a few years ago when the young people did not know what a garden plum was. The curculio...
-Strawberries Running Out
The strawberry in its natural conditions is a native of high northern latitudes, or high elevations in southern ones. Hence, in elevations near the sea, in warm climates, the low vital power caused by...
-To Kill Scale
Where one is afraid pure linseed oil may not be furnished, the following prescription furnished by the Entomological department of the Department of Agriculture may be employed : Kerosene....... .......
-A Large Apple Tree
H. C. Hovey gives to the 'Scientific American the following figures relating to an apple tree about 175 years old at Hotchkiss, Conn. : Circumference of the trunk, near the ground.....15 ft. 3 in. ...
-Trouble With Fruit Trees
F. A. M., Pottsville, Pa., writes : I live in the country on account of delicate health, and among other things I have been giving much time and study to the cultivation of fruit. I have planted an...
-Moore's Diamond Grape
A Rochester correspondent sends us a sample of this - one of the hybrids raised some years ago by Jacob Moore. The bunch weighed five ounces, and though the quality was very good, we had our doubts ab...
-Japanese Persimmons From Norfolk, Va
Larger and larger! Only think of Persimmons weighing each over half a pound! Yet this is the story the scales tell us about some specimens sent us by Mr. Reynolds, of Norfolk, Va. This locality seems...
-The Lindley Grape
Mr. Blodget writes: When I left my house this morning I did not expect to send you the hastily-collected grapes I have just put in the express, but I opened them at Mr. Marot's, and, at his suggestio...
-Insects Injurious To Fruits In North Carolina
C. W. W., Wilson, N. C, writes: I send you to-day a small basket of apples and peaches. The apples are the Shockley, Romanite and Bar Seedling, three of the hardiest varieties of winter apples in t...
-Louisa Plum
Mr. Samuel Miller, Bluffton, Mo., writes: If nothing happens to prevent, I intend mailing you a box - or rather a tin can - with some Louisa Plums, a variety which I do not think ever gets East. It ...
-Forests And Rainfall
It is not so many years ago since the Editor of this magazine stood almost alone in showing that there was no evidence worthy of being called scientific to show that trees had any influence on the inc...
-Trees As Lightning Conductors
Electricians in the Old World have come to the conclusion that the greatest protection a building can have is to have a few tall trees planted near it. The branches of a tree are as so many points con...
-Rainfall And Forests
Now we have the Indian Agriculturist, which seems to speak as if it were well known in that' country, that the removal of forests has a tendency to increase the rainfall on the area cleared. It, how...
-Natural History And Science. The Palmetto And Its Uses
Among the native growths of Carolina, no tree, perhaps, has been an object of greater interest than the Palmetto, and from the earliest dates of civilization on her shores, it has received distinguish...
-Growth Of Agave Heteracantha
Enclosed please find photographs of Agave he-teracantha, with its spike of mature seed and seed-pocs, flowers, etc.: of which I sent you some time ago. Also of Fourcroya elegans, which, though a very ...
-The Tonga Plant. Epipremnum Mirabile
Of this celebrated plant Mr. Wm. Bull says: A remarkable Arad introduced from the South Sea Islands; it has large shining dark green elliptic-oblong pinnatisect leaves, more or less oblique, and havi...
-Temperature And Hardiness In Trees
We take it for granted that every constant reader of the Gardeners' Monthly knows by this time that the hardiness of trees is not a question of temperature merely, but that the hygrometer as well as...
-Remarkable Variation In A Concord Grape
A correspondent at Newark, N. Y., writes: We mailed you to-day some sample grapes. They are taken from one branch of a Concord vine, which for the past three or four years has borne grapes double the...
-Giving A Special Flavor To Fruits
M. M., Chicago, 111.: I have read in an agricultural paper the positive statement, that if the fruit-stem of a watermelon, in its young condition, be bored and impregnated with the flavor of vanilla,...
-An Easy Way To Make Hybrids
Mr. Mahlon Carver, of Carversville, Bucks co., Pa., writes: I have thought for years there should have been more progress in bringing new varieties of fruits, plants and cereals than by the slow, un...
-Attar Of Roses
A correspondent writes: Have you verified the recipe for Otto of Roses given on page 317 of G. M.? I am afraid the person who embarked in the oil of rose business, and used that process, would 'get ...
-Phylloxera In Pennsylvania
I would be much obliged to you, if you can give me the following information: Is the vine cultivated in Pennsylvania; in which part of the State; and is it with purpose of making wine? Is the vin...
-Needle Grass Of Texas
G. W. H.,Belvi-dere, N. J., sends the following interesting note: I enclose some fragments of the seed vessels of what we call Needle Grass, in Texas; grows on sandy land west of Colorado River. Wi...
-Advertising
Perhaps in no other country is the press so liberally patronized by seedsmen, florists and nurserymen as in the United States. In their advertising seasons, which cover most of the months of the year,...
-Fragmentary Gossip
An esteemed friend, writing from England, says: On July 4th I went to Lichfield, and was sorry to find Dr. Johnson's Willow had been destroyed by a storm. It is so twisted and torn into fragments, an...
-Patent Rights On New Fruits
Some years ago there was an urgency in some quarters that patent rights should be given for new fruits, and the Gardeners' Monthly was not kindly spoken of, because it could not conscientiously advo...
-Pontius Pilate
The forestry convention held in Scotland recently, and where our Professor C. V. Riley received a gold medal for his services in forestry, has been picking up odd bits of knowledge outside of their im...
-Subterranean Flowers
Professor Eichler has lately described, in the Jahrbuch des Konig-lichen Botanischen Gartens zu Berlin, a singular Brazilian Anona, which, from the peculiarity now to be mentioned, he calls rhizanth...
-William Saunders, Of London, Ontario
The Rural New Yorker of August 9th has an admirable likeness of this eminent Entomologist and good friend ol intelligent horticulture. We say, admirable likeness, because the cuts of well-known people...
-Francis B. Hayes
The Massachusetts Horticultural Society sustains a severe loss in the death of this gentleman, who was serving his fifth term as its President. He died at his Boston residence on the 20th of September...
-George Bentham
In the death of this gentleman who, on September 10th passed away in his eighty-fourth year, we lose one of the greatest botanists of our age. His name is connected with so many plants, that in this w...
-The Man Wonderful And The House Beautiful
An allegory. By Ch. and Mary A. Allen. New York: Fowler & Wells Co. This is a work for home reading, intended to teach the principles of physiology and hygiene. It has the misfortune of a long title,...
-Exotic Or Indigenous
Mr. F. W. Kelsey, says: If you will pardon the expression, I do not see that your criticism on the use of the word 'Exotics'in my article helps it materially, for it assumes either that I made a mist...
-Origin Of The Name Veronica
F. R. W., West Philadelphia: Since reading your interesting work on the ' Flowers and Ferns of the United States,' I have taken a great interest in the derivation of plant names. Interested in Vero...
-The Lotus
Inquirer. The Lotus of the Egyptians is not our Nelumbium luteum, the American Water Chinquapin, but a very closely related species, Nelumbium speciosum. The latter has rosy pink flowers; the forme...
-Seventy-Five Kinds Of Apples
A correspondent desires to know what in the world is the meaning of the premium offered in the New Orleans Exhibition for apple trees of seventy-five kinds? What nursery grows seventy-five kinds of a...
-Ontario Fruit-Growers' Society
The annual meeting was held at Barre, on the 2d of October. The officers elected for the coming year are Mr. Saunders, President; Mr. Buck, of Ottawa, Vice-President, and Mr. Beadle, of St. Catharines...
-Encouragement For Skill At Horticultural Exhibitions
It is some time since we commented on the effete system of premiums as given at horticultural exhibitions, and suggested improvements thereon. What we said seemed to be wasted. The old system prevails...
-Mass. Horticultural Society
The number of wealthy amateurs, who love gardening, and do their best to encourage a spirit of emulation, which reacts favorably on public taste, is very large around Boston; these mostly support ably...
-Cryptogamic Plant Exhibit
Dr. Thomas Taylor, microscopist of the Department of Agriculture, has prepared for the New Orleans Exhibition one of the finest collections of drawings of cryptogamic plants ever brought together. The...
-December, 1884. Volume XXVI. Number 312. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
If we look carefully at the streets of our towns it will surprise those who reflect to see how the trees crowd each other, spoil each other, and defeat the object for which they were set out. The lead...
-Note On Caladium
Having the past Spring come into possession of some Caladium bulbs, the growth of which has since proved a source of great satisfaction, I desire to inquire more about this interesting family of plant...
-Sedges For Lawns
I am glad to observe that in the minds of some, several of the Sedges might be turned to good account when lawn grasses refuse to grow, not only on barren stretches of moorland, but in front yards in ...
-Victoria Regia In The Open Air
The Queen of the Amazon - the Victoria Water Lily - has been flowering beautifully the past summer in a tank eighteen feet in diameter, in the garden of Dr. T. G. Richardson at New Orleans. The leaves...
-Consumption Of Smoke
As recently noted, one of the worst enemies to gardening near large cities is smoke. Anything bearing on the removal of this evil has an interest to our readers. The following simple method for the co...
-Rosa Carolina - A Beautiful Summer Rose
When in France a few years ago, the writer observed to his companion that the French women seemed to have more taste in dress than Americans. Nonsense, was the reply, you only have strange eyes in...
-White And Yellow Broom
The yellow broom does not make a particularly handsome plant, but in May when covered with its golden butterfly blossoms few things in the shrubbery are more attractive. At the same season the white b...
-The China Tree
The East Indian Melia Azederach, singularly enough, has obtained the name of China Tree in the Southern States of the Union, where it thrives remarkably well. It only succeeds in very sheltered situat...
-Fruiting Of Akebia Quinata
A Williams-port, Pa., correspondent says: To-day I found on an old vine of Akebia quinata, the peculiar seed which I send you by mail. To me they are entirely new, never having noticed them on my Ake...
-Variegated Bitter-Sweet
J. C. S., 107 East Thirty-first street, New York, writes: Enclosed are variegated leaves of Solanum dulcamara, familiarly known as ' Bitter-Sweet.' Is the variety worth cultivating? I discovered t...
-Propagating Bermuda Grass For Lawns
In the South they have no grass which tillers out sufficiently to make a sod good enough for lawns, as there is in the more Northern States. The Bermuda Grass, a rather tender, but creeping kind, is o...
-Disease In Rose Leaves
M. L. H., Minneapolis, Minn., asks: Will you kindly tell me what causes rose leaves to turn black, like the enclosed, and what I can do to prevent them from doing so? My bushes are thrifty, and ap...
-A Rhododendron Borer
A correspondent finds her rhododendrons suffering from a stem borer which enters near the ground, as in the quince and other fruit trees, and from which the plants often break clean off, during a stor...
-December, 1884. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The amateur - the novice so to speak - is much inclined to go to the professional man when puzzled how to treat his plants; and the lady whose only conservatory is the window-room with its two score p...
-Communications. Carnations, Pansies And Violets
The pansy has undergone some changes within twenty-five years; the class of fancy pansies, of which fine specimens have been shown by E. L. Beard, has been introduced within that time. But the culture...
-Winter Culture Of Mignonette
Mignonette is of easy cultivation when once its requirements are understood. Some potfuls are useful and acceptable for decoration at all times, but especially in the spring and early summer; it can t...
-Propagating Oxalis Floribunda
Miss Jennie T., Shoemakertown, Pa. This plant, as well as its pretty ally O. multiflora, is easily raised by cuttings of the roots. Both are truly ever-blooming plants, and do well as basket plants, a...
-Origin Of The Petunia
All the Petunias under cultivation have been derived from two species from South America, - the white is P. nyctagini-flora, the purple, P.violacea, a very small flowered kind. P. parviflora has been ...
-Odontoglossum Vexillarium Rubellum
This beautiful autumn-blooming variety of O. vexillarium was introduced by Mr. Wm. Bull, who says it is specially remarkable in two peculiarities which it presents, namely, its habit of flowering in t...
-An Oil Experiment And A Thermometer Test
My previous papers in the Gardeners' Monthly were incidentally the result of asking a question concerning the Editor's experience with oil upon pear trees, and the response being favorable, I was indu...
-Olives In Texas
Several years ago I imported some olive trees from Southern France. They grew off so beautifully that I was encouraged to import a larger lot the next year. These too started off splendidly and I had ...
-Some New White Grapes
I send you by express, charges paid through, a small box containing specimens for comparison, of the three notable white grapes, Empire State, Niagara and Pocklington. I do not think either variety ...
-A Fine Howell Pear
Mr. A. W. Harrison, Secretary of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, places before us a Howell pear weighing 1 lb. 1 1/2 oz. and measuring 12 1/2 inches in its lateral circumference. It was from t...
-The Enterprise Meat Chopper
We do not know why a screw press or grinder should be called a chopper. The Enterprise Co., of Philadelphia, sends us one. We expected to give it to the officer who has charge of our wood shed, and ...
-Diseases Of Fruit Trees
Under this heading Mr. C. M. Hovey contributes an article brim full of common sense, to the Massachusetts Ploughman. It is but recently that we had to call attention to a lament of a scientifiic seria...
-Downing Grape
J. J. B.,Fishkill, N. Y., writes: I send you by express, this day, prepaid, a bunch of the Downing grape for your inspection. I have grown bunches of this variety that weighed two pounds each. Its...
-Avoiding The Odor Of Onion
A lady writing from Newport, R. I., says: You were so kind about the 'wiggling' flowers of Centaureas, last year, that I venture to send you a queer, but comfortable, thing I found out this morning w...
-Cost Of A New Jersey Forest Fire
The October fire in New Jersey is estimated to have consumed between $100,000 and $150,000 worth of property, besides the losses of time by the great number of men engaged in trying to prevent its spr...
-The Wattles For Tan-Bark
These trees have been found to grow very well in many parts of California. Prof. Hilyard has been experimenting with them on the University grounds at Berkely, and writes that the wattles, Nos. 1, 2 a...
-A Large Walnut Tree
The Athens (Ga.) Banner says: 'About seven, miles south of Hickory, near the South Fork river, on the John Wil-fong farm, stands a remarkable walnut tree. It is twenty-seven feet in circumference, bei...
-Natural History And Science. Geography Of Plants
The lecturer said we habitually recognize differences in the character of vegetation when we peak of Tropical, Temperate or Arctic plants. Even the most uneducated mind cannot avoid contrasting the r...
-A Birch Growing Out Of A Chestnut Tree
When I was a boy, years and years ago, there grew on my father's land, in the western part of the township of Belchertown, Mass., a large chestnut tree, from the south side of which, about six inches ...
-Water Plants
The lecturer said water plants were the aristocracy of the vegetable kingdom, if rank is to be measured by antiquity of origin. They were the earliest forms of plant life, and must have commenced thei...
-Euadenia Eminens
This curious plant furnishes a remarkable illustration of an irregular flower, two of the petals having- advanced to huge proportions over the rest. A pansy might afford another illustration wherein t...
-"Fertilization By Insects"
In a town not far from Boston, it was announced, that, at a meeting of the local scientific society, one of the townspeople would deliver a lecture upon The Fertilization of Flowers by Wind and by I...
-The Palmetto In Florida
Mr. A. H. Curtiss tells the Florida Dispatch: The palmetto naturally excites more interest in the mind of tourists than any other tree, and here, at the very gateway to the State, they may see it in...
-Blooming Of Phyllocactus Grandis
Mr. E. S. Miller, Wading River N. Y., writes: Perhaps the subject of Night Blooming Cereus is getting stale. But I have had two plants of Phyllocactus grandis (Lamaire) recently. One showed no signs...
-" Heart Hybrids"
An esteemed correspondent writing from Boston, says: I have just run through the pages of the November number and find many ' interesting' articles that should thus be permanently recorded; and thi...
-Hybridization In Asters
A. G. observes: The Gardeners' Monthly has, perhaps, noticed that Mr. Woolley Dod, in Garden and Gardeners' Chronicle, writes of the spontaneous hybridizing of Asters in his own garden. He is a tru...
-A Little Excursion In Washington Territory
Ever since we have been in Washington Territory we have been hearing of Chelachie (Indian for Fern Prairie), which seemed to be an exceptional bit of country in many ways. It is about twenty miles...
-W. D. Brackenridge
In our efforts to do justice to those who, still living, have been prominent as authors in American Horticulture, we meet with many difficulties; not by any means the least being the modesty which pre...
-Eli K. Price
The public parks of Philadelphia and art and science in general have lost one of their best friends in the death of Eli K. Price. He was perhaps one of the ablest of the many remarkable men that have ...
-Typograpical Errors
We make it a rule always to correct errors of the press or of other kinds, as soon as noted; other papers rarely do so, and hence, may seem to have claims to perfection which the Gardeners' Monthly mi...
-Phylloxera Laws
As our readers know, the trade in Nursery stock with continental Europe, which was growing to be quite an item in our American exports, has been wholly suspended through the phylloxera laws. It has a...
-French Market Gardeners
The Gardeners' Chronicle, tells us that the agricultural life of a French market gardener begins, one may fairly say, from babyhood. At eight or nine years of age his mental education - if, indeed, ...
-Caryophyllus, The Carnation
The botanical name of the Carnation is Dianthus Caryophyllus. The Gardeners Chronicle, says: Incidentally we may allude to the term Caryophyllus as applied to the Dianthus, from which our Carnation...
-Bible Flowers
Those unacquainted with the subject will simply be astonished at the wealth of floral imagery contained in the Bible, no less than the number of plants, flowers, fruits, and shrubs mentioned therein, ...
-Cultivated Plants And The Time Of Their Introduction
The following list contains the date of introduction of some of the foreign plants which are now familiar in our gardens and conservatories: The common Acacia tree, a native of North America, was firs...
-Diseases Of Field And Garden Crops
By Worthington G. Smith, 1884. London: Published by Macmillan & Co. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co. Those who wish to understand thoroughly what may come before them in connection with the disea...
-Three Visits To America
By Emily Faith-full. New York: Fowler and Wells Company. Miss Faithfull is well known in connection with many good deeds for the elevation of women, and the good of humanity in general. Her visits to...
-Rural Taste
By Maximilian G. Kern. Columbia, Missouri. The object of this work has our cordial sympathy. Mr. Kern believes that the elements of rural taste should be a part of an intelligent education, and so do...
-Forestry
This monthly magazine, now in its twelfth year, commences its new series with the November number, and with a change of publishers. It is now issued from Edinburgh, instead of London. It has been from...
-Whittier's Poem On The Burning Bush
S. D. M. says: I am a great admirer of Whit-tier, and have a volume which I thought contained all his poems, but do not find one with that to which you made such pleasant reference in the Hints o...
-Sir Michael Bass
Mr. Harding says; If I thought Sir Michael Bass was a reader of the Monthly I would certainly apologize to him through its pages, for the vexatious mistake I unfortunately made when commenting upon b...
-Forest And Botanical Work
A correspondent from Ainsworth, Nebraska, desires to find out how to get rid of ' pocket gophers.' They live on roots, and can eat the roots off from a six-year-old apple tree. The Gardeners' Monthly...
-Downing's Fruits And Fruit Trees
Mr. Charles Downing writes: There is a mistake in the November number of the Gardeners' Monthly, relating to a new revised edition of 'Downing's Fruits and Fruit Trees,' which I will thank you to cor...
-Chrysanthemum Show At Horticultural Society's Hall, Philadelphia
The exhibit showed a gratifying improvement in cultural skill over the exhibit of last year, with room for a still greater advance another season. The amateur exhibitors had by far the best grown spec...
-Proceedings Of The Mississippi Valley Horticultural Society
Mr. W. H. Ragan, Secretary, Greencastle, Indiana, says: Our society owes a debt of over four hundred dollars. As an offset to this indebtedness, we have a a surplus of a few hundred copies of the val...
-A Double Red-Flowered Plum - Alcohol From The Chestnut
A Double Red-Flowered Plum The double Chinese cherry, now some years under culture in American gardens, and admired for the pretty rosy tinge to its petals is to be reinforced by a double red-flowe...
-The Chestnut In Canada - Information Regarding The South
The Chestnut In Canada Mr. P. E. Bucke says that all attempts to get the sweet chestnut to grow at Ottawa have failed. Blue Gum Charcoal The Spanish newspapers tell us that the wood of the Eucaly...
-Origin Of The Best Roses - Book On Coniferae
Origin Of The Best Roses The French maintain their reputation as the raisers of the greater number of popular roses, as the long list of French names of the newer ones testifies. England gives us a f...
-Progress Of Orchid Growing - War On The Codling Moth
Progress Of Orchid Growing It is pleasant to note that the increase of the taste for orchid growing increases as we learn how simple their culture really is. At a recent meeting of the Ger-mantown Ho...
-Apples Grafted On Pears - Col. M. P. Wilder
Apples Grafted On Pears The Revue Horticole says that it has been regarded in France as impossible to graft apples on pears, and a successful attempt is regarded as very remarkable. In this country t...
-Begonias - The Cuthbert Raspberry
Begonias If Michel Begon, the patron of Botany of the 17th century, for whom the books tell us Plumier named the Begonia, were alive now, he would be proud of the great number of beautiful plants whi...
-Grape Products In California - Self-Blanching Celery
Grape Products In California The receipts from an acre of Tokay grapes are about $200. Harvey Davis Strawberry Is said to have been in culture ten years in the vicinity of Boston, and highly thou...
-The Club-Root In Cabbage And Turnips - Designs And Flowering Plants
The Club-Root In Cabbage And Turnips Mr. George Henderson, Rye, New York, writes that this disease does not occur when cabbage plants are set out on ground where onions have grown the year before. An...
-Lilium Auratum - The Phylloxera In Australia
Lilium Auratum It appears they find the same trouble, in getting Lilium auratum to do well in England, as we do in this country. A correspondent of the Journal of Horticulture says, that notwithstand...
-Fighting The Phylloxera - Horse Radish
Fighting The Phylloxera The French government appropriated $250,000 towards aiding the French vine growers in fighting the Phylloxera, and has promised a similar sum for next year. It shows the impor...
-Solanum Ohrondii - The Florida Dispatch
Solanum Ohrondii This novelty, is said by Mr. J. G. Baker to be an old species described as S. Commersoni. Mr. Baker, as we understand, does not regard S. Fendleri as distinct from S. Jamesii, whic...
-Single Chrysanthemums - Window Plants In The Old World
Single Chrysanthemums There seems to have been a satiety of double flowers. From double Dahlias the public taste has dropped to single ones; and the latest rage is for improved single Chrysanthemums....
-The Dogs Of London - Ptelea Aptera
The Dogs Of London A market gardener near London contracts for all the stray brutes taken up and killed by the dog-catchers. During the summer months his receipts of dead dogs exceed a thousand a wee...
-Arctositaphylos Oppositifolia - Magnolia Thurberi
Arctositaphylos Oppositifolia This genus which is so well known from the curious manza-nita - A. pungens - has had a new one under the above name added to it by Dr. C. C. Parry. The whole genus has...
-Rose, Secretary Nicholas - Forced Strawberries
Rose, Secretary Nicholas One of the roost beautiful roses ever introduced was the Geant des Battailes, but it was a poor grower, easily mildewed, and has measurably disappeared from cultivation. The ...
-Hardiness Of The Spanish Chestnut - The Virgin's Mantle
Hardiness Of The Spanish Chestnut F. G. says: I see that a correspondent from Buffalo, New York, says that the Spanish chestnut is not hardy there, as he imported a few plants and for two successi...
-Baron Ferdinand Von Mueller - Retinospora Plumosa Aurea
Baron Ferdinand Von Mueller The many friends of this distinguished Australian botanist will be glad to learn that he has fairly well recovered from his long spell of illness, and is again at work ene...
-Fir Tree Oil - The Earth Almond
Fir Tree Oil This insecticide seems to be gaining steadily in favor. It is certainly a great boon to amateurs, furnishing a safe and easy application. Plant culture by amateurs loses a great portion ...
-Comparative Age Of Apple Trees - Peach Curl In Indiana
Comparative Age Of Apple Trees In the West twenty years is believed to be the average duration of an apple tree, as against forty in the Atlantic portion of the United States. Cactus Hedges These...
-Canker Worm - Abnormal Strawberry
Canker Worm A correspondent from White Plains, New York, writes that the canker worm is playing great havoc with his apple trees, and desires to know whether there is any cheap and effectual remedy. ...
-Truffles In America - Exportation To France And Other Parts Of Europe
Truffles In America While we are waiting to know of a certainty whether the truffle has been found in the Atlantic portion of the United States, and are rather inclined to decide that they have not, ...
-How To Heat A Greenhouse With Water - The Climbing Hydrangea
How To Heat A Greenhouse With Water By J. D. Carmody, Evansville, Indiana. This is full of very valuable facts and suggestions, from which the most experienced plants-man may derive some profit. A...
-Lilium Harrisi - The Currant Worm
Lilium Harrisi A correspondent of the London Journal of Horticulture says that numbers of the old typical form of L. longiflorum have been foisted on the English public for this. He procured some gen...
-Preserving Liquid For Fruits - The Game Fish Of The North
Preserving Liquid For Fruits A correspondent asks, and we shall be very glad to have a reply: I desire to collect fruits and vegetables for the New Orleans Exposition. I am told that the fruits, che...
-Ivy Leaves - Late Flowered Roses
Ivy Leaves We have a large lot of material on our table this month, with no word of who from, or for what purpose sent. The letters and parcels often come in at different mails, and it is hard to con...
-Rose Pests In Nevada - Celery In July
Rose Pests In Nevada A lady sends us specimens of rose leaves almost white from being preyed on by a kind of thrip which appears to us to be identical with the grape leaf hopper. A Yellow Verbena ...
-New Early Grapes - Kieffer Pear On Quince
New Early Grapes The Keystone, Daisy and Early Concord, are new candidates for earli-ness; the second one named being also wonderfully productive. The same introducer has twenty more not ful...
-Grapes And Currants - Flowering Of The Night Blooming Cereus
Grapes And Currants A Camden, N. J. correspondent sends us a bunch of native grapes, in which all but about half a dozen berries have become currants. Just why these berries become seedless and grow ...
-Fertilization Of Yucca - Editorial Temper
Fertilization Of Yucca It is believed that the Yucca does not seed in Europe on account of the absence there of insects adapted to cross-fertilization. We have from a correspondent at Rome, who gathe...
-Combination Fences - Treatment Of Palms
Combination Fences Barbed wire strung on temporary cheap posts, and then some enduring living plant set out along it, make an everlasting fence. Such fences are growing into popularity. In the South ...
-Stock For Grafting Oranges - Protecting Strawberries From Birds
Stock For Grafting Oranges In Florida they find Limonia trifoliata a good stock for the orange. It is an East Indian species, and known as Triphasia Aurantiola, in some botanies. Seeds From Richar...
-Pea Nuts - Fruit Of The Nettle Tree
Pea Nuts 2,010,000 bushels was the crop of the United States for 1883, of which Virginia furnished nearly half. They bring the raiser about $1.75 per bushel. Protecting Cherries From Birds When t...
-White Oak - Lemuel Clapp
White Oak The immense value of the white oak, Quercus alba, created a double surprise at the International Forestry Exhibition - surprise that it was so good, and surprise that the fact was not more ...
-Mr. E. A. Carriere - Perennial Larkspurs
Mr. E. A. Carriere The well-known editor of the Revue Horticole, and Chief of the Flort-cultural Department of the Museum at Paris, has been decorated with the insignia of the Legion of Honor for his...
-Double Hydrangeas - Seedling Geranium
Double Hydrangeas Nanz & Neuner, write: In reply to your question on page 263 about Hydrangeas, we say, that we had several of the Hydrangea, Thos. Hogg, come double with us for the last two years, ...
-Extent Of Land In Fruit - Fertilizers For Forced Vegetables
Extent Of Land In Fruit Few people have any idea of the enormous extent of land under fruit culture in the United States. A correspondent from Barnesville, Ohio, tells us that about 6,000 bushels of ...
-Woodcock Grape - Unpaid Express Packages
Woodcock Grape The originator claims for this extra earliness, coloring before the Concord begins to change. It is an excellent keeper, never drops from the stem, and is of first-class favor. It is ...
-Fashionable Names - Heliopsis Laevis
Fashionable Names Sericiculture is now the fashionable name for silk culture; Dendriculture for tree growing; Fragariculture for the strawberry; Solanituberosiculture for the potato, and Znidroykstch...
-Rose Hedges In Texas - Marlboro Raspberry
Rose Hedges In Texas The Macartney Rose makes one of the best protective hedge plants in Southern Texas. Hybrid Lobelias A new race has been originated by the firm of Vilmorin, Andrieux & Co., of...
-Prunes - Evergreen Blackberry
Prunes It is believed in Germany that only a certain variety of Plum known as the Prune, is fit for drying. Mr. Isaac Collins of Haywards, California, finds in that climate, Coe's Golden Drop does ju...
-The Hardest Wood Known - The Healthfulness Of London Smoke
The Hardest Wood Known W. C. B., West Philadelphia, Pa., writes: Mahogany, the desert Ironwood tree and Lignumvitae have each come under our notice as being'the hardest wood in existence. Which i...









TOP
previous page: The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V25 | by Thomas Meehan
  
page up: Gardening and Horticulture Books
  
next page: The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V27 | by Thomas Meehan