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The Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V27 | by Thomas Meehan



One of our nurserymen recently complained to the writer, of those people who continually wrote to his firm for advice. " Please send me -, and at the same time tell me how to treat them," is a sample of numerous requests. The profit on the whole transaction might be but a dollar or two. Only for the request, the order would be turned over to the proper clerk, and the proprietor could turn his attention to profitable work...

TitleThe Gardener's Monthly And Horticulturist V27
AuthorThomas Meehan
PublisherCharles H. Marot
Year1885
Copyright1885, Charles H. Marot
AmazonFour-Season Harvest: Organic Vegetables from Your Home Garden All Year Long

Devoted To Horticulture, Arboriculture And Rural Affairs.

Edited By Thomas Meehan, Formerly Head Gardener to Caleb Cope, Esq., at Springbrook, and at the Bart-ram Botanic Garden near Philadelphia; Graduate of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, (London,) England,. Member of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Author of "American Hand-Book of Ornamental Trees." etc.

-January, 1885. Number 313. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
One of our nurserymen recently complained to the writer, of those people who continually wrote to his firm for advice. Please send me -, and at the same time tell me how to treat them, is a sample ...
-Communications. Shade Trees For Florida
In a recent number of the Monthly some one asked about street shade trees for Florida. No one who has seen the great variety that make their home in her forests ought to be troubled about a choice. I ...
-Ornamenting Grounds
The great pleasure I enjoyed with my flowers and plants, in the summer just over, has induced me, as usual, to care for them in the winter. Having no greenhouse, I tied carefully my century plants, tw...
-A Lawn Grass For The South
In December number of Gardeners' Monthly, a correspondent from Charleston inquires about the planting out of Bermuda grass. The usual mode is by chopping the root stems into small pieces, so that they...
-Rosa Microphylla
In 1862 Dr. Maximowicz discovered near Lake Hakone, in Central Japan, the original type of the Microphylla rose in a spontaneous condition - the species being only known before from the cultivated for...
-Staphylea Colchica
This is a species of Bladder-nut from the South of Russia. It is very much like S. Bumalda from Japan, already in cultivation in American gardens, but it flowers later, and has larger bunches of flowe...
-Spiraea Aruncus
A grand plant, not by any means so abundant as it should be in our gardens, owing to its very distinct and effective appearance. Of course there are positions in the garden where it would be out of pl...
-Destroying Lichens On The Trunks Of Trees
A subscriber of Newport, R. I. says: Will you oblige me by giving your opinion as to the best application (wash) for removing or preventing the growth of lichen on the bark of certain trees. I have h...
-The Victoria Lily At New Orleans
Dr. Richardson says : The statement in the last Gardener's Monthly that Victoria regia was successfully grown last season in my garden pond, without artificial heat, is strictly true; but the flowers...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Vanda CŒRulea
This fine plant has been in flower with me since the last week in September until now (Nov. 12th), and as I see some of your correspondents are interested in Orchids, I send you a few notes on its cul...
-Begonia Metallica
The large bronze colored leaves of this comparatively new Begonia are quite distinct from any other variety. The habit of the plant is robust, symmetrical, and well-branched from the base. The leaves ...
-Notes On Orchids And The Victoria Regia
Your very interesting number for November reminds me to say, with regard to Orchids, that my experience coincides in many respects with that of your correspondent Epiphyte. Orchids here, however, se...
-The Richardia Aethiopica From Seed
A note I observe on page 299 of October Gardeners' Monthly, says: The common Calla rarely produces seeds. This, I presume, means naturally; as with a little care it produces seeds quite readily. I h...
-Begonia Florida Incomparabilis
This was sent out last spring by Haage & Schmidt, of Erfurt, who describe it as a hybrid between B. semperflorens and B. Schmidti, with leaves much like the latter and the blooming qualities of the fo...
-Propagation Of Double Bouvardias
There is a general belief among a good many florists that to propagate Alfred Neuner and Gen. Garfield Bouvardias, top cuttings have to be used in order to preserve their double qualities. That when p...
-Linum Trigynum
Linum trigynum, one of our oldest stove or warm greenhouse plants, is one that is rarely seen in cultivation at the present time; but as it is to be found enumerated in a few of the catalogues of our ...
-Specimen Fuchsias
No subject is of greater interest to the soft-wooded plant growers than the history and cultivation of the Fuchsia. To the present race of young gardeners the giant specimens of a dozen or more years ...
-Dieffenbachia Jenmanii
A new species from British Guiana, sent to Messrs Veitch by its discoverer, Mr. G. S. Jenman, Superintendent of the Botanic Garden at Georgetown, to whom we have much pleasure in dedicating it. It is ...
-Dinner Table Decorations
A correspondent of the London Journal of Horticulture says: Above all avoid overcrowding. In general few plants are wanted at the dinner table; at one for four persons, I should put two Crotons, Chel...
-The Taste Of An African Prince
It is said that Cetewayo, the great African chief who was taken prisoner and carried to England, thought no flower of the many thousands cultivated in English gardens, exceeded in beauty the Salvia pa...
-Steam Heating
Gardener, Chicago, Ills., asks: Why is it, if steam is so superior to hot water heating, that none of the old gardeners knew of it. They seem to have run on hot water and never thought of steam ? ...
-Tar On Hot Water Pipes
Tne following letter and reply have been kindly handed to us by Mr. Peter Henderson : Pottsvim.e, December 5th, 1884. Dear Sir: 1 built four greenhouses last summer and put 2000 ft. of pipe in for ...
-Diseases In Roses
J. G. H. New York, writes: I would like to have you inform me through the MoNTHLy what kind of a disease it is that has got into the roots of my plants. The rest of the roots are the same as the pi...
-January, 1885. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The writer of this was invited recently to look at a garden where, in the proprietor's language, bad luck prevailed. His ornamental trees, that had been pounded in when planted, died for all, and ...
-Communications. New Fruits In New Hampshire
The season of 1884 cannot be classed as a successful one for the small fruit grower and orchard-ist. The spring was unusually backward, and hard frosts continued until nearly June; that of May 30th be...
-The Shaffer Raspberry
A good many fruit growers object to the color of this raspberry, asserting this fault will tell against it on market. I think this peculiar color will be a benefit to its sale when it becomes better k...
-Immediate Effect Of Crossing On Fruits
The New York Independent says of the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, recently held in Philadelphia: In the regular sessions three of the most eagerly anticipated...
-Forced Fruits In England
In the old world some of the best skill was employed in forcing fruits, but the introduction of steam is changing all this. Fruits from the tropics can be now transported toward the arctics nearly as ...
-Culture Of The Banana
The banana is an annual, the fruit coming to maturity about a year from the time that the shoot is planted, the stem of the plant then attaining a height of eight or ten feet and perhaps thirty-six in...
-Grapes On Trees
It has long ago been noted that a grape vine will grow faster when growing over a tree than when trained in any other way. Some observers have from this fact tried to grow grapes successfully on trees...
-The Evergreen Blackberry Of The Sandwich Islands
A lady residing in Washington Territory sends a leaf, confirming Mr. Carman's statement that it is but the cut-leaved English Blackberry : I enclose a small leaf of the ' Evergreen Blackberry' menti...
-Forestry. Communications. Forestry On The Plains
Will you allow me to make a few remarks on a subject of no small importance to the nation ? The lack of trees on our vast and cheerless prairies has come to be felt as a great national want. Forestry ...
-Value Of Timber
It is now a fact beyond all question that figures in relation to the value of any given tree for forestry purposes, are of no value whatever for a guide for forestry planting, so much of the value of ...
-The Douglas Spruce
This from the moist climate of Northern California, Oregon, and Wash-ton territory, is just suited to the very similiar climate of England and other countries bordering the eastern side of the Gulf St...
-Forestry In China
A correspondent of the London Gardener's Chronicle says : I noticed that nearly every garden contained a few specimens of the Chusan Palm, Chamaerops Fortunei, which the natives cultivate for the pur...
-The Carob Tree
This singular tree has been successfully introduced and fruited in California, and as it promises to be one of the most useful trees in the dryer and temperate regions of our country, the following fu...
-Kitool Fibre
The Palm, Caryota urens, Linn., is a native of Ceylon, Malabar, Bengal, Assam, and various parts of India. Amongst natives of Ceylon it is known as Kitool; in India it is called Bastard Sago, Coonda p...
-Pinus Sinensis
The Gardener's Chronicle tells us that the trees of Pinus sinensis adjacent to the Wong Lung Kun Monastery, 50 miles from Canton, are very fine indeed; but they are exceeded in magnificence by those o...
-Black Walnut Culture
Mr. Graves, of Texas, ten years ago planted ten acres to walnut trees, by hand, two hundred to the acre, in all two thousand trees. The trees are now nine inches through, and grow at the rate of an in...
-On Irregularity In Flowers
In your article on Euadenia eminens, published in Dec. No. of the Gardeners' Monthly, I find some observations respecting the regularity and irregularity of flowers, in relation to their attitudes (or...
-On Rapid Changes In The History Of Species
At a recent meeting of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Mr. Meehan exhibited flowers of a remarkable Halesia, and remarked on the wide divergence reached without any intervening modifi...
-Of The Sexes In Chestnut Trees
The past season, when my chestnut tree was in full bloom, I got branches with the early male flowers, from other bearing trees, a mile or more away, and hung them up all over my tree. There was a fine...
-Kaempferia Gilbertii
We have here a sketch of a pretty plant belonging to the ginger family or Zingiberaceae, sent us by Mr. Wm. Bull. A fleshy-rooted perennial, with attractively variegated foliage, introduced from the E...
-Podophyllum In China
One of the most interesting facts in botanical geography is the correspondence between the flora of the Eastern United States and that of China and Japan. New illustrations of this are being continual...
-Cracking Of Fruits
One of the most valuable exercises that the devotees of gardening can indulge in, is to look closely into the causes of every occurrence within their experience. On our table some one placed a specime...
-Ericaceous Beauty At Home And Abroad
When, after a long voyage, the adventurous traveler, on leaving the deck of his vessel, first feels the sand under his feet, as he steps on shore in some distant land, his searching eyes will be met w...
-The Lotus Of The Ancients
Inquirer (p. 350 of Gardeners' Monthly), probably wants information in regard to the famed Lotus, the food of the Lotophagi, which Homer says was so delicious as to make those who ate it forget thei...
-Recollections Of By-Gone Scenes
In reading the interesting article of Wm. T. Harding in the November Monthly, and following him in vivid imagination in his rambles through Needwood forest, I cannot but share with him in surprise and...
-The Old Botanic Garden Of Bartram
About fifty of the descendants of John Bartram, the botanist, assembled in the ancient Friends' meeting-house in Darby recently, for the purpose of arranging a family organization. The extreme incleme...
-The Quassia Tree
Dr. Baillon has just presented the Horticultural Society of Paris with a specimen of Quassia excelsa, a very rare tree, and at present, perhaps, the only one in Europe. The history of this solitary in...
-Mortgages On Farmlands
A Georgia paper thus describes the peculiar operations of a mortgage company : The Freehold Land and Mortgage Company, of London, sues Walter A. Base-ley, Jr., of Greene Co., for $2700. This indebted...
-Why Magazines Live Or Die
The Boston Herald has an article on the death of The Continent. The why and the wherefore puzzles it and other people. Its editor thought its struggle was because it was published in Philadelphia, and...
-The Fox Grape
A foxy grape in the old world, is one which has a brown instead of a black color as it should have - in short, a black grape hardly colored. It is more than probable, that the term fox grape was giv...
-Gardening For Women
Miss Gertrude Sack-ett, in an admirable address before the Summit County Horticultural Society, at its recent meeting at Springfield, Ohio, remarked: One thing should here be spoken of - a woman may ...
-Vicia Denniesiana
In the herbaceous department at Kew this strange and curious plant is now in flower. It was received at Kew from the garden of the late H. C. Watson, Esq., of Thames Ditton. That gentleman described t...
-Mr. John Gardner
This well known horticulturist, gardener and general estate manager to Pierre Lorillard, met with a severe gunning accident recently at the hands of a friend, who did not know he was near. One shot we...
-History Of The Pineapple
For this, the material is not abundant, or, I should rather say, good material. For the most voluminous writers upon this subject have evidently regarded their imagination as a fountain of facts. Ther...
-Orchids, The Royal Family Of Plants
By Harriet Stewart Miner. Boston: Published by Lee and Sheppard, and in New York, by Charles T. Dillingham. Price, $15.00. The most magnificent work of its class ever issued in our country, and will ...
-How The Farm Pays
By William Crozier and Peter Henderson. New York: Peter Henderson & Co. This is a large octavo of 379 pages, handsomely printed and profusely illustrated, giving the experience of two of the most suc...
-Ornamental Gardening For Americans
By Elias A. Long. Orange Judd Co., New York. No work issued for many years in our country has come before us that we can more cordially welcome than this. Books on fruits, flowers, and vegetables, ar...
-Pronunciation Of Veronica
Kate R. writes: You did not tell us which of the two forms of pronunciation of Veronica we should use, presuming there is but one correct way. [Our original correspondent who inquired about Veron...
-George Sterling
The subject of this notice died in Edinburgh, Scotland, on the 29th of last May, aged Seventy-nine years. His name as a gardener, and particularly as a botanist, was known throughout Britain. Uneduca...
-Haarlem Exhibition Of Flowering Bulbs, March, 1885
In 1885 the General Society for improving Horticulture at Haarlem will celebrate the fourth century of its existence, and on that occasion an exhibition will be opened at Haarlem on a large scale, bei...
-The Pennsylvania State Horticultural Society
This body meets this year in Lancaster on January 21st and 22d. The usual arrangements for excursion tickets will be made, application for which must be made to E. B. Engle, Secietary, Chambersburg, P...
-Chrysanthemums At The New York Show
Mr. Gerald Howatt gives the Country Gentleman some account of the Chrysanthemum show at the recent Fair of the American Institute, from which we take the following, as giving some points in comparison...
-February, 1885. Number 314. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
There is much written about planting in fall or planting in spring; about planting large trees or small trees; about pruning, grafting, or the general management of trees above ground; but about the t...
-Communications. Lophospermum Scandens
The climbing or scandent Lophospermum, Lophospermum scandens, is a very interesting half-hardy perennial climbing plant belonging to the natural order Scrophulariaceae. It is a plant of vigorous growt...
-Planting Large Trees
Ten years ago more than a hundred trees, of considerable size (from 20 to 50 inches in girth, or about I foot in diameter on an average), were transplanted on the Capitol grounds. They were not in a t...
-Worms In A Rose-Bed
A reader, New Jersey, says : I send enclosed in this a sample of worm that is very troublesome to me in the greenhouse, on the benches covered with soil. It destroys the roots of plants in pots, par...
-Myosotis Eliza Ganrobert
Mr. F. E. McAllister, of New York, calls our attention to this remarkable variety of Forget-me-not. The flowers are in a certain sense double, having double the number of lobes to the corolla that is ...
-Propagating Roses
Carrie B., Pittsburgh, Pa., asks: Can you tell me how to raise plants of a rose we value very much ? We know nothing of grafting or budding, but suppose the plant can be raised from slips, though s...
-February, 1885. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Plant culture, as an art, has scarcely kept pace with other departments of gardening. A fine, and really well grown specimen plant, is too frequently the work of time or circumstances, rather than the...
-Communications. Cultivation Of The Cyclamen
Cyclamen Persicum and its varieties can be raised from seed with the greatest ease by sowing them early. Latter part of January or February I think is about the best time to sow. Purchase a packet or ...
-A Remedy For Rose Mildew In Greenhouses
Perhaps the florist has few more subtile enemies to contend against than mildew, and for this reason much has been written upon the subject, both as regards its prevention and its cure. But as it is o...
-Cyclamen Flowers
Cyclamens will soon throw up their pleasant flowers that droop their heads in modesty and blush to the tips of their lengthened ears, as if conscious of their own admired beauty. It may not be amiss t...
-Painting Hot-Water Pipes With Gas Tar
No one who reads the Gardeners' Monthly paints the pipes with gas tar; but there are some who have not this good fortune, and they, after getting into trouble, worry our readers to help them out. Hith...
-Panax Victoriae
When our English cousins find a new plant in the general order of things, they name it in honor of collector, the owner, or some well-known cultivator, botanist, or patron of gardening. When there is ...
-The Chrysanthemum Disease
Of late years a disease has attacked Chrysanthemums, which seriously detracts from the pleasure of their culture. The leaves are attacked by a fungus in early summer, and by autumn there are but few l...
-On The Cultivation Of Chrysanthemums
Like the greater part of herbaceous plants of this class they are tenacious of life, and easily grown; but if they are to be cultivated well, a regular system of management is necessary. After the flo...
-Hot-Water Pipes
Having for a number of years studied the question of economically heating incubators and chambers for hatching germs, I have been obliged to give a great deal of attention to the subject of boilers an...
-Cultivating The Dove Orchid
A correspondent of the Garden tells us that in a collection in England this contains a fine plant, which has again flowered with great freedom. It has produced six flower-spikes, which have grown to a...
-Oxalis Lutea Plena
A correspondent asks: Can you or any of your readers give me any information concerning Oxalis lutea plena? It is described as having large, double, yellow flowers, resembling dandelions. I should li...
-Disease In Carnations
W., Sharon, Pa., writes: We make the forcing of Carnations a specialty, and this fall when we lifted our plants, we noticed a good many that looked yellow and sickly, and unfit to plant on the be...
-Destroying Plant Lice
I. J. L.: I had a lot of Chrysanthemum plants last summer, in the open ground, covered with Black Aphis. I applied Paris green, but it had no effect whatever. Are they poison-proof or what ? [T...
-Gas Tar On Hot-Water Pipes
Mr. Henderson kindly sends us another wail, from Dr. W. H. H., Frankfort, Ky.,and remarks: Here is another victim. If you wish to benefit your species, put up on every issue - Gas Tar!! Beware ! !...
-Watering Plants With Warm Water
I. C. W., Fishkill. N. Y., writes: Will you say through the Monthly whether plants in general, roses, carnations, violets, etc., in particular, would be benefited by watering and syringing during t...
-Mildew
Rose-grower, Brooklyn, N. Y., writes : It seems to be granted now, that some of the lower forms of plant life, of which mildew is a type, will attack the healthiest vegetation, though at one time ...
-February, 1885. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
We feel in our seasonable hints this month, like making a full plea for better gardening all along the line. As the Secretary of the Worcester County (Mass.) Horticultural Society somewhere says: to t...
-Communications. Kalamazoo Celery
Midway between Detroit and Chicago lies the beautiful city of Kalamazoo, sometimes appropriately called Celeryville. Fifty tons of the esculent are expressed from Kalamazoo daily now during the height...
-Is The English Gooseberry Worth Growing?
Please allow me to say a few words in favor of the English gooseberry. It appears, from what I have lately read, it came very near being excluded from the American Pomological Society's list of small ...
-Potato Sets
Disputes continue as ever before about the relative advantages of large or small potatoes for seed, or of whole or cut potatoes. At the outset it is apparent that a very small potato - the size of a p...
-Lima Beans Without Poles
It is not always possible or convenient to get poles to have Lima beans run on. Some have recommended that they run over brushwood; but even brushwood is not always to hand. Again, some have proposed ...
-Big Fruits
Excelsior desires to know what there is in the big pears* or big apples, that the Gardeners' Monthly loves to record their weight so much. For my part I would sooner have a small Seckel Fear, or a ...
-Fumigators For Hot-Beds
E. H., Clyde, O., asks : Can you or any of your subscribers inform us through the Gardeners' Monthly, whether there is a fumigator made that can be used in fumigating hot-beds from the outside, a...
-Growing The Foreign Grape
Lover of Good Fruit desires to know how he can grow the European grape. He has tried in the open air, and, though the plant seems to do well for a year or two, mildew generally attacks the plant and...
-Wild Cherry Timber
We are glad to know that Western tree planters are beginning to understand that profitable timber planting is not to be confined to Black Walnut or Catalpa. These are useful enough in their way, but s...
-A National Forestry Law
Senator Miller, of New York, has introduced a bill into the National Legislature by which five men are to be appointed commissioners at a salary of five thousand dollars a year each? to look after the...
-Large Deciduous Cypress
Some of the States are trying to rival one another in regard to the largest specimens of Taxodium distichum for the World's Fair. Trunks eight feet long are set up. North Carolina has one six feet thr...
-Waste Land In England
England is beginning to believe that free trade is not good even for England. The moment there is any manufacturing depression, the population leaves for countries that protect manufactures, instead o...
-Interesting Vegetable Forms
To the thoughtful observer almost every vegetable form has something of interest, but to the masses they are generally only weeds or common plants. Even those that have some striking peculiarity soon ...
-Editorial Notes. Medinilla Curtisii
Those who love beautiful plants, and to watch them in their behaviour through all their various forms, always have a rich treat in the natural order, Melastomaceae, to which this beautiful novelty bel...
-Sudden Developments In Species
A distinguished Canadian botanist pleasantly writes: The Gardeners' Monthly for January has come to hand, and I have looked through it with interest. You must do an immense amount of periodical readi...
-Curious Fact About The Variegation Of Foliage
Mr. Frank L. Bassett, Hammonton, N. J., notes: Some time ago I put in some cuttings of Tradescantia zebrina that had half of each leaf green and the other half yellow. In part of them the green was t...
-Change In The Color Of Flower Of Victoria Regia
A correspondent says: The changes which the Victoria regia flowers undergo, as indicated by Dr. Richardson's gardener (p. 6) were very well shown in magnificent colored plates published in Moore's Ga...
-Injurious Insects
A Subscriber says: After reading Mr. A. W. Smith's remarks on diseases of plants, I thought I would ask: Would not an inquiry into the losses and injuries incurred by destructive insects be also an...
-Bits Of Reminiscences
And when the weary traveler gains The height of some commanding hill, His heart revives, if o'er the plains He sees his home, though distant still. And thus, in the florid diction of ...
-Making Known The Gardeners' Monthly
It may do no harm to remind the many friends of the Gardeners' Monthly, that it is issued at the low subscription price, chiefly that the publisher may have a claim on the friends of the Magazine, to ...
-The Landscape Gardener Of Fairmount Park
Public life is anything but pleasant, from the exposure to malice and the many insidious attacks which it entails. Landscape Gardener Miller, of Fairmount Park, has just been through the ordeal, and k...
-Charles Downing
The death of this distinguished pomologist, which occurred on the 19th of January, closes a remarkable era in the history of American horticulture. It is well known to students of social philosophy, t...
-Charles Darwin
Lives of this great man will soon come from the English press. One has recently appeared, of which a reviewer in an English daily paper says : Darwin was a native of Shrewsbury, and it was eminently...
-Rev. James Sprunt
We note by a brief paragraph in a Baltimore paper that Dr. Sprunt died recently at his home in Duplin county, North Carolina. He was among the first of the correspondents of the Editor of this magazin...
-The People's Farm And Stock Cyclopedia
By Waldo F. Brown. Published by Jones Brothers & Co., Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis. The first impression in receiving a book of this kind is that so much has already appeared of this class, that...
-Floral Magazines
Though our Magazine is conceded to cover a wider field than any similar publication in this country, we feel that much of our success is due to the excellent work done by other contemporaries, in spec...
-Landscape Gardening Work
A correspondent, writing from a town in Massachusetts, wishes to know how to establish himself as a landscape gardener, for which, from education and experience, he believes himself to be well suited....
-Profits Of Plant And Seed Collecting
A lady in South Carolina sends us the following letter. Though addressed to us in our public capacity as Editor of a Magazine, it is not clear that it was meant for publication; but as a reply may be ...
-Diseases Of Plants
Prof. J. C. Arthur, who has made a specialty of the study of the diseases of plants, and who has charge of the New York Experimental Station, at Geneva, New York, kindly writes to say that if any corr...
-Ladies' Traces Or Ladies' Tresses
F. B. H. writes: Reading an English work recently, I find it a matter of difference whether our pretty autumn orchid, Spiranthes, should be known as Ladies' traces or a Lady's tresses. As the Gar...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society In November
The Boston Horticultural Hall was again in its best on the occasion of the Annual Chrysanthemum show, which was pronounced by all the veteran exhibitors as the finest of that kind ever held in Boston,...
-Hints To Exhibitors
I enclose an extract from a private letter from Boston, which may interest you. It is written by a flower lover. Is there not a hint for exhibitors therein ? I wish I could describe to you, so you c...
-Mass. Horticultural Society
In the annual report of this Society, the committee of arrangements, in reviewing the exhibitions of the year now closing, pronounce them the most successful, so far as the quality, beauty and extent ...
-March, 1885. Number 315. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
This is the proper season to lay down box-edgings. To make them properly, the soil along the line of the edge should be first dug, and then trod very hard and firm, so that it may sink evenly together...
-Communications. A New Double Bon Silene
Lovers of the rose are fully aware that for fragrance, beauty of color, neatness of bud, free flowering and forcing qualities, the old Bon Silene remains at the head of the many varieties of the Tea r...
-Carpet Bedding At The Government Grounds, Ottawa, Can
I send you photos taken from my beds as they appeared on the Government Grounds, Canada, during the past year, which I hope you will find interesting. A description of them will be necessary, so as t...
-Tall Late-Flowering Paeonies
With Paeonies, as with Tulips, we have a taller and later blooming race, having flowers of the most lovely color imaginable, bold round buds which open out gradually into great semi-double flowers of ...
-Lilium Leichtlini, Hook. Fil
A very lovely species from Japan, admirably represented in Bot. Mag., t. 5673. Stem I½ - 3 feet high, brownish, clothed with narrow lanceolate leaves, pointing upwards - racemose at the top. Flowers f...
-The Japanese, Or Ramanas Rose
Of all single roses in flower, this is just now the best and the sweetest. It is distinct and beautiful alike in leafage and in blossom. Planted in good deep rich soil, it spreads rapidly, throwing up...
-Iris Juncea
There is no Iris, except perhaps the common Pseudacorus, that has such rich yellow flowers as this rare species, blossoms of which have been sent to us by Mr. Edward Wallace, from the New Plant and Bu...
-Horticulture As An Element In Progress
Miss Viola Smith, Summit county, O., remarks : What can horticulture do towards making happy homes for children ? Let us imagine a house built on a plot of bare, plowed ground. Let nothing be planted...
-Coning Of Cedar Of Lebanon
Mr. Wm. Fowler, Clifton Park, Baltimore, writes: I send you by mail two cones of Cedrus Libani. We have two trees here which have borne seed for the first time last year. Will you please inform me it...
-Grass For Sandy Ground
A Merchantville, N. J., correspondent says: I am building a cottage for summer use in Merchantville, N. J., - a place where lawns do not seem to flourish. In view of the poor soil, its very sandy nat...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Notes On Begonias
1 have been a reader of the Gardeners' Monthly for several years past. Have read with much interest the history and introduction of new plants, and especially of Begonias. We are, I might say, enthusi...
-William Francis Bennett Rose
Probably no rose was ever better known to the public before it was sent out, than the new crimson Tea, William F. Bennett, known as the Bennett Rose. Having heard so much of it, and being a rose g...
-Canna Iridiflora Ehemanni
In the October number of the Gardeners' Monthly, Mrs. R. B. Edson has an article under the heading of Summer Notes. The writer does not find fault with the article, but especially commends that por...
-Notes On New Plants
Several years ago, when I first commenced to take the Monthly, I never read the advertisements; now, they are the first part I look over, to see if there be anything new. We get all novelties, whether...
-The Carnation Disease
1 may be repeating something already said in the Monthly about this matter, but it is of such importance that I think most of your readers interested will excuse it. I think we have demonstrated that ...
-Gas Tar
Comment is not necessary to show the bad results of using gas tar on heating pipes. So many instances have been recorded in horticultural works, of its injurious effects on plants, that no reader will...
-Cypripedium Grande
Messrs. Veitch, Chelsea, London, continue in the good work of raising hybrid orchids, and are lucky enough in producing some kinds that are quite as distinct and remarkable as species discovered in th...
-Heating And Glazing At RŒHrer Brothers, Lancaster, Pa
Those who love to study progress in floriculture would find themselves well repaid by a call on Roehrer Brothers, florists, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. They own twelve acres of ground in the suburbs of t...
-Dinner-Table Decoration
What may be called a golden rule in dinner-table decoration is, always to have some distinct feature in each arrangement. If a design is worked out in colored leaves, let them be used in such quantiti...
-Gas Tar In Greenhouses
A correspondent from Dundas, Ontario, writes: I had a small conservatory built last summer, 16x20, and heated by a Hitchings boiler through coils of four-inch cast pipes. I had a lot of fine monthly ...
-Ravages Of The Rose Bug
A correspondent writes, under date of January 13th: Enclosed please find two specimens of what we call rose bugs and grub. We have lost a number of roses, especially Niphetos, by this so-called grub ...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. The Insect Problem, By T. Bennett
I see by the last issue of the Monthly an inquiry on the subject of insect depredations. Allow me a few words on this important subject. Is it not time to take decisive steps in this matter and form s...
-A Hundred Bushels Of Apples From One Tree
In the Gardeners' Monthly for December some one mentions the case of an apple tree bearing forty-three bushels of apples in one year, and asks for record of larger yield. I would call to your notice ...
-English Gooseberry
In the February number of your useful journal I observed an article headed, Is the English Gooseberry worth growing? I used to grow this fruit quite successfully in Central New York, but could not ...
-Empire State Grape
Like Mr. Geo. W. Campbell, I have my doubts as to the ascribed parentage of this fine new, white variety. I must confess, that I am at a loss to understand how Hartford Prolific and Clinton could prod...
-Zinc Labels
I send you specimens of a method of using zinc labels for roses, herbaceous plants, etc. I have used them (zinc labels) for more than twenty years with great satisfaction on trees, and recently have t...
-Introduction Of New Vegetables
Why would not the Kerguelen-Land Cabbage (Pringlea antiscorbutica) be a valuable plant to introduce into Alaska ? It is noteworthy that Heard's Island, which is even more remote and bleak than Kerguel...
-Forestry. Communications. Facts In Forestry
Zebulon Pratt of Bridgewater, purchased twenty-five acres of wornout land in North Middleborough for $25 per acre, and in the spring of 1863 had it set to white pines, at an expense of about $200. The...
-Root Fungus
The note which we recently gave detailing the work of the landscape gardener of Fairmount Park in destroying root fungus on shrubs and trees by the use of sulphur has had a wide circulation since it a...
-Profitable Timber Trees
When people are told to plant timber trees, they are seldom told what kinds of trees are most profitable, yet this is a most important part of forest culture. In our own country few people know what k...
-March, 1885. Natural History And Science. Communications. Soil Analysis
In this article I wish to speak of soil analysis as helpful in determining what manures to apply to land. It is a plain proposition. If by analysis we can discover the constituents of soil, we can equ...
-Davallia Fijiensis Plumosa
We give here an illustration of a class of ferns known as the hare's-foot, or the rabbit's-foot fern, from the thick creeping rhizomes, which push over the surface, often hanging over the sides, and f...
-March, 1885. Natural History And Science. Scraps And Queries
Can Plants Sleep for Centuries? - A Canadian botanist writes : . I read the very interesting account of your Alaska trip. There are some facts in it of which I shall take advantage as occasion presen...
-How To Hybridize
P. H., Peterborough, Ontario, Can., asks : * Is there a work from which I could learn the art of hand-fertilizing the blossoms of fruits and melons, etc.; the fertilizing the female blossoms ...
-Wax-Berry Candles
G says: Chambers' Cyclopaedia says : 'Myricacordifolia, of South Africa, yields wax for candles.' - Art. Candleberry. W. Fraser Rae, in his 'Newfoundland to Manitoba,' p. 127, says, that 'on the ri...
-Literature Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Trees Growing Through A Tombstone
I noticed in the December number of the Monthly, page 369, a communication by Dr. C. W. Greene, referring to a birch growing out of a chestnut tree. A similar curious instance came under my notice, i...
-My Second Visit To Lorillard's Gardens
In the year of our redemption '83, when flowers which owe their birth to genial May were freely blooming in their native habitats, I started from Mount Holly, to see all I could of them, between there...
-Lines On Dr. Warder
His was the gentle spirit of the woods, The genius of the tongueless mysteries, Eternally that dwell within the trees, The flowers, the grasses, and the bursting buds; A member of their secret broth...
-Personal Experiences In The Life Of A Gardener
In looking over the last number of the Gardeners' Monthly, I notice that a correspondent asks how to establish himself as a landscape gardener, and your appropriate remarks thereon. With you, I say th...
-March, 1885. Literature. Editorial Notes
Should Horticulture be Taught in our Public Schools ? - This question was ably handled by Professor Wickersham, late Superintendent of Public Instruction of the State of Pennsylvania, at the late Stat...
-Duncan Rhind
Mr. Rhind is not unknown to our readers as a contributor of some excellent papers on garden topics. He is one of those accomplished gardeners who do credit to the profession, and whose abilities and s...
-George C. Briggs
George C. Briggs was one of the famous firm of Briggs Brothers, who were the pioneers of fruit culture in California. Every one has heard of the wonderful - wonderful for that time - peach orchard nea...
-Select Extra-Tropical Plants
Readily eligible for Industrial culture or Naturalization. By Baron Ferd Von Mueller. Detroit: published by Geo. S. Davis, 1884. This was originally prepared for Australian use, but the succinct info...
-How To Propagate And Grow Fruit
This is a small and very useful pamphlet, issued by Mr. Chas. A. Green, editor of the Fruit Grower. State Board of Horticulture of California, Annual Report for 1883. From A. H. Webb, San Francisco, ...
-Reminiscence Of A. J. Downing
Mr. T. S. Gold, West Cornwall, Conn., notes: Your remarks upon the work of A. J. Downing in the interests of landscape gardening, in the February number, called out by the recent death of his brother...
-Honorable Names To Plants
J. H. S. says: In reading your remarks on Panax Victorias, and our English cousins naming new plants in honor of their nobility or royalty, I thought in this the English have a decided advantage o...
-Floral Notes From New Orleans Exhibition
At Horticultural Hall the principal regret is that Prof. Tracy was obliged to leave to attend to other business; not, however, without leaving an indelible mark behind him. The success of the Horticul...
-The New York Chrysanthemum Show
This magnificent exhibit deserves a record in your journal. It was held at Horticultural Hall, 28th street, New York, about the 8th of November last. This hall is about 50 by 75 feet in area. No other...
-American Pomological Society
The preparations in progress indicate that the meeting at Grand Rapids, Michigan, commencing September 9th, will be one of the most successful in the history of the Society. President Wilder has recov...
-The Pennsylvania Horticultural Association
This body had a very successful meeting at Lancaster. Judge Stitzel of Reading, who had been re-elected President for several successive terms, declined a re-election, from, as he expressed it, no lac...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Death Of Mr. Downing
At the meeting of January 31st, Col. M. P. Wilder, in some feeling and appreciative remarks, introduced the following : Resolved, That the members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society desire ...
-Programme Of Meeting For Discussion During The Season Of 1885
Mar. 7. Propagation of Trees from Seeds, by Jackson Dawson, Jamaica Plain. Mar. 14. Nomenclature of Fruit, by Hon. Marshall P. Wilder, Boston. Mar. 21. Heating Greenhouses, by Joseph H. Woodford, Newt...
-April, 1885. Number 316. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
In these seasonable hints we endeavor to present such facts as may serve to jog the memory, keeping that which is absolutely new for the body of our work. In the South tree planting will be about over...
-Communications. New Geraniums
We do not believe that of any other plant is there as much seed annually sown, in the hope of producing better varieties, as of the geranium. This is not strange as hybridizers have been eminently suc...
-Triumph Of Ghent
An excellent novelty which will be in great demand for borders and edges of flower beds. It is very bushy. The leaves are bordered with pure white, and the whole plant is almost covered with lively li...
-New Double White Mignonette, "Snowball." By W. F. Dreer
During the summer of '82 Mr. George Knoll, of Bethlehem, began experimenting with the various leading kinds of Mignonette with a view toward its improvement. Of a large number of seedlings obtained fr...
-The Classes Of Roses
China Or Bengal A native of China brought to Europe during the eighteenth century. They are of moderate, branching growth, flowers of medium size, and require a rich soil and close pruning. They give...
-Combination Hedges
An arbor vitse hedge separating the vegetable garden from the lawn, occupying more than six feet in width of valuable ground and having become somewhat dilapidated from its thirty years of service, wa...
-The Love Of Herbaceous Plants
In an admirable essay before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society recently, Mr. E. L. Beard says: What is needed in the place of bedding plants is diversity of form and color and artistic combinat...
-Raising Chrysanthemums From Seed
Mrs. J.G. M., Buffalo, N. Y., writes: Could you not give, for amateurs, in the next issue of the Gardeners' Monthly, some directions about the raising from seeds, and care through the summer, of th...
-Wintering Roses In The North-West
W. W., Northfield, Minn., says: In the December number a correspondent who signs 'M. L. H.' Minneapolis, Minn., says: 'I have no trouble wintering roses here.' If you could get your correspondent t...
-April, 1885. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
We are pleased to note that the hints we recently gave in this department for good potting as a 'means for good plant growing have attracted wide attention. We have not seen for a long time anything i...
-Communications. Cyclamens
I am glad to see an increasing interest in the growing of cyclamens. A great many persons have asked me what is the best sort to grow, and in reply I would say the Persicum and its varieties are my fa...
-Of Taste In Floral Arrangement
I agree with W. about the lack of taste in exhibitors at floral fairs or exhibitions. I had the pleasure six years since to be placed on a committee of three, to award premiums on pot plants and cut...
-Mildew In Roses
I have read Mr. Veitch's article on mildew and his remedy, and I wish to say that I have used dry sulphur over twenty years and never saw any bad effects from it. No one need be troubled with mildew i...
-The Hot-Water Cure
In the fall of 1883, I procured a set of about two dozen new Chrysanthemums. They were soon covered with a small, almost black aphis or plant louse that I had never seen before. My man smoked the hous...
-Ghiesbreght's Sericographis
Sericographis Ghiesbreghtiana is a very pretty and valuable winter flowering warm greenhouse plant, belonging to the natural order Acanthaceae. It is a shrub of dwarf growth, attaining a height of fro...
-Removing Gas Tar From Hot-Water Pipes
Although I have not been troubled with gas tar on my pipes at any time, yet, from my knowledge of gas tar in many experiments, I know the cure. If a thick coat of whitewash of lime be put on, after sc...
-The Cyclamen
How seldom we find this plant, in the greenhouses of to-day, grown as it should be. I think it one of the best plants for decorating a conservatory or greenhouse, and for a window plant it has no equa...
-Propagating Plants
I with many other amateurs have felt the need greatly of a rapid means of propagating what plants we wish to increase; and the need has become more urgent since we have established a bureau of exchang...
-Insects On Roses And Carnations
Mrs. G. R., Pemberton, N. J., writes: Your remarks on page 31 of the January number of the Gardeners' Monthly, give me courage to write you on a subject in which I am much interested. I send you ...
-Cause Of Mildew On Roses And Other Plants
Rose Grower says : I note in the Gardeners' Monthly remedies for the cure of mildew. Is anything known of its cause and prevention? [Under the name of mildew we are speaking of small funguses. ...
-Greenhouse Flues
D. B. C, Dubois, Pa., writes: I have built a new greenhouse which I want to heat by flue. Would you be kind enough to inform me what sized grate to use, and also the size of drain pipe for a house...
-Double Oxalis
D. R. Woods, New Brighton, Pa., writes : - In reply to your correspondent on p. 43, February number Gardeners' Monthly, would say Oxalis lutea plena is a desirable bulb. Its flowers are very double,...
-New Varieties Of Ferns. Adiantum Rhodophyllum. Adiantum Cuneatum Deflexum
It makes little difference to a lover of plants whether the little beauty he admires is what a botanist calls a species, or only a variety. If they are distinct and lovely it is all the same. The two ...
-Fruit And Vegetabie Gardening. Communications. The Fruit Of The Japan Quince. By. Gen. Noble
We welcome the utile cum dulce, when it is the honest boast of any plant of floral loveliness. The mass of blooming plants yield us only their fragrance and flowers. Of ornamental shrubs, I think o...
-The Foreign Gooseberry
If cultivators knew how easily a crop of Foreign Gooseberries can be produced, I think they would be inclined to try them. I have cultivated English Gooseberries, the past eight or ten years with unif...
-Wire As A Plant Support
Your note on Lima Beans Without Poles, in the February number of the Monthly, has induced me to make a few remarks on the various uses to which wire may be applied for gardening purposes, as a suppo...
-Vegetation Under Orchard Trees
At the recent meeting of the New York Horticultural Society, the everlasting topic of surface management in orchards, was of course warmly discussed - discussed warmly on both sides, says the report. ...
-Uniformity In Apple Barrels
At the meeting of the Western New York Horticultural Society, a committee consisting of Julius Harris, H. T. Brooks and C. M. Hooker appointed at the last annual meeting to ascertain the dimensions of...
-Prices Of Fruit In Rochester In 1884
Mr. Charles M. Hooker, at a recent meeting of the Western New York Horticultural Society stated that the past season was one of very great abundance in the production of nearly all varieties of fruits...
-Product Per Acre Of Strawberries In Western New York
Mr. C. M. Hooker says that in 1884 strawberries produced a wonderful crop. Never before was so heavy a crop grown here - 6,000 to 8,000 quarts per acre not being uncommon. The usual average in previou...
-Cure For Grape Vine Mildew
Prof. Caldwell told the recent meeting of the Western New York Horticultural Society that it has been discovered that mildew can be prevented by soaking the stakes on which the vines twine in a soluti...
-Insect Injurious To The Tomato
A Vine-land correspondent says: I have taken the liberty to send you, by express (paid), a paper package that contains a specimen of what may perhaps be called the club-root in a greenhouse tomato-pl...
-Canada And The Timber Duties
A Canadian essay on the decrease of the forests of the United States, is fairly blotted with the tears of the author, over the impending ruin to our country when the timber is all cut away. He thinks ...
-Forestry In The Old World
We are very apt to wonder why it is that so much is done ignor-antly in our country, when the old world gets the best skill - the right men for the right places. But the truth is they do no better tha...
-Encouraging Forestry In Pennsylvania
The Editor of this magazine, as an honorary member of the State Board of Agriculture of Pennsylvania, has continually pressed on that body the folly of any legislation looking to the Preservation of...
-Rare Rocky Mountain Firs And Pines
An Illinois correspondent says : How few people know when they are well off. ' A rare lover of coniferae' on page 4, January number of the Monthly, says, 'If I were a nurseryman and twenty years you...
-Conifers Of The Rocky Mountains
G.J. B. writes : I saw in the Monthly for January, page 4, a few remarks in regard to the indigenous evergreens of the Rocky Mountains. Being a resident of Denver and greatly interested in the cu...
-April, 1885. Natural History And Science. Communications. Soil Analysis
I desire in this article to mention various examples of successful soil analyses, for the purpose of showing their utility. The logic of facts is irrefutable. Very many samples of soils are forwarded ...
-Torpid Vegetation
The Gardeners' Monthly's article. Can Plants Sleep for Centuries? induces me to say a word on the longevity of trees in a dormant state. I packed a box of 1000 Catalpa trees purposely to test them....
-Economic Uses In Nigella Dama-Scena
BY G. Le Maout and Decaisne record that in South Germany and the Alps the seeds of Nigella are used in flavoring bread. The same thing once obtained in this country. My mother used to flavor a certain...
-Close Union Of Different Species Of Trees
Your recent notices of the apparent union of trees of two widely different species recall the fact noted by Seemann in his History of the Palms (p. 105), that in India and Ceylon it is very common ...
-Influence Of The Graft On The Stock
Among the strongest arguments in favor of the idea that the graft has an influence on the stock is the experience of nurserymen with apple trees. It is well known that nurserymen can tell a variety by...
-Yellow Berried Myrtle Holly
A Wilmington, N. C, correspondent says: I send you by this mail a fruiting specimen of Ilex myrtifolia with yellow berries. The small tree I have removed to my yard to be able to examine it in flower...
-Heteromeles Arbutifolia
Miss Helen C, Benardo, San Diego co., Cal., writes : With this I mail you a bunch of berries that I picked from one of the many bushes that cover the hills here, and wish you would tell me through...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Reminiscenses Of Charles Downing
Among the noteworthy incidents in the life of Chas. Downing is the fact, that, to the last, Down-ing's fruit book is credited to the authorship of A. J. Downing, who died over forty years ago, by the ...
-Ladies' Tresses Or Traces
. In a recent number of the Gardeners' Monthly, the Editor, in reply to a query from a reader, explains the name Ladies' Traces as being due to the fancied resemblance of the twisted spikes of the p...
-Ladies And Horticulture
Any one holding a public position, where flowers are grown, will soon find out that ladies not only love flowers but take great interest in their culture. If we look at the humblest cottage window we ...
-Bulb Collecting
In your paper of February (pages 61-62) you give a very interesting correspondence about profits of plant and seed collecting; and although I agree totally with your reply, as the principal object of ...
-Origin Of The Name Persimmon
G. says: The European Diospyros Lotus, or date-plum, is called Pishamin in Chambers' Cyclopoedia, Art., Date Plum. This word seems to be suspiciously like Persimmon, but the books say the latter i...
-M. Carriere
We have already noted the government honor conferred on this distinguished French horticulturist; some additional notes concerning him are given by a correspondent of the Garden : Those who are acqu...
-James Ritchie
The few still remaining of the older race of florists in the United States will learn with great regret of the death of James Ritchie, which occurred March IIith, from suffocation with coal gas, comin...
-How John's Wife Made Money At Home
Published by Hunter M'Calloch, 1828 Reed St., Philada. This is full of very good suggestions about beekeeping, silkworms, canaries, one cow, and chickens. It is a pamphlet of 80 pages, and will be we...
-Corn And Potato Manual
By J. C. Vaughan, Chicago. The tables of the Gardeners' Monthly fairly groan with trade catalogues which we are repeatedly asked to notice. There is rarely one that has not some commendable feature, ...
-Cactaceous Plants: Their History And Culture
By Lewis Castle, of the Journal of Horticulture, London; sold also by Chas. H. Marot, Philadelphia. This is a very timely little book, for there never was a period in the history of American Horticul...
-Plant Life On The Farm
By Dr. M. T. Masters. New York : Orange Judd Company. Dr. Masters is the editor of the London Gardeners' Chronicle, and besides his labors in many branches of botany, stands especially pre-eminent in...
-Transactions Of The Worcester County, Massachusetts, Horticultural Society, For 1884
From the Secretary, Ed. W. Lincoln. Last year, in noticing the receipt of this excellent publication, we remarked on the injustice to the whole community, of letting the property of voluntary associa...
-Cinnamon Vine
A correspondent complains that she had the Chinese Yam in her garden, and much prized it as an ornamental vine for the summer covering of an arbor. Seeing advertised the Cinnamon Vine, she ordered it ...
-Careless Statements Of Facts
Referring to the statement of an English Encyclopcedia that the Pashamin is a name given to Diospyros Lotus, when it is the Indian name of an American species, a correspondent says: It is not in a...
-Derivation Of Diervilla
G. asks: - What was the name of the man from whom the genus Diervilla got its name ? His name is variously given as Dierville, Diéreville, (acute accent on first e,) Dièreville, (grave accent,) et...
-The World's Exposition And Cotton Centennial
What part have the horticulturists and florists had in preparing this grand display ? The ground on which this Exposition is spread out was once a plantation. Till within a few years it was not open t...
-Fruit Display
Tables for display of fruit fill the entire center of Horticultural Hall. Four rows, side by side, seven to eight feet wide, go the whole length of the Hall, amounting to over two thousand feet in len...
-Editorial Notes. Pennsylvania State Horticultural Association
Judge Stitzel said he had the pleasure of introducing the lecturer of the evening, Prof. Thomas Meehan, whose theme was Fruits and Flowers in Connection with the Progress of Civilization. Starting ...
-May, 1885. Number 317. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The system of bedding plants has called for a new class of characters. Formerly viewed as a florist's flower, a verbena, for instance, would require roundness of form in the individual flower as a f...
-Communications. Canna Ehemanni
When a boy, in about 1844 or '45, my father received from the well-known firm, Booth & Sons of Hamburg, this Canna, under the name of Iridiflora, and if I recollect right, it was exactly the same thin...
-The Clematis
The complaints of a nurseryman, in the Gardeners' Monthly for January, of having many unprofitable questions put to him, and which he can ill afford time to answer, reminds me that I frequently find m...
-New Styles Of Chrysanthemums
One would have thought that after the immense variety florists have produced, there was room for no more new styles among Chrysanthemums. But the French have produced a race that has the ray petals ha...
-Hyacinthus Candicans
In reference to this plant, noted specially by Mr. Krelaage in his interesting paper on bulb collections in our last, Mr. Baines says in the Gardeners' Magazine: The Galtonia, generally known as Hya...
-Improved Asters
The cultivation of the Aster has for a long time occupied the attention of florists and those interested in beautiful flowers; and, like the chrysanthemum, it is now at its height. We have before us ...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Geraniums
Without entering into a full explanation of the origin and home of this class of plants, which is very ably described by our distinguished horticultural writer, Peter Henderson, in his Hand Book of ...
-Anthurium Andreanum
Certainly there was not another plant that was so much spoken of as this noble arad, when first introduced from New Granada, where it was discovered by Mr. Ed. André, the well-known French botanist, w...
-Crinum Amabile
Bulb very large, cylindrical; leaves broad, glaucous, 2 or 3 feet long; flower spike 18 inches long termined by an umbel of flowers (twenty-six on our plant); each petal 5 inches long, light purple, w...
-Begonia Socotrana
This very fine plant is quite distinct from any other in the genus. The tuber produces a quantity of bulblets, the leaves are orbicular, peltate light green, the flower stem rises 8 to 12 inches from ...
-Cypripedium Spicerianum
One of the prettiest Lady's Slipper from East Indies. The leaves resemble C. villosum, the flower is borne singly on a stem 4 to 6 inches high. The dorsal sepal is nearly 2 inches long, pure white wit...
-Glazing
With your permission I venture to take part in the discussion relating to the glazing of plant houses. Several years ago a severe hail storm demolished the roofs of a number of houses then in my charg...
-The Good Economy Of Gas Tar
Having read several articles in the Monthly in regard to the injurious effect of gas tar on hot-water pipes, also the one in the March number from the Superintendent of Government Grounds, of Ottawa, ...
-May, 1885. Floral Notes From New Orleans
I wish some benevolent person would send me for love or money (I have abundance of both) a plant of Lasiandra macrantha, var. floribunda. I have L. macrantha, but this life is almost too short to wait...
-Encourage Window Gardening
Whenever you make reference to window gardening, as you often do, I am very much pleased. When we walk along the streets of our cities and inadvertently give a glance at a few well-cared-for, well-kep...
-To Make Hanging Baskets
For years I have made very beautiful hanging baskets in the following way : I take a stick as thick as my wrist and 18 inches long. To the stick I fasten a handle 4 inches from each end of the stick. ...
-Coal Tar On Hot-Water Pipes
I have heretofore given my only experience in removing coal tar from hot-water pipes without burning them. I will re-state that the pipes in question were painted with tar from the gas works here. A w...
-Platycerium Grande
The creature we figure is not a mollusk but a fern. It is remarkably like a shell fish however, and the illusion has been favored by its owner planting it in a large shell, suspended in his conservato...
-Tendency Of Sunset Rose To Make Blind Shoots
Mr. A. Williams, Sharon, Pa., writes: This winter my Sunset roses have shown in a marked degree a tendency or disposition to make blind instead of flowering wood, and I venture the inquiry, doesn't t...
-Yellow Double Oxalis
W. P. Simmons & Co., Geneva, Ohio, say: We notice in the two last numbers of the Monthly articles on the Double Oxalis. Believing this refers to the one offered in our catalogue, we would say we purc...
-The Bridal Rose, Blackberry
Mr. John F. Clark says: I send you flower of the * Bridal Rose,' Rubus rosaefolius. This plant I consider well worthy of cultivation, yet it is rarely met with nowadays. I am sure the florists could ...
-May, 1885. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The most paramount question with the fruit gardener is the destruction of insects. We have to confess to a belief that all schemes for their wholesale destruction have proved failures, and that our be...
-Communications. Diminished Crops Through Injury To Foliage
Last season I had rather a singular experience in trying to raise a few peas for family use. On the night of the 29th of May we had a very severe frost, so much so indeed, that the ground was frozen t...
-One Hundred And Twenty Bushels Of Apples From One Tree
In your December number a correspondent reports an apple tree bearing forty-three bushels of apples in one year, and in your March number Mr. N. S. Piatt calls attention to a tree in Cheshire, Conn., ...
-Notes From Zanesville
Seventeen degrees below zero has killed all the peaches and most varieties of grapes. Catawbas, Hartfords, Nortons, Brightons, Jeffersons, and even the white Concord seedlings, Martha, Lady Belinda, A...
-Grape Rot
In the October number of the Gardeners' Monthly, inquiries are made about the cause of grape rot, so prevalent in the Western States. It is probably caused by planting on deep soils and want of draina...
-White Grapes
There is just a little senseless mania in regard to white grapes. That color or want of color is no more desirable in grapes than in peaches and apples. Last year the Martha and Lady were not so salab...
-The Insect Problem
On reading the chapter by Mr. T. Bennett in the March number of the Monthly, I am led to offer your readers a scrap of my own experience. All Southern cultivators are aware that cotton seed is a very ...
-Scraps And Queries. Japan Quince For Preserves
Dr. Green writes : A contributor to your Monthly lauds the Japanese quince as a cooking fruit. I had a thorough test made of its cooking qualities many years ago, and found the product tough, and ha...
-Forestry. Communications. Old And Large Trees
There is something awe-inspiring in the presence of a tree of great age and colossal dimensions. There is an elevating grandeur in the view of the lofty mountain whose storm-furrowed summit penetrates...
-A Live Wooden Fence
A large land-holder in England has planted an immense fruit farm, 40,000 plum trees being one of the items set out. In order to make a perfect thief-proof fence, he has surrounded the farm with cotton...
-Nigella Damascena
Under this title a correspondent in April Gardeners' Monthly says the seeds of Nigella are used in flavoring bread and refers to the ragged lady as the common name. The N. sativa was in somewhat co...
-Peach Diseases
I cut away to-day the last of the peach trees I held to be of priceless value, the seedling October Clings, that have borne crops of ample proportions from 1868 to 1883, failing last year completely. ...
-Anthurium Splendidum
It is said that Alexander wept after he had conquered the whole world, because there were no more nations left to conquer. Those who are marching out to conquer nature, and to become possessed of a kn...
-Individuality In Plants
A. B., Leesburg, Florida, says: While you are discussing fertilization in your magazine, could you enlighten me on the following point? Mr. Darwin, I think, wrote in one of his books that from a fe...
-Immediate Effect Of Pollen
A Leesburg, Fla., correspondent says: I see in the Gardeners' Monthly it is considered impossible that an immediate cross can have any effect on the shape of a fruit; but don't you think that it can...
-Pinus Banksiana Not In Colorado
A correspondent says: You have made a mistake on page 114 in naming P. Banksiana as one of the trees in the mountains above Denver. P. contorta, or rather P. Murrayana looks very much like P. Banksi...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. The Derivation Of Persimmon
In the current number of Gardeners' Monthly I note that the Editor after giving a statement from Captain Smith's narrative to show that the original spelling of the word persimmon was Putchamin, i...
-Mechanics Interference With Gardeners
Not the least of the ills gardeners are heir to is the meddling of mechanics with the direction of work that properly belongs to the gardener. A few years ago one of my customers wishing to take down ...
-The Name Persimmon
This word has been variously spelled. Botanists of the early part of this century (Muhlenberg, Barton, Eaton) spell it with one m. The following are, in chronological order, some of the orthographies:...
-A Knowledge Of Horticulture
The fast strides that horticulture has been making in cultural points, new introductions, and many other things, render it impossible for any gardener to keep pace with the times without access to hor...
-Rush-Light Candles
Your recent notice of Bayberry candles recalls to mind a much more ancient and equally interesting means of domestic illumination, the rushlight. On account of the literary interest attaching to the r...
-Col. N. J. Colman
There is no reason why a President should not appoint a friend or the friend of a friend to a distinguished office, if the appointee have superior fitness and qualifications for the position. But this...
-Vine Culture In California
By Charles Joly. Among the many able essays continually offered to the French Society of Horticulture this one is prominent. He tells the French people of the wonderful progress of grape culture in ou...
-Report Of The U. S. Department Of Agriculture For 1884
The Commissioner reports that during the past year over 100,000 economic plants have been propagated and disseminated for experiments. The department introduced the Japan Persimmon 15 years ago, and m...
-The American Seedsman
Published by Isaac F. Tillinghast, La Plume, Pa. This is a monthly magazine devoted wholly to the interests of the American seed trade. Among the topics discussed in the number before us is the liabi...
-Kind Words From A Subscriber
No one but those who have had the actual experience knows of the crosses, trials and tribulations that beset the Editor of a magazine like this. The Editor of the Gardeners' Monthly has had twenty-sev...
-Sericographis Ghiesbrechtiana
Ignoramus has been moved to inquire which form of expression is the correct one. The title reads Ghiesbrechtiana Sericographis, but Sericographis Ghiesbrechtiana in the body of the article in las...
-Plural Names
Inquirer says: As I note your magazine endeavors to aid intelligence in every branch that horticulturists are expected to know something about, I would ask whether the plurals you often use for pla...
-Wants To Know
A New York correspondent says: When we don't know we have to go to headquarters to find out. A list of plants sent to me by a customer to supply puzzles me. I have managed by inquiry to get the most ...
-Horticulture At The New Orleans Exposition
That the New Orleans Exposition is now a very great success cannot for a moment be denied. Complete in every department - save one - it offers a vast field for study in all branches of the arts, scien...
-Floral Notes From The New Orleans Exhibition
In the Horticultural Department at the Exhibition, I notice Cattleya citrina in bloom. It is not near as much grown as it deserves to be. Its golden yellow flowers are very graceful and beautiful. Als...
-Spring Show Of The Massachusetts Horticultural Society
The spring show of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather, came out above all expectations; and coming out of zero weather into a hall filled with the b...
-Cactaceae And Agave At The World's Exposition
Possibly the display is the most extensive ever gotten together at one exhibition. One exhibitor, Mr. J. H. Erkener, of San Antonia, Texas, claims to have on exhibition twenty thousand specimens, obta...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society
Mr. J. E. Mitchell, a leading merchant of Philadelphia, who has long and faithfully served the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society as Vice President, has been elected to the Presidency of the Society, ...
-June, 1885. Number 318. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Some people advocate the pruning of ornamental trees in summer when they require it, for the reason that the wound seems to heal over without any injury to the tree. This is in a great measure correct...
-Communications. Chrysanthemum Fragments
Both spring and summer, as they gradually merge into each other, bring forth in continuous succession, an array of pretty flowers peculiar to each month, with remarkable punctuality. And so true is t...
-Wearing Of The Eye In Zinc Labels
Regarding the objection that the eyelet hole in a zinc label soon wears away when it is suspended by a copper wire, I have used them for some years and, as I understand it, the wearing is not from gal...
-The China Tree
You failed to do full justice to Melia Azederach, Pride of India; one variety called in ignorance Umbrella Tree from its peculiar habit of growth forming a dense round head, flattish underneath, wh...
-The Marbled Rose
It was only a day or two before receiving the Gardeners' Monthly that I was thinking of this rose, so familiar to me in my childhood, but which I have not seen for forty or more years. I was therefore...
-Flower Notes From New Orleans
Burchellia capensis is now in bloom, and I like it. Sparmannia Africana makes too much foliage for the amount of flower to be useful as a flowering plant. Eriostemon scaber and others are good. I hav...
-Raising New Varieties Of Gladiolus
Mr. James Douglas gives the Gardeners' Magazine his method as follows : The variety intended to bear seeds must be watched, and as soon as the anthers can be perceived in the centre of the half open...
-The Winter Aconite
It is a matter of surprise that this lovely flower is not more common in American gardens. It is not much in love with the common flower garden, but loves to take care of itself in woods or thickets, ...
-Broken Branches Of Norway Spruce
Under Norway Spruce trees towards spring, are frequently found broken branches in considerable quantities. The Editor has always regarded this as resulting from the operations of a twig borer or girdl...
-Care Of Lawns
We have called attention to the well-known fact, that no plant can live without green leaves, and plenty of light to keep them green; and then to the obvious fact, that if we cut grass low and keep it...
-Double Fringed Petunias
Mr. Rupp, Shire-mantown, Pa., writes: I send to you by this mail, three flowers of my new Petunias I told you about last winter in Lancaster. The one in the middle is only about two-thirds the averag...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Winter And Spring Flowering Den-Drobes
The winter and spring flowering members of the Dendrobium family are among the most beautiful, and they are certainly the most enjoyable, as at this season of the year (March) the greenhouse is a very...
-Mixed Plants In Greenhouses
We are better informed in the culture of greenhouse plants than was known, say ten or fifteen years ago. Then it was thought special plants should have special houses to insure success in their cultur...
-Coral Tree
The cockscomb coral tree, Erythrina crista-galli is a very beautiful summer blooming shrub of deciduous habit, belonging to the natural order Leguminosae, and it is a native of Brazil, from whence it ...
-Flowering Of The Sunset Rose
I notice in May number remarks by Mr. A. Williams on Sunset Rose and blind wood. I have two thousand plants of this (with me) valuable rose in beds and in pots. I find it in habit of bloom and growth ...
-The Sunset Rose
In the May number, Mr. A. Williams, of Sharon, Pa., says that his Sunset roses this winter have shown, in a marked degree, a tendency to make blind instead of flowering shoots, and asks if this is not...
-The Culture Of Cactuses
Since sending you my photographs of flower beds and mentioning that there was a Cactus bed in the background, I have had several communications asking me to give some hints on Cactus culture through y...
-Improvements In Propagating Plants
In your answer to Mrs. J. S. R. Thomson, at page 106, you speak of boxes of rooted heath cuttings and give us to understand that the illiterate youth and the sand mush had done done it, to use the d...
-Arrangement Of Roses As Cut Flowers
Mr. Joseph H. Brown, the Ex-President of Rhode Island Horticultural Society, recently addressed the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, on Roses, and gave the following suggestions about them as cut ...
-Expensive Orchids
Orchids are very expensive, because they cannot be readily propagated so as to give good plants in a reasonable time. They are, therefore, mostly imported from their native haunts. It has been discove...
-A Dwarf Stephanotis
Among the sweetest and best things for cut flowers is Stephanotis flori-bunda. It beats orange blossom in fragrance, and will keep for a week without fading. The flowers bring enormous prices in Cove...
-Dieffenbachia Regina
A very distinct and striking addition to the Araceous family, introduced from South America. It has oblong elliptic leaves, which are rounded at the base, shortly acuminate, and almost wholly covered ...
-June, 1885. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Those who have small gardens and love to grow their own fruits and vegetables, have little idea how great is the advantage in having deep soil to grow them in. Not only can one get double the crop fro...
-Communications. Pruning And Care Of Orchards
The old proverb, Prune when your knife is sharp, has often been repeated, but if we follow it we are some time sure to cut too deep. Winter is commonly recommended, but needs some modification. If ...
-The Comet Pear
Mr. Cay wood complains that a pear which grew on a neighbor's farm, and which with that owner's knowledge and tacit consent he named Comet, has been distributed by another firm as the Lawson. This pe...
-Old Apple Trees
When I was a young man I was at school at Albany, in the State of New York. I there learned of the existence of an Indian orchard, about twenty-five miles or so from the city - somewhere back of the...
-Mulching
In an address in January, before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Col. Wilson discussed against the supposed advantages of mulching. Some of his reasons will hardly be concurred in by those wh...
-The Bee Nuisance
A movement on the part of fruit growers against the enormous destruction caused by bees on fruits is on foot in California, as we judge by the following from a California paper. Bees can be easily tra...
-Catching Cotton Moths
The late W. L. Schaffer, President of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, had an orchard measurably free from injury by the work of the codlin moth, and which immunity was purchased by a persisten...
-Paper Bags For Grapes
The use of paper bags in grape culture is one of the great advances in the modern art of gardening. It was among the earliest teachings of the Gardeners' Monthly, that the practice at that time...
-Tewkesbury Winter Blush Apple
One of the features of the Horticultural meeting at Lancaster was the universal praise given to this variety. It was regarded as one of the most profitable grown, as it is certainly one of the best, i...
-The Cut-Leaved English Blackberry
A Lansing, Leavenworth county, Kan., correspondent writes : I am a grower of small fruit and vegetables for market. I obtained through a friend (who has traveled extensively in the far West) a blackb...
-The Wonderful Strawberry
Some years ago we gave an illustration of The Wonderful strawberry. As it is more than probable that this wonderful strawberry has gone the way of so many wonderful seedlings, no one will probably ...
-Forestry. Communications. Notes On Remarkable Trees
A writer in the Gardeners' Monthly for May says that the Baobab does not get its growth in less than 800 years. But J. D. Hooker says it is a very fast growing and short-lived tree. Your corresponde...
-Profits Of Forestry
We contend that when once we can show that a man may make more profit from planting a hundred acres with trees than with corn or other farm crops, Forestry in America will not need advocates. For this...
-An April Forest Fire
The dead brush left from former thinnings, and allowed to rot and dry in the New Jersey forests, caught fire in April this year and hundreds of acres and thousands of dollars of valuable property were...
-Forest Culture
F., Lincoln, Nebraska: I am always particularly interested in the forestry column of the Gardeners' Monthly, and note that you lay stress on the difference between American forest culture, and that...
-The Atamasco; Or, Fairy Lily
Amaryllis Treatae, or Fairy Lily, are they not Atamasco Lilies, botanically introduced since 1822 ? In Peter Henderson's Hand-book of Plants, page 256, under Zephyranthus, we see this : Zephyran-...
-Cypripedium Insigne
I see by an article in the April number of the Gardeners' Monthly that you mention about Cypripedium insigne having two flowers on a spike. I wish to say I find that a common occurrence. We had severa...
-How To Produce Variegation
Just what induces a plant to become variegated is still a mystery. Mr. Rupp, the famous improver of the Chinese Primrose, tried in vain everything he could think of to produce variegation in the leave...
-Effect Of Frost On Orange Trees In Florida
A correspondent of the San Francisco Chronicle, says: I have traveled away from my theme, which was in the beginning the cold wave. Some friends, with myself, were talking about it to a gentleman, lo...
-Wild Celery Seed
The wild celery seed of Chesapeake Bay, on which the ducks and geese feed, giving the flesh the delicious flavor so much prized by epicureans, is the curious water plant known as Vallisneria spiralis....
-Tree Tomato Of Jamaica
This is the popular name of a fruit naturalized in Jamaica, and found in many old gardens of the Coffee districts of St. Andrews and Manchester. By the kindness of Sir Joseph Hooker it has been determ...
-Sewage
A London paper says that the sewage problem has yielded a new notion. Sir J. B. Lawes is of opinion that the most profitable way to dispose of sewage is to send it to the sea; its phosphates and other...
-Clematis From South America
Mrs. J. S. R. Thomson, of Spartansburg, South Carolina, sends us a White Clematis flower which we thought to be one of the numerous varieties of Clematis crispa, but she describes it as having a tuber...
-Economic Use Of Wild Cherry Kernels
The Gardeners' Chronicle tells us that in a report by Consul Biliotti on the trade and commerce of the district of Trebizond for the year 1883, it is stated that the kernel of a diminutive species of...
-A Plea For The English Sparrow
Some one who has a very tender spot in his heart has been writing to the Gardeners' Magazine a plea for the English Sparrow. Among other things he gets off the following : The love-call is certainly...
-The Perfume Of Roses
In Roses there are seventeen different sorts of scent. Sweet Briar scent, as in the garden variety; Moss Rose scent, as in Common Moss and family; Austrian Briar scent, as in Copper Austrian and fam...
-Japanese Tea
Tea is one of the principal productions of Japan, and a large quantity of it is exported to the United States from the ports of Yokohama and Kobe. In Japan the use of Tea dates back to very early time...
-Scraps And Queries. Loco Weed
A Lincoln, Neb., correspondent says: Inclosed I send you a plant which is said to remain green the year round. It is found on the prairie and has the reputation, when eaten by cattle and horses, of c...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Badly Sold
What is it? said Mr. Peter Henderson to the writer, a short time ago, as he tossed down a faded, yet still beautiful, rosy pink flower. A Brunsvigia, I guess, was the answer; but noticing a dange...
-History Of Hybrid Gladiolus
The Gardeners' Chronicle says: The celebrated French cultivator of the Gladiolus, M. Souchet, late gardener at the Imperial gardens at Fontainebleau, began to hydridize or fertilize for raising new v...
-Liability Of Seedsmen
A case of unusual interest between a seedsman and his customers has been decided by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania; an abstract from the Philadelphia Public Ledger, we give: In the case of Shisl...
-The Earliest Nursery In The United States
We are inclined to claim for German-town the credit of starting the earliest nursery in the United States. Of course Bartram's garden is older as a garden, and as its owner was a plant collector, and ...
-Nurseries Of B Mann & Sons, Lansing, Mich
These were started but 12 years ago, 8 years ago having but one 11 by 24 feet house. They have now about 3,000 feet of ground covered by glass for cut flowers, and about 15 acres of ground around them...
-Mr. George Rosenham
As the West builds up it will become more and more an interesting historical question, who were the earliest nurserymen in the several sections, and we are always glad to place on record all the facts...
-Valuable Works For Sale
The wife of one of our distinguished pomologists, whose income has been seriously impaired since her husband's death, wishes to dispose of a complete set of the Proceedings of the American Pomological...
-Fruit Culture
By W. C. Strong. Boston : Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 1885. Numerous works have appeared from time to time on fruit culture and kindred topics. One would think there was no room for more. But in no branc...
-Microscopical Bulletin
Published monthly by J. W. Queen & Co., Philadelphia. One of the most remarkable experiences in literature is that of scientific magazines. A love of science permeates the whole community, but very f...
-Direction Of Letters
It may be well to remind our readers that, in writing, Penn. and Tenn. look very much alike; and as there are a number of post offices of the same name in Tennessee and Pennsylvania, letters often go ...
-Dante's Pronunciation Of Veronica
G. says : Concerning the pronunciation of the name Veronica, Dante (if my scansion is correct,) accents the penult, which gives us Va-ro-nee'-ka. He refers to the relic of that name. [Besides t...
-Exhibition Notes From New Orleans
I spent two hours among the California exhibits at the Exposition grounds a day or so ago. Conifers and fruit trees are looking splendid. I was glad to notice among flowering stuff Rhododendron occide...
-World's Exhibition And Cotton Centennial - The Continued Display
The fine display of Citrus fruits at Horticultural Hall has been well-sustained, both Florida and California having largely renewed their exhibits. In fact, there has been no flagging of interest or ...
-July, 1885. Number 319. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The past autumn and spring were rather favorable transplanting seasons, but under the best conditions some extra care should be given the first season. The time is coming when transplanted trees of th...
-Communications. Clematis Native Of South Carolina
Will not the Editor of Gardeners' Monthly kindly correct a mistake which I note on page 185, June issue, relative to a Clematis sent him, which he describes as white ? whereas the flower which I sent ...
-The Variegated Eulalia
The variegated Japan Eulalia, Eulalia Japonica variegata, is a very beautiful hardy perennial plant, belonging to the natural order Graminaca?. It is a reed-like plant of robust habit forming when we...
-Cultivating The Mammoth Sequoia Of California
To the Editor of this magazine, one of the most interesting lessons learned in California, was one which only one experienced in the culture of trees could learn; namely, that the Sequoia gigantea is ...
-Public School Gardens
Great efforts are being made in France to have gardens attached to all public schools. It is found in Philadelphia that there is always a pressure to get into those schools that happen to have little ...
-Preserving Iron Surfaces From Oxidation
Pulverulent zinc is mixed with oil and a dryer, and the mixture is applied with a brush. For ordinary exposure, one coating of this mixture is affirmed to be sufficient, but a double coat, it is claim...
-Portraits From Bedding Plants
Leaf plants, or carpet bedding, as they are called, are quite familiar in the form of lettering, out in our park, or spelling the names of rural railway stations. Town Topics tells how, two years ago,...
-Root Insects On The Clematis
Galls that appear on the roots of the Clematis, much resembling those which appear on the roots of grapes attacked by the phylloxera, are well-known enemies to cultivators of the Clematis. Prof. Willi...
-The Hen And Chicken Daisy
S. T. W., Forest Grove, Oregon, writes: I send by this mail a box containing a daisy which you will see has assumed a somewhat singular form; viz. A number of small daisies around the central. One...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Notes On Mildew And Other Topics
Much interest seems to be taken in the subject of Mildew on Roses and its cause. I am of your opinion, Mr. Editor, that mildew very seldom attacks healthy plants, and when it does we are simply told...
-Permanganate Of Potash
I noticed an extract in the Canadian Horticulturist from the Garden, London, of a party that had been experimenting with this material which induced me to try it, and as his experiments cannot reach m...
-A Remedy For Rose Mildew
Since the fact became known that linseed oil and sulphur kills mildew without hurting the foliage of roses or other plants, it is claimed by some that the oil is wholly unnecessary as sulphur alone is...
-A Hybrid Between The Rose Geranium And The Pelargonium
The difficulty experienced in obtaining seed of the Rose Geranium is well known - at least to me. In 1881 and previously I had tried a number of times to induce the flowers to form seed, by fertilizin...
-Shrubby Begonias
There are very few classes of plants more easy to manage than these are, requiring a good open porous soil, fairly rich, with their drainage perfect, and at no time an over supply of water. Their root...
-Blind Wood In Rose Propagation
Mr. Williams, of Sharon, Pa., complains of blind shoots and lays it to the use of blind wood for cuttings. Well, he is just about right, my experience in using that kind of wood bears out his theo...
-Rose Lusiades
This rose was regarded as a most remarkable sport, and some attention was attracted to it even in this country where anything claiming to be fancy among roses is sure to have a good run. But it appe...
-Mimulus Culture In Pots
I have occasionally seen, in country districts, Mimuluses grown by cottagers as window plants, and with astonishing success. I have also met with good plants of them at cottagers' shows thoroughly wel...
-Disease In Roses
A Saratoga correspondent says: Upon investigating into the cause of some of my roses dying, I find nothing in the soil to show any reasons for it, unless it be a white, thread-like fungus; and yet wh...
-New Carnations
C. M., Hudson, N. Y., says: I send you to-day, as a novelty, my new Carnation, 'Canary Bird.' Also one that I believe is quite as unique, though perhaps it may be otherwise, as I have not seen it b...
-Beautiful Pansies
A collection from Mr. John F. Clark reminds us that though we see large and showy pansies everywhere, not near as much beauty has been evolved from them as they are capable of affording. Some of these...
-Double Richardia Alba Maculata
Dou ble callas, or callas with two spathes, are not uncommon, but one of this species sent to us by Mr. Slocombe, of New Haven, is a novelty. In a calla flower, the white spathe is little more than a...
-New Or Rare Plants. Dieffenbachia Rex
The whole tribe of Arums, or, as American boys would say, Indian turnips, affords us some of the most beautiful kinds of ornamental leaf plants known. This one is said to be especially beautiful, and ...
-July, 1885. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
In many amateurs' gardens late peas are valued. It is essential that they be planted in the coolest part of the ground. The pea is a cool country plant, and when it has to grow in warm weather it mild...
-Communications. Cultivation; As Affecting The Strawberry
In the consideration of the cultivation of the Strawberry, under this heading, the first requisite is to form a clear conception of what the vegetative and reproductive organs are, and wherein their u...
-Grapes In Paper Bags
I am only a woman stumbling often accidentally upon valuable processes; have been cultivating fruits, flowers and vegetables for over twenty years, with my only aid, common sense and the many valu...
-Cultivating Orchards
A correspondent sends us the following from California, as reported of a speaker at a late meeting of the State Horticultural Society; and remarks that it coincides with what the Gardeners' Monthly ha...
-Peach Yellows
There seems to be some mixture of ideas in the minds of some who have given thought to this subject. A well known fruit grower of great experience recently spoke vehemently against the idea that fungu...
-Fire Blight In The Pear
Reading a new work recently in which horticultural knowledge is professedly brought down to the present time, we find pear blight referred to in precisely the same language and terms as would have ...
-Fruits To Eat Or Fruits To Sell
The Farmers Home Journal referring to our recent note on new fruits, makes the following good point in addition : To please the eye, is the aim of the fruit seller, and it is no longer an object to...
-Classification Of Apples
Dr. Hogg, an eminent English pomologist regards the best characters for a classification of apples to lie in the depression or calyx basin, and the carpellary walls of the fruit - that is to say, the ...
-The Pear As A Family.Fruit
Whatever may be said of the pear as a profitable or unpro. fitable fruit for market, there is no doubt that it is one of the most reliable of all for family use. No tree takes care of itself so well. ...
-Large Pears
At a pomological exhibition (apple show, they call it in the Old World) at Exeter, in England, a report says that in class twenty-five, six dishes, five fruits each, Sir T. D, Acland, Bart., was first...
-Wilson Junior, Blackberry
Mr. Parry in 1870, selected plants of Dorchester and Wilson Early, and planted them together, far away from any other to mix with, trusting that the pollen of one kind might perhaps intermix with the ...
-Product Of A Single Potato
The amazing reproductive capacity of some insects is more than equalled in the vegetable world. The seeds in a single orchid capsule are capable of making millions of plants. The spores from a single ...
-Forest Fires
The New York Commercial Bulletin, in presenting its usual monthly record of losses by fire, makes the following pertinent comment: The fires keep up their ravages in a way that should compel attenti...
-Drainage For Trees
The necessity for good drainage for trees as well as for flowers is well illustrated by Californian experience. In many places the soft surface soil is only about a foot deep. Then there is hard pan ...
-Growth Of Timber In Rocky Land
People often have an idea that rocky ground is poor ground. On the contrary, it is very rich from the vegetable accumulations which get between the crevices and cannot be washed away. Prof. Maynard re...
-Succession Of Forest Growths
One of the most interesting studies connected with forestry is the succession of forest growths. It is a common observation that when a forest disappears it is generally replaced by one of a different...
-Fragrance
Among all the harmonies of nature, those which afford the most universal delight, which are appreciated and enjoyed by the most lowly as well as the most refined, are the accords of fragrance, the har...
-The Flower Farms Of France
The growing of plants and flowers for use in perfumery, medicine and culinary art, is a most important branch of horticultural industry in that part of France bordering upon the Gulf of Lyons and the ...
-Common Names Of Plants
I was induced to refresh my botanical (local) lore by reading the query to our good Editor, to see if I could help him out, but I failed in every instance but one; yet I came across so many names just...
-Selaginella Involvens Variegata
The cause of variegation or the green parts of plants blanching is not clearly made out. When it comes to a question of a plant growing in darkness, we say in explanation it is for want of light, that...
-Honey Dew
A very interesting fact has recently been developed in connection with the production of the sweet secretion known as honey-dew, on the leaves of plants. That leaves are often coated with this substan...
-Bud Variation
H. B. H., Oakland, Cal., writes : Your answers to correspondents are very interesting indeed to us, and we find our own experience described very often exactly in them. In your May number you quot...
-Fruiting Of The Salisburia At Lewisburg, Pa
Prof. Geo. G. Groff sends us specimens of fruit from a tree at Lewisburg. He has never seen aments on it. Another tree about 100 yards away bears aments, but he has never seen fruit on it. These trees...
-The Hollyhock Disease
J. C. Arthur, New York Agric. Exper. Station, Geneva, N. Y., says: 'There is no record of the hollyhock disease caused by Puccinia Malvacearum occurring upon any cultivated plant in America, and is on...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Interesting Places
After perusing the well arranged spring catalogue of select hot-house, greenhouse, hardy and new plants, received from David Fergusson & Sons, Laurel Hill Nurseries, Philadelphia, I felt the strongest...
-The Duke Of Westminster's Garden
Eaton Hall is one of the most beautiful ducal palaces, and has one of the most interesting gardening establishments in England. The gardener has fifty-six men employed under him. The number of glass h...
-Mummy Peas
The modern Egyptian is nearly as good as Ah Sin, when playing the game of Fleece your brethren. Employ one to get you some mummy peas at a big figure, and he will get you the mummy and carefully un...
-P. B. Hovey
The founder and senior partner of the well-known seed firm of Hovey & Co., of Boston, died at his home in Cambridge on the 3rd of June, in his 81st year. He was born, in the house where he always live...
-The Canadian Forester's Illustrated Guide
By J. C. Chapais, Montreal. Eusebe Senecal et Fils, publishers. 1885. The object of this work is to make Canadian farmers and others acquainted with the trees composing Canadian forests. Accurate dra...
-The Jesup Collection Of Woods Of The United States
By Prof. C. S. Sargent. New York: D. Appleton & Co. Morris K. Jesup, the President of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, collected specimens of all the woods of the United States, and ...
-Gray's Botanical Text Book
Professor Gray's Text Book went through five editions under the sole supervision of the author. When the sixth was called for botany had so far advanced that Dr. Gray had to commit portions of the wor...
-Five Acres Too Much
By Robert Barnewell Roosevelt. Orange Judd Company, New York. New Edition. When Ten Acres Enough appeared many went wild over the enormous profits supposed to be made out of a few acres of ground,...
-Mushrooms Of America: Edible And Poisonous
By Julius A. Palmer, Jr., Boston : Published by L. Prang & Co. 1885. There is no more universally appreciated vegetable than the mushroom. A very large number of species are edible. But numbers of sp...
-Talks Afield About Plants And The Science Of Plants
By L. H. Bailey, Jr. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 1885. This is of a class of books very acceptable to the readers of the Gardeners' Monthly, a class which tells in a pleasant and popular way the ...
-Baron Mueller's Select Plants
The public seldom know how much they owe to the unselfish labors of men of science. We noted recently the republication of the above named useful work in this country, by G. S. Davis, of Detroit, it h...
-The Shamrock Of Ireland
W. H. P., Iowa City, Iowa, says : Will you be so kind as to answer through the columns of your esteemed journal, the Gardeners' Monthly, the following questions: What is the true Shamrock of the...
-Giddings' Nurseries, Danville, Illinois
It was not those miserable compositors this time, but the naughty Editor that located Giddings' nurseries at Danville, Indiana, instead of Danville, Illinois. But after all what business has Illinois ...
-The Lawson Pear
Mr. John S. Collins says: I notice in last monthly, under the heading of 'The Comet Pear,' an opinion of the Editor of the Gardeners' Monthly which I do not consider correct. It would no doubt have b...
-World's Exposition
The first season of the World's Exposition came to a close to-day. There were causes at the opening, and for a time subsequent, that prevented it from becoming a financial success. This is the only Ex...
-July, 1885. Floral Notes From New Orleans
If you think I am getting troublesome, bear with me this once. I do not think I shall write again for some time. The thermometer as I write is 900 in the shade at my door, and I often catch the shamel...
-The Premium System, As Exemplified At New Orleans
As a good illustration of the absurdity of the premium system noted in our last, a correspondent says: A lady knowing I was fond of cactuses bought for me from one 'who has taken ten premiums,' the r...
-American Exhibition In London
Mr. Burnet Landreth, the well-known chief of the Agriculture Bureau of the Centennial, writes: As one of the Vice Presidents of the 'American Exhibition ' to open in London May 1st, '86, permit me to...
-August, 1885. Number 320. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
The excessive drouth which has prevailed in many parts of the country, has not been without its lessons to the horticulturist. In Germantown where from three to five inches of rain is the record for J...
-Communications. The Amaryllis In The South
The Amaryllis is a plant which deserves a greater amount of attention in the Southern States than is usually accorded it. The hybrid, A. Johnsonii, is an old inhabitant of the gardens in the South. Ot...
-Cause Of Broken Branchlets In The Norway Spruce
I blame the squirrels for the broken branches found under the Norway Spruces in the spring - note of which you made in last number of Gardeners' Monthly. Although I have never seen a squirrel cut a b...
-Beauty And Utility In The Spike Rush
Among the sedges of our wet lands there are few plants more beautiful than some of the more delicate species of Eleocharis, called *' Spike Rushes by authors, and Frog's Hair by country people. A l...
-An Open Letter To A "Flower Sister." By Mrs. Fannie E. Briggs
Mrs. Wellcome's letter in the June number has touched so many chords of memory that I must respond; and as, doubtless, many of the readers of the Gardeners' Monthly have the same associations, I trust...
-The White Fringe Tree
It takes a long time for plants to be thoroughly well known, and this we now illustrate is a striking example. It has been in cultivation for a century, but chiefly in the gardens of the curious, and ...
-Floriculture In Georgia
The Augusta Chronicle tells us that the mild climate of Georgia is very favorable to gardening. A single red variety of the Camellia brought from England in 1808 or 1809 is now a fine tree in Charlest...
-Salt Ox Lawns
A correspondent from St. Paul, Minnesota, writes: As a reader of the Gardeners' Monthly for many years I have become a firm believer in its teachings, but was sadly disappointed by following the advi...
-The York And Lancaster Rose
Several years since the rose growers had given, them (by Peter Henderson I believe) a new rose, striped; and therefore called American Banner. It created quite a sensation and demand. I amongst the re...
-Gas Killing The Roots Of Trees
Nanz & Neuner, Louisville, Ky., write: Through the carelessness of the New Gas Co. (water gas) we are losing a number of trees here on the principal streets, some as old as twenty and thirty years. G...
-Magnolia Cordata
We had reason for believing that the true Magnolia cordata had been confused with forms of Magnolia acuminata, and that the genuine which is rare even in its native places, did not exist in nurseries,...
-Greenhouse And House Gardening. Communications. Culture Of Cactuses
For several weeks past I have been on the tiptoe of expectation over an article on the growth, culture and habits of the Cactus, that my Cactus correspondents have been telling me would appear in thi...
-The Relative Cost Of Steam And Hot Water Heating
I have been making some inquiries, by mail, of florists, covering the country from Bangor, Me.-to Baltimore, Md., and from the Atlantic to Chicago, 111., hoping thereby to obtain the practical facts r...
-Manettia Cordifolia
The cordate leaved Manettia, M. cordifolia is a very beautiful, half hardy, summer flowering, twining or climbing vine, belonging to the natural order Cinchonaceae. It is a native of Buenos Ayres, wh...
-New Or Rare Plants. Davallia Tenuifolia Veitchiana
Ferns adapted to pot culture are now rather numerous, and one may readily make a good selection and get great variety among a comparatively small list; but kinds adapted to hanging vases or baskets ar...
-Night-Blooming Cereus
W. L. M., Des Moines, la., writes : Please tell me if you can if there is more than one kind of Farfugium, and to what class or family of plants it belongs ? Peter H. makes no mention of it in his ...
-The Greenhouse Rose Beetle
A lady of Madison, New Jersey, writes : Will you be kind enough to give in the magazine an accurate description of the rose-bug mentioned by Mr. Henderson on p. 170 of the June number? Is it the same...
-August, 1885. Fruit And Vegetabie Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The grape-vine at this season will require attention, to see that the leaves are all retained healthy till thoroughly ripened. It is not a sign of healthiness for a vine to grow late; on the contrary,...
-Forcing Strawberries
Mr. Thos. Foulds, Hoyt, Montgomery Co., Pa., writes: Will any of your correspondents give their experience on strawberry culture under glass ? This query was asked in one of the previous numbers o...
-History Of The Scuppernong Grape
At a meeting of the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle, held at Aiken, S. C, recently, Mr. H. W. Ravenel observed that there are varieties of the grape which have been propagated by cuttings, t...
-Saur Kraut With Oysters
Boil six pounds of saur kraut till tender in water with four ounces of butter and the same quantity of lard. An earthenware or a porcelain-lined pot closely covered is the best for the purpose. A shee...
-Disease In Cabbages
J. R., Elizabeth-town, N. J., writes: I am searching for information. I am a young gardener and have been three years in the North. I have had good success in growing most all kinds of plants and ...
-An English Gooseberry
Some one sends us a branch with large white gooseberries of the English race, but no note has reached us as to what it is or where from. If it is a seedling, and an opinion is desired, we can only sa...
-Immediate Effect Of Pollen On Fruit
By request the Editor of this magazine wrote a review of all that he could find on record relating to the chapter by Mr. Darwin, favoring the view that there is an immediate effect of pollen on fruit....
-Sending Peaches By Express
A Baltimore correspondent says : I write at the request of my employer who places great value on your knowledge in everything connected with the business. He wants to know the most improved method o...
-Centennial Cherry
Coales & Tool send us all the way from Napa, California, six cherries by mail, that reached us as fresh as if just gathered from the tree, and were quite as good flavored as the Napoleon Biggareau fro...
-Rapidity Of Growth In Timber Trees
We have frequently drawn attention to the fact that there will never be a scarcity of timber in our country, because the wide-awake American will be sure to plant as soon as it becomes scarce enough t...
-Red Cedar Telegraph Poles
We continually read the most astonishing statements by Europeans about things in America, and wonder why it is that every one must go from home to learn news of his next neighbor. We just took up an a...
-An Ancient Forest Fire
Captain Zargo, a Portuguese, landed in Madeira in 1419. Dr. Fruc-tuosa gives an account of the expedition. He says Zargo found the Island one vast impenetrable forest, and fired the woods in order to ...
-The Corsican Pine
As some attention is being given to this pine for timber in the old world, it may serve to indicate its growth in America to note that one planted by the late Robert Buist is still growing in his grou...
-Durability Of The Larch
It seems too bad that after waiting some fifty years for forestry profits, the English and Scotch should find their hundreds of acres of larch an arid waste so far as bankable returns are in quest...
-Rapid Growth Of Timber Trees
We have seen in our country that it is possible to get trees large enough for profitable timber in twenty years, but not by planting them in masses as in a natural forest, but by giving them room to d...
-The Way To Make Timber Culture Profitable
The Philadelphia Weekly Press, which, by the way, has one of the most ably edited agricultural departments in its weekly edition of any daily paper that comes to our table - takes exception to some re...
-Common Names Of Native Plants
I sympathize deeply with our Florist friend, who recently sent to our genial Editor to help him out, the list of plants bearing such names as Lizzard's Back, Dutchman's Breeches, etc. When I have foun...
-Fermentive Activity As An Important Factor In The Economy Of The Creation
It is not usual in writing a series of papers to close with what should have been more properly the initiative; but this having happened more through accident than intention I trust it will be overloo...
-Zephyranthes Atamasco
Whilst on my daily visits to my beds of these fairy lilies, I was astonished to find specimens that had four calyxes and four corollas instead of the regular number, three, and have taken them up - an...
-On The Disappearance Of Pith In The Wood Of Plants
Some years ago Mr. Thomas Meehan called the attention of the Botanical Section of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia to the curious fact that when trees of Elder, Paulow-nia, and other tr...
-The Wild Fruits Of Colorado
A lady, Marion Muir, contributes to Vicks Monthly some very interesting facts regarding the wild fruits of Colorado, less valuable than they might be, because one can scarcely know what is referred to...
-Drinking Water, And Cess-Pool Nuisances
The nitrogenous matters in bad water are just what plants like to feed on. Plants in streams tend to purify the water, and the roots of trees around cesspools feed on matter that might, but for them, ...
-A Water Plant Catching Fish
The bladders of the curious water weed - Utricularia - still occupy the attention of the curious in the Old World. The fact that these bladders caught living things was first observed in this country ...
-Fertile Hybrids
After the full account of the want of sterility in hybrids, which appeared in the Independent some months ago, nothing further is, perhaps, deemed necessary; and yet it may be useful to place on recor...
-Hybrid Between Rose Geranium And Pelargonium
Mr. Ernest Walker, New Albany, Ind., writes: In the manuscript of my article A Hybrid Between the Rose Geranium and Pelargonium, page 199 July number Gardeners' Monthly, I indicated the cross - Ro...
-Self-Fertilization In The Fig
F. B., Stockton, California, writes: So much is said about the necessity of cross-fertilization in flowers, I wonder how the fig manages, that has no open flowers at all. Surely insects can bring ...
-The Word, Shamrock
In answer to a query as to the meaning of the work Shamrock (page 221,Gardeners' Monthly), I would say that it is from the Irish, seamrog (Gaelic, seamrag), a diminutive of seam, mild, gentle, a...
-Floral Notes From Washington
I expect you will be surprised to hear from me under the above heading; but I have not felt so well for some time past, and thought I would try some place where the thermometer does not average so hig...
-Names, Wise And Otherwise
I feel sympathy for the correspondent who is seeking light on that list of outlandish names given on page 155, May number. I think, that the Sheep's Horns is Martynia proboscidia, also called Devil...
-The Witch Hazel
In a quotation from Mr. L. H. Bailey's book (on page 220) it is intimated that the name wych-hazel (or witch-hazel or elm) for Ulmus montana is due to the wood having in olden times been used in the c...
-Purchaser's Risk
A question of great interest to agricultural and horticultural pursuits was recently decided by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, Justice Gordon giving the opinion of the court. A Pennsylvanian bough...
-Honors To M. Rodigas
European governments delight to honor horticultural editors. The Spanish government has made our Belgian Colleague a Knight of the Royal Order of Isabella the Catholic. Jay Gould's Conservatories at ...
-The Greenhouses Of Dennison Brothers, Of Philadelphia
Mr. J. Wooding notes as showing what intelligent industry will accomplish, that only twelve years ago, the head of the firm located at Belmont avenue, near the city line, with only capital enough to b...
-A Good Gardener At Liberty
We understand that in consequence of some contemplated change in Dr. Richardson's place at New Orleans, Mr. M. H. Lester, his former gardener will come North if a suitable situation offers. His lively...
-Mr. John Feast
This eminent florist of Baltimore died in that city on the 7th of June, in his 85th year. The Gardeners' Monthly has especial cause to offer a sincere tribute of regret for his loss, as he was its ear...
-Botanical Club Of The American Association For The Advancement Of Science
Horticulture derives so much aid from botanical science that whatever passes as botanical merely, has still an interest for the intelligent horticulturist. These will be glad to know that the Botanica...
-The Work Of The American Association Of Florists
Mrs. J. S. R. Thomson, Spartans-burg, S. Carolina, says : I am very anxious to be satisfied on several subjects, and woman-like, don't well know where to begin or where to leave off. 1st. I would l...
-September, 1885. Number 321. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
We have become so habituated to rapid work that many good practices of the slow old times have become nearly forgotten. For instance, trenching ground for trees and flowers is so utterly neglected tha...
-Communications. Note On Azalea Mollis, And Rhododendrons
In a recent Monthly I noticed the Azalea mollis referred to as not hardy. I have a bed of this Azalea containing a dozen plants which have proved for some half dozen years as hardy as any shrub on my ...
-Destruction Of Trees By Coal Gas
The death of trees in cities is frequent and the stereotyped diagnosis is gas. That gas will destroy trees I doubt not. Illuminating gas is of less specific gravity than air, and if escaping under g...
-The Umbrella China Tree
In the June number of the Gardeners' Monthly, page 164, I notice a communication from Mrs. J. S. R. Thomson which mentions that there is one variety of the China called in ignorance Umbrella Tree. ...
-Lawn Grass
Meadow, West Philadelphia, Pa., desires us to tell her through the Monthly the best grass for a lawn. The best kind depends on many circumstances. If rather low ground and somewhat stiff soil the...
-A White-Leaved Honey Locust
J. G., Tipton, Mo., sends a white-leaved Honey Locust. He saw the small plant first in 1884, and it is now 34 inches high, and still retains its variegation. He would like to know whether it is like...
-Grass For A Lawn
A correspondent at Staunton, Virginia asks: What is the best lawn treatment? Is there anything better than Agrostis stolonifera to mix with our common Blue Grass for a lawn ? [There is no benefit ...
-Hardy Cacti
Mr. Bassett, Hammonton, N. J., asks: Is there any cactus with brilliant red flowers, sufficiently hardy to stand our winters? Opuntia Rafinesqui blooms freely here in any sandy waste, and I woul...
-Dahlia Stem Borer
E. S. Miller, Wading River, L. I., N. Y., says: I was surprised that you never heard of the Dahlia stem borer. Twenty years ago it used to trouble me. It would bore out the stem when from six inches ...
-Destroying Chicory And Similar Weeds
We give the inclosed here in order to repeat advice to a New York correspondent that may be useful to others elsewhere: Can you give me any advice as to how to destroy or get rid of chicory when it g...
-Improved Hepaticas
Mr. W. F. Bassett, Hammonton, N. J., says: Years ago, in my boyhood, when roaming over the fields and in the forests of 'the Old Bay State ' in search of nature's floral treasures, I found several He...
-Treatment Of Rhododendrons
A Virginia subscriber asks: How shall some Rhododendrons, transplanted last fall and not protected from the winter and spring winds, be treated? They survived, but that is all. Very little growth th...
-Injury By The Seventeen-Year Locust
Some very intelligent people write what to do with the larvae of the seventeen-year locust, which the entomologists tell them must do immense injury by feeding on the roots of fruit trees for seve...
-September, 1885. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Flowers in winter, is now a great aim, and it has got to be in a measure anything so that it be flowers. The great variety of beauty which flowers afford is seldom thought of, and if we have Roses, Bo...
-Communications. Cactuses
It is astonishing what an interest the New Orleans Exhibition has awakened in Cacti. True enough, they only need to be seen to be admired, and yet the majorityof florists cannot bear them - perhaps, ...
-Culture Of The Cacti
I am glad that my brief article has brought out Mr. Siler's remarks, for they are such as all growers may benefit by. The instances he gives are in accord with my ideas, only in so far as their abilit...
-Verbena Culture
The culture of the Verbena is not nearly as well understood by the average gardener or florist as it should be, and I believe that most of the more successful cultivators have yet much to learn. It is...
-Steam Heating A Success
I have carefully read and studied every article contributed to your valuable journal in favor and against steam heating but have not found in one article anything that compares with the heating of E. ...
-Linseed Oil And Sulphur As A Cure For Rose Mildew
We have a number of inquiries in regard to Mr. Veitch's remedy for mildew, in Feb. No., page 39. The tenor of all is, that Mr. Veitch has not given the proportions. But we do not think any exact propo...
-Flowering Of The Night-Blooming Cereus
Mr. E. S. Miller, Wading River, N. Y., writes: Seeing your note on the flowering of C. Mac-donaldii in Kansas and Virginia about the same date, June 6th, I thought it of interest to note that mine w...
-Begonia Feastii
Mrs. E. Bonner, Xenia, O., says: In the Gardeners' Monthly for August, you refer to the death of a florist friend, Mr. John Feast, of Baltimore. Among the plants mentioned as having originated at ...
-Cypripedium Oenanthum Superbum
Messrs. Veitch, of Chelsea, near London, continue the work begun by their father thirty years ago, hybridizing orchids, and are continually raising new ones quite as distinct and beautiful as original...
-Rose, " Her Majesty."
Messrs. Charles F. Evans and Craig Bros., of Philadelphia, have bought the entire stock of this rose which was raised by Mr. Henry Bennett, of Shepperton, England, who considers it his finest producti...
-September, 1885. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The great progress which market gardening has made in cheapening the cost of producing fruit, has not been favorable to that excellence which the lovers of good fruit usually aim at. But even as a mat...
-Communications. Cabbage Maggot
J. R., page 238, has only had in his 120 cabbage plants the experience of many a market gardener in this section with their thousands of plants. This maggot on the cabbage is getting to be a great e...
-Strawberries In Florida
The first fruit were gathered at Altoona in the first week in January. The first shipments the first week in February, of last year. A little over half an acre gave 109 bushels. The winter climate of ...
-A Dry Autumn And Strawberries
At this point not quite 1½ inches of rain fell from July 8th to October 20th, 1884. All vegetation suffered, but most of all small fruits, especially strawberries. From a plat of five-sixths of an acr...
-The Cabbage Worm
In the Gardeners' Monthly for August, 1885, page 239, I see that J. R., of Pllizabethtown, N. J., asks for information concerning some maggots that appear to be destroying the roots of his cabbage and...
-A Cheap Tree Digger
Perhaps I may serve the nursery craft and others by describing a home-made one-horse digger, which has proved a very serviceable tool for my purposes. Taking a worn-out side-hill plough, the swinging ...
-Elberta Peach
The following note is from Mr. John H. Parnell, West Point, Georgia, under date August 1st, - the fruit reaching us in perfect condition on August 4th : I send you a crate of one of our best and ne...
-The Jewell Strawberry
Many so-called new fruits come to-day and are gone to-morrow, that it seldom seems worth while to encumber our pages, which we hope will be of permanent value, with large illustrations. We make an...
-Black Knot
Reine Claude, Frankford, Phila., writes: It seems to me that the black knot on plum and cherry has taken a renewed lease of life this year. Some ten years ago I had it very bad in my garden, and I...
-Figs For Drying
J. P., Dixon, Solano co., Cal., says : Oblige me by the following information if you can : Out here in California we have several varieties of figs. A few of them are good for marker undried, but ...
-R. E. Lee Peach
These were received from Mr. J. H. Parnell, West Point, Georgia, on the 26th of July. It is rather larger than the average of early peaches that come to our table, measuring seven and a half inches ro...
-The Springfield Black Cap Raspberry
W. F. G., Springfield, Mass., writes : I send you by express a sample of our new thornless black raspberry, Springfield. We claim it is the earliest black cap grown; is prolific and of extra go...
-Forest Fires Of 1885
This is a sample of what we have seen almost daily in the morning papers : Large forest fires are raging at Harvey's Lake, twelve miles from Wilkesbarre. Fifty men are fighting the flames, and it is...
-The Age Of Yew Trees
The Garden has an interesting paper on Yew trees, and their ages. One at Fountaine Abbey in Yorkshire, was certainly a large tree of great age when the monastery was founded in 1132. The trunk of one...
-Plantation Of H. G. Russell, Of East Greenwich, Rhode Island
The Philadelphia Weekly Press says this gentleman has 230 acres of forest planting. Part was planted this spring with two or three-year-old plants of White Pine. The land is coarse gravel or pure sand...
-Denuded Norway Spruces
The presence of small evergreen branches under the trees at the close of winter first attracted my attention two years ago. I do not think it the work of squirrels, for the twigs may be found on the n...
-The Rose - Its Place In Antiquity Among Flowers
The Greeks adored the rose, and the Romans bestowed praises on this flower of the highest antiquity. Anacreon sang its primal birth. Homer praised its form of grace, and borrowed the brilliant colors ...
-Effect Of Drouth On Plants
Several weeks have passed since rain has fallen here; and all the time the July sun has been pouring down his rays most fiercely and unmercifully. At noon the mercury usually stands at something near ...
-Wild Flowers Of Rochester, N. Y., As Compared With California
Twice I have made a list of the species of wild plants found in a mile's walk - on one occasion from my residence, by way of street and canal-side, to Fair Grounds, on the edge of the town; on the oth...
-Editorial Notes. The Curl In The Peach
In the report of the Botanist to the New York agricultural experiment station (we shall soon have to have a reform in these long names, as well as in the names of fruits) Prof. Arthur says the curl ...
-Variations Among Plants
B., Leesburg, Fla., says : I have found your articles on fertilization very interesting. Since I read about the fig in your magazine, I thought that since those fruits have been raised for so many ...
-Tobacco Changing To Petunias
C. H., Pembroke, Genesee Co.,N. Y.,writes: I sowed this spring on a hot-bed three varieties of tobacco - Conn. Seed Leaf, Hayne's and Wilson. It came up well, and what seems strange to me, there i...
-Fertile Japan Yam
Mr. Wm. Muir, Fox Creek, St. Louis Co., Missouri, writes: I enclose portion of vine of Dioscorea Batatas, with seed vessels and bulblets. I have cultivated the Dioscorea Batatas since about 1858, an...
-Goober And Pindar
In regard to the article in July number Gardeners' Monthly, page 216, on Origin of the name Goober for the Pea nut,T will state that among the negroes in the coast region of South Carolina, the name...
-Where Florists Should Locate
This question many florists ask themselves, and with but few exceptions, I dare say, all imagine that, in order to be successful they must locate as closely to a metropolis as possible, regardless of ...
-Lawson Or Comet Pear
We note that some question is still raised as to our decision in this matter. If wrong we shall be glad to be set right, for we can have no personal interest in the decision one way or another. We are...
-History Of The Leconte Pear
When the average literary man - the literary magazine man - gets off his horse, he is very apt to carry his poet's license along with him. We rarely find one who can give any historical fact correctly...
-Hard-Working Editors
The London Gardeners Magazine has the following : Editors make a poor figure in the affairs of the National Rose Society. There were four in the last list of the general committee, and not one of th...
-Mr. Edgar Sanders
This well-known and esteemed florist of Chicago, according to the Prairie Farmer, which gives an excellent likeness of him, was born October 1st, 1827, at East Grim-stead, Sussex, in England. There he...
-Andrew Mcnair Dryburgh
Some thirty years ago, when the fame of the florists of Philadelphia and the exhibitions of the Pennsylvania Society filled the land, the name of Andrew M. Dryburgh was a very common one among the suc...
-Charles Wright
As we go to press the telegraph announces the death of this eminent botanist, which occurred on his farm at Weathers-field, Connecticut, on the nth of August, in his seventy-fourth year. He was found ...
-American Fruit Culturist
By J. J. Thomas. New Edition. New York : William Wood & Co. 1885. If the demand for a work is a proof of its value, we have the test here, for this has been through so many since about 1850, we belie...
-Report Of Prof. J. C. Arthur, Botanist To The New York Agricultural Station, 1884
Even to this day there are excellent horticulturists who doubt whether small microscopic organisms in the vegetable kingdom are capable of originating disease in plants. They believe they always follo...
-The American Florists
The American Florists had a good time at Cincinnati. There were some four hundred in attendance, Philadelphia having much the largest delegation present outside of the place of meeting. Twenty-one Phi...
-Maurandya Barclayana
Alexa says: Can you tell me the history of a plant I greatly admire, and which is known in gardens as the Barclayana Vine ? I have looked through Mr. Henderson's Handbook of Plants, which, by the w...
-Dutch Prizes For American Exhibitions
The General Union for the Cultivation of Bulbs, under the patronage of the King of the Netherlands, at Haarlem, Holland, has in view to promote by all proper means, the love for flowers in general, an...
-International Exposition At Antwerp, Belgium
It took just thirteen days per S. S. Penland from the foot of Grand St., Jersey City, to see the Exposition. I thought I would just take a race across and see some plants that would be new to me; but ...
-The Cactuses At New Orleans
We have the following letter on this subject: In your July number I find under 'Editorial Notes,' a quotation from a letter written you, in regard to the rare Astrophytum myriostigma. As I had an exh...
-October, 1885. Number 322. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
We have now reached a season when, more than another, work is in order, and we have to put in practice the lessons of the year. We shall therefore content ourselves with noting briefly things not so m...
-Communications. Manettia Cordifolia
Manettia cordifolia, by Charles E. Parnell. August number Gardeners' Monthly, page 232. I am inclined to think that Mr. Parnell has accepted the ipse-dixit of some author as to the hardiness of thi...
-Gas Killing Trees
I am exactly in the same condition as Nanz & Neuner with regard to street trees. A leaky gas pipe runs alongside of them for a considerable distance, and although I have had it thoroughly examined, an...
-Amaryllis In The South
Under this heading in August number I read with much pleasure and interest the above referred to article, and can corroborate and add to what P. H. O. has so well said. I am well acquainted with and...
-Dark Hybrid Perpetual Roses
Among the hybrid perpetual roses none attract so much attention in my garden as the very dark ones. A great many people have an idea that Gen. Jacqueminot is about the only dark one grown. And they al...
-Cottage Gardening At Upland, Delaware Co., Pa
This has been a peculiar and in some respects a discouraging season for gardening operations in this section. The early potatoes are very poor, early sweet corn nearly a failure, Lima bean plants orna...
-Fagus Purpurea Tricolor
I wish to take time by the forelock and save the public from disappointment, and the nurserymen from one more strain upon their consciences. This tricolored beech is an exceedingly beautiful novelty, ...
-Gardening In New Brunswick, Can
A New Brunswick paper notes that a love of gardening is progressing rapidly. The Normal School grounds are especially beautiful. A beautiful fountain has been placed near the City Hall, and Mayor Fine...
-Dark Flowering Cactuses
Mr. A. Blanc writes: Mr. Bassett asks for a hardy red blooming Opuntia, to plant with the native yellow-flowered Jersey variety. I send you a sample of a variety sent to me from Montana, and said to ...
-New Single Tuberose
The Michel Plant Company, St. Louis, writes: We send by to-day's mail a specimen of a new single Tuberose, and also a spray of the common, by way of contrast. This originated with us a few years ago,...
-Rhododendron Culture
Max., Staunton, Va., says: The Rhododendrons to which allusion was made (p. 262), had plenty of leaf-mould, and were in aerated soil. The trouble was, that while their foliage did not mind summer h...
-Rye Grass For Lawns
Red Top, Pittsburg, Pa., says: Will you please advise some of your readers as to the merits of Perennial Rye Grass (Lolium perenne) as a component part of a mixture for lawn grass. It is claimed t...
-Bleeding In A Norway Spruce
W. F. G., Springfield, Mass., writes: I have a Norway Spruce that bleeds badly from the but end of several dead branches. All are on one side. The dark spots in the figure at the left are dead lim...
-Hardy Cactuses
Apart from Opuntia Mis-souriensis, O. Rafinesquii and O. vulgaris and their varieties, we have very few hardy Cactuses. I have succeeded in wintering safely O. pescorvi and some others, but with uncer...
-Tender Cactuses
I regard all Cactuses not absolutely hardy as being tender and treat them accordingly. While a few degrees of frost may not hurt some of them, still it does not do them any good. Epiphyllums, Phylloca...
-Propagating From Blindwood
Experience is a good but expensive school, and those that learn there are not apt to forget their lessons. One of my first lessons was in growing fuchsias for flowering. I took cuttings of blind shoot...
-Rose Culture
The subject of ventilation for rose houses, is one of much importance to rose growers. To grow plants for the purpose of propagation requires a different treatment from that of growing them for bloom....
-Dieffenbachia Weirii
Mr. Weir's Dieffenbachia, Dieffenbachia Weirii, is a very beautiful and distinct stove plant with ornamental foliage, belonging to the natural order Aracene. It is a native of South America, where it ...
-Chrysanthemum Fly
Every purchase of Chrysanthemums brings us an army of this pest, but I have always succeeded in getting rid of them. My method is to watch the plants carefully every day and wash them in strong soap-s...
-Flowering Of Cactuses
The first of six buds on Cereus McDonaldii flowered on the 6th of June with Mr. Macaulay, Ellsworth, Kansas, and about the same time one was opening with Mr. Pfifer, of Danville, Virginia. The simulta...
-Flow Pipes In Hot Water Boilers
A Constant Reader, Bangor, Me., says: Your remarks on the above subject (page 199 July number) seem very reasonable and may be made very practicable. Water certainly must need greater force to ru...
-Disease In Coleus
F. L. F., Catonsville, Md., writes: I send by mail a root of Coleus Verschaffeltii, and will be greatly obliged if you can assign a cause for the fungus growth upon it. We have had numbers of plan...
-New Or Rare Plants. Amasoma Punicea
In reference to this remarkable new greenhouse shrub, we have the following note from Messrs. Veitch : This is unquestionably one of the most beautiful flowering shrubs that has been brought under t...
-Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Communications. Insects In Cabbage Roots
On page 239 J. R., Elizabethtown, N. J., inquires how to get rid of the maggot that destroys cabbage by boring the root. I have been troubled very much with the same pest in my cauliflower. My remed...
-Culture Of The Blueberry
The Blueberry is a valuable fruit, and is the only reliable fruit to grow in the extreme northern latitude where most other fruits winter-kill. It is perfectly hardy; stood 400 below zero the past win...
-Pear, William Fuller
D. Lee & Son, Madison, O., send samples, which were eaten the first week in August. It is a greenish yellow pear, about the size, form, and season of ripening, as Giffard, coarser flesh, rather sweete...
-Cherries From California
The freight from California to the East is bearing hard on California fruit growers. Of one car containing 1,660 boxes, large consignments were forwarded to Cleveland, Boston, Philadelphia, Milwaukee,...
-Running Out Of Varieties Of Fruit
A Virginia correspondent says: Referring to your notes on decay of varieties of strawberries (page 271), why is the spread of fungus troubles 'more fairly to be attributed to climatic causes' than to...
-Grapes In Valley Of Virginia
Max, Staunton, Va., under date 5th Sept. says: - For once the Vineyardist has nothing of which to complain - no rot, mildew nor any other ill, to which the grape is heir, troubled him this season, ...
-Small Berries On Lindley Grapes
Mr. Lorin Blodget says : I pick to-day a few bunches of grapes from the Lindley vine, Rogers' hybrid No. 9, which are clearly affected by a cross fertilization with a Delaware vine alongside of them...
-Lutie Grape
This is an accidental find on the grounds of Dr. Chisholm, near Nashville, and believed to be a seedling. It is at any rate different from any variety known to the Doctor, who is well versed in grape ...
-Forestry. Communications. Succession Of Forest Growths
Three years ago I published my observations on the succession of forest growths in the Rocky Mountains and all the forests in the Northwest. Since that time it has been observed that the same rule app...
-The Wood Of Thuja Gigantea, And Of Cupressus Nutkaensis
A correspondent of the Garden says: Thuja gigantea is, among the trees on the Northwest coast, the Indian's best friend, for out of its wood and bark he manufactures endless articles of domestic, hu...
-Forestry In New Hampshire
Report of the Forestry Commission appointed by the Legislature, July, 1881. The Commission consisted of Governor Hale, Messrs. Henry G. Jesup, Joseph B. Walker, William H. Hills, Joseph Barnard, Willi...
-Forests And The Water Supply
As frequently noted in these columns practical matters depend so much on correct deductions, that what would be nothing but abstract science to most persons, becomes very much more to those in our pro...
-New Races Of Flowers
Since it has been well established by the work of the Florist that the old maxim that like produces like, as a test of a true species, is just as characteristic of any garden variety, much more enco...
-Sources Of Nitrogen In Plants
Mr. Darwin's careful experiments on the so-called carnivorous plants, to our mind conclusively overturned the conclusions of Boussingault, Lawes, Gilbert, Pugh and others, that plants do not obtain an...
-Finding Rare Plants
Mrs. J. S. R. T., Spartanburg, S. C, writes : I have an absorbing desire to catch the attention of all to the many attractions of our fair sunny South-land. Floriculture being my specialty, I am b...
-Mistletoe On The Oak
Student inquires whether the Mistletoe is found on the Oak in this country, as it is never found on the Oak in the Old World ? [The fact is the Mistletoe has been found on the Oak in a few rare ...
-Change In An African Marigold
Mr. A. Blanc says : I send you two flowers of a Marigold, both taken from one plant. You will notice that one is single and the other perfectly double. This plant produced nothing but single flowers ...
-Letter From Paris
Before I left Antwerp I visited the flower market. It is held under the trees in the Public Square, and the plants were chiefly of what we should know as of the bedding class. The Lobelia and Heliotro...
-Our Lady's Garden
In his letter to Apollinaris, Pliny the younger gives us a charming description of the garden surrounding his villa in Tuscany. From it we derive nearly all the knowledge we have of the Roman viridari...
-A Monument To General Grant
Landscape gardeners contend that their art is equal to any, and are a little sensitive that they seldom receive the homage which the artist in general receives from society. There is no doubt that if ...
-Free Distribution Of Seeds Bythegovernment
At the third annual meeting of the American Seed Trade Association, held at Rochester, June 9th, loth, and nth, 1885, the subject of the free distribution of seeds by the government came up, and Mr. V...
-In Memoriam
In reviewing events since our last meeting, I feel that we should most gratefully recognize that Divine Goodness which has preserved the lives of so many of our members to the present time. Some few -...
-What Our Society Has Accomplished
When we reflect on the unsettled and chaotic condition of pomology in our country when our Society was established, the narrow limits to which fruit culture was confined, and the few engaged in it, an...
-Florists' Convention Notes
Philadelphia is selected for the next convention. Mr. C. L. Allen, of Garden City, N. Y., said that plants reason, think and feel. Mr. Robert Craig, of Philadelphia, wonders what the rose Andre Schw...
-The International Exposition At Antwerp, Belgium
One franc is the price of admission to the Exposition. To-day, another franc is charged - inside - for admission to the Horticultural Department. It is arranged about as any other first-class Expositi...
-Apparently Different Ideas Amongst Business Men
But if it is to be a grand collection of ordinary merchandise, a bazaar, a mere mart where the people are to be brought together to buy and to sell, a mere question of ordinary ' business,' as our co...
-The Florists' Convention At Chicago
Your correspondent who reported the doings of the Cincinnati Meeting of the Society of American Florists, made several errors, one of which should be corrected. It is true that Mayor Probasco extend...
-November, 1885. Number 323. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Gardening would be more nearly an echo of paradise than it is now, only for the annoyances caused by insect foes. The red spider is a terrible pest, and the past season it has been more than usually d...
-Communications. Tobacco Stems And Ashes
I find tobacco stems placed about the root of a peach tree answer three important purposes, viz: that of a good mulch, destroy the borer, and answer the object of a splendid fertilizer. Wood ashes al...
-Nicotiana Affinis - A New Annual
Nicotiana affinis is certainly one of the grand novelties amongst new introductions. I always speak of things as I find them. I made a bed of it with some fears of what it might turn out, judging from...
-Euphorbias For Embankments
For the railroad embankment I will recommend Euphorbia Cyparissias. Near Mumford, Western New York, I saw a spread of it, the which covered an area of ten feet square, or more. It had evidently start...
-Planting Tuberose Sets For Sets And Bulbs- By Mrs. J. S. R. Thomson
I noticed with great interest the article of Ernest Walker in October number, page 297, on Propagating from Blindwood, especially that point made. The difference in time cuttings took to bloom. My ...
-Roses Grown In Georgia
In the October number of the Gardeners' Monthly, under Florists' Convention Notes, Mr. Charles Henderson is reported as saying, that the dormant rose plants which he received from Georgia last autu...
-Sedums In Ornamental Gardening
The Sedums were made for the gardener. Knowing their colors and the height each attains in a season's growth, he may lay out a perfect garden at the start, never needing afterward to approach it with ...
-Lobelia Cardinalis
This is one of the most showy plants we grow, and we find it very easy to handle. When one has a wet corner to plant in, it will require no care except planting; but we take either the small offsets t...
-The Japan Snowball
The misfortune of common names is, as we have often suggested, that no one feels bound to adopt a name already common to a plant, but feels privileged to give it another name or as many names as he li...
-Evergreen Hedges For The South
While Northern gardens pride themselves on the beautiful hedges made by the Hemlock Spruce, or Arbor Vitae, Southern gardens revel in beauty by the wealth of broad-leaved evergreens which they can use...
-The Beauty Of Oaks
It is conceded that on a variety of points being considered no class of tree has so many good ones as the oak. They are growing in favor with ornamental planters. So far the English Royal oak has had ...
-Hardiness Of Alstrcemeria
M.M., St. Paul, Minn., asks: Will you kindly give me information in the next number of the Gardeners' Monthly as to whether Alstoemeria Errembaultii and Fritillaria praecox alba are hardy here? The...
-Callicarpa Americana
W. F. H., Huntsville, Ala., writes: I take the liberty of sending the fruit and leaves of a very showy plant common here on the hillsides and open places in the forests; but mostly confined to the...
-November, 1885. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
The recent sale of the late Mrs. Morgan's Orchids has been the theme of so many articles in the daily papers, that people who do not even know that such a magazine as the Gardeners' Monthly is in exis...
-Communications. Steam Heating A Success
In reading the article with the above heading in September issue, by N. B. Stover, I was much surprised at the statement that the cost of heating over 12,000 square feet of glass, a work-shop, and a d...
-Pentas Carnea
The flesh colored Pentas, P. carnea, is a very handsome and free flowering stove or warm greenhouse plant, belonging to the Natural Order Cinchonaceae. It is the only species known, and is a native of...
-New Roses
Mr. John N. May, Summit, N. J., is the fortunate possessor of a new rose, which is destined to make its mark - a white one - in the near future in this flower-loving world. This candidate for public f...
-Dendrobium Dearii
I would like to say a few words in praise of Dendrobium Dearii, which I think ought to be in every collection of Orchids; for with about half a dozen plants you can always have some of those frosted w...
-The Palm House At Glasnevin, Near Dublin
M. Joly, in the proceedings of the Central Horticultural Society of France, gives an interesting account, with illustrations, of a recent visit to this grand horticultural structure. It is 73 feet hig...
-Improved Amaryllises
So much has recently been noted by correspondents of our magazine in regard to the beauty of the Amaryllis, and the ease with which they were grown, that we give on opposite page an illustration of on...
-Black Aphis
J. B., Allegheny, Pa., writes: I mail specimens of insects which have caused much trouble and considerable loss. I have used tobacco in powder and as a fumigant; also used whale oil soap, insect po...
-November, 1885. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Among the numerous varieties of new fruits continually coming into market, it must puzzle the novice which to select. The raiser of novelties - as in the case of a grape introducer - whose card is bef...
-Communications. A Talk About Mushrooms
The third lecture of the autumn series Dr. Roth-rock delivered in Horticultural Hall, Fairmount Park, recently. It was by special request that the subject, Mushrooms and Toadstools, was taken up. The...
-Identical Fruits
It would be next to impossible if among the thousands of seedling plants that annually appear, some one or another did not appear like unto some former one. Many of us older fellows cannot see a parti...
-The Globe Peach
Mr. Shearer, of Tuckerton, Pa., sends us a box of peaches which he has raised and named the Globe. It is a very pretty peach ripening with and somewhat of the style of Crawford's Late. It is about ...
-Root Fungus And Yellows
The Fartn and Garden says: We would ask the Gardeners' Monthly, if its root-fungus theory be true, how it is, that if the tops of so many peach trees that have the yellows, are cut away two feet or s...
-Plum Culture
How strikingly the modern triumph over the one time irresistible curculio is illustrated, anyone can see by the fruit stands and fruit stores which exhibit plums in profusion everywhere. Scarcely ten ...
-Newtown Pippin Apple
A Rochester correspondent says : L. T. Sanders, Collinsburg, Louisiana, requested me to mail you an apple, which I have done to-day; no doubt he has written you about it. [We have not heard from th...
-Eaton Grape
A new grape by the Moores generally means a. good improvement, and this is no exception. The bunch weighed 14½ oz., and the black berries are large: It has a rather tart flavor which is more acceptabl...
-Grapes From Green Wood Cuttings
A Canadian correspondent says : Being interested in grape growing the question has come up, are vines grown from green wood cuttings in all respects as good as when grown from ripened wood ? [Years...
-Dotted And Russetted Apples
M. R., Honesdale, Pa.: To what extent are the small black dots and occasional russet characteristic of any one variety of apple? [If we understand correctly what our correspondent means by small...
-Kalamazoo Celery
We are indebted to Messrs. Van Hampton & Co. for several stalks of Kalamazoo celery. It was received on the 25th of September, so we suppose has not yet finished its growth. It was trimmed in marketab...
-Fruit Of The Japan Chestnut
T. Brothers, Orleans, France, write : Please say through the Gardeners' Monthly whether the statement in an American catalogue that the Japan chestnut will produce seven nuts in one burr is correct ...
-Forestry. Communications. The Corsican Pine For Timber
We have had many inquiries lately for Corsican pine trees, and one of our patrons has taken us rather severely to task for not keeping up with the times, and growing so few kinds. Our experience with ...
-A Fine Specimen Of Amelanchier Canadensis
Emerson says, '* There are two remarkable varieties of this species found in Massachusetts. Both are called Shad-bush, from flowering when the shad begin to ascend the streams. One of these, A. ovali...
-Salix Fragilis For Tanning
A subscriber at Lewistown desires to know-how he may get from Russia a stock of this willow which he has read of in the Western papers, as being introduced into that section from Russia for tanning pu...
-Growth Of Trees At Rahway, N. J
Facts concerning the growth of trees in America are much needed for intelligent guidance in our forestry operations. The following figures are made by Mr. W. E. Clark, civil engineer, from trees growi...
-Change Of Climate
M. R., Honesdale.Pa.: In your last you say, 'Now climates must of necessity change.' Why 'of necessity?' I find no statement in treatises on the physical relations of the earth. I am interested ver...
-Extracts From A Botanist's Journal
A picture of a ditch and its surroundings. Which ditch is close, and parallel with, a bank of the Erie Canal, in the outskirts of Rochester. Picture taken on the spot: From one side to the other of i...
-Host Plants Of The Mistletoe
That the Mistletoe will be found on a plant abundantly in one period of the world's history, and in the same region centuries later be found chiefly on other plants, is extremely interesting in connec...
-The Atamasco Lilies
It is perhaps unfortunate that the language of flowers has not the same meaning to the horticulturist as to the botanist. So far as botany is concerned, the light flowered Atamasco lily - Zephyranthes...
-Immediate Influence Of Pollen On Fruit
A leading pomologist, himself of great experience in crossing and hybridizing, writes : When it can be shown that a long variety of a cucumber can, by immediate crossing, be made to produce a short o...
-The Mistletoe In Virginia
Mrs. M. H. G. writes: In your issue of the Gardeners' Monthly and Horticulturist, date October 1st, 1885, I notice an article on the mistletoe, in reply to an inquirer signing himself ' Student.' I...
-Mistletoe In South Carolina
Mr. H. W Ravenel, Aiken, S. C, remarks : In regard to the question of 'Student,' referred to in October number, about the host of the mistletoe, I will say that as far as I have observed in this regi...
-Literature, Travels And Personal Notes. Communications. Good Words For The Prinos And Holly
Irving, in his love of nature, thus alludes to the holly providently planted about the house, to cheat winter of its dreariness, and to throw in a semblance of green summer. It was during the mont...
-Local Names Of Plants
One of the first flowers I remember was the Lychnis Chalcedonica, Scarlet Lychnis, called in New England Prince's Pride. In the West it is called Bleed-hearts and Fire-ball. Chrysanthemums (C. ...
-Postage On Monthly Magazines
Just why a weekly magazine should be carried by the United States Mail for a less rate of postage than a monthly, is not clear. It seems like one of those unjust regulations that are the more reprehen...
-George W. Clinton
Among the recent deaths botantists will regret, is that of Judge Clinton, of Buffalo, N. Y., who died suddenly on the 7th of September, in his seventy-eighth year. Notwithstanding his age, he continue...
-Materia Medica
A lecture by Prof. W. Saunders, before the Western University at London, Ontario, is full of interesting matter connected with the history of plants in their medical relationships. It is curious to lo...
-Intelligent Readers
We have before us a letter, giving some praise to our magazine for the general intelligence displayed by correspondents who write for it; and another correspondent calls attention to his copying a pap...
-Where To Locate
We were in some doubt about passing R. C. Poppey's paper in our last. It had too personal a tone about it, and yet seemed to be disinterested. We are now sorry we did. Mr. Grove P. Rawson writes from ...
-American Pomological Society. Rules Of Pomology
Address by Hon. Marshall P. Wilder, at the 20th Session of the American Pomological Society. (Concluded from page 318). Nothing has afforded me more gratification than the favor with which our Rules...
-Production Of New Fruits
And now in fulfillment of my promise to urge upon you while I live, the importance of producing from seed, new improved varieties of fruits, adapted to the various soils and climates of our vast terri...
-Pennsylvania Horticultural Society - Fifty-Sixth Annual Exhibition
The marked improvement that continues to be seen in the culture of plants, fruits and flowers, which this Society has done so much through its long life to foster, still continues in evidence from thi...
-Meetings Of Local Horticultural Societies
It has often been remarked that the managers of local horticultural meetings, make great mistakes in getting some three-story, or other room, in which refined and cultured people will not assemble. Th...
-Chrysanthemums Shows
The taste revived during the past few years, for Chrysanthemum growing, has been much fostered by the exhibitions of the Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania Horticultural Societies. We should be ...
-December, 1885. Number 324. Flower Garden And Pleasure Ground. Seasonable Hints
Twenty-eight year? ago the Editor took pen in hand to prepare the first number of the Gardeners' Monthly. It has been a long term of very hard but very pleasant work. Large numbers of those who subscr...
-Communications. A Lady's Rock Garden
My rockery, which I at one time believed could not be excelled, was built with long, irregular moss-covered gray boulders - so large that but one could be hauled at a time - old stones that looked as ...
-The Best New Roses To Be Sent Out November Ist, 1885, In France
Tea, Marquise De Vivens (Dubreuil) Very free bloomer; beautifully shaped, large buds; very dark bright rose, edged yellowish white. Outside of the petals white, slightly yellowish; semi-double, fine ...
-Injury To Roots From Coal Gas
Since sending you my experience with gas on roots of trees, I have come across the following article in the Gardeners' Magazine, which some of your readers may not see. It says : Cuttings of willows...
-Southern-Grown Roses
Mr. A. Oelschig, of Savannah, Ga., in the November number of The Monthly, takes exception to some remarks I made at Cincinnati in regard to Southern-grown roses. The remarks in question, which were ma...
-Protecting Roses In Winter
My rose plants are in straight rows, four feet apart, and three feet apart in the rows. Before it is time to cover them for winter (which is usually from the 10th to the 15th of November), and while t...
-Some New Introductions Of This Year
Geranium Madame Solleri is a new introduction that may be well said to surpass any other of the white-leaved kind in cultivation. This praise it surely deserves, and anyone wanting a plant for ribbon ...
-A New Spruce, Picea Breweriana
Mr. Sereno Watson thus describes a new Californian Conifer: Branches slender, often elongated and pendant, puberulent; leaves 5 to 12 lines long, ½ to nearly I line wide, strictly sessile upon the sle...
-Disbranching Of Norway Spruce In Winter
A correspondent says : I asked Prof. Charles S. Sargent how he explained the trimming of the Norway spruce, about which I have previously written, and he thinks the ends of the twigs are so brittle i...
-Crocking Or Draining Pots
J. B., Fred-ericton, N. B., writes: I think Mr. Henderson has no greater admirer of his business tact and capabilities, than I in my humble way; but I was both amused and surprised to find in unpac...
-Black Fly On Chrysanthemums
A correspondent complains that Paris Green placed on Chrysanthemums had no effect at all in ridding the plants of the black aphis. Why the complaint is sent to us is not clear, as we have no knowledge...
-Double Stocks
Mrs. Theodosia B. S., San Buena Ventura, Cal., asks : Will you kindly inform me through the columns of the Gardeners' Monthly, why pot grown seeds of Stocks are superior to those grown in the open ...
-December, 1885. Greenhouse And House Gardening. Seasonable Hints
What are known as Dutch bulbs, need no recommendation from us as being plants particularly adapted to window culture. These are Hyacinths, Tulips, and Crocuses chiefly. But the class of Cape bulbs are...
-Communications. Carnation, Pres. Degraw - Its Fault, - The Remedy
It is well-known that the tendency of the Pres. Degraw carnation to split the calyx in opening - thus spoiling the form of the flower - greatly detracts from its value for winter forcing. For some tim...
-Chorozema Cordata
The heart-shaped leaved Chorozema, C. cor-data, is a very pretty dwarf evergreen greenhouse plant, belonging to the natural order Fabaceae. It is a plant of rapid growth, having numerous erect stems a...
-The Predisposing Causes Of Mildew
It seems to be the mission of a large class of fungi to act the part of scavengers in Nature, as they hasten the decomposition of dead and decaying organisms, which otherwise might taint the atmospher...
-Culture Of Tree Mignonette In England
Those who have not yet had an opportunity of visiting the horticultural establishments in the neighborhood of London, or the great flower shows, such as are held at the Crystal Palace, the Regent's Pa...
-The Red Spider
According to the Country Gentleman, at the meeting of the Society of American Florists, C. L. Allen, who has had much successful experience in the cultivation of ornamental plants, said that the red...
-Seedling Ferns
Many of the most useful decorative ferns, such as the Adiantums or Maidenhair section, and the equally useful Pteris serrulata and others, produce seed or spores freely, and only need a suitable seed-...
-Palms For A Small Conservatory
Mrs. J. G. M, Buffalo, N. Y., says: I write to ask if you, or some correspondent of the Gardeners' Monthly, can tell me what is the reason my lilacs do not grow. I have two, one purple and one whit...
-Spineless Cactuses
Amateur writes: I notice in the September number of the Gardeners' Monthly Mr. Blanc's interesting paper on Cactuses. In speaking of the Astrophytum he says he believes it to be the only cactus wit...
-December, 1885. Fruit And Vegetable Gardening. Seasonable Hints
Very little can be done now in this department, except by way of preparation for another year. Manure can be placed on the ground wherever required, and asparagus beds, if not already done, should ha...
-Communications. A Plea For The Hoe
Of late there seems to have arisen a prejudice against the hoe. I belong to the opposite party. I know too well the advantages of a thorough use of the hoe, to hold it in light esteem. Certain agricul...
-Bark Insects On Fruit Trees
The London Garden says: For destroying Moss or Lichen on fruit trees, there is nothing better than lime thinned to the consistency of whitewash, and strained through a fine sieve or thin canvas to e...
-Grafting And Budding
Mr. Spaulding stated at the late meeting of American Nurserymen, that for applying the wax in grafting, he used fine cotton yarn soaked in hot wax. The yarn is run on a big spool, and then thrown into...
-Pear Blight
The point we made recently, that scientific men who are aiding us by their researches in discovering the causes of plant diseases, do not render us the service they might, because of confusion in iden...
-Qualifications Of Good Celery
We have in the fruit catalogues, the distinction of good for market, or good for amateurs. We should have some such distinction among vegetables. In celery, for instance, there ought to be a distincti...
-Cherries Under Glass
Notwithstanding the English climate is peculiarly a cherry one, and cherry-ripe, in season, one of the most familiar of London cries, the wealthy classes with whom excellence is more of a considerat...
-American Grape Vines In France
As evidence of the interest taken in this plant, it may be noted that there is a monthly magazine there, bearing the title of Vigne Americaine. The American roots are grafted in immense quantities,...
-American Grape Culture
There is something phenomenal in the improvement of the American wild grapes. Possibly nothing like it has occurred in the history of fruit culture anywhere. In 1858 Mr. P. Barry said at the January m...
-Is The Fire Blight An Enemy Or Friend Of The Pear Grower
Mr. Hovey makes a good point in the Rural New Yorker, that when people talk of abandoning pear culture on account of the fire blight, we have only to look at the abundance of fruit everywhere, and the...
-The Bacterian Theory Of Pear Blight
William C. Medcalf, 98 Avenue D, North St. Paul street, Rochester, N. Y., writes: The papers on the above subject, which have appeared in the Gardeners' Monthly, do not as clearly point out the origi...
-Disease In Raspberries
J. writes: My neighbor has some very thrifty Blackcap raspberries that, after sending up stout canes five and six feet high, began suddenly to die about four weeks since, and some are now dying. On...
-Ritson Pear
Stone & Wellington, Toronto, Canada, write : We mail you to-day a sample of a new seedling pear, which we call 'Ritson.' The original tree is over 65 years of age, and still bears large crops of fin...
-Apple, Bentley's Sweet
J.G. R. K., Lov-ettsville, Va., writes: I cannot let the opportunity pass to send you a veteran apple by mail, that I found with several others in a box in the cellar, perfectly sound, where they h...
-Yellow Forest Apple
Mr. Sanders, Col-linsburg, La., says: I can't tell you the exact difference between the Yellow Forest and the Newtown Pippin, as I have not seen the above, but find that the description in Thomas' ...
-Forestry. Communications. Facts In American Forest Planting
I would respectfully report that the contract of R. Douglas & Sons for planting and cultivating the tree section at Farlington, Kansas, is now completed. Below is the height of the trees and circumfe...
-Cocoanuts In New Jersey
The following is from a Philadelphia paper : It will no doubt surprise our readers to learn that successful efforts have been made by English capitalists to domesticate in England certain species of...
-Profitable Forestry In America
We are sure it will be a surprise to the readers of the Gardeners' Monthly to learn from a European magazine that Thomas Meehan believes that forests cannot be planted to any profit in America. Thomas...
-The So-Called Hardy Catalpa
We always protested against the specific use of this name to the Catalpa speciosa as distinguished from C. bignonioides, because the latter is quite as hardy as most North American forest trees are. C...
-Native Flowers Of South Carolina Near The Mountains Of North Carolina
I was interested in an article on page 278, September Gardeners' Monthly, comparing the native flowers of Rochester, N. Y., with California, within a given radius, and the desire to have some adequate...
-Variation In Nature
Last spring I sent a few notes of observation, on my experiments with corn, to the Philadelphia Record, for the purpose of ascertaining the present views regarding that plant; the Agricultural Editor ...
-Grafting Dutch Bulbs
A Philadelphia correspondent says: I am about to plant some bulbs in small pots (Hyacinths, Tulips and Crocus) and wish to find out, without consuming the necessary time to experiment, whether I woul...
-Horticulture In The United States During The Last Fifty Years
This is a subject not unworthy of our consideration when we look at the almost universal interest it exercises over the minds of the people of the present day. At the time our story begins, 1837, Phi...
-Frank J. Scott
The frontispiece to our Volume for 1885, represents the Author of Suburban Home Grounds, one of those standard works on American Landscape Gardening, which has done honor to our country and for whi...
-The Grounds Of George W. Childs, Bryn Mawr, Near Philadelphia
Landscape gardening, as a fine art, met with a severe check in America by the sudden death of Andrew Jackson Downing over a quarter of a century ago. There may have been men in the profession as highl...
-A Fraud And His Partners
The Editor of the New England Homestead kindly informs us that some scamp is pretending to be a correspondent of our two papers, and for a consideration, will insert in his correspondence a puff ...
-Ridiculous Names For Fruits
Col. Wilder's efforts to reform the names of fruits - and of course flowers - are meeting with singular success. We cannot wholly control by rules an introducer's right to give a name to his fruit; bu...
-A Fungoid Disease
It is wonderful how an error once started, becomes prevalent, even among those who should know better. As the word a fungoid disease fell from the lips of the Editor some years ago, Prof. C. V. Ri...
-Azalea Mollis
Germans who try to do English, often do it very prettily. The following is from a catalogue intended for English readers: The Azaleas Mollis has now become one of the most important plants in the c...
-Famines In The Land
No one need fear a recurrence of the famines which, as history relates, formerly desolated the earth; steam brings the surplus of favored parts rapidly to the starving sections. It would not take long...
-Ruskin's Notions Of Botany
Recently we noted the singular ignorance of popular magazine writers about things in botany and horticulture, that they could know all about by a few moments of investigation, if they were not so impr...
-R. C. Poppey
After going to press last month, we found the following unique specimen on the Editoral desk, sent over from the publisher's department. Fearing R. C. P. may not already have had the ample satisfact...
-Prospects Of Gardening In Georgia
A lady correspondent writing from Dalton, says, that fruits grow so easy that everybody has thousands, therefore no one needs to buy. Thousands of bushels of peaches and apples rot on the ground. It ...
-Exaggerated Pictures
A correspondent who has had much to do with the staggering task of making pictures for catalogues, desires us to publish the following from the London Garden: It is.said that even the humble worm wi...
-The Past Year In Washington Territory
A lady writes; Our Washington Territory weather is nothing if not in an extreme one way or another. March and half of April were hot and dry as July usually is. Spring-blooming bulbs were scorched w...
-Massachusetts Horticultural Society
The Spring Exhibition of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, which opened March 19th and continued until Friday the 20th, was without question the best ever held in Boston; and in fact in no othe...
-Horticultural Displays
The Autumnal exhibition of plants and flowers of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society was a great improvement on last year. All the exhibits were very good indeed, especially were those, plants good...
-Opening Day Of The North, Central And South American Exposition
Yesterday was truly a gala day in New Orleans. All business was suspended. Many of the stores were not opened even for the early morning hours, the city devoting itself to the ceremonies of the openin...
-The Chrysanthemum Show Of The Pennsyl Vania Horticultural Society
As our December number goes to press earlier than others on account of the preparation of the Index for the whole volume, we have space for but a short account of this admirable exhibition. Even had w...
-Horticultural Conventions
Botany and horticulture have become so closely interwoven that the two generally go together now in the old world. The latest novelty in conventions is to bring together those who are interested in an...
-Retinospora Fulleri - Number Of Fruits In The Old World
Retinospora Fulleri Retinospora Fulleri is a sport from R. aurea plumosa, but instead of the golden tint of the parent, is of a delicate pale green. The branches and foliage are also slenderer. The o...
-American Peaches In France - The American Garden
American Peaches In France M. Catros-Gerand, in the Revue Horticole, calls attention to the American peaches, Amsden, Cumberland, Downing, Alexander and Beatrice - the last, however, being English an...
-The Caterer - Good For Insects
The Caterer E. C. Whitton, Phila. It is no use to raise nice fruits or vegetables unless some one knows how to cook them well. This is an excellent monthly magazine devoted to the kitchen. Japan I...
-Col. M. P. Wilder - American Apple Trade
Col. M. P. Wilder It will, we are sure, gratify the numerous friends of Col. Wilder, to know that notwithstanding his advanced years, he presided at the annual meeting of the New England Geneological...
-Corner In Oranges - Archduke Rudolphe
Corner In Oranges Not a commercial corner exactly, but a safe corner in a cold room, is the latest project in Florida. Now they have to be sent to market when ready, and sold at any price that ca...
-Princess Stephanie - Silk Culture In France
Princess Stephanie A remarkable dwarf variety, covered with enormous flowers of a beautiful lilac pink color; very double. Dangers From Wire Fences Forestry says that among the dangers which foll...
-Mahaleb Cherry As A Timber Tree - Cypripedium Insigne With Two Flowers
Mahaleb Cherry As A Timber Tree The Bullettino della R. Soc. Toscana di Orticultura says this tree grows spontaneously on the calcareous hills near Vienna, and is extensively cultivated in Austria, B...
-A Large Puff Ball - A Double Lilium Speciosum
A Large Puff Ball This fungus grows to an enormous size sometimes - that is, the species known as Lycoperdon giganteum. Prof. R. C. Call found one in 1877 in Herkimer county, New York, 5 feet 4 inche...
-Another Rose Coming To America - Wood Or The Butternut Tree
Another Rose Coming To America It is said that Her Majesty, another of Mr. Bennett's, has been bought by Mr Evans of Philadelphia, for $2,500. Cold Water To Kill Insects Perhaps no more useful ...
-Hybrid Potatoes - Parker Earle
Hybrid Potatoes Mr. Thomas Laxton, well-known as a successful hybridist, and the originator of some fine crosses among peas, has undertaken to cross potatoes with other species of the genus Solanum, ...
-The Home Florist - Disease Of_the Hollyhock
The Home Florist This work, noticed favorably in our magazine on its first appearance, has been so well received that a second edition has been called for. It has been revised by the author, Elias A....
-Rosa Rubrifolia - Utilizing The Trunks Of Tree Ferns
Rosa Rubrifolia The taste for the original wild single roses has developed remarkably since the introduction of the Rosa rugosa. The Journal des ftoses says that one of the best is Rosa rubrifolia - ...
-A Fine Chrysanthemum - Injury To Fruit Crops By Birds
A Fine Chrysanthemum Mr. Wm. Barr, of Orange, New Jersey, tells the Garden: My gardener, Mr. John Farrell, has been successful this year in growing some of the finest standard Chrysanthemums ever sh...
-Bees And Fruit - Eucalyptographia
Bees And Fruit The fruit growers of Fresno, California, are determined to clean out all the bee-raisers from that section, on account of the enormous destruction to ripening fruit. The English Spa...
-Correction Of Note On Persimmon - Lavatera Arborea Variegata
Correction Of Note On Persimmon W. R. Gerard writes:, After sending my note on the word Persimmon (p. 152, Gardeners' Monthly), I asked the Editor to change one of the sentences. Not having a copy o...
-Artificial Manures - A One-Leaved Yellow Locust
Artificial Manures Notwithstanding the analyses of chemists, in regard to the perfection of chemical manures, and the fact which they so easily demonstrate that the greater part of stable manure is n...
-Spanish Moss - Early And Late Flowering Single Roses
Spanish Moss This well-known product of the Southern forest is used to stuff mattresses, and is an extensive article of commerce in this trade. The pulp used to be taken off by rotting. Now a process...
-The Catalpa - Prunus Pissardi
The Catalpa So much has been said of the Catalpa as a timber tree, that we may forget that it is also one of the most desirable of ornamental trees. In July it is a mass of lovely flowers at a time w...
-Paris Green For The Canker Worm - Charles Turner
Paris Green For The Canker Worm The New England Homestead notes with surprise that so many New England apple trees are eaten by canker worm as with fire, though the Homestead has so repeatedly shown ...
-The Periodical Cicada - The English Gooseberry
The Periodical Cicada By Prof. C. V. Riley. Issued by the Department of Agriculture. The best way to learn about anything is to study when the spirit of inquiry is excited. A timely paper has therefo...
-Odor In Cereus Grandiflorus - California Palm
Odor In Cereus Grandiflorus A. G.: We are indebted to our valued correspondent for the following note: The Editor of Gardeners' Monthly, on p. 235, has forgotten the old and long-recorded fact tha...
-Fine Sugar Maples - Poverty Weed
Fine Sugar Maples On the grounds of Wm. Allan Richardson, near Louisville, some Sugar maples measure seventeen feet in circumference. Rose, Lamarck This grand old Noisette rose is of French origi...
-Randolph Peters - Loss By Gas
Randolph Peters Few men were better known in the nursery trade than Mr. Randolph Peters. He was a man of indomitable energy and perseverance, and amidst many discouragements brought a very small nurs...
-Specimens Of Fruits And Plants - Dr. Regel
Specimens Of Fruits And Plants These often reach us without any indications as to where they came from. And as there may be many scores of letters, it is not always possible to tell to what package t...
-Andrew J. Moore - The Stephanotis As A Cut Flower
Andrew J. Moore The Gardeners' Monthly loses a very good occasional contributor in Mr. A. J. Moore, of Berlin Heights, Ohio, who died on September 5th, within a few days of his fifty-fourth year. He ...
-Yellow Hybrid Perpetual Rose - Olive Culture
Yellow Hybrid Perpetual Rose Great efforts have been made by Rosarians to get a yellow hybrid perpetual, but without success. Gloire Lyonaise was advertised as such, but is said to be but a poor yell...
-Strawberry Growing In England - Mr. M. H. Lester
Strawberry Growing In England Strawberry growing by the hundred acres was surely an American invention, but our English cousins are fast following in our wake. Gardening Illustrated says that H. E. V...









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